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Card Familiar Name Familiar Type Description
Anonymous 212   Familiar

A "great Cat" that appears at Mary Smith's home. Despite being stabbed with a sword, beaten over the head with a staff, and thrown in a sack, the cat does not die. It is finally stashed under the stairs, where it disappears of its own accord. (54)

Appears in:
Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft. Cambridge: 1590, 54

Anonymous 177   Spirit

A spirit that is allegedly given to Alice Newman by Ursley Kempe. Newman keeps Anonymous 177 in an earthen pot, "which she carried away with her vnder her aperne," and also sends it to plague John Johnson and his wife (Mrs. Johnson) to death. (10-11)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 10-11

Anonymous 197   Apparition

An entity that appears to Anonymous 25 in the form of a beautiful young man wearing "a long white robe." Anonymous 25 had been praying by her bed when suddenly "the chamber shined as bright within, as if it had beene sun-shine [...] and spake vnto her with a soft and sweet voyce, saying, Arise in the name of God, and placed her on a chayre." After this visitation, Anonymous 25 fell to the ground and "recouered her spirits." ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Two Remarkable and True Histories, which Happened this Present Year, 1619. London: 1620,

Ambrose Waterduke   Spirit

A spirit that William Whycherly attempts to conjure "at Yarmouth in the great circule, with the sword and ring consecreated," but is unsuccessful because he "was so sore afraide that he ran away before the spirit called Ambrose Waterduke could appeare." ()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

Amie   Other

One of three familiars described as being in the shape of black moles without a tails, which were allegedly given to Rebecca Jones by a man in a ragged suit with great eyes. It is fed with blood and milk and may have been the one to to "kill a Sowe of one Benjamin Howes of Little-Clacton in the County aforesaid; and the said Sowe was killed by the said Impe accordingly." Rebecca Jones claims that she sent Amie to skill Katherine Bumstead because her husband, Thomas Bumstead beat Jone's sone for eating his honey. (36, 37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37-38

Anne Walker   Apparition

An apparition of a dead woman named Anne Walker, who appears to James Graham and recalls how she was murdered by Mark Sharp. Anne had allegedly become pregnant, and after being sent away with Mark Sharp, was never heard from again until appearing before James Graham. Graham recalled that at "one a clock at night he came down the stairs [and] there stood a Woman upon the midst of the Floor with her hair about her head handing down, and all bloody, with 5. large wounds on her head." The apparition of Anne Walker allegedly told Graham that Sharp "slew [her] with a Pick (such as men dig Coals withal)" and stated that he must reveal her story or else she would continue to haunt him. (19-20)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 19-20

Anonymous 1   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a white cat, and allegedly belongs to Father Rosimond's daughter. (15)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 15

Anonymous 10   Other

A monster "whelp'd and bred in Wales" that "ate so much Goats Milk, that is has been very subject of late Years to have Horns sprout forth of its Head." The monster "was never known to blush, tho sometimes to look pale," and created havoc around town by "having confederated with some Wolves, and prey'd upon some Sheep Skins that contain'd the City Charter." After this incident, "three or four hundred Men from Westminster hunted it," and the monster "was dignified with a fine Collar and a Pouch, to the great DIshonour and Scandal of both; and was trusted with the Custody or a certain large Conscience." (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. O rara show, a rara sight! A strange monster. London: 1689, 1

Anonymous 100   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a black imp, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke of Suffolk. Clarke sends Anonymous 100 to kill two cows belonging to Mr. Edwards; Anonymous 100 is sent to complete this task alongside imps sent by Elizabeth Gooding and Anne Leech. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 101   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a white imp, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Gooding of Suffolk. Gooding sends Anonymous 101 to kill two cows belonging to Mr. Edwards; Anonymous 101 is sent to complete this task along with an imp belonging to Anne Leech, and an imp belonging to Elizabeth Clarke. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 102   Familiar

A familiar in the form of a white imp who is sent by Anne Leech of Mistley in the county of Essex to destroy John Edwards, the infant son of Richard Edwards, along with a black imp sent by Elizabeth Gooding. The white imp is exchanged with Anne Pearce, and among several others (Anonymous 105, Anonymous 104), causing mischief as exchanged. The imp also took suck from Anne Leech, and often spoke to her. This may be one of the two imps Gooding is legally charged with having, one of which is in the "form of a 'younge catt' and the other of a mouse, and one was called 'pease.'" (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 103   Familiar

A familiar in the form of a black imp who is allegedly sent by Elizabeth Gooding of Mistley in the county of Essex to kill John Edwards, the infant son of Richard Edwards, along with a white imp belonging to Anne Leech. This may be meant to represent one of the two imps which Gooding is legally indicted for entertaining and feeding, which include "a 'younge catt' and the other of a mouse, and one was called 'pease.'" (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 104   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a gray imp who is exchanged among Anonymous 105, Anonymous 102, Anne Pearce of Stoke in Ipswich, Suffolk, and Anne Leech, her sister-in-law. The gray imp causes mischief between the exchanges, sucked from Anne Leech, and often spoke to her. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 105   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a black imp who is exchanged among Anonymous 104, Anonymous 102, Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk, and her sister-in-law, Anne Pearce of Ipswich, Suffolk. The black imp causes mischief between exchanges, sucks from Anne Leech, and often speaks to her. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 106   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of an imp, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Gooding. Gooding allegedly sends Anonymous 106 "to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Mannyntree" in 1642. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 107   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a mouse which allegedly appears from the lumps on Richard Dugdale's chest and belly during one of his fits, believed to be caused by the Devil, which runs up and down his clothes. (46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

Anonymous 108   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a dog which allegedly appears from the lumps on Richard Dugdale's chest and belly during one of his fits before Mr. Jolly, believed to be caused by the Devil. (46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

Anonymous 109   Spirit

An evil spirit familiar which is allegedly the Devil, who spoke through Richard Dugdale during one of his fits in front of the minister, Mr. Jolly. The spirit claims that Richard Dugdale is "his own." (76)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 76

Anonymous 109   Devil

An evil spirit familiar which is allegedly the Devil, who spoke through Richard Dugdale during one of his fits in front of the minister, Mr. Jolly. The spirit claims that Richard Dugdale is "his own." (76)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 76

Anonymous 110   Devil in the shape of

An evil spirit familiar which is allegedly the Devil, who possesses Richard Dugdale during his final fit on March 24, 1690, and takes his leave of him, "it left him with a strange kind of vomiting, yet nothing visible appearing." After this fit, the evil spirit is gone, and Richard Dugdales no longer suffers from fits. (79)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 79

Anonymous 111   Familiar

A familiar which appears in the shape of a mole that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex, given to her by Mother Arnold (alias White-Cote) circa 1581 or 1582 along with a toad-shaped familiar, presumably as replacements for the first preternatural being (a mole) which died. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 112   Familiar

A familiar which appears in the shape of a toad that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney confesses to leaving this toad at John Harrold's house where it "pinched his wife and sucked her til she dyed." This was the last act which this toad did for Upney. It soon after disappeared. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 113   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad and belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex, given to her by Mother Arnold (alias White-Cote) circa 1581 or 1582 along with a mole-shaped familiar, presumably as replacements for the first preternatural being (a mole) which died. She was able to keep this toad "a great while," but it also presumably died. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 114   Familiar

A familiar which appears in the shape of a mole that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex, given to her by Mother Arnold (alias White-Cote) circa 1581. Upney could send it to "clap" anyone who did her "ill will." Like most of Upney's familiars this being was short lived. It "taryed not aboue a yeere with her, but it consumed away." (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 115   Familiar

A familiar spirit that takes on the form of both a rat and a toad, known to belong to Ellen Smith; when John Eastwood refused Ellen Smith's son alms, Smith sent this spirit to Eastwood's home to cause him pain. Eastwood, with the assistance of a visiting neighbor, catches the familiar in tongs and holds it in the fire, causing the fire to turn bright blue and almost go out, and bringing an agonized Smith to his door. (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 6-7

Anonymous 116   Familiar

One of three familiar spirits allegedly owned, fed, and entertained by Mary Johnson of Wivenhoe, Essex. This familiar appears in the form of a mouse. (226)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witch Hunting and Witch Trials. London: 1929, 226

Anonymous 118   Familiar

One of three familiar spirits allegedly owned, fed, and entertained by Mary Johnson of Wivenhoe, Essex. This familiar appears in the form of a rat. (226)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witch Hunting and Witch Trials. London: 1929, 226

Anonymous 120   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the forms of a gray-blackish dog and a human with cloven feat, and is allegedly kept by John Walsh. Walsh apparently kept the familiar for one year of his master's life, and for three years after his master's death. After performing various tasks for Walsh, the familiar would be given "some lyving thing, as a Chicken, a Cat, or a Dog." Walsh also had to give the familiar "two lyving thynges once a year," along with one drop of Walsh's blood," which the "Spirite did take away upon hys paw." (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, 4

Anonymous 120   Familiar

A familiar from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to be white in colour allegedly belonging to Margaret Flower. Flower claimed during her examination that Anonymous 120 would suck from her left breast. When it first came to her, she promised it her soul, and it made a covenant with her to do whatever she commanded of it. (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Anonymous 121   Spirit

A spirit conjured by John Walsh through the use of a book, two wax candles, and a cross of virgin wax. Walsh would ask the spirit to steal items for him, which it would do. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, 3

Anonymous 122 (plural)   Other

A group of fairies that appears before John Walsh, and advises him on who has been bewitched. The fairies appear in various colours including "white, greene, & black," and only "between the houres of xii and one at noone, or at midnight," because that is when Walsh uses them. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, 3

Anonymous 123   Spirit

A familiar from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to take the shape of a white rat, allegedly belonging to Phillip Flower. Flower alleged during her examination that this spirit would suck from her left breast, and had been doing so for three or four years. She added that "when it came first vnto her, shee gaue her Soule to it, and it promised to doe her good, and cause Thomas Simpson to loue her, if shee would suffer it to sucke her, which shee agreed vnto." At the time of the examination, it had last sucked on the night of February 23, 1618. (F4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v

Anonymous 123   Spirit

A familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to appear in the form of a hedgehog and belong to Jane Hott. Hott claimed during her examination that Anonymous 123 started visiting her 20 years before to suck from her once or twice a month. If it came to suck in the night, the pain of it would awaken her. When it tried to lay on her breast, she would strike it off with her hand. It was said to be "as soft as a Cat." (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 4

Anonymous 124   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a toad belonging to Anonymous 154 that drinks the milk that is left out for it in a flat dish. This toad likely functions as any other familiar, to perform a variety of services for the witch it belongs to. In this case, however, the familiar functions to debunk witch beliefs. it is dissected and proves to be a 'normal' toad. (283)

Appears in:
Bickley et al., A.C.. The Gentleman's Magazine Library. London: 1884, 283

Anonymous 125   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a mole, and is allegedly kept by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland uses her familiar to torment and kill Mrs. Jennings' maid after she denied Lakeland a needle. (8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 126   Familiar

One of two familiars that appear in the form of a dog, and is allegedly kept by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland sends one of her dog familiars to torment and kill Mr. Lawrence and his child. Upon Lakeland's death, when she was executed by burning, something in the form of a dog grew upon the leg of Mr. Beale, after which it could not be used. (7-8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 127   Familiar

One of two familiars that appear in the form of a dog, and is allegedly kept by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland sends one of her dog familiars to torment and kill Mr. Lawrence and his child. Upon Lakeland's death, when she was executed by burning, something in the form of a dog grew upon the leg of Mr. Beale, after which it could not be used. (7-8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 128   Devil

A devil that allegedly possesses Richard Dugdale on September 26, 1689, causing him to become deaf and dumb for the time period of a month. This is confessed to the minister Mr. Jolly through writing on a piece of paper. (22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 22

Anonymous 129   Other

Conjoined twins, born of a young woman (Anonymous 21) through infinite pain and danger. The body of one infant grew out of the neck of the other, with this child having "neither head nor feet, but was only content with thighes and two-stumps for leggs." This child also did not have any arms, "but two imperfect branches came from the shoulders of it which had no hands at all." Additionally, "the nails both for the hands & foot in a sormidable length and shapenesse did grow out of the hipps on each side." Unlike this child, the second twin was "in the shape of a man child, and perfect in every limb, it was but little but very lovely to behold, spare and leane and its feet were fastoned in the hollow trunke which grew about the neck of the other monster out of which it doth appeare the whole body doth proceede." (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 129   Monster

Conjoined twins, born of a young woman (Anonymous 21) through infinite pain and danger. The body of one infant grew out of the neck of the other, with this child having "neither head nor feet, but was only content with thighes and two-stumps for leggs." This child also did not have any arms, "but two imperfect branches came from the shoulders of it which had no hands at all." Additionally, "the nails both for the hands & foot in a sormidable length and shapenesse did grow out of the hipps on each side." Unlike this child, the second twin was "in the shape of a man child, and perfect in every limb, it was but little but very lovely to behold, spare and leane and its feet were fastoned in the hollow trunke which grew about the neck of the other monster out of which it doth appeare the whole body doth proceede." (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 130   Spirit

A familiar spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appeared in the form of "a Spirit, blacke and shaggy, and having pawes like a Beare, but in bulk not fully so big as a Coney," and known to belong to John Winnick. Anonymous 130 first appeared to Winnick when he was cursing the loss of his purse, which contained 7 shillings, and offered its assistance in exchange for Winnick's soul and worship. It produced the purse the next day, in the company of two other spirits (Anonymous 131 and Anonymous 132), whom it demanded Winnick also worship. Anonymous 130 had Winnick sign a compact with blood it extracted from Winnick's head; thereafter it would suck from marks on Winnick's body along with its two fellow spirits. This spirit's function was to ensure that Winnick never wanted for food, and in that capacity intimidated Anonymous 88 into stealing food from her master's house at Winnick's behest. (3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

Anonymous 131   Spirit

A familiar spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appeared in the form of a white cat, and known to belong to John Winnick. Anonymous 131 allegedly first appeared to Winnick in the company of Anonymous 130 and Anonymous 132 after Anonymous 130 returned Winnick's purse. After Winnick agreed to worship all three spirits and signed away his soul in blood, the spirits would suck from marks on Winnick's body. This spirit's function was to hurt animals at Winnick's behest, but Winnick claimed he never took advantage of its services. (3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

Anonymous 132   Spirit

A familiar spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appeared in the form of a grey coney (a rabbit or hare), and known to belong to John Winnick. Anonymous 132 first appeared to Winnick in the company of Anonymous 130 and Anonymous 131 after Anonymous 130 returned Winnick's purse. After Winnick agreed to worship all three spirits and signed away his soul in blood, the spirits would suck from marks on Winnick's body. This spirit's function was to hurt people at Winnick's behest, but Winnick claimed he never took advantage of its services. (3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

Anonymous 133   Familiar

A spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly appeared to Ellen Shepherd at her home one day when she was "swearing and cursing about the discords of her children." She claimed that this spirit had bid her to go with it, but she sent it away. Not long after, she went into the field, swearing, cursing and blaspheming once again, and the same spirit came to her with three more spirits also like rats, demanding that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead and promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 133   Spirit

A spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly appeared to Ellen Shepherd at her home one day when she was "swearing and cursing about the discords of her children." She claimed that this spirit had bid her to go with it, but she sent it away. Not long after, she went into the field, swearing, cursing and blaspheming once again, and the same spirit came to her with three more spirits also like rats, demanding that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead and promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 134   Familiar

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 135 and Anonymous 136). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 135   Spirit

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 136). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 135   Familiar

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 136). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 136   Spirit

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 135). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 136   Familiar

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 135). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 139   Devil in the shape of

A devil in the shape of a grey-hound, who allegedly possess the seventeen year old male servant of Henry Chowning in Kent. The Devil appears before the servant (Anonymous 384) and afterward, causes the servant to fall very ill. Dr. Skinner attends to the boy, and concludes that the devil possessed him, tempting him "to strange things, as to go to Sea," speaks through him, and causing him much pain. Dr. Skinner casts out the spirit from the boy with medicine, so that "he was made perfectly well in 18 days time." (1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

Anonymous 140   Familiar

A familiar from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to be spotted black in colour allegedly belonging to Margaret Flower. Flower claimed during her examination that Anonymous 140 would suck from "the inward part of her secrets." When it first came to her, she promised it her soul, and it made a covenant with her to do whatever she commanded of it. (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Spirit   Devil in the shape of

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. She recognized this spirit as Spirit. The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Spirit   Spirit

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. She recognized this spirit as Spirit. The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Anonymous 142   Familiar

A familiar from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Amy Denny and take the form of a toad. According to Dorothy Durent's deposition against Denny, the toad fell out of infant William Durent's blanket after Durent followed the directions of Dr. Jacob of Yarmouth. Durent had a youth of her household catch the toad in tongs and hold it in the fire, where it "made a great and horrible Noise, and after a space there was a flashing in the Fire like Gun-powder, making a noise like the discharge of a Pistol, and thereupon the Toad was no more seen nor heard." The next day, Denny's niece (Anonymous 389) and Durent separately found Denny to be scorched and burnt by fire. (9-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 9-11

Anonymous 143   Apparition

A familiar from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and take the form of a dog. According to Mary Chandler's deposition against Cullender, Susan Chandler saw an apparition of Cullender accompanied by the dog during her fits of vomiting pins, blindness and dumbness. (40-41)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 40-41

Anonymous 143   Familiar

A familiar from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and take the form of a dog. According to Mary Chandler's deposition against Cullender, Susan Chandler saw an apparition of Cullender accompanied by the dog during her fits of vomiting pins, blindness and dumbness. (40-41)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 40-41

Anonymous 144   Apparition

An unknown number of familiars from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to Margaret Arnold's deposition against Cullender and Denny, her nieces Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy cried out "Why do not you come your selves, but send your Imps to Torment us?" during one of their fits. (32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 32-33

Anonymous 144   Familiar

An unknown number of familiars from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to Margaret Arnold's deposition against Cullender and Denny, her nieces Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy cried out "Why do not you come your selves, but send your Imps to Torment us?" during one of their fits. (32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 32-33

Anonymous 145   Devil in the shape of

The Devil in the shape of a "flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The flying horse is transmogrified from the Devil's first disguise as a carrier with four horses. As a carrier, the Devil bound Joseph Buxford as his apprentice for eight days with the permission of his father, when Joseph Buxford refused to apprentice to a weaver and wanted to join the army instead. As soon as Joseph Buxford is bound, and his father leaves, "his new Master metamorphosed in a trice," and takes Joseph Buxford onto his back, and "snatches him up forthwith into the aire." From the air, the flying horse and Joseph Buxford see the Earth so that "London and other magnificent Cities on greater then small Cottages." They also fly past the moon, and into "watrie dominions," only to end in "a profound Cell or Cave." All of this is described as the beginning of a "stupendious Miracle," and the sights the flying horse shows Joseph Buxford are greater than what astrologers and philosophers can ever imagine. Upon landing in the cave, "the earth seeming to open it selfe," the Devil "now dischargeth his burthden, and assumeth a more terrible shape then that of the flying Horse," as the Devil. (3-4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 3-4

Anonymous 146   Devil

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. Anonymous 146 stood at the foot of her bed, and is said to have "a blacke head like an Ape." he spoke to her, but she could not recount what he said because he would not speak plainly "or let her vnderstand his meaning." The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Anonymous 146   Devil in the shape of

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. Anonymous 146 stood at the foot of her bed, and is said to have "a blacke head like an Ape." he spoke to her, but she could not recount what he said because he would not speak plainly "or let her vnderstand his meaning." The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Anonymous 147   Spirit

A familiar or spirit, known to take the form of a white dog, allegedly belonging to Anne Baker. Baker claimed in her examination that Anonymous 147 was her "good spirit," but revealed nothing of its function. (D4, E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4, E2

Anonymous 147   Familiar

A familiar or spirit, known to take the form of a white dog, allegedly belonging to Anne Baker. Baker claimed in her examination that Anonymous 147 was her "good spirit," but revealed nothing of its function. (D4, E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4, E2

Anonymous 148   Spirit

A familiar from Goadby in the County of Leicestershire, known to take the shape of a little white dog, allegedly belonging to Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed during her examination to have seen this spirit sucking on Willimott under her left flank at Willimott's home, around the time of the last barley harvest. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anonymous 148   Familiar

A familiar from Goadby in the County of Leicestershire, known to take the shape of a little white dog, allegedly belonging to Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed during her examination to have seen this spirit sucking on Willimott under her left flank at Willimott's home, around the time of the last barley harvest. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anonymous 149   Spirit

A spirit or familiar known to appears in the form of a white mouse, which allegedly came to inhabit Gamaliel Greete due to his habit of swearing. According to Joan Willimott, if Greete "did looke vpon any thing with an intent to hurt, it should be hurt" while the mouse was inside him. Willimott claimed to know this from her familiar, Pretty. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 15   Spirit

A grey devil described as of a "stout thick squat stature" who appears and tells Margaret Gurr that if she does not soon hang herself with clothes lines, she must thrust knitting needles in her ears as a means of killing herself. Four days later, as she lies down in her bed, the grey devil reclines beside her, and begins painfully gripping her hands and wrists, immobilizing her, as he pretends to rest (snoring all the while). She cannot escape his grasp. Finally, God grants her the strength to wriggle free and the horrible imp or devil vanishes out of her sight and she is able to get some peace. Later, this same devil and his accomplice, a black devil, carry Margaret Gurr through the air when she fetches water. The Devil may also be responsible for property damage at the household of Margaret Gurr's master, Christopher Elderidge. When Margaret Gurr prays, however, she is no longer subject to the temptation of the grey devil. Dr. Skinner eventually casts out the grey devil from Margaret Gurr's body, so that the grey devil visits her no more. (1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

Anonymous 150   Familiar

A spirit or familiar known to appear in the form of a rat, and allegedly kept by Joan Flower. According to Joan Willimott, Anonymous 150 appears with another spirit, Anonymous 151, which appears in the form of an owl. These two spirits are said to suck from beneath Flower's right ear, and to have told Flower that she "should neyter be hanged nor burnt" for witchcraft, which proved true as Flower died before her trial. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 150   Spirit

A spirit or familiar known to appear in the form of a rat, and allegedly kept by Joan Flower. According to Joan Willimott, Anonymous 150 appears with another spirit, Anonymous 151, which appears in the form of an owl. These two spirits are said to suck from beneath Flower's right ear, and to have told Flower that she "should neyter be hanged nor burnt" for witchcraft, which proved true as Flower died before her trial. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 151   Familiar

A spirit or familiar known to appear in the form of a owl, and allegedly kept by Joan Flower. According to Joan Willimott, Anonymous 151 appears with another spirit, Anonymous 150, which appears in the form of a rat. These two spirits are said to suck from beneath Flower's right ear, and to have told Flower that she "should neyter be hanged nor burnt" for witchcraft, which proved true as Flower died before her trial. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 152   Spirit

A spirit from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of hare. This sprit allegedly appeared to James Device after his grandmother Elizabeth Southerns asked him to go to church and bring the communion bread to the spirit she sent to meet him on the way home. He ate it instead, and the hare-spirit threatened to pull him to pieces. Device prayed to God, and the spirit vanished. (H3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3

Anonymous 153   Familiar

A familiar spirit from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a man with cloven feet and to belong to Margaret Pearson. According to Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, Pearson and this spirit " hath done very much harme to one Dodgesons goods, who came in at a loope-hole into the said Dodgesons Stable, and shee and her Spirit together did sit vpon his Horse or Mare, vntill the said Horse or Mare died." (S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Anonymous 154   Other

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to take the form of a black sow and to belong to Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton. When Anonymous 89 beat Henry Sutton over the ears for throwing stones and filth, Henry went crying home to his mother Mary Sutton; Mary vowed to take revenge. The next day, Anonymous 89 and another servant were taking a cart of corn to the market and spotted "a goodly faire blacke Sow" grazing, which kept pace with them until a mile out of Bedford. At that point, the sow "turne twice or thrice about as readily as a Windmill sayle at worke: And as sodainly their horses fell to starting and drawing some one way, some another." The horses were maddened, wild and sweating, and took off with their load. On the way back to Milton, they observed the sow returning to Mother Sutton's home. (B-B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B-B2

Anonymous 155   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to take the form of a beetle and thought to belong to Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton. When an old servant of Master Enger's (Anonymous 89) was heard talking of the Suttons' misdeeds, "a Betle came, and stroke the same fellow on the breast: and hee presently fell into a trance as he was guiding the Plough." His fellow servants were unable to help him; after a time he recovered on his own and headed home to report the incident to Master Enger. (B2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B2v

Anonymous 155   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to take the form of a beetle and thought to belong to Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton. When an old servant of Master Enger's (Anonymous 89) was heard talking of the Suttons' misdeeds, "a Betle came, and stroke the same fellow on the breast: and hee presently fell into a trance as he was guiding the Plough." His fellow servants were unable to help him; after a time he recovered on his own and headed home to report the incident to Master Enger. (B2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B2v

The Rogue   Apparition

A spirit from Spital in the County of Northumberland, that allegedly appeared to Margaret Muschamp in various forms, such as a dragon, bear, horse or cow. during one of her fits. She was seen in her bed to shield herself from blows, which she claimed came from "a Club, a Staffe, a Sword, and Dagger." Her "good things" (Anonymous 157 and Anonymous 158) fought for her and defeated this sprit. When the fit began, Muschamp was heard to cry out "the Rogue," a term later used to refer to John Hutton and implying that this spirit was either acting on Hutton's behalf, or Hutton himself. (5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 5

Anonymous 157   Spirit

A spirit or angel from Spital in the County of Northumberland, one of two that allegedly appeared to Margaret Muschamp "bodyed like Birds, as big as Turkies, and faces like Christians, but the sweetest creatures that ever eyes beheld." This one was also known to take the shape of a dove. They would appear to her during her fits; Muschamp claimed they were angels sent by God to receive her soul. She was often observed in discourse with them thereafter. The spirits allegedly protected her when she was attacked by an apparition she called the Rogue (Anonymous 156), and acted as her protector against witches during subsequent fits. According to Muschamp, the angels urged her to speak out and accuse Dorothy Swinow of killing her aunt Lady Hambleton, consuming her brother, tormenting her and causing James Fauset's unnatural fits; they also bid her accuse John Hutton of being her worst tormentor. Muschamp claimed that if the Justices and Judges of the Assizes would not give her family justice, her angels would "would visibly, to the admiration of all the beholders, appear like a man and a woman, and justifie the truth." They once left Muschamp for a space of twelve weeks, much to her distress, and told her that unless she took care to not be frightened or angered for that duration, they would not return. While they were absent, "her enemy would make every third fit a terrible one." Muschamp credited these beings with foretelling strange things before they happened. In her final fit, Muschamp addressed her angels at length; this speech was witnessed by over 100 onlookers and recorded for posterity. (1)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1

Anonymous 158   Spirit

A spirit or angel from Spital in the County of Northumberland, one of two that allegedly appeared to Margaret Muschamp "bodyed like Birds, as big as Turkies, and faces like Christians, but the sweetest creatures that ever eyes beheld." This one was also known to take the shape of a partridge. They would appear to her during her fits; Muschamp claimed they were angels sent by God to receive her soul. She was often observed in discourse with them thereafter. The spirits allegedly protected her when she was attacked by an apparition she called the Rogue (Anonymous 156), and acted as her protector against witches during subsequent fits. According to Muschamp, the angels urged her to speak out and accuse Dorothy Swinow of killing her aunt Lady Hambleton, consuming her brother, tormenting her and causing James Fauset's unnatural fits; they also bid her accuse John Hutton of being her worst tormentor. Muschamp claimed that if the Justices and Judges of the Assizes would not give her family justice, her angels would "would visibly, to the admiration of all the beholders, appear like a man and a woman, and justifie the truth." They once left Muschamp for a space of twelve weeks, much to her distress, and told her that unless she took care to not be frightened or angered for that duration, they would not return. While they were absent, "her enemy would make every third fit a terrible one." Muschamp credited these beings with foretelling strange things before they happened. In her final fit, Muschamp addressed her angels at length; this speech was witnessed by over 100 onlookers and recorded for posterity. (1)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1

Anonymous 159   Familiar

A familiar spirit from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to belong to Elizabeth Weed, which appears in the form of a young man or boy. This spirit allegedly appeared to Elizabeth Weed and offered its services, in addition to two other spirits named Lilly and Priscill, if Weed would renounce God and Christ and worship them instead. This spirit had her sign a compact in her blood, which he extracted from her left armpit; the compact gave Weed 21 years of service from the familiars and required that she give up her soul. Thereafter, this spirit's role was "to lye with her carnally, when and as often as she desired, and that hee did lye with her in that manner very often." (1-2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1-2

Anonymous 159   Devil in the shape of

A familiar spirit from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to belong to Elizabeth Weed, which appears in the form of a young man or boy. This spirit allegedly appeared to Elizabeth Weed and offered its services, in addition to two other spirits named Lilly and Priscill, if Weed would renounce God and Christ and worship them instead. This spirit had her sign a compact in her blood, which he extracted from her left armpit; the compact gave Weed 21 years of service from the familiars and required that she give up her soul. Thereafter, this spirit's role was "to lye with her carnally, when and as often as she desired, and that hee did lye with her in that manner very often." (1-2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1-2

Anonymous 16   Spirit

A black devil of little stature and short, who appears to Margaret Gurr, enters her, and speaks in her. He crouches inside her, wishing sad wishes with the most ugly shrieking noises, and roaring out curses. The black devil instructs Gurr to curse and swear as I do and wish such wishes as I do and tells her that if she does, she should again be well. He and his accomplice, a grey devil, carry Margaret Gurr through the air. When Margaret Gurr prays, she is released from these temptations, and the black devil may be responsible for property destruction of the household of Margaret Gurr's master, Christopher Elderidge. The devil is cast out of Margaret Gurr by Dr. Skinner, and afterward bothers her no more. (1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

Anonymous 160   Spirit

A spirit from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, which Elizabeth Chandler alleged began to torment her in the night with puffing and roaring six months after Goodwife Darnell turned her into a duck. Chandler claimed that she found the bottom of her belly sore after this spirit visited her, and that "she did never willingly invoke or imploy the same, but hath prayed to God to deliver her therfrom." (7-8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7-8

Anonymous 161   Familiar

A familiar from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is witnessed by some members of Joseph Cruttenden's household to be "tumbling about" when Cruttenden's house catches an unnatural fire, which "flashes somewhat like Gunpowder," and "flamed not." The familiar is in the shape of a black bull, and might belong to an old woman (Anonymous 398) who predicted the fire to a servant girl of Cruttenden's. (55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Anonymous 162   Spirit

The spirit of a man in St. James's in London, who used to carry "stockins and such ware about to sell," whose servant murdered him "for the money" before running away and becoming a soldier. The spirit appears to this servant (Anonymous 403) as a "headless Man," and stood by his Bed, saying, "Wilt thou yet confess?" Eventually, the spirit turns into a "bed-fellow" for the servant, still saying "Wilt thou yet confess?" When the servant confesses, he is sent to Hispaniola. (57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 162   Familiar

The spirit of a man in St. James's in London, who used to carry "stockins and such ware about to sell," whose servant murdered him "for the money" before running away and becoming a soldier. The spirit appears to this servant (Anonymous 403) as a "headless Man," and stood by his Bed, saying, "Wilt thou yet confess?" Eventually, the spirit turns into a "bed-fellow" for the servant, still saying "Wilt thou yet confess?" When the servant confesses, he is sent to Hispaniola. (57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 162   Spirit

A familiar imp which Mary Greeneleife allegedly allows to feed on her daughter as well as the daughter of Susan Sparrow. This may be the mysterious leveret which also haunts their home. This hare was allegedly chased by Anthony Sharlock's dog, on the off chance it was the leveret which was making his son ill, and Good-man Merrill's dog. Mary Greeneleife denies having a familiar and denies the leveret was anything but a natural wild animal acting strangely. (19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19

Anonymous 162   Familiar

A familiar imp which Mary Greeneleife allegedly allows to feed on her daughter as well as the daughter of Susan Sparrow. This may be the mysterious leveret which also haunts their home. This hare was allegedly chased by Anthony Sharlock's dog, on the off chance it was the leveret which was making his son ill, and Good-man Merrill's dog. Mary Greeneleife denies having a familiar and denies the leveret was anything but a natural wild animal acting strangely. (19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19

Anonymous 164   Devil in the shape of

The Devil "in the shape of a Black Dog with terrible Eyes," who appears before Anonymous 407 in Colchester in Essex, when Anonymous 407 "in a Bravado, and Defiance of the Devil," would walk at night in a churchyard. This apparition brings "terrors" to the mind of Anonymous 407, so that Anonymous 407 is "never quiet in his Mind till he got into good Society. The Devil follows Anonymous 407 to Colne in the county of Essex when he moves, appearing to Anonymous 407 while he prays, as "the Black Dog," and made like "he would have torn Mr. Harlakenden's Throat out," although Mr. Harlakenden seemed unaware of this apparition. Anonymous 164 also appears on occasion as "a Fly or a Flea, and various shapes," and continues to follow Anonymous 407 until his deathbed. However, by that time, Anonymous 47 is so "ferious Christian," that "this Dog or Flea made no impression upon him." (153)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 153

Anonymous 165   Devil

A devil that possesses "a Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409), causing in her alongside "a suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis," a number of "strange Histerical Fits," over the course of five years between 1642 and 1647. These fits are characterized by: her increase in strength far above her own, so that "many could not hold her" ; her requests for "Needles and Pins, and Cords," so that she might kill herself; her ability to foretell that a papist would come to cure her, and her laughter "at his Holy Water" ; her "Swear[ing], Curs[ing], and Rage against any that were Religious, and Hugg[ing] of those that were Vicious, and be merry with them." However, once Richard Baxter returns to Bewdley, he prays by her side one night, which encourages the neighbours to pray for her as well. While "they were Praying, she was usually in violent Rage, and after thankt them." One day, Mr. Thomas Ware prayed for her, and the maid "fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone." She also says, "The Black Dog is gone," suggesting that the devil appears to her in the shape of a black dog. After this, she "never had a Fit." Richard Baxter further believes that the devil managed to gain "a Real possession" of the maid alongside her "suror uterinus," after a young man and her sin together during her fits, when "his Lust was provoked" by her "naked Body [tossed] about, she being strong and comely." (193-194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193-194

Anonymous 166 (Plural)   Other

Three magical beings who are conjured by Dr. Lamb in his house in London, in front of two witnesses: Sir Miles Sands, and Mr. Barbor. Dr. Lamb first conjures a tree in the middle of the room, and after appeared these "three little Fellows," who are described as having "Axes on their Shoulders, and Baskets in their Hands." They "presently fell to work, cut down the Tree, and carried all away," save a single wood chip which fell on Mr. Barbor's velvet coat. (156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

Anonymous 167 (Plural)   Familiar

A number of tiny white speckled and black birds which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box, and feeds them with wheat, barley, oats, bread, and cheese and gives them water or beer to drink. The bird spirits would, according to Dowsing, suck blood from her mother's hands and her brother's legs, but appear to have left Dowsing alone (she had to clarify to the examiners that the spot upon her hand was a burn, presumably as opposed to a witch's mark. Despite their vampiric tendencies, these spirits are described as rather begin. Dowsing claimed that brother would evidently play with these bird spirits until their "tuitling and tetling," grew tiresome, at which time he would put them back into their box. Despite her daughter's colourful evidence, Annis Heard "denieth that she hath any imps Aueses or blacke birds." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 167 (Plural)   Spirit

A number of tiny white speckled and black birds which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box, and feeds them with wheat, barley, oats, bread, and cheese and gives them water or beer to drink. The bird spirits would, according to Dowsing, suck blood from her mother's hands and her brother's legs, but appear to have left Dowsing alone (she had to clarify to the examiners that the spot upon her hand was a burn, presumably as opposed to a witch's mark. Despite their vampiric tendencies, these spirits are described as rather begin. Dowsing claimed that brother would evidently play with these bird spirits until their "tuitling and tetling," grew tiresome, at which time he would put them back into their box. Despite her daughter's colourful evidence, Annis Heard "denieth that she hath any imps Aueses or blacke birds." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 168 (Plural)   Familiar

A number of tiny black and white and red and white cow spirits, the size of rats with short horns, which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box lined with black and white wool, and feeds them with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, and gives them water or beer to drink. Dowsing claims her mother gave her a tiny black and white cow spirit named Crowe and gave her brother a red and white cow spirit named Donne; she does not testify that they did any magic with these spirits. Annis Heard responds to these accuations quite emphatically, claiming she did not have "any kine called Crowe or Donne." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 168 (Plural)   Spirit

A number of tiny black and white and red and white cow spirits, the size of rats with short horns, which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box lined with black and white wool, and feeds them with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, and gives them water or beer to drink. Dowsing claims her mother gave her a tiny black and white cow spirit named Crowe and gave her brother a red and white cow spirit named Donne; she does not testify that they did any magic with these spirits. Annis Heard responds to these accuations quite emphatically, claiming she did not have "any kine called Crowe or Donne." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 169   Spirit

A Daemon, who appears to be the spirit of the deceased second wife of the deceased father of Mr. Philip Furze, who appears before Mr. Philip Furze's servant, Francis Fey. She first appears to Francis Fey when she throws him off his horse on his way home to Spreyton, in the county of Devon, from Totnes. He was cast "with such violence" to the ground, that there was a "resounding [...] great noise." The female spirit also caused Francis Fey's horse to leap "25 foot, to the amazement of all that saw it." The spirit also shows herself to other members of the household, such as Thomasine Gidly, Ann Langdon, and a small child (Anonymous 414), "which by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit, they were fain to remove from that house." The spirit is further capable of changing shape: she is sometimes "very horrid," at other times "like a monstrous Dog belching out fire." She has also been described "in the shape of a Horse, carrying with it one pane of glass, & a small piece of Iron" taken from a window she flew at. The Daemon also takes great delight in causing trouble for Francis Fey: his head is thrust into "a very strait place," between a bed and wall, which required "the strength of divers men" to free him; she causes the binding of his arm after these injuries to be "strained with such violence," that he is almost strangled to death. The binding also makes a "strange and dismal noise." She also attempts to strangle Francis Fey using "Cravats, and Handkerchief" worn around his neck. This Daemon also "shewed great offence at the Perriwigs which the young man used to wear;" on one occasion, she breaks through two boxes and a number of weights protecting a perriwig in order to cut it "into many small parts and tatters,"; another time, she tore a perriwig off of his head, and "reduced [it] into very small fragments." On another occasion, the specter tears out one of the shoe-strings of Francis Fey's shoe, and caused it clasp and curl around the hand of a maid (Anonymous 415) "like a living Eel, or Serpent." The daemon further causes damage by tearing up a pair of gloves, "which is so dexterously tatter'd, and so artificially torn, that it is conceived a Cutler could not have contrived an Instrument, to have laid it abroad so accurately," however this was done in Francis Fey's pocket in less than a minute. The spirit also tore up the clothing of Francis Fey and "a servant maid" if they wore their own clothes. Other "strange and fantastical freaks" accomplished by the spirit include: moving a barrel of salt; placing bacon on a hand-iron; and twisting the feet and legs of Francis Fey so they are about his neck or chairs and stools. It is said that the specter "appears in resemblance of her own person, she seems to be habited in the same cloaths, and dress." On Easter evening, in 1628, she takes Francis Fey "up by the skirt of his doublet, [...] and carried [him] a heighth into the Air." When Francis Fey is found again after being missing, he is found in a "Trance, or extatick fit," but upon recovering from this fit, claimed that he had been in "perfect sense" and that the Daemon had carried him very high into the air - a fact verified by the finding of a shoe and a perriwig in a tree and out of doors. The spirit also comes to Francis Fey in Crediton, in the shape of a bird, and threw a "weight of Brass or Copper" at the forehead of Francis Fey when he is being treated by a Physician. The spirit "continued to molest the young man in a very severe and rugged manner, often handling him with great extremity," and continued to haunt him for some time. (180)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180

Anonymous 169   Other

A Daemon, who appears to be the spirit of the deceased second wife of the deceased father of Mr. Philip Furze, who appears before Mr. Philip Furze's servant, Francis Fey. She first appears to Francis Fey when she throws him off his horse on his way home to Spreyton, in the county of Devon, from Totnes. He was cast "with such violence" to the ground, that there was a "resounding [...] great noise." The female spirit also caused Francis Fey's horse to leap "25 foot, to the amazement of all that saw it." The spirit also shows herself to other members of the household, such as Thomasine Gidly, Ann Langdon, and a small child (Anonymous 414), "which by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit, they were fain to remove from that house." The spirit is further capable of changing shape: she is sometimes "very horrid," at other times "like a monstrous Dog belching out fire." She has also been described "in the shape of a Horse, carrying with it one pane of glass, & a small piece of Iron" taken from a window she flew at. The Daemon also takes great delight in causing trouble for Francis Fey: his head is thrust into "a very strait place," between a bed and wall, which required "the strength of divers men" to free him; she causes the binding of his arm after these injuries to be "strained with such violence," that he is almost strangled to death. The binding also makes a "strange and dismal noise." She also attempts to strangle Francis Fey using "Cravats, and Handkerchief" worn around his neck. This Daemon also "shewed great offence at the Perriwigs which the young man used to wear;" on one occasion, she breaks through two boxes and a number of weights protecting a perriwig in order to cut it "into many small parts and tatters,"; another time, she tore a perriwig off of his head, and "reduced [it] into very small fragments." On another occasion, the specter tears out one of the shoe-strings of Francis Fey's shoe, and caused it clasp and curl around the hand of a maid (Anonymous 415) "like a living Eel, or Serpent." The daemon further causes damage by tearing up a pair of gloves, "which is so dexterously tatter'd, and so artificially torn, that it is conceived a Cutler could not have contrived an Instrument, to have laid it abroad so accurately," however this was done in Francis Fey's pocket in less than a minute. The spirit also tore up the clothing of Francis Fey and "a servant maid" if they wore their own clothes. Other "strange and fantastical freaks" accomplished by the spirit include: moving a barrel of salt; placing bacon on a hand-iron; and twisting the feet and legs of Francis Fey so they are about his neck or chairs and stools. It is said that the specter "appears in resemblance of her own person, she seems to be habited in the same cloaths, and dress." On Easter evening, in 1628, she takes Francis Fey "up by the skirt of his doublet, [...] and carried [him] a heighth into the Air." When Francis Fey is found again after being missing, he is found in a "Trance, or extatick fit," but upon recovering from this fit, claimed that he had been in "perfect sense" and that the Daemon had carried him very high into the air - a fact verified by the finding of a shoe and a perriwig in a tree and out of doors. The spirit also comes to Francis Fey in Crediton, in the shape of a bird, and threw a "weight of Brass or Copper" at the forehead of Francis Fey when he is being treated by a Physician. The spirit "continued to molest the young man in a very severe and rugged manner, often handling him with great extremity," and continued to haunt him for some time. (180)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180

Anonymous 17   Apparition

A headless and tail-less bear that allegedly appears to Stephen and Margaret Hooper. Anonymous 17 evidently came up on to the bed, stroked Margaret Hooper's feet three times, took her out of the bed, rolled her around the floor of the bed chamber, and then rolled her under the bed. Stephen Hooper attempted to strike Anonymous 17 with a stool, but it felt as if he was stroking a featherbed. (Image 5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Most Dreadfull Discourse of a Woman Possessed with the Deuill who in the Likenesse of a Headlesse Beare Fetched her out of her Bedd. London: 1584, Image 5-6

Anonymous 18   Spirit

One of two spirits that possess the young Maid from Arpington (Anonymous 32) in the county of Kent, causing her to suffer from tormenting fits. The two spirits (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) speak from within the Maid and chant, "Weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker," as well as cause her to "bark like a little Dogg twice together." However, Anonymous 18 is exorcised from the Maid after Doctor Boreman prays for her, with the spirit emerging from her mouth in the form of a serpent. This serpent wrapped itself around the doctor's neck, but immediately vanished after it was plucked off by a "standers by." (Anonymous 449) The maid is still possessed by another spirit (Anonymous 88) after this dispossession, however. (3-5)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 3-5

Anonymous 2   Familiar

A familiar which appears in the form of a squirrel to Joan Peterson, alleged to have taught Peterson all of the strange things she is known to do. This being was seen and heard talking with Peterson through the night by a maidservant, "which so affrighted her that she lay as if she were in a trance;" the maidservant "was so bewitched by it, that she could not remember one word" of the conference between the two. Peterson's son also knew of the familiar, and was known to speak of it to his schoolfellows. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6

Anonymous 21   Familiar

A cat that Mary Smith allegedly uses to bewitch Cicely Balye. It is believed that Smith placed the cat (Anonymous 21) upon Balye, causing her to become sick, languished, and exceedingly lean, ailments that continued for over a year. (56)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 56

Anonymous 22   Apparition

A being that appears in several forms to both Thomas Lipeat and John Mowlin. When appearing before Mowlin, the apparition pretends to be sent by God to do God's work. These apparitions to John Mowlin continue for some five weeks, and appear as a man in a coloured coat with "holes in [his] hands and feet," as well as through Voices. These same apparitions visit Thomas Lipeat, who suspects that they are not from God, but from the Devil. These apparitions appear before Thomas Lipeat over the course of several nights, starting out as a ball of fire, followed by a moon, followed by a "strange form," and last of all, as a gentleman offering money. When Anonymous 22 presents itself to Thomas Lipeat, he says "The peace of him is at hand." Through prayer, however, Thomas Lipeat discovers that the apparition is actually sent from the Devil. Anonymous continually counsels Lipeat to speak with John Mowlin. Lipeat's beliefs are confirmed when the Apparition asks Lipeat to omit that he heard the Voice of God, but rather just tell others that he had a Vision. When Anonymous 22 offers Thomas Lipeat money, but having been warned by God in a dream that the Devil would tempt him in this fashion, Thomas Lipeat refuses, saying that the grace of God is sufficient. Anonymous 22 leaves after Thomas Lipeat's refusal, and no longer returns. (1 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Divell in Kent. London: 1647, 1 - 3

Anonymous 24   Devil in the shape of

Imps or devils that appears in various forms, including a toad, a frog and a mouse. It is believed to torment the demoniac, Jane Stretton, who suffers from violent fits. The witnessing of such imps is believed to be proof of the involvement of witchcraft "and such Diabolical means," with her fits, which last some nine months, although the visitation of imps and devils never ceases for Jane Stretton. These imps may have been sent by Anonymous 322, the wife of a cunning man who was insulted by Jane Stretton's father. (8)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 8

Anonymous 24   Spirit

Imps or devils that appears in various forms, including a toad, a frog and a mouse. It is believed to torment the demoniac, Jane Stretton, who suffers from violent fits. The witnessing of such imps is believed to be proof of the involvement of witchcraft "and such Diabolical means," with her fits, which last some nine months, although the visitation of imps and devils never ceases for Jane Stretton. These imps may have been sent by Anonymous 322, the wife of a cunning man who was insulted by Jane Stretton's father. (8)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 8

Anonymous 25   Apparition

An apparition in the form of a human wearing a dark habit that appears to Anne Arthur as she is out walking one night. Arthur believes the apparition might be male, but after "observing his countenance to be stern and dreadful," she begins to suspect that it is the Devil. Arthur grows fearful of Anonymous 25, as it continues to follow her while she walks. After following her for a while, the apparition offers Arthur a bag of silver for her poverty. It then offers her a bag of gold after her initial refusal. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent. London: 1685, 2

Anonymous 26   Apparition

A number of apparitions that allegedly appear to Christian Shaw while she is having a fit. Shaw claims that "she met with Apparitions of strange and unaccountable things," however, she also believes that she was carried "in a swing by six Women and four Men" to the gate of her parent's home. When Shaw and "her Tormentors" arrived at the gate, however, they "could [not] open it so that they left her there as usual." This is somewhat surprising for Shaw, as the gate "was not bolted nor lock'd." (11-12)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 11-12

Anonymous 27   Apparition

An angel "with Wings in a flaming Light" that appears to Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl suffering from fits. He appears before her during a time period she is rendered speechless. Sarah Bower refers to Anonymous 27 as "the Man of God," and he councils her to place her trust in God, and not yield to Satan. He also predicts that she will shortly die, and gave her a message to pass on to "the People of London and England, [that] if they did not speedily repent from their Sins, especially that of Pride in Apparrel, and turn from the Evil of their Ways, God Almighty would give them up as a Prey to their Enemies." The angel continues to pull Sarah Bower "one way, and the Devil another." (4-5)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 4-5

Anonymous 28   Devil in the shape of

A being that takes the form of five kittens, and is found by Robert Aldridge in William Sommers' bed while he is having a violent fit. The being manifested after Aldridge had knelt "downe to prayer" next to Sommers' bed, the appearance causing "the bed clothes at the feete to shake, move, and leape as the leaves of an Aspen tres shaken with the winde." (23)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, 23

Anonymous 29   Other

A being that takes the form of three kittens and is found by Joan Pie in William Sommers' bed. Pie had "heard a clapping in his bed, as though it had bene the clapping of 3. hands," but she discovers it is "the creeping off 3. kitlings." Pie attempts to capture the being, but is unable to do so. (26)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, 26

Anonymous 3   Spirit

A spirit that haunts Andrew Mackie's house by throwing stones, destroying property, and hurting people (5)

Appears in:
Telfair, Alexander. A True Relation of an Apparition Expressions and Actings of a Spirit. Edinburgh: 1696, 5

Anonymous 30   Devil in the shape of

A spirit that appears to Edmund Newton in the form of a bearded man with cloven feet, "cloathed in russet." Anonymous 30 offers to heal Newton's sore leg, a proposition that Newton does not accept. (57)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57

Anonymous 31   Spirit

One of potentially several spirits allegedly kept by Margaret Wellam. Margaret is "accused upon suspicion 'to be a witch and to give sucke or feede evill spirrits'." (265)

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937, 265

Anonymous 33   Familiar

A familiar spirit from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, appearing in the form of a black greyhound, which Margaret White, in her confession, claimed came to her after she had made a malefic compact with the Devil. (24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24

Anonymous 34   Spirit

One of two imps allegedly sent by Goodwife Harwood and Goodwife Young to torment Mr. Hall, who, finding they were unable to hurt, plagued his daughter Mary Hall. They spirits, which speak through Hall, claim that they sometimes we are in the shape of Serpents, sometimes of Flyes, sometimes of Rats or Mice." They entered her home, via the chimney and entered her body, via Mary's foot. They would blaspheme and mock Dr. Woodhouse, they would tempt Hall to choke herself and prevent her from reading the bible. They would prevent her from riding her horse, by make her dance about and smash her against walls. The imps instruct Mary Hall's mother to buy Hall gifts, but telling her she "should not sleep, and would sometimes heave her up in bed, and tell her, Mary, we will buy you a black Gown, Hoods, and Scarfs, and Ribbins, Hay! Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins." They also refuse to answer the philosophical posed to them by William Drage. (32-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32-39

Anonymous 35   Spirit

One of two imps allegedly sent by Goodwife Harwood and Goodwife Young to torment Mr. Hall, who, finding they were unable to hurt, plagued his daughter Mary Hall. They spirits, which speak through Hall, claim that they sometimes we are in the shape of Serpents, sometimes of Flyes, sometimes of Rats or Mice." They entered her home, via the chimney and entered her body, via Mary's foot. They would blaspheme and mock Dr. Woodhouse, they would tempt Hall to choke herself and prevent her from reading the bible. They would prevent her from riding her horse, by make her dance about and smash her against walls. The imps instruct Mary Hall's mother to buy Hall gifts, but telling her she "should not sleep, and would sometimes heave her up in bed, and tell her, Mary, we will buy you a black Gown, Hoods, and Scarfs, and Ribbins, Hay! Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins." They also refuse to answer the philosophical posed to them by William Drage. (32-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32-39

Anonymous 36   Spirit

A spirit in the shape of a mouse that appears to Anonymous 254 before he is plagued by strange fits. The spirit appears to be a possessing agent, but is kept at bay by an amulet given to Anonymous 254 by a wizard (Anonymous 255). (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 36   Familiar

A spirit in the shape of a mouse that appears to Anonymous 254 before he is plagued by strange fits. The spirit appears to be a possessing agent, but is kept at bay by an amulet given to Anonymous 254 by a wizard (Anonymous 255). (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 37   Spirit

A spirit in the shape of a "whyte thing" that surrounds Anne Mylner when she returns home from Fathers Kyne's and passes into the fieldes along the "high way neare to the City." The day after encountering this entity, Mylner is forced to stay in bed due to illness and pain all over her body, and does not eat or drink for several days. Mylner suffers from fits and is considered possessed for upwards of fifteen weeks. Master (John) Lane preaches and prays for Mylner repeatedly and she is eventually restored to a perfect health and liking. (1-3)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, 1-3

Anonymous 39   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a horse, which belongs to Anonymous 269, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape: "when the hors tormented him, he woold whinny." The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the hors, yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 40   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a dog which belongs to Anonymous 292, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape. In this case, Smyth would presumably bark like a dog, to signify he was possessed by Anonymous' dog spirit (Anonymous The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [dog], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 41   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a cat which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape. In this case, "when the cat tormented him, he would cry like a cat." The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [cat], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 42   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a polecat which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar\'s shape. In this case, when the polecat tormented him, he would hisse. The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [pullemar], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 43   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a fish which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar\'s shape. In this case, when the fish tormented him, he would blow bubbles, or open and close his mouth like a fish. The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [fish], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 44   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a code (cod?) which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape. In this case, when the fish tormented him, he would blow bubbles, or open and close his mouth like a fish. The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [fish], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 45   Familiar

One of two imps that appears in the form of a rat, which Joyce Boanes "bed to her in the likenesse of Mouses," and "sucked on [her] body." Along with a familiar named Rug, Anonymous 45 helps to kill ten or twelve of Richard Welch's lambs, and to later to kill a Calf, a Sheep and a Lamb which belonged to Thomas Clynch. This familiar may be the one described by Rebecca Jones as Boane's dun coloured mouse allegedly used to kill Thomas Bumstead, who died "about three weekes after," a murder spurred on by Bumstead having beaten Rebecca Jones' son. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Anonymous 46   Familiar

A familiar, which may appear in the form of a yellow cat named Besse, that is allegedly sent by Susan Cock to Margaret Landish. Landish claimed the famliiar "sucked on her privie parts, and much pained and tormented her." The familiar was allegedly used to kill and torment Robert Turners's servant, making him bark like a dog, groan, crow, and sing, and to kill "six or seven shoots or hogges" which belonged to Mr. Mannock. Landish denied that she had used her familiar to do any harm. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Anonymous 47   Familiar

A familiar gifted to Rose Hallybread by Goodwife Hagtree. Hallybread fed her familiar with blood and oatmeal "for the space of a yeer and a halfe," but soon thereafter lost it. (33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33

Anonymous 48   Familiar

A famliar that appears in the form of a small gray bird, and is given to Rose Hallybread by Joyce Boanes. Hallybread uses this familiar to kill Thomas Toakley's son, and torment and kill Robert Turner's servant. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Anonymous 49   Familiar

One of the familiars allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke of Manningtree in Essex. Clarke offers to call this spirit to come and play on her lap if Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne promise not to hurt her. They refuse and the familiar does not appear. This may be Holt, the white kitten that Clake is found guilty of entertaining, employing, end feeding with the "intention of obtaining [its] help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices," or it may be another familiar. Clarke is hanged on a different charge. (6)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6

Anonymous 50   Familiar

One of three familiar spirits allegedly owned, fed, and entertained by Mary Johnson. She allegedly keeps this particular familiar in her pocket, and describes it as being "in shape somewhat like a Rat, but without tayl and eares." Johnson uses this familiar to kill Elizabeth Otley's child. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Anonymous 51   Familiar

A spirit that appears in the form of a dun coloured mouse, and is allegedly kept by Dorothy Waters of Clacton in the county of Essex. Waters allegedly "did entertaine, employ and feede" the spirit. Witnesses Joseph Longe and Richard Cole gave evidence regarding this accusation, testimony that aided in Dorothy Waters' indictment. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341106)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341106

Anonymous 52   Familiar

A familiar spirit in the form of a squirrel that is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Hare of Great Clacton in the county of Essex. Hare is indicted, found guilty, and executed by hanging on charges of having etertained, employed, and fed a familiar "in the likenesses of a squirrell." Her case is witnessed by Roger Himpson and John Knightes. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341110)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341110

Anonymous 53   Familiar

One of two familiars allegedly "entertaine[d] and feede" by Anne Thurston of Great Holland. Thurston is charged with keeping "two evil spirits, one in the form of a bird, the other of a mouse." Her case is witnessed by Samuel Wray and John Alderton. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142

Anonymous 54   Familiar

One of two familiars allegedly "entertaine[d] and feede" by Anne Thurston of Great Holland. Thurston is charged with keeping "two evil spirits, one in the form of a bird, the other of a mouse." Her case is witnessed by Samuel Wray and John Alderton. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142

Anonymous 55   Familiar

A red mouse shaped familiar allegedly owned by Elizabeth Harvey, allegedly given to her by Marion Hocket in around 1638-1639 who promised her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars, (one of the red mice as perhaps represented by Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty), back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194

Anonymous 56   Familiar

A red mouse shaped familiar allegedly owned by Elizabeth Harvey, allegedly given to her by Marion Hocket in around 1638-1639 who promised her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars (either the three red mouse or Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty), back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194

Anonymous 57   Familiar

A red mouse shaped familiar allegedly owned by Elizabeth Harvey, allegedly given to her by Marion Hocket in around 1638-1639 who promised her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars, (one of the red mice as perhaps represented by Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty), back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194

Anonymous 58   Familiar

One of two black mole shaped familiars that are allegedly kept by Susan Went of Langham, Essex. Went is accused of entertaining, employing, and feeding "two evil spirits," charges that she "pleads not guilty" to. Went is ultimately found guilty of the charges against her, and is executed by hanging. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206

Anonymous 59   Familiar

One of two familiars that appear in the form of black moles, which Susan West of Langham, Essex allegedly "did enterteine, employ, and feede. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206

Anonymous 60   Apparition

A snake which mysteriously appears coiled on a shelf in the Stock household after Francis Stock has a disagreement with William Hatting, calling his wife, accused witch Sara Hatting, a "scolder." Mrs. Stock attempt to cut or smash the serpent to death with a spade, but discovers that it disappears when she administers a blow. Mrs. Stock grow ill and dies within seven days of this incident; her daughter dies within ten, and soon after a third child grows sick with the same kind of "extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body" that has plagued its sister and mother, and dies. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Anonymous 61   Devil in the shape of

A very handsome young man who appears at the threshold of John Bishop's home in Much Clacton, purportedly there to see Rebecca Jones. He asks Jones how she is, asks to see her wrists, and pricks her until she bleeds, carrying away her blood on his fingertip. This may or may not be the first form of two forms in which the Devil appears to Jones; Jones also encounters a man in a ragged suit who allegedly gives her three familiars. (61-62)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 61-62

Anonymous 62   Devil in the shape of

A man who appears to Rebecca Jones on the road between Great Clacton and St.Osyth as she is en route to sell her master's butter. Jones describes him as eerily frightening, "being in a ragged sute, and having such great eyes, that this Examinant was much afraid of him." This man, who seems to be another form of a devil (Anonymous 61), or the Devil himself. He also told her to nurse them on blood and milk and, although her promised that they would do her no harm, he instructed Jones to use them to seel vengeance "on her enemies, and bid her murther some, but not too many, and he would forgive her; and then went away." (36-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36-37

Anonymous 63   Apparition

A being that appears in the form of a black dog, and allegedly appears in Joan Peterson's home in Wapping, in the Greater London region. Anonymous 63 evidently "went directly to Peterson, and put his head under her arm-pits," an act that astonished and frightened the man who was present in Peterson's house. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Anonymous 64   Familiar

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 65   Familiar

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 66   Familiar

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 67   Familiar

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 68   Devil in the shape of

A being in the shape of an ugly fiend with fiery eyes that Richard Galis alleged to see on the road late at night; it was sitting in a poor man's cart when Galis attacked it with his sword. Galis thought it was Satan himself, and bid it leave in God's name. A great light allegedly appeared around the cart, and the fiend dispersed with the light leaving nothing but the stench of brimstone behind. (Image 11-12)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, Image 11-12

Anonymous 69   Spirit

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 69   Devil in the shape of

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 70   Devil in the shape of

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 70   Spirit

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 71   Spirit

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 71   Devil in the shape of

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 72   Spirit

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 72   Devil in the shape of

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 73   Spirit

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 73   Devil in the shape of

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 74   Spirit

A spirit that appears in the form of a little rugged dog with a white coat, who appeared to Elizabeth Francis when she cursed Alice Poole for refusing to loan her yeast; this spirit promised to plague Poole in the head in exchange for a crust of white bread. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 4-5

Anonymous 75   Devil in the shape of

The Devil in the shape of a snake, who visits Anne Styles in Stockbridge while a Gentleman prays for her, after she signed her soul to the Devil. Anne Styles is physically tormented during the four days of prayer when Anonymous 75 (the Devil) visits her. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Salisbury Assizes. Or the Reward of Witchcraft. London: 1653, 2

Anonymous 76   Familiar

A spirit that appears in the form of a black dog, and is allegedly seen leaving Widow Webbe's home immediately following the death of her daughter; the daughter had been struck in the face by Ellen Smith causing her to become ill and die in vengeance for a falling out with Ellen Smith's daughter, implying that this being had been summoned at her behest. The sight of the black dog distressed Widow Webbe out of her wits. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Anonymous 76   Spirit

A spirit that appears in the form of a black dog, and is allegedly seen leaving Widow Webbe's home immediately following the death of her daughter; the daughter had been struck in the face by Ellen Smith causing her to become ill and die in vengeance for a falling out with Ellen Smith's daughter, implying that this being had been summoned at her behest. The sight of the black dog distressed Widow Webbe out of her wits. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Anonymous 77   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a black dog with the face of a toad and one of the nine spirits in total which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 78   Familiar

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 79   Familiar

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 80   Familiar

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 81   Familiar

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 82   Familiar

One of the four toads allegedly owned by Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney's final two toads perish after she flees, having been accused of being a witch by John Harolds (Harwood) and Richard Foster of being a witch. It presumably starves to death, or dies of neglect. (A4v, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4v, B

Anonymous 83   Familiar

One of the four toads allegedly owned by Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney's final two toads perish after she flees, having been accused of being a witch by John Harolds (Harwood) and Richard Foster of being a witch. It presumably starves to death, or dies of neglect. (A4v, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4v, B

Anonymous 84   Devil in the shape of

The devil who allegedly appears in the form of a "Tall Slender Black Man, of a thin Visage, and a thick Speech," who appears to James Day at his request in writing in blood. The black man spends some offering James Day "money and worldly goods," as long as James Day should agree to be his servant. He also suggests James Day should become quite good at "games," and in fact, may enchant James Day to have luck at the lottery that evening. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 85   Spirit

A spirit that appears in the form of a "great black man with no head" to Anne Styles during her fits and asks her for her soul. When Styles replied that it was not hers to give even though he had her blood, Anonymous 85 tumbled and threw her about, before vanishing in a great gleaning fire. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 6

Anonymous 85   Devil in the shape of

A spirit that appears in the form of a "great black man with no head" to Anne Styles during her fits and asks her for her soul. When Styles replied that it was not hers to give even though he had her blood, Anonymous 85 tumbled and threw her about, before vanishing in a great gleaning fire. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 6

Anonymous 86   Spirit

One of two spirits that appear in the form of ragged boys before Anne Styles at the behest of Anne Bodenham. Styles claims that Bodenham took the"fore-finger of her right hand, and pricked it with a pin, and put it into a pen, and put the pen into [her] hand, and held her hand to write in a book," at which point "one of the Spirits laid his hand or claw upon the Witches, whilest the maid wrote," with the spirit's hand being noticeably cold. According to Styles, after this malefic compact was made, she, Bodenham and the spirit all said "Amen," and the spirit gave Bodenham a piece of silver that he had bitten. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 5

Anonymous 86   Devil in the shape of

One of two spirits that appear in the form of ragged boys before Anne Styles at the behest of Anne Bodenham. Styles claims that Bodenham took the"fore-finger of her right hand, and pricked it with a pin, and put it into a pen, and put the pen into [her] hand, and held her hand to write in a book," at which point "one of the Spirits laid his hand or claw upon the Witches, whilest the maid wrote," with the spirit's hand being noticeably cold. According to Styles, after this malefic compact was made, she, Bodenham and the spirit all said "Amen," and the spirit gave Bodenham a piece of silver that he had bitten. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 5

Anonymous 87   Spirit

One of two spirits that appear in the form of ragged boys before Anne Styles at the behest of Anne Bodenham. Styles claims that Bodenham took the"fore-finger of her right hand, and pricked it with a pin, and put it into a pen, and put the pen into [her] hand, and held her hand to write in a book," at which point "one of the Spirits laid his hand or claw upon the Witches, whilest the maid wrote," with the spirit's hand being noticeably cold. According to Styles, after this malefic compact was made, she, Bodenham and the spirit all said "Amen," and the spirit gave Bodenham a piece of silver that he had bitten. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 5

Anonymous 87   Devil in the shape of

One of two spirits that appear in the form of ragged boys before Anne Styles at the behest of Anne Bodenham. Styles claims that Bodenham took the"fore-finger of her right hand, and pricked it with a pin, and put it into a pen, and put the pen into [her] hand, and held her hand to write in a book," at which point "one of the Spirits laid his hand or claw upon the Witches, whilest the maid wrote," with the spirit's hand being noticeably cold. According to Styles, after this malefic compact was made, she, Bodenham and the spirit all said "Amen," and the spirit gave Bodenham a piece of silver that he had bitten. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 5

Anonymous 88   Devil in the shape of

One of two spirits that possess the young Maid from Arpington (Annoymous 32) in the county of Kent, causing her to suffer from tormenting fits. The two spirits (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) speak from within the Maid and chant, "Weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker," as well as cause her to "bark like a little Dogg twice together." One of the spirits (Anonymous 18) is exorcised from the Maid after Doctor Boreman prays for her, with the spirit emerging from her mouth in the form of a serpent. Anonymous 88, however, remains within the maid, causing her face to contort so horribly, it is believed that not even her closest relatives would recognize her. This spirit would also make noise whenever Anonymous 32 moves, sometimes answering questions posed to it, and "at other times, making a hideous murmuring, as if it disliked its present habitation." This spirit appears to remain in possession of the maid. (3-6)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 3-6

Anonymous 88   Spirit

One of two spirits that possess the young Maid from Arpington (Annoymous 32) in the county of Kent, causing her to suffer from tormenting fits. The two spirits (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) speak from within the Maid and chant, "Weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker," as well as cause her to "bark like a little Dogg twice together." One of the spirits (Anonymous 18) is exorcised from the Maid after Doctor Boreman prays for her, with the spirit emerging from her mouth in the form of a serpent. Anonymous 88, however, remains within the maid, causing her face to contort so horribly, it is believed that not even her closest relatives would recognize her. This spirit would also make noise whenever Anonymous 32 moves, sometimes answering questions posed to it, and "at other times, making a hideous murmuring, as if it disliked its present habitation." This spirit appears to remain in possession of the maid. (3-6)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 3-6

Anonymous 89   Monster

A deformed infant born of a well appareled young woman (Anonymous 94) staying in Goodwife Watts' house. The child was born with no head, but two faces, with one "visibly to be seene, directly placed in the breast, where it had a nose, and mouth, and two holes for two eyes, but no eyes." The second face "was not perfectly to be seene, but retained a proportion of flesh in a great round lump." This deformed figure horrified the women attending the birth. (4-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News out of Kent of a Monstrous and Misshapen Child. London: 1609, 4-6

Anonymous 90   Spirit

An evil spirit familiar in the form of a young man that allegedly belongs to Rebecca West. West is indicted on charges of entertaining, employing, and feeding Anonymous 90, whom she calls "Her Husband," for the purpose of witchcraft and sorcery, but does not appear to have been prosecuted or found guilty on these charges. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914

Anonymous 90   Familiar

An evil spirit familiar in the form of a young man that allegedly belongs to Rebecca West. West is indicted on charges of entertaining, employing, and feeding Anonymous 90, whom she calls "Her Husband," for the purpose of witchcraft and sorcery, but does not appear to have been prosecuted or found guilty on these charges. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914

Anonymous 91   Familiar

The familiar of Mother Atkins who visits the servant Richard Burt in the shape of a "monstrous black cat" during his lunch hour in Pinner, Middlesex. The cat startles Richard Burt, and "began to shake the strawe, and to make a wad thereof." (3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 3

Anonymous 92   Familiar

A familiar of Mother Atkins who darts across the path of the servant, Richard Burt, in Pinner, Middlesex, who is walking his master's dog. The dog "began to faint, and runne rounde about his maister, and to whine pitifully, as who shoulde say that hinde of game was not for them," and once the servant follow the hare, he discovers it going to the notorious witch Mother Atkin's house. (2-3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 2-3

Anonymous 93   Familiar

A grey cat Temperance Lloyd and Grace Thomas claim to have seen going into Thomas Eastchurch's shop. Lloyd also met with the cat the following day, after which the cat retired and went back to Thomas Eastchurch's house. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 14

Anonymous 93 (Plural)   Other

SIx familiars that appear in the form of imps, who frequented Mr. Lowes Parson daily in order to help him commit "many other most hanous, wicked, and accursed acts." These imps sucked Mr. Lowes Parson on the crowne of his head and under his tongue, as evidenced by teats in those areas. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 94   Familiar

A number of familiars that appear in the form of imps, and who suck from alleged witches Thomas Evererd and Mary Evererd of Halesworth, Suffolk. These two witches are tried, convicted, and condemned to death in 1645, at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 95 (Plural)   Familiar

A collection of familiars that appear in the form of imps, who belong to one old woman (Anonymous 271) present at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. They come to her "in severall shapes," although it is unclear what these forms are. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 236   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad, and is allegedly kept by Teecle's wife. Anonymous 236 is thought to have been the cause of Jane Walter's bewitchment, as he would often creep into her lap. This caused Walter's to have a tongue "tied in her Head with a Hempenstring, and run full of Pins." Walter also suffered from "many strange Fits, sometimes 20 or more in a day." It is believed that the toad managed to affect Jane Walter by climbing into her lap on multiple occasions. When it was offered to burn the familiar, it mysterious disappeared. (7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Anonymous 96 (Plural)   Familiar

Familiars in the form of several imps who belong to a number of witches imprisoned and searched at Bury St. Edmunds, found by four searchers from Suffolk. These imps take suck from their masters, and leave teats in various parts of the body. The imps also visit in "divers other shapes," including snakes, wasps, rats, and hornets. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 97   Familiar

A familiar in the form of an imp who is sent by a woman from Suffolk in 1645 (Anonymous 274) "in the likenesse of a little black smoth Dog" to play with the young son (Anonymous 275) and only child of a gentleman (Anonymous 281) and his wife (Anonymous 282) who offended the woman by being discontented with her frequent visits. At first, the child "refused to play with it," but the imp persisted, until "at length the Child made much of it" and the imp brought the young son to " a water side, and there drowned the said child to the great grief of the parents." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 98   Familiar

A familiar which appears in the shape of a toad that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney allegedly sends this toad hopping over the threshold of her home or more likely Richard Fosters's home, as his wife was also approaching. The toad allegedly "pinched her." This was the last act attributed to this toad. It "neuer returned againe" to Upney. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 98 (Plural)   Familiar

Familiars in the form of a number of imps who are associated with a woman (Anonymous 276) imprisoned in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. The imps are stripped of their power to harm others by the prayers of "divers godly Ministers" at the pleading of that same woman "who seemeth to be very penitent for her former lewd and abominable indeavours, and acts." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 99   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a gray imp who is sent to Anne Leech in Mistley, Suffolk and kills a black cow and white cow belonging to Richard Edwards and two horses belonging to Mr. Bragge. Anonymous 99 sucks from Anne Leech and speaks to her often. Anonymous 99 also kills Elizabeth Kirk, and the daughter of Widow Rawlyns. (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7-8

Apparition 1   Apparition

An apparition "in an affrightening shape" that charges towards, and knocks to the ground, a soldier (Anonymous 291) stationed on watch in London "near the Chappel of St. James's House." (57-58)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57-58

Apparition 3 (plural)   Apparition

Several Apparitions which appear to Richard Dugdale after a night of drinking, on his road home to his Master's house the following morning. Richard Dugdale finds himself unable to "tell the resemblance thereof." (62)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62

Apparition 4   Apparition

An apparition which allegedly appears to Richard Dugdale, in the form of "smoke or mist." Richard Dugdale had been feeling "some heaviness," so came in to rest from the fields. When lying in the bedchamber after drinking, an apparition appears to him; this leaves way for "a fear upon him." (62-63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63

Apparition 5   Apparition

An apparition which allegedly appears to Richard Dugdale while he is resting from the fields in his bedchamber, on a morning he was feeling "some heaviness," and took a drink. At first, Richard Dugdale mistakes this apparition for a fellow servant, Hindle, who is a "hard-favoured man," whose hair had been clut very close to his ears. This apparition is also described as a "Black Man." The apparition presses down upon Richard Dugdale's chest, and turns into a naked child, which then turns into a "Filmert, and went away with a shrill shriek." It is believed that these Apparitions danced before Richard Dugdale as well, before disappearing in a flame of fire. (62-63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63

Apparition 6 (Plural)   Apparition

A group of "several Apparitions" who present themselves to Richard Dugdale. RIchard had been "sitting with some Company [when] his Side was suddenly seiz'd as with a burning pain, as if it had been whipt and stung with Nettles, or stab'd with Needles." It is after this, in the evening, that the apparitions appear, but soon "after Vanish'd before him. (2)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 2

Apparition 7 (Plural)   Apparition

An unknown number of apparitions who appear before Joseph Buxford in Hell. They are "divers men, who [Joseph Buxford] has formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to [the Devil] to receive their due recompense for the same." These apparitions howl fiercely, and many are of people Joseph Buxford recognizes from "before the Langport fight." As they wail out of "insupportable paine," they say, "Woe, Woe, unto us that ever we undertooke the defence of such an unjust Cause." (4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Aubon   Devil

A spirit known by the name of Aubon who claims to be from Ireland, allegedly possessed Alexander Nyndge, and was said to be driven out by prayers led by Edward Nyndge. Aubon tormented Alexander Nyndge for six months, in which his body swelled, eyes bulged, lumps moved under his skin, he behaved and gestured oddly, flapping noises were heard from his body, he flung himself from the bed against the floor an bedstead, and his face and body were deformed. Edward Nyndge conjured Aubon forth to converse with him on multiple occasions, in which the spirit gave his name, origins and claimed to be tormenting Alexander Nyndge in order to claim his soul. Aubon is said to have a hollow voice when speaking through Alexander. (Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7

Aubon   Spirit

A spirit known by the name of Aubon who claims to be from Ireland, allegedly possessed Alexander Nyndge, and was said to be driven out by prayers led by Edward Nyndge. Aubon tormented Alexander Nyndge for six months, in which his body swelled, eyes bulged, lumps moved under his skin, he behaved and gestured oddly, flapping noises were heard from his body, he flung himself from the bed against the floor an bedstead, and his face and body were deformed. Edward Nyndge conjured Aubon forth to converse with him on multiple occasions, in which the spirit gave his name, origins and claimed to be tormenting Alexander Nyndge in order to claim his soul. Aubon is said to have a hollow voice when speaking through Alexander. (Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7

Ball   Spirit

A familiar from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a brown dog and to belong to Elizabeth Device. According to Device's confession, Ball bid her to make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it by the fire and crumble it slowly over the course of a week after he harassed her for having a bastard child. She did so, and Robinson died within a week of the image being crumbled away; James Device, Elizabeth's son, echoed this account in his own deposition. Elizabeth's daughter Jennet Device alleged that Elizabeth also had Ball kill James Robinson and Henry Mytton. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4-F4v

Ball (2)   Spirit

One of three familiar spirits from Raunds in Northampton, alleged to belong to Arthur BIll. Their shape, use and the conditions of their upkeep are unknown; Bill is said to have given this one the name Ball. (C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C4

Baro   Spirit

An "orientalle or spetentrialle spirit" that William Whycherly attempts to conjure using "a circle called Circulus Salaomonia at a place called Pembsam in Sussex." Robert Bayly, John Anderson, John Hickely, and Thomas Goslyng also attempt to conjure Baro using a "sworde, ring, and hallywater," but they, along with Whycherly, are unsuccessful. ()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

Beelzebub   Familiar

A familiar from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, which Mary Darnell claimed belonged to Elizabeth Chandler and had caused her furmity to boil over even after removed from the fire. Chandler denied having any familiars, though she added "she did call a logg of wood Beelzebub, and a sticke Trullibub" (7, 8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7, 8

Benias   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Tardebigge and Henlipp in the county of Worcestershire and known to belong to Dr. John Lamb. Dr. Lamb is said to have kept Benias trapped in his crystal ball, the source of his predictions, along with three other unknown spirits. Benias was chief amongst them, and Dr. Lamb summoned him with declarations of adoration. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 5-6

Besse   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a yellow cat, gifted to Susan Cock by her Mother, Margery Stoakes, and which appeared to Cock the "same night her said mother dyed." Besse, along with the "imps of the said Rose Hallybread, Joyce Boanes, and Margaret Lindish" killed ten or twelve of John Spall's sheep, tormented Robert Tender's servant, and, along with Margaret Landish's imp, "killed six or seven shoots or hogges of the said Mr Mannock." Cock is indicted, tried, and found guilty entertaining, employing, and feeding this "evil spirit in the form 'of a yellow catt'" a crime for which she is hung. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Bidd   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a dun colored ferret, described as having fiery eyes, and which allegedly appears to Joan Prentice of Hinningham Sibble (aka Sible Hedingham), Essex circa November, 1583 as she sits in an alms house, claiming to be Satan and demanding her soul. Prentice responds that her soul belongs "onely vnto Iesus Christ, by whose precious blood shedding, it was bought and purchased," but willingly granted him her blood. The moment of malefic compact would not be the only time Bidd would drink from her, however. He "sucked blood out of her lefte cheeke," before Prentice sent him to spoil William Adams' brew. Bidd allegedly "leapt vpon her left shoulder, and sucked blood out of her lefte cheeke," before she sent him to "nippe" two year old Sara Glascock. What exactly that order entailed became a point of contention between Prentice and Bidd. She allegedly scolded him after he killed the child, and Bidd disappeared from her life. Bidd does not appear in the legal record. ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Jacke (3)   Other

One of four imps that allegedly belong to Alice Manfield, which were gifted to her by Margaret Grevell. According to information given by Richard Rosse, Manfield called her imps Robin, Jack, William, and Puppet. The imps are described as "two shees" and "two hees," with all four being "like vnto blacke Cats," which Manfield kept "in a boxe with woll" upon a shelf by her bed; the imps are fed with blood they suck from Manfield's body, as well as bread and beer when they do her bidding. The imps perform a variety of tasks for Manfield: Robin and Puppet are sent on separate occasions to plague Joan Cheston's cattle after Cheston and Manfield had a falling out; Jack is sent, two years after Robin is sent to plague cattle, to plague Joan Cheston's husband, Robert Cheston, to death; William informs Manfield, the day before her apprehension, that she will be captured and "called in question," and also destroys stores of food and drink. (61-67)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 61-67

Black Bird   Familiar

The familiar devil which allegedly belonged to Elizabeth Bradwell and appeared to her in the form of a black bird. (48)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 48

Anonymous 198   Apparition

A "Black grim Man" who appeared to Elizabeth Anderson while she was "playing about the door" of her Grandmother's house. Elizabeth saw the "Black grim Man go into the House to her Grandmother," at which time her Grandmother "desired her to take the Gentleman (as she named him) by the Hand," after which Elizabeth would receive a "Bon[n]y Black new Coat," which she did. Following this, the man "immediatly [...] vanished and went away," but returned a month later. At this second appearence of the man, Elizabeth is again told to hold his hand, but she "would not be perswaded to do it," and she quoted the Lord. After this, Elizabeth was not troubled by the black grim man again. (9-11)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 9-11

Blackeman   Devil in the shape of

A spirit from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear as a man wearing with black clothing, to have ugly feet, and to sometimes appear old, who allegedly gave Jane Wallis her familiars Grissell and Greedigut and visited her repeatedly with them to give her two or three shillings at a time. When Blackeman first appeared to her, he scared her by first seeming to grow taller, then smaller, then vanishing altogether. There are conflicting accounts of his relationship with Wallis: She claims that "shee would not suffer him," but Edward Wingfield alleged that she told him she had allowed Blackeman the use of her body as often as three times a week. In addition, Wallis claimed that Blackeman first appeared to her six weeks before her examination, while Wingfield placed the first meeting at a year prior. (12-13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12-13

Bun   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a great black cat, is named Bun, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Stile. Bun attempts to rescue Stile on her way to jail, only to be banished, as Stile hoped to gain favor though cooperation. (27)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 27

Bunne   Devil

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, known to appear primarily in the shape of a little dog and sometimes in the shape of a mouse, and to belong to Joan Williford. In her confession, Williford claimed to have signed a contract with the Devil in which he promised to be her servant for 20 years, which contract was almost up. Seven years before, the Devil appeared to her in the shape of a little dog and asked her to forsake God and rely on him instead, promising that she would lack for nothing. She called him Bunne, and he would bring her money thereafter. Bunne allegedly carried Thomas Gardler out a window to fall on his backside. Williford also claimed Bunne told her that Elizabeth Harris had cursed John Woodcott's boat several years before. This familiar is said to have come to her twice while she was in prison to suck from her in the form of a mouse. Harris claimed that Williford told her that Bunne told her that "though the Boate, (she not knowing what Boat,) went chearfully out, it should not come so chearfully home." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1-2

Bunne   Familiar

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, known to appear primarily in the shape of a little dog and sometimes in the shape of a mouse, and to belong to Joan Williford. In her confession, Williford claimed to have signed a contract with the Devil in which he promised to be her servant for 20 years, which contract was almost up. Seven years before, the Devil appeared to her in the shape of a little dog and asked her to forsake God and rely on him instead, promising that she would lack for nothing. She called him Bunne, and he would bring her money thereafter. Bunne allegedly carried Thomas Gardler out a window to fall on his backside. Williford also claimed Bunne told her that Elizabeth Harris had cursed John Woodcott's boat several years before. This familiar is said to have come to her twice while she was in prison to suck from her in the form of a mouse. Harris claimed that Williford told her that Bunne told her that "though the Boate, (she not knowing what Boat,) went chearfully out, it should not come so chearfully home." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1-2

Captain Brown   Apparition

An apparition who appears in the form of Captain Brown before two gentlewomen, after he is murdered by his servant. Captain Brown had recently been given some money and his servant, being a greedy individual, "knokt him off his Horse, cut his Skull, cut off his Head, and put it into a Sack," after which the body was buried in a hole in the ground. Although the servant denied the murder, he was arrested on suspicion and "sent to Shrewsbury Prison." When Captain Brown appeared to the two gentlewomen, he smiled at them with "Countenance, and then walked to the Window, and opened the Casement." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of a Most Horrid and Barbarous Murder and Robbery Committed on the Body of Captain Brown. Edinburgh: 1694, 1-2

Anonymous 241   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a cat, that serves Elizabeth Knott by appearing before her at twelve at night, and promising her "anything she would desire, except money." Elizabeth Knott wishes to have John Laman's cow bewitched, as his wife denied her money which was due to her. Three weeks later, a familiar in the shape of a cat bewitches John Lamans' cow. This familiar sucked upon the breast of Elizabeth Knott "when she was cast upon the water." However, "after she came out of the water, she never saw it any more." (4 - 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4 - 5

Anonymous 206 (plural)   Apparition

A group of cats that appear to James Barrow during his fits and tempt him with food and wine. When Barrow does not eat or drink the temptations the cats demand his soul. (5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

Christ   Familiar

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Collyn   Other

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Anonymous 213 (plural)   Familiar

A a group of crustaceans (crabs) which mysteriously appear and scuttle about the floor boards of Edmund Newton's shoe making shop. They allegedly belong to Mary Smith and operate as her familiars, although they aren't purported to do anything. (57-58)

Appears in:
Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft. Cambridge: 1590, 57-58

Crowe   Familiar

A tiny black and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to seven year old Annis Dowsing, daughter of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. Dowsing claims that Crowe is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that her brother was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Crowe   Spirit

A tiny black and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to seven year old Annis Dowsing, daughter of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. Dowsing claims that Crowe is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that her brother was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Dainty   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a mouse allegedly owned and used by Marian Hocket. Hocket is searched and has no discernible witch's marks, yet she is found guilty of entertainging, employing, and feeding "three evil spirits in the form "of a mowse" called Littleman, "of a mowse" called Pretttyman and "of a mowse" called Daynty." (29-31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31

Dandy   Spirit

A familiar from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a brown dog and to belong to James Device. According to Device, Dandy first appeared to him by Pendle's new church and requested his soul in exchange for being revenged of anyone he wanted. Device replied "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it." Two or three days later, he argued with Anne Townley when she accused him and his mother of stealing from her, and she hit him between the shoulders; two days later, Dandy came to him and instructed him to make a clay image of Townley, and said that with Dandy's help, he could kill or destroy her. Device did as he was instructed and crumbled the image a bit each day for a week. Two days after the image was gone, Townley died. Device also set Dandy on John Duckworth after Duckworth promised him an old shirt and later denied it to him; Duckworth was dead within a week after. James' sister Jennet Device claimed that Dandy appeared in the shape of a black dog and killed Townley for him. Jennet also alleged that Dandy had killed John Hargreaves and Blaze Hargreaves for James. James claimed that he last saw Dandy the Tuesday before his apprehension, and Dandy departed with a cry and a flash of fire when James would not give him his whole soul. (H3-H4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H4

Deformed Thing   Familiar

A cat sized, many legged thing with rough hair. The familiar spirit of Margaret Waite. (32)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32

Dicke   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Jude, Dicke was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Dicke   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Jude, Dicke was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Anonymous 191   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a dog, and is allegedly kept by Alice Gooderidge. Gooderidge claims that she received her familiar from her mother, Elizabeth Wright, and that her famliar resembles William Gregories' dog. This statement leads others to believe that William Gregories' dog is actually Gooderidge's famliar. (27)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 27

Donne   Familiar

A tiny red and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to the son of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to his seven year old sister, Annis Dowsing, Donne is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that she was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Donne   Spirit

A tiny red and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to the son of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to his seven year old sister, Annis Dowsing, Donne is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that she was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Dragon   Apparition

The apparition of a dragon which appears to Dr. John Pordage in August of 1649 at his home in Bradfield in the county of Berkshire. It is the third apparition which comes into his bed chamber at night, the first was the spectral appearance of a known conjurer named Everard, and the second was the figure of a giant. The Dragon which appears to Poradge, was described as "very Terrible," and very large, taking up most of his bed chamber, with "great Teeth and open Jaws, whence he often ejected Fire against [him]. (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Elemauzer   Familiar

An familiar allegedly kept by Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke, witches living in Manningtree, Essex. Elemauzer was "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Elimanzer   Devil in the shape of

A familiar devil that appears in the form of a white dog to Hellen Clark. Clark claims she fed Elimanzer with milk-pottage. (10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 10

Everard   Apparition

The disembodied spirit of a man named Everard, who is described as a "Reputed Conjurer" that allegedly appears to Dr. John Pordage in August of 1649 at his home in Bradfield in the county of Berkshire. "Everard is the first of three apparitions which appear to Pordage: the second is a giant and the third is a dragon. The apparition of Everard is seen to be wearing his normal "Apparel, Band, Cuffs, Hat, &c." When Pordage pulled back the curtains, this being "seemed to walk once through the Chamber very easily, and so Disappeared" (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Anonymous 244   Spirit

An evil spirit (Anonymous 244), aka "the Devil's instrument," who afflicts a woman living on Goswell Street (Anonymous 236). This woman's brother-in-law (Anonymous 236) decides to pursue this spirit in an attempt to exorcise her of it. On June 13, 1678, he prepares a fire, and "phasied the Evil Spirit to be got into a Stone-Bottle that hung over the fire," a bottle which roared loudly. The room he finds himself in becomes filled with unexplained smoke and fire. Anonymous 236 also hears a noise like a Clap of Thunder, or the report of a Cannon, and suffers a blow to the side of his head that makes him feel as if he has been stuck with awls (tools) or needles, which throws him to the ground. The Evil Spirit then departs up the Chimney, "carrying away the Pot-hangers and Bottle with him; but the Bottle came down again, still roaring and casting a dismal tract of Smoak, but not in any part broken." The spirit seems gone, or trapped in the bottle. After this incident, Anonymous 224 seems cured of her affliction. (5 - 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 5 - 7

Fancie   Spirit

A familiar from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear most often in the shape of a man, and sometimes in the shape of a bear, and to belong to Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. Tibb first appeared to Whittle when she was a guest of Elizabeth Southerns' where he provided a feast along with Southerns' familiar Tibb. At that feast, Southerns convinced Whittle to become a witch and accept Fancie as her familiar; at first, she would only let him suck from her. Fancie would appear to her regularly for the next four years, requesting her soul; at the end of those four years, she agreed. In exchange, he told her "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list," and commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie whenever she wanted something. She set him on Robert Nutter for making advances on her daughter Anne Redferne and threatening her with eviction when she refused him; Nutter was ill for about three months before finally dying. She also sent Fancie to kill Anthony Nutter's cow for favouring Elizabeth Southerns. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Fancie   Familiar

A familiar from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear most often in the shape of a man, and sometimes in the shape of a bear, and to belong to Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. Tibb first appeared to Whittle when she was a guest of Elizabeth Southerns' where he provided a feast along with Southerns' familiar Tibb. At that feast, Southerns convinced Whittle to become a witch and accept Fancie as her familiar; at first, she would only let him suck from her. Fancie would appear to her regularly for the next four years, requesting her soul; at the end of those four years, she agreed. In exchange, he told her "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list," and commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie whenever she wanted something. She set him on Robert Nutter for making advances on her daughter Anne Redferne and threatening her with eviction when she refused him; Nutter was ill for about three months before finally dying. She also sent Fancie to kill Anthony Nutter's cow for favouring Elizabeth Southerns. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Fancie   Devil in the shape of

A familiar from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear most often in the shape of a man, and sometimes in the shape of a bear, and to belong to Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. Tibb first appeared to Whittle when she was a guest of Elizabeth Southerns' where he provided a feast along with Southerns' familiar Tibb. At that feast, Southerns convinced Whittle to become a witch and accept Fancie as her familiar; at first, she would only let him suck from her. Fancie would appear to her regularly for the next four years, requesting her soul; at the end of those four years, she agreed. In exchange, he told her "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list," and commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie whenever she wanted something. She set him on Robert Nutter for making advances on her daughter Anne Redferne and threatening her with eviction when she refused him; Nutter was ill for about three months before finally dying. She also sent Fancie to kill Anthony Nutter's cow for favouring Elizabeth Southerns. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Fillie   Familiar

A familiar spirit in the form of a white cat which allegedly belonged to 'the strange woman' (Anonymous 116) for twenty years. (34, 85)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34, 85

Fletcher's boy 1   Spirit

One of two of Elizabeth Fletcher's two spirits who often appears in the shape of a boy and who torments Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax (59-61)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 59-61

Fletcher's boy 2   Spirit

One of two of Elizabeth Fletcher's two spirits who often appears in the shape of a boy and who torments Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax (59-61)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 59-61

Frog   Familiar

One of three familiar spirits, two mice and one frog, allegedly owned by Joan Cooper. Frog, a Frog spirit, may be the imp Cooper sent to kill "two of John Cartwrights children," who die within two or three weeks, and "to destroy the wife of one George Parby of Much-Holland aforesaid, which did kill her within three dayes after." (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Furze (Ghost)   Spirit

The ghost of the father of Mr. Philip Furze, who allegedly appears to the servant Francis Fey in Spreyton, in the county of Devon. The ghost approaches Francis Fey, "with a Pole or Staff in his hand, resembling that he was wont to carry when living, to kill the moles withal." He tells Francis Fey not to fear him, for he seeks only to have "several Legacies which by his Testament he had bequeathed were unpaid," be fulfilled. This includes giving ten shillings to two persons, one of whom is dead, and so the money went to the next relation. The specter also asked that twenty shillings be given to "a Gentlewoman, Sister to the deceased," and promised to leave the servant boy alone should this be fulfilled. The specter also speaks of his second wife, also deceased, as "a wicked woman," though she was otherwise generally "esteemed [...] a very good woman." After Francis Fey attempts to fulfill these wishes, the specter visits him, and learns that the Gentlewoman refused to accept the shillings, as she believed they were "sent her from the Devil." The specter replied that Francis Fey must go to Totnes, and "buy for her a Ring of that value," which she would then accept. This comes to pass, and the old Gentleman "hath seemed to be a rest, having never given the young man any further trouble." (177 - 179)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 177 - 179

George   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a dog and is allegedly kept by John Palmer. George appears to Palmer after he participated in a malefic compact with the Devil, and is accompanied by another familiar named Jezebell, who appears in the form of a woman. This familiar was possibly responsible for an attack on Mr. Cleavers' horse. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 3-4

Germany   Familiar

An evil spirit familiar in the form of a gray cat that allegedly belongs to Rebecca West. West is indicted on charges of entertaining, employing, and feeding Germany for the purpose of witchcraft and sorcery, but does not appear to have been prosecuted or found guilty on these charges. WItnesses to her case include John Cutler and Thomas Hart (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914

Gibbe   Familiar

A large black cat spirit; the familiar spirit of Jennit Dribble. (33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33

Gille   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a black cat, and is allegedly kept by Mother Devell. Gille is used to aid Mother Devell in her witchcraft, and is fed daily with a mixture of milk and Mother Devells blood. (10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 10

Ginnie   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a kitten and is allegedly kept by Mother Margaret. Ginnie is fed with crumbs of bread and Mother Margarets blood. (11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 11

Greate Dicke   Spirit

One of three spirits allegedly kept by Ellen Smith of Maldon. Smiths son claimed that his mother kept the spirits, named Willet, Great Dicke, and Little Dicke, in a wool pack, wicker bottle, and leather bottle respectively. When Smiths house was searched authorities found the bottles and pack, but the spirits had vanished away. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 8

Greedigut   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a greyhound, and is allegedly kept by witches living in Manningtree, Essex (either Jane Wallis, Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke). Greedigut is "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. Greedigut also appears with Grizzel, and the two also appear as humanoids to Joan Wallis of Keyston in Huntingdonshire. Wallis alleged in her confession that Greedigut and Grizzel had been given to her by a spirit calling himself Blackeman; she described them as dogs with bridles of hog's hair, and said they would come to her with Blackeman bearing two or three shillings at a time. Edward Wingfield alleged that Willis told him Greedigut and Grizzel would suck from her body where marks had been found, they sometimes took forms other than those of dogs, and that once they had pulled a man from his horse to rob him of his money. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Anonymous 193   Apparition

A green angel that appears to Thomas Darling, along with a green cat, while he is having a violent fit. Darling claims the green angel troubled him, a statement that lead his friends to believe a "lightnes in his head" was causing him to say such things. (1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

Anonymous 193   Spirit

A green angel that appears to Thomas Darling, along with a green cat, while he is having a violent fit. Darling claims the green angel troubled him, a statement that lead his friends to believe a "lightnes in his head" was causing him to say such things. (1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

Anonymous 192   Apparition

A green cat that appears to Thomas Darling, along with green angels in the window, while he is having a violent fit. Darling claims the green cat troubled him, a statement that lead his friends to believe a "lightnes in his head" was causing him to say such things. (1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

Grissill   Spirit

One of three familiar spirits from Raunds in Northampton, alleged to belong to Arthur BIll. Their shape, use and the conditions of their upkeep are unknown; Bill is said to have given this one the name Grissill. (C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C4

Grizzel   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a greyhound, and is allegedly kept by witches living in Manningtree, Essex (either Jane Wallis, Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke). Grizzel is "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. Grizzell also appears with Greedigut, and the two also appear as humanoids to Joane Wallis of Keyston in Huntingdonshire. Wallis alleged in her confession that Greedigut and Grizzel had been given to her by a spirit calling himself Blackeman; she described them as dogs with bridles of hog's hair, and said they would come to her with Blackeman bearing two or three shillings at a time. Edward Wingfield alleged that Willis told him Greedigut and Grizzel would suck from her body where marks had been found, and that once they had pulled a man from his horse to rob him of his money. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Gyant   Apparition

The apparition of a giant which appears to Dr. John Pordage in August of 1649 at his home in Bradfield in the county of Berkshire. It is the second apparition which comes into his bed chamber at night, the first was the spectral appearance of a known conjurer named Everard, and the third was that of a dragon. This apparition has a "great Sword in his Hand without a Scabbard," which he appeared to flourish against Pordage, and appeared to have "the figurative similitude of a green Tree lying by him." This haunting lasted approximately a half hour, before the apparition vanished. (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Gyles   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a cat or a thick dark substance a foot in height shaped like a sugar loaf, and to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of Gyles. Barthram sends Gyles to torment Joan Jorden after her toad sprits fail, and he comes into her chamber through the chimney in the night to scrape and knock at the walls and shuffle through the rushes. He also clapped her on the cheeks to awaken her, kissed her several times while slavering on her, and sat on her breast to press her so she could not speak. At other times he held her hands so she could not stir, and her voice so she could not speak. He "spake and vttered many thinges," as witnessed by Symon Fox and numerous others. In answer to the questions put to him, he claimed to have come for Joan's life, to be a boy, to have belonged to Doll Barthram for as long as 20 years, and that Barthram gave him her life and her soul. He also said that he, along with fellow familiars Tom and J., hanged Caver's wife at Barthram's command, but only after he failed to drown her by leading her into a flooded ditch. Gyles also told of how he, also by Barthram's command, killed a child, in the womb of the mother, by nipping out the braines; and that hee entred into another partie and killed him, by tearing his heart in peeces." Shortly thereafter, the woman's pregnancy ended in a stillbirth, and the man died strangely. In addition to killing Jordan, Gyles was also charged with tearing John Sheereman to pieces, and with killing Symon Fox, and his wife, children and cattle. (93-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 93-96

Hercules   Other

One of two familiars, allegedly owned by Cecily Sellis which her son, John Sellis describes as "like his sister" with "eyes as big as himself" and that his brother John describes as "big as his sister" with eyes like "vnto goose eyes." Hercules (alias John, Jack, Sotheons) is a black male imp which allegedly became unruly and attacked John one night, grabbing him by the leg or the toe, leaving a mark. This attack caused some conflict in the family; Henry Sellis Sr. yelled at his wife, and when Henry Sellis Jr. told his mother he was afraid, she yelled at him. Between the two boys, the story emerges that Hercules lives with his own sister imp on a soft padding of wool, nestled into the roots of a crab apple tree. She is fed milk with a wooden spoon from a wooden bowl by both of the boys' parents, Henry Sr. and Cicily Sellis, and is sent to hurt Richard Rosse's maid before sent away, or sold for two pennies. (D2-D2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D2-D2v

Hisse Hisse   Familiar

A familiar from Stathorne in the County of Leicestershire, allegedly belonging to Ellen Greene; this spirit appeared in the form of a Moledewarp, or mole. Ellen Greene claimed to have received this spirit, and one other in the form of a kitten, from Joan Willimott, and that Willimott had named it Hisse Hisse. Hisse Hisse would sit on her left shoulder and suck from her neck beneath her ear. Greene sent Hisse Hisse to bewitch several people to death, including the Anne Dawse, a husbandman's son named Robert WIlliman, Mrs. Patchett and the Patchett's child. In exchange for Hisse Hisse's services, Greene gave her soul to the Devil and let Hisse Hisse suck from her at the change and full of the moon. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Holt   Familiar

An imp familiar in the form of a white kitten that is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke. Although Holt is only ever mentioned by Hopkins, and is not mentioned in the other accusations against Clarke, he is named as part of the legal indictment against her, and she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, end feeding Holt, with the "intention of obtaining [its] help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices." Clarke is hanged on a different charge. This may the familiar represented as Anonymous 49. (2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

Hornet   Familiar

An familiar spirit allegedly belonging to Mary Johnson. This familar is manifest by making the deafening buzz of a hornet. It torments George Durrant, making him shriek, sweat, swell, and otherwise lay "in a great extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Imp 6   Spirit

An imp that is allegedly employed by Aubrey Grinset of Dunwich in the County of Suffolk. Grinset is alleged to have sent this imp to cause Thomas Spatchet's fits, which was done at the Devil's urging. (19, 20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19, 20

Anonymous 176 (plural)   Other

A group of imps that are allegedly kept by Joan Peachey. According to testimony given by Ales Hunt, Peachey threatened and demanded obedience from the imps, and that Peachey was also skilled and cunning in witchery. (11-12)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 11-12

Anonymous 211 (plural)   Other

A group of imps that appear in various forms, including kittens, and are allegedly kept by Mother Benefield, Mother Goodwin, Anne West, and Rebecca West. The imps are commanded by these women to kill a horse, a cow, and a child (Anonymous 193). (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Inges   Familiar

A white spotted cat; the familiar spirit belonging to Margaret Waite's daughter. (33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33

Jack   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and like Jack, is one of the spirits invoked through a magic circle which she cast with Mother Humfrye of Maplested. The two spirits make Cunny promise to "giue them her soule for their trauaile, for otherwise: they would doo nothing for her," which she promised to do. She sent them to "milke Hurrelles Beastes," however, they refused to share the milk with her. Although she had attempted unsuccessfully to bewitch Minister Kitchin Minister and the shoemaker George Coe, Jack and Jyll bewitched the miller, William Unglee and his servant, Barnabie Griffyn. Jack accompanies Cunny's grandson to Sir Edward Huddlestones property, where Jack extracted a "mighty Oke-tree," from the ground "by the roots: and no winde at all stirring at this time." (A3-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3-A4v

Jack (3)   Familiar

One of three familiar spirits, two mice and one frog, allegedly owned by Joan Cooper. Jack, a mouse spirit, may be the imp Cooper sent to kill "a child of one Thomas Woodward, which her said Imp did kill within a fortnight after." (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Jacke   Familiar

One of three familiar spirits from Raunds in Northampton, alleged to belong to Arthur BIll. Their shape, use and the conditions of their upkeep are unknown; Bill is said to have given this one the name Jacke. (C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C4

Jacke (2)   Familiar

One of two min-horse spirits which, according to her daughter, Feby Hunt, allegedly belong to Ales Hunt of St. Osyth, in the county of Essex. This familiar, Jacke, is said to be black. Febey contends that Jacke and its white-colored sibling are "kept in a litle lowe earthen pot with woll, colour white and blacke," kept by her mother's bedside, and fed with "milke out of a blacke trening dishe." She walks the constables through her home, pointing to their shelf and the dish which they ate from (which the constables confiscated.) Although she did "also confesse that her mother had charged her not to tell any thing," Feby also contends that her mother sent both her familiars to Hayward of Frowicke, but to what end shee can not tell, & shee being asked howe she knew the same, saieth, that shee hard her mother bid them to go." Hunt later confesses, on her knees and in tears, to having Jacke and its partner Robbin, but claimed that both of them had abandoned her, "and willed her therefore to shift for her selfe. And so they went from her, and sithence this Examinate saith shee sawe them not." (C3-C3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C3-C3v

James   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of mouse and allegedly belongs to Anne Cate, alias Maidenhood, of Much Holland in the county of Essex, given to her in approximately 1623 by her mother, Anonymous 345. This may be the familiar which Cate sends to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman," laming him immediately, and contributing to his death within six months. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Jarmara   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the forms of "a sandee spannel" and a tan spaniel, and allegedly belongs to Elizabeth Clarke. Hopkins describes him as kept fat off Elizabeth Clarke's blood. Although Jarama is only ever mentioned by Hopkins and Edward Parsely as discovered in terms of her being watched, and is not mentioned in the criminal accusations against Clarke, he is named as part of the legal indictment against her, and she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, end feeding Jamara, with the "intention of obtaining their help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices." Clarke is hanged on a different charge. (6-10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6-10

Jay   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a bird, and is allegedly kept by Margaret Grewe. According to witnesses John Panant, Ellen Mayer, and Elizabeth Hunt, Grewe named the bird Jay, and possibly used it to bring about the instantaneous death of John Munt. After her indictment Grewe pled not guilty, but was found guilty and executed by hanging. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341098)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341098

Jeso   Familiar

One of three black mole shaped familiars which allegedly belongs to Anne Cooper and "suckled on the lower parts of her body." This familiar is allegedly sent by Cooper to kill Gregory and Joan Rous' child, Mary, who was "strangely taken sick, and languishing, and within a short time died. Panu also appears with moles named Jeso and Wynowe. Wynowe may have been presumed to be involved in John Curstissurre's bewitchment. (22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

Jesus   Familiar

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jockey, Sandy, Mris. Elizabeth, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Jezebell   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a woman and is allegedly kept by John Palmer. Jezebell appears to Palmer after he participated in a malefic compact with the Devil, and is accompanied by another familiar named George, who appears in the form of a dog. This familiar was possibly involved with the killing of one of Mr. Cleaver's horses. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 3-4

Jockey   Familiar

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jockey, Sandy, Mris. Elizabeth, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Jockey (2)   Familiar

One of two familiar spirits that are allegedly kept by Joyce Boanes. Boanes is accused of entertaining and feeding "two evill spirittes, one called Jockey and the other Rugge." Boanes pleads not guilty to the charges, but is ultimately found guilty and executed by hanging in 1645. WItnesses to the case include Robert Turner, Elizabeth Parker, and Rose Handkin. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341174)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341174

Jone   Familiar

A familiar from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear in the form of a brown mouse with a white belly, which allegedly appeared to Anne Desborough in the company of another mouse-spirit, this one entirely brown, which had appeared to her before. The two mouse-spirits demanded to suck her blood; Desborough agreed, denied God and promised them her soul on her death. She later named this mouse-spirit Jone (the first was named Tib); it promised to hurt cattle at her bidding, but was never asked to. Jone appeared to her daily to suck her blood. (10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Jude   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Dicke, Jude was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Jude   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Dicke, Jude was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Jyll   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits (of nine in total) which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny, of Stisted, Essex, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, which are said to "sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Like Jack, Jyll is one of the spirits invoked through a magic circle which she cast with Mother Humfrye of Maplested. The two spirits make Cunny promise to "giue them her soule for their trauaile, for otherwise: they would doo nothing for her," which she promised to do. She sent them to "milke Hurrelles Beastes," however, they refused to share the milk with her. Although she had attempted unsuccessfully to bewitch Minister Kitchin Minister and the shoemaker George Coe, Jack and Jyll bewitched the miller, William Unglee and his servamt, Barnabie Griffyn. Jyll also lamed a local boy, Anonymous 64. Most grievously, however, Jyll is said to have killed two year old Susan Glascock. (A3-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3-A4v

Anonymous 210 (plural)   Familiar

A group of imps that appear in the form of kittens and belong to Mother Benefield. Benefield states that the imps are her children, which "she had by as handsome a man as any was in England." Benefield sends the imps to kill a horse, a cow, and a child (Anonymous 193). (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Ladies of Scalding   Other

Three furies who appear before Joseph Buxford in Hell. They are "attending upon" two men being tortured in Hell, Greenvile and Goring, who served in the "Malignant Army" Joseph Buxford wants to join. Their office is known as the Ladies of Scalding, and they pour acomite down the throats of Greenvile and Goring. (4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Lilly   Spirit

A familiar spirit from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appears in the form of a white puppy, and known to belong to Elizabeth Weed. Lilly's function is to cause harm to people whenever Weed desires it; in this capacity Lilly was sent to kill Henry Bedell, but was unable to due to lack of power. Lilly succeeded, however, in killing Bedell's child. Weed also set Lilly on Edward Musgraves, but Lilly was unable to kill him. (1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Little Devil   Devil in the shape of

The devil appears in the form of two birds, one named Little Devil and the other Partner, which Old Alice allegedly uses to torment Mildred Norrington, and to kill Edward Anger, Richard Anger, and Wolton's wife. (72)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 72

Little Dicke   Spirit

One of three spirits allegedly kept by Ellen Smith of Maldon. Smiths son claimed that his mother kept the spirits, named Willet, Great Dicke, and Little Dicke, in a wool pack, wicker bottle, and leather bottle respectively. When Smiths house was searched authorities found the bottles and pack, but the spirits had vanished away. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Little Robin   Devil

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. She recognized this spirit as Little Robin. The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Little Robin   Spirit

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. She recognized this spirit as Little Robin. The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Littleman   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a mouse allegedly owned and used by Marian Hocket. Hocket is searched and has no discernible witch's marks, yet she is found guilty of entertainging, employing, and feeding "three evil spirits in the form "of a mowse" called Littleman, "of a mowse" called Pretttyman and "of a mowse" called Daynty." (29-31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31

Lyerd   Familiar

A male familiar which appears in the shape of a red lion or a hare, which belongs to Elizabeth Bennet. She allegedly sends it to "plague Fortunes wife and his chylde," to Bonners' wife "to plague her," to lame William Bonner's wife on the knee, lips, and eyes, plagues two of "Byets beastes [...] the one a red Cow, the other a blacke" to death. Both Suckin and Lyerd pursued Bennett relentlessly before she finally agreed to engage their services. Suckin and Lyerd stalked her through an entire bread making process, from grinding the grain at the mill, where they first appeared They first came to her at the mill, stopping her in her tracks and refusing to let her move for over two hours, on her way home, while she sifted the meal (and stayed with her as she added the yeast), returned as she kneaded her bread, again as she prepared her fire (and again as she stoked it). Finally, they had enough. Bennett testified that they "tooke this examinat by the hippes, and saide, seeing thou wilt not be ruled, thou shalt haue a cause, & would haue thrust this examinat into ye burning Ouen, & so had (as this examinat saith) but for the foresaide forke, but this examinat striuing and dooing what shee coulde to her vttermost, the saide spirite burnt her arme, the which burning is apparaunt and euidently too bee seene." They did corrupt her finally, however, when she sought revenge on Byet. Byet "had oftentimes misused her this examinat and her Cattell." Bennett confessed to sending Lyerd to plague his black cow and his red cow to death. Suckin, however, acted on Bennett's behalf (or so it claimed) but not at her behest, when it "plagued y^ said Byets wife to the death," alleging that "I knowe that Byet and his wife haue wronged thee greatly, and doone thee seuerall hurtes, and beaten thy swyne, and thrust a pytchforke in one of them." In for a penny, and outraged that Byet has called "her olde trot, old whore, and other lewde speaches," Bennett finally gave in entirely to temptation and "caused the spirite, called Suckin, to goe and plague the sayde Willyam Byette where that woulde: The which the sayd spyrite did, and at the retourne of it, it tolde this Examinate, that it met Byet in the barne yarde, and that it had plagued him in the hippes, euen vnto death." Bennett finally theorizes that she suspected that Mother Turner has deliberately unleashed this mini-plague on her after she refused to give Turner milk; Cecilly Sellis also mentions Mother Turner (Joan Turner) as being one of the possible refuges her familiars, Robin, Jack, the William, and Puppet (alias Mamet) sought when she was indicted. (B2v, B4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2v, B4

Margaret   Other

One of three familiars described as being in the shape of black moles without a tails, which were allegedly given to Rebecca Jones by a man in a ragged suit with great eyes. It is fed with blood and milk and may have been the one to to "kill a Sowe of one Benjamin Howes of Little-Clacton in the County aforesaid; and the said Sowe was killed by the said Impe accordingly."Jones allegedly sent this familiar to kill Thomas Bumstead, who dies three weeks later, after Bumstead beat her son for eating his honey. (36, 37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37-38

Mary Johnson Apparition   Apparition

The apparition of Mary Johnson which appears to Annaball Durrant. After seeing this apparition, in the rather inauspicious location of an outhouse, Durrant is struck stiff, lame, and mute. She remains in this condition for around two weeks before regaining her health. (24)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24

Mawde   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad, allegedly kept by Mother Dutton which she names Mawde. Mawde lives in the border of green herbs within Mother Duttons garden, is fed with blood drawn from her owne flancke, and can allegedly tell every man's errand on sight. (9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 9-10

Mercury   Other

One of two familiars, allegedly owned by Cecily Sellis which her son, John Sellis describes as "like his sister" with "eyes as big as himself" and that his brother John describes as "big as his sister," with eyes like "vnto goose eyes." Mercury is apparently a white female imp. Between the two boys, the story emerges that Mercury lives with her own brother imp Hercules (alias John, Jack, Sotheons), on a soft padding of wool, nestled into the roots of a crab apple tree. Mercury is fed milk with a wooden spoon from a wooden bowl by both of the boys' parents, Henry Sr. and Cicily Sellis, and is sent to hurt Richard Rosse's maid before being sent away, or sold for two pennies. (D2-D2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D2-D2v

Anonymous 208   Apparition

An apparition alleged to have appeared in Richard Galis' room at midnight, taking the form of a large, shadowy black cat approaching his bed. The cat is only seen by Galis; he believes it to be a transformed witch due to his brother James' encounter with Mother Dutton at the age of fifteen. Galis claims to be visited numerous times by this apparition, adding later in the account that it may instead be the Devil himself in the cat's likeness. (5-6)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 5-6

Minnie   Familiar

A spirit in the form of a partially coloured red and white dog who belongs to Alice Goodridge that she sends to torment Thomas Darling (29)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 29

Minny   Devil

A devil that appears to Alice Gooderidge, the Witch of Stapen Hill, in the form of "a little partie-colored dog red and white" that she calls Minny. Gooderidge confesses to using Minny for revenge purposes, specifically to torment Thomas Darling "in euerie part of his bodie" after he called Gooderidge a witch. Gooderidge also confesses that Minny "followed the boy [Thomas Darling] to Burton" and told Gooderidge that he had fulfilled her request for revenge. Minny also allegedly stayed with Gooderidge "two nights at Burton Hall," where he continually scratched her head and "scrapeth in the straw." John Darrell, who allegedly dispossessed Darling, also claims that Gooderidge sent Minny to torment the boy. (26)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 26

Anonymous 199   Monster

A disfigured baby born of Margaret Mere of Maidstone, Kent. The baby is born "being a man child [and] had first the mouth slitted on the right side like a Libardes mouth, " with "the left arme lying vpon the brest [...] hauing as it were stumps on the handes." Additionally, the baby's left leg was "growing vpward toward the head, and the ryght led bending toward the left leg [and] the foote thereof growing into the buttocke of the sayd left leg. In the midst of the backe there was a broade lump of flesh in fasion like a Rose." The baby's deformities are attributed to the child's illegitimacy and its mother's wickedness. The baby only lives for twenty three hours (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Forme and Shape of a Monstrous Child, Borne at Maydstone in Kent. London: 1568, 1

Anonymous 200   Monster

A male baby, born of Anthony Smith's wife, that has no limbs or tongue. Upon its birth, the baby had "neyther hande, foote, leege, nor arme, but on the left syde it hath a Stumpe growynge out of the shoulder, and the ende thereof is rounde, and not so long as it should go to the elbowe, and on the ryghte syde no mencion of any thing where any arme should be, but a litel stumpe of one ynche in length." The baby is said to be cursed by its illegitimacy, with both its mother and father being married and having had children previously with other people. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The True Reporte of the Forme and Shape of a Monstrous Childe, borne at Muche Horkesleye. London: 1562, 1

Anonymous 201   Monster

A stillborn baby born of a young woman (Anonymous 20). The baby "was born, but dead, and there it was shewed, and from thence caryed into the Church-yard a day or two after, and there buried." The baby was considered a monster, likely because of an unmentioned deformity. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration of a Strange and Wonderful Monster: Born in Kirkham parish in Lancashire. London: 1646, 4

Anonymous 202   Monster

A lump of deformed flesh, born by Anonymous 24. The deformities, the result of a curse, are described as being "both hee and shee, borne without a nose, without hands and feet or legs, one eare, and that grew inthe neck, and where the legs and armes should have beene, there grew pieces of flesh and no bones nor [j]oints." Although the baby is born alive, it soon died after birth, although its mother continued to live. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 196   Monster

A monster found by John Vandael of Amersfoort inside the entrails of a dead cow. The monster has a head "like an Otters head, but rounder; it had the nose and mouth of a man, but eares like vnto a Dogge, yet the shape of the eyes resembled much a mans." Additionally, the monster also has "a huge long tongue, like vnto a Cow or some other beast of that kinde," as well as a "fleshy colour" and a mouth "all growne about with hayre." (9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Two Remarkable and True Histories, which Happened this Present Year, 1619. London: 1620, 9-10

Anonymous 194   Other

A monstrous fish that was found in the county of Chester. This fish is reported to be twenty yards and one foot in length, and five yards in height. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Description of a strange (and miraculous) fish cast upon the sands in the meads. Unknown: 1690, 1

Mounsier   Familiar

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Collyn, and Christ. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. ()

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645,

Anonymous 195   Devil in the shape of

A mouse-like spirit that Robert Aldridge witnesses running up William Sommers' leg and then into his belly, causing it to "swell to a verie great quantitie, twise so big as his bodie." After the mouse spirit enters Sommers' body "remayned there for the space of a quarter of an houre." (22)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, 22

Mris. Elizabeth   Familiar

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Ned   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits (of nine in total) which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Newes   Familiar

An imp familiar that appears in the form of a polecat with a slightly bigger head, and is allegedly conjured by Elizabeth Clarke. Although Newes is mentioned by Hopkins as discovered in terms of her being watched, a mysterious pole-cat sounding shriek is mentioned by Richard Edwards, in reference to Elizabeth Clarke and Rebecca West. Newes does not appear in the Elizabeth Clarke's legal indictment. However, a Newes does appear in the legal indictment against Rebecca West. West is accused entertaining, employng, and feeding "'a white katt' called Newes" with the "intention of getting [its] help in withcraft and sorcery." (2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

Nicholas   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits (of nine in total) which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Partner   Devil in the shape of

The Devil appears in the form of two birds, one named Little Devil and the other Partner, which Old Alice allegedly has owned for over twenty years and which she keeps in two bottles, hidden under the all at the back of her home in Westwell and buried in the ground in Kensington. Partner is used to torment Mildred Norrington, causing "delaies, [such] as roring, crieng, striving, and gnashing of teeth; and otherwhile with mowing, and other terrible countenances, and was so strong in the maid, that foure men could scarse hold hir downe." Partner had attacked Norrington eight times over the course of a year, striking, in the garden, in the hall, in her bed, the field, in the court, in the water, (where he "cast hir into the moat"), and again in her bed. He also attacked her in the vicarage and in the loft at Westwell. Partner is also used to kill Edward Anger, Richard Anger, and Wolton's wife. Norrington later retracted her possession. (72)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 72

Peckin the Crown   Familiar

An imp familiar allegedly kept by a coven of witches living in Manningtree, Essex. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Phillip   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a rat, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Stile. Philip is fed with crumbs of bread and blood drawn from Stiles right wrist, an act that has evidently left permanent marks on her skin. At one time, Philip provided Stile with milk and cream when she was unable to beg any. (11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 11

Pigin   Familiar

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Tyttey, appears in the shape of black female toad. Kempe also claims that her female familiars "were to punishe with lamenes, and other diseases of bodyly harm: and also to destroy cattell." Pigin does not appear to have done these things with Pigin, however. Kempe later confessed that she sent Pigin to punish "Letherdalls Childe" and then "burst out in teares and fell vpon her knees, and asked forgiuenesse of the sayde Letherdalls wife." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Pretty   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Goadby in the County of Leicestershire, described as a fairy and known to appear as a woman. Joan Willimott named it Pretty and alleged in her examination that William Berry gave her this spirit by blowing into her mouth, and that Berry urged her to give Pretty her soul. Pretty is said to come to Willimott weekly, and would "tell her of diuers persons that were stricken and forespoken," which Willimott would then seek to help through prayers. Pretty appeared in an ugly form the Friday before Willimott's examination, to tell Willimott that a woman at Deeping had given her soul to the Devil; Pretty then requested a piece of Willimott's girdle. Willimott claimed that she had only sent Pretty out once, to check on Francis Lord Rosse's well-being, and that Pretty had reported he was improving. (E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v-E3

Pretty (2)   Familiar

A familiar from the County of Huntingdon, known to take the shape of a little black puppy, whom Margaret Simon allegedly gave to Francis Moore for the purpose of killing any animal Moore chose to curse. Simon told Moore "that she must keep that dog all her lifetime." Pretty was used to kill two cows, the first belonging to Edward Hull and the second belonging to Peter Browne, after the cows got into her field and ate her grain and corn respectively. Pretty caused Hull's cow to swell before dying. Moore claimed that she had killed Pretty the year before her examination, but that the dog had been haunting her, and crept under her clothes after Moore was apprehended to torture her so she couldn't speak to confess freely. (5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Pretty-man   Familiar

A familiar in the shape of a mouse allegedly owned and used by Marian Hocket. Hocket is searched and has no discernible witch's marks, yet she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, and feeding "three evil spirits in the form "of a mowse" called Littleman, "of a mowse" called Pretttyman and "of a mowse" called Daynty." (29-31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31

Prickeare   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of mouse, and allegedly belongs to Anne Cate, alias Maidenhood, of Much Holland in the county of Essex, given to her in approximately 1623 by her mother, Anonymous 345. This may be the familiar which Cate sends to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman," laming him immediately, and contributing to his death within six months. Cate claims she sent Prickeare to kill John Tillet, and to kill Susan, the daughter of John Rawlins (John Rowlandson) of Much-Holland, a crime for which she was convicted. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Prickeare (2)   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a mouse, which Bridge Mayers allegedly "did enterteine, employ, and feede." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341202)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341202

Prickeare (3)   Familiar

One of three familiar spirits, two mice and one frog, allegedly owned by Joan Cooper. Prickeare, a mouse spirit, may be the imp Cooper sent to kill "a child of one Thomas Woodward, which her said Imp did kill within a fortnight after." (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Priscill   Spirit

A familiar spirit from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appears in the form of a black puppy, and known to belong to Elizabeth Weed. Priscill's function is to cause harm to cattle whenever Weed desires it; in this capacity Priscill killed two horses belonging to Edward Musgrave, one horse belonging to John Musgrave, one cow belonging to William Musgraves, and one cow belonging to Thomas Thorpe. (1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Puppet   Familiar

One of four imps that allegedly belong to Alice Manfield, which were gifted to her by Margaret Grevell. According to information given by Richard Rosse, Manfield called her imps Robin, Jack, William, and Puppet. The imps are described as "two shees" and "two hees," with all four being "like vnto blacke Cats," which Manfield kept "in a boxe with woll" upon a shelf by her bed; the imps are fed with blood they suck from Manfield's body, as well as bread and beer when they do her bidding. The imps perform a variety of tasks for Manfield: Robin and Puppet are sent on separate occasions to plague Joan Cheston's cattle after Cheston and Manfield had a falling out; Jack is sent, two years after Robin is sent to plague cattle, to plague Joan Cheston's husband, Robert Cheston, to death; William informs Manfield, the day before her apprehension, that she will be captured and "called in question," and also destroys stores of food and drink. (61-67)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 61-67

Pusse   Spirit

A familiar from Stathorne in the County of Leicestershire, allegedly belonging to Ellen Greene; this spirit appeared in the form of a kitlin, or kitten. Ellen Greene claimed to have received this spirit, and one other in the form of a mole, from Joan Willimott, and that Willimott had named it Pusse. Pusse would sit on her right shoulder and suck from her neck beneath her ear. Greene sent Pusse to bewitch several people to death, including the Baker for the town of Goadby (Anonymous 65), a husbandman named Willison, Mrs. Patchett and the Patchett's child. In exchange for Pusse's services, Greene gave her soul to the Devil and let Pusse suck from her at the change and full of the moon. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Pusse   Familiar

A familiar from Stathorne in the County of Leicestershire, allegedly belonging to Ellen Greene; this spirit appeared in the form of a kitlin, or kitten. Ellen Greene claimed to have received this spirit, and one other in the form of a mole, from Joan Willimott, and that Willimott had named it Pusse. Pusse would sit on her right shoulder and suck from her neck beneath her ear. Greene sent Pusse to bewitch several people to death, including the Baker for the town of Goadby (Anonymous 65), a husbandman named Willison, Mrs. Patchett and the Patchett's child. In exchange for Pusse's services, Greene gave her soul to the Devil and let Pusse suck from her at the change and full of the moon. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Pyewacket   Familiar

A familiar allegedly kept by Jane Wallis, Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke, witches living in Manningtree, Essex. Pyewacket was "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Anonymous 205   Devil in the shape of

A rat that appears to James Barrow and enters his body, causing him to look and act like a Changeling (a fairy child). Barrow's Master "caused him to rise and put on his clothes, and a very good dinner was provided, but [Barrow] not a bit could he eat." (9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 207 (plural)   Apparition

A group of rats that appear to James Barrow during his fits and tempt him with food and wine. When Barrow will not eat or drink the temptations the rats demand his soul. (5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

Anonymous 209   Spirit

A spirit that appears in the form of a red dog, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke. Elizabeth sends the spirit to Mr. Long to make him fall off his horse and break his neck, which it fails to do. According to Goodwife Clarke, the red dog spirit did not perform its task "because the power of God was above the power of the Devil." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 5

Robbin   Familiar

One of two mini-horse spirits which, according to her daughter, Feby Hunt, allegedly belong to Ales Hunt of St. Osyth, in the county of Essex. This familiar, Robbin, is said to be white. Febey contends that Robbin and its black-colored sibling, Jacke, are "kept in a litle lowe earthen pot with woll, colour white and blacke," kept by her mother's bedside, and fed with "milke out of a blacke trening dishe." She walks the constables through her home, pointing to their shelf and the dish which they ate from (which the constables confiscated.) Although she did "also confesse that her mother had charged her not to tell any thing," Feby also contends that her mother sent both her familiars to Hayward of Frowicke, but to what end shee can not tell, & shee being asked howe she knew the same, saieth, that shee hard her mother bid them to go." Hunt later confesses, on her knees and in tears, to having Jacke and its partner Robbin, but claimed that both of them had abandoned her, "and willed her therefore to shift for her selfe. And so they went from her, and sithence this Examinate saith shee sawe them not." (C3-C3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C3-C3v

Robbyn   Familiar

One of two familiars which appears in the shape of a toad, and is allegedly given to Margery Sammon in a "wicker basket, more then half full of white and blacke wooll" by her mother, the Widow Barnes on the day she died (February 12, 1582). Sammon confesses she was instructed to feed and keep them (she does not appear to have used them to commit any felonies) and to feed them with milk, lest they get hungry and drink her blood. Sammon "fed them twise out of a dyshe with mylk," but does not claim to have kept them long. Mother Barnes allegedly suggested to Sammon that she should send the familiars to Mother Pechey if she did not want them, and that Pechey "is a Witch, and will bee glad of them." After hearing that Ursula Kempe was apprehended as a witch, Sammon claims to have taken the familiars, in a basket to a field, released them, and "bad them goe to the sayde Mother Pechey," who Sammon claims may well have them. (C4-C4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4-C4v

Robin   Familiar

One of four imps that allegedly belong to Alice Manfield, which were gifted to her by Margaret Grevell. According to information given by Richard Rosse, Manfield called her imps Robin, Jack, William, and Puppet. The imps are described as "two shees" and "two hees," with all four being "like vnto blacke Cats," which Manfield kept "in a boxe with woll" upon a shelf by her bed; the imps are fed with blood they suck from Manfield's body, as well as bread and beer when they do her bidding. The imps perform a variety of tasks for Manfield: Robin and Puppet are sent on separate occasions to plague Joan Cheston's cattle after Cheston and Manfield had a falling out; Jack is sent, two years after Robin is sent to plague cattle, to plague Joan Cheston's husband, Robert Cheston, to death; William informs Manfield, the day before her apprehension, that she will be captured and "called in question," and also destroys stores of food and drink. (61-67)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 61-67

Robyn   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of mouse, and is allegedly kept by Anne Cate, alias Maidenhood, of Much Holland in the county of Essex, given to her in approximately 1623 by her mother, Anonymous 345. This may be the familiar which Cate sends to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman," laming him immediately, and contributing to his death within six months. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Rug   Familiar

A spirit in the form of a mouse that allegedly comes out of the mouth of Anne Ashby. During Ashby's examination, a groom who was present called Rug to come into his mouth, and a fortnight later the groom died near the City of London. (5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 5

Rug (2)   Familiar

One of two imps which came into Joyce Boanes' "bed to her in the likenesse of Mouses," and "sucked on [her] body." Rug, along with Anonymous 45 was used to kill ten or twelve of Richard Welch's lambs, and later to kill a Calf, a Sheep and a Lamb which belonged to Thomas Clynch. Rug was also used, in concert with Margaret Landish, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread's familiar, to torment and kill Robert Turner's servant; Rug's job was to make him bark like a dog. Rug also participated in the murder of ten or twelve of John Spall's sheep. Boanes was indicted and found guilty on charges of having entertained and fed Rug. She was hanged on this charge as a witch in 1645. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Rutterkin   Familiar

A familiar from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to appear in the form of a cat and have the name Rutterkin, and to allegedly belong to Joan Flower. To aid her bewitchment of Sir Francis Manners and his family, Flower would rub various objects belonging to Manners' family on Rutterkin. This included a glove from Henry Lord Rosse, another glove from Francis Lord Rosse, a handkerchief from Lady Katherine Manners, and wool from the mattress Countess Manners gave Margaret Flower with her severance. Rutterkin was thus instrumental in bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death, causing the illness of Francis Lord Rosse, and rendering Sir Francis and the Countess unable to conceive more children. However, Rutterkin could do nothing against Lady Katherine; when Flower tried, "Rutterkin whined and cryed Mew: whereupon shee said, that Rutterkin had no power ouer the Lady Katherine to hurt her." According to Phillip Flower, Rutterkin would leap onto Joan Flower's shoulder and suck from her neck. Margaret Flower alleged that Rutterkin was among the devils that "appeared vnto her in Lincolne layle, at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight." (F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Sacke   Devil in the shape of

A familiar that appears in the forms of a black rabbit, and is allegedly owned by Anne West of Lawford, Essex. This familiar may have been one of the one two familiars which Elizabeth Clark claimed also sucked on her, and which is represented in the wood cut of Matthew Hopkins, Anne West, and Elizabeth Clark. According to an unnamed man in Manningtree, this familiar may have also been one of the three or four rabbit shaped spirits he saw leaving Anne West's home one dusky morning. He caught one of them, tried to brain and drown it, but it would not die. Anne West claimed she had sent the familiars out on a different errand and seemed rather annoyed that this man was bothering her so early in the morning. (6, 39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6, 39-40

Sandy   Other

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Mris. Elizabeth, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Satan   Spirit

Satan in Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who allegedly causes an illness and pain in Mr. Hopkins, "as he thought with the Spleen." Mr. Hopkins experiences no melancholy with his illness, and claims is he is "possest" or "bewitcht." He continues in pain for some time, and "before he dyed, a piece of Wood came down into the rectum intestinum," which had to be pulled out using fingers. His wife attested that the piece of wood was "the length of ones finger," and she was sure "he never swallowed any such thing." It is concluded that Satan is responsible for Mr. Hopkin's pain and bewitchment. (60)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 60

Satan   Spirit

Satan appears to William Long and William Turner during the alleged exorcisms of Rachel Pindar and Agnes Brigges, and is turned away by them with nothing. He departs both girls, although later Rachel Pindar and Agnes Brigges admit to having fabricated their possessions. (4-11)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 4-11

Satan   Spirit

Satan (sometimes referred to as The Devil) possesses Richard Dugdale, causing him to experience many unnatural fits. Sometimes, Satan causes Richard Dugdale to "transform himself into an Angel of Light," during which time he recites sermons he has never heard; other times, Satan causes Richard Dugdale to display "Diabolical Rage and Blasphemy against God, and Christ, and the things of God." Often, Satan speaks through Richard Dugdale, and engages in arguments with Mr. Jolly, eventually declaring that Richard Dugdale signed a paper contract with him. Upon Richard Dugdale's deliverance, Satan exclaims, "Dicky, Thou hast this day narrowly escap'd me, and thou may'st thank my Tormentor as long as thou livest, and do for him all that lies in they power, by way of acknowledgment, since but for him thou hadst this day been carry'd to Hell" (46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

Sathan   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Hatfield Peverel, known to appear in various forms including a white spotted cat, a large dog and a toad. Sathan is said to speak in a strange, hollow voice, and to require a drop of blood for every deed requested of him; the pricks would leave a lasting red mark. He was used by several witches. Elizabeth Francis received Sathan as part of her induction into witchcraft; her grandmother Eve of Hatfield Peverel instructed her to give Sathan her blood, feed him with bread and milk, and to keep him in a basket. Francis first asked Sathan to make her "be ryche and to haue goodes," so he brought her 18 sheep, but these sheep soon wore away. Sathan also advised her to have sex with Andrew Byles, a wealthy man Francis desired for a husband, but he refused to marry her after. Furious, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and then kill him; Sathan also advised her on which herb to drink to abort her pregnancy. Francis later successfully married Christopher Francis, but their marriage was unhappy; Francis first had Sathan kill their infant daughter and later lame Christopher. Francis passed Sathan on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse in exchange for a cake about 15 years after receiving him. Mother Waterhouse used Sathan for numerous mischiefs against her neighbours, including killing livestock, spoiling a brewing, spoiling curds and causing death by illness; she rewarded him with a drop of blood and a chicken, which he ate down to the bones and feathers. Mother Waterhouse also had Sathan kill her husband, as she too had an unhappy marriage. Sathan would make her pray in Latin. Though Sathan came to her as a cat, Mother Waterhouse had him turned into a toad and kept him in a wool-pot. He allegedly had the gift of prophecy, warning her in advance of her apprehension and execution. Joan Waterhouse, Mother Waterhouse's daughter borrowed Sathan once when the neighbour's daughter, Agnes Brown, refused her bread and cheese. Sathan appeared in the form of a large dog with horns and demanded her body and soul in exchange for scaring Brown; Joan agreed. Brown claimed that Sathan came several times in the form of a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle appeared with the milkhouse key in its mouth and demanded butter; the last time the dog appeared he held a dagger in his mouth and identified himself as belonging to Mother Waterhouse. (9-13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-13

Scariot   Spirit

A spirit William Whycherly calls upon using a crystal. Scarlot has a "knowledge of thyngs stolen," and is used by Whycherly to restore people to their lost goods. ()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

Sparrow   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a Sparrow, and is allegedly kept by Anne Cate; the familiar was given to Cate in approximately 1620 by her mother. Cate claims that "to whomsoever shee sent the said Imp called Sparrow, it killed them presently." (34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34

Anonymous 204   Spirit

One of two spirits allegedly kept by Johane Harrison. Johane stated that she had two spirits attending "on her, one for men, another for cattell." These spirits are used to aid Johane in her witchcraft, in addition to the instrumental magic she performs with a needle and parchment. (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19

Anonymous 203   Spirit

One of two spirits allegedly kept by Johane Harrison. Johane stated that she had two spirits attending "on her, one for men, another for cattell." These spirits are used to aid Johane in her witchcraft, in addition to the instrumental magic she performs with a needle and parchment. (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19

Suckin   Familiar

A female familiar which appears in the shape of a black dog that belongs to Elizabeth Bennet. She allegedly sends Suckin to "plague one Willingall," who languished, sickened, and died, to William Willes' who also languished for years and died. Suckin and Lyerd stalked her through an entire bread making process, from grinding the grain at the mill, where they first appeared They first came to her at the mill, stopping her in her tracks and refusing to let her move for over two hours, on her way home, while she sifted the meal (and stayed with her as she added the yeast), returned as she kneaded her bread, again as she prepared her fire (and again as she stoked it). Finally, they had enough. Bennett testified that they "tooke this examinat by the hippes, and saide, seeing thou wilt not be ruled, thou shalt haue a cause, & would haue thrust this examinat into ye burning Ouen, & so had (as this examinat saith) but for the foresaide forke, but this examinat striuing and dooing what shee coulde to her vttermost, the saide spirite burnt her arme, the which burning is apparaunt and euidently too bee seene." They did corrupt her finally, however, when she sought revenge on Byet. Byet "had oftentimes misused her this examinat and her Cattell." Bennett confessed to sending Lyerd to plague his black cow and his red cow to death. Suckin, however, acted on Bennett's behalf (or so it claimed) but not at her behest, when it "plagued y^ said Byets wife to the death," alleging that "I knowe that Byet and his wife haue wronged thee greatly, and doone thee seuerall hurtes, and beaten thy swyne, and thrust a pytchforke in one of them." In for a penny, and outraged that Byet has called "her olde trot, old whore, and other lewde speaches," Bennett finally gave in entirely to temptation and "caused the spirite, called Suckin, to goe and plague the sayde Willyam Byette where that woulde: The which the sayd spyrite did, and at the retourne of it, it tolde this Examinate, that it met Byet in the barne yarde, and that it had plagued him in the hippes, euen vnto death." Bennett finally theorizes that she suspected that Mother Turner has deliberately unleashed this mini-plague on her after she refused to give Turner milk; Cecilly Sellis also mentions Mother Turner (Joan Turner) as being one of the possible refuges her familiars, Robin, Jack, the William, and Puppet (alias Mamet) sought when she was indicted. (B2v, B4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2v, B4

Sugar   Devil in the shape of

A black rabbit allegedly owned by Anne West of Lawford, Essex. This familiar may have been one of the one two familiars which Elizabeth Clark claimed also sucked on her, and which is represented in the wood cut of Matthew Hopkins, Anne West, and Elizabeth Clark. According to an unnamed man in Manningtree, this familiar may have also been one of the three or four rabbit shaped spirits he saw leaving Anne West's home one dusky morning. He caught one of them, tried to brain and drown it, but it would not die. Anne West claimed she had sent the familiars out on a different errand and seemed rather annoyed that this man was bothering her so early in the morning. Although Sugar and Sack is only ever mentioned by John Sterne and Edward Parsely as discovered in terms of her being watched, and is not mentioned in the criminal accusations against Clarke, he is named as part of the legal indictment against her, and she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, end feeding him with the "intention of obtaining [its] help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices." Clarke is hanged on a different charge. (2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

Susan   Other

One of three familiars described as being in the shape of black moles without a tails, which were allegedly given to Rebecca Jones by a man in a ragged suit with great eyes. It is fed with blood and milk and may have been the one to to "kill a Sowe of one Benjamin Howes of Little-Clacton in the County aforesaid; and the said Sowe was killed by the said Impe accordingly." Jones does claim that she sent Susan "to afflict the childe of one Mistris Darcy of St Osyth aforesaid," but not too much. (37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 37-38

Susan 1   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a mouse named Susan, and was gifted to Susan Cock by her mother, Margery Stoakes. Susan appeared to Cock the "same night her said mother dyed," and is thought to be one of the imps that "killed six or seven shoots or hogges of the said Mr Mannock." Susan is also likely one of the imps Cock sent "to the house of one Robert Tender [...] to torment his servant," as an act of revenge for the servant refusing to give Cock "a sack full of chips." (33)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 33

Tewhit   Familiar

A yellow bird, the size of a crow, which belongs to Margaret Thorpe. (33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33

The Devil   Devil

The Devil allegedly appeared to Thomas Sawdie first in the form of a woman who offered him money, and when Sawdie refused, as a great black dog with fiery eyes for the next three nights until the boy accepted and agreed to meet him in a field in eight weeks' time. The morning after Sawdie made his compact, he began suffering fits. Sawdie also began howling and whistling whenever anyone prayed or read scripture, and then would fall into a dead sleep. The Devil appeared thereafter in the form of "a little man, with long fingers, and great eyes, clad all in black, and that usually like Velvet" who would sometimes be pleasant and show Sawdie wondrous things, and at other times would threaten him. The Devil was finally cast out when Sawdie's Master, John Roberts, gathered the aid of several ministers, led by Mr. Teag, to pray over the boy, which weakened the possession enough that Sawdie was freed the next day after being made to recite the Lord's Prayer repeatedly out in the field. Sawdie claimed that reciting the Lord's Prayer caused the Devil to leave him out his mouth in the form of a rat which went into a fire at the hedge in the ditch bordering the field, at which time the fire ascended into the air with the rat and sailed off into the distance. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 1-2

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears in the form of "prodigious and horrid shapes" to Christian shaw during her fits and threatens "to devour her, and then she would fall dead and stiff with all the parts of her body distepded and stretched out as a Corpse without sense or motion." (12-13)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. A True Narrative of the Sufferings and Relief of a Young Girle; Strangely Molested, by Evil Spirits and their Instruments. Edinburgh: 1698, 12-13

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears to Lewis Gaufredy of Marcelles, Fance "in humane shape, apparelled like a Gallant Fellowe." Gaufredy describes how the Devil appeared to him after he "began to reade on a Magicke Booke," which he had recieved from his uncle. Gaufredy was initially frightened by the Devil's visit, and was also "possessed with two verie badde affections," which he clarifies are ambition and being in the "companie of some special Maidens." (10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Life and Death of Lewis Gaufredy. London: 1612, 10

The Devil   Devil

A being described as the Devil is alleged to have appeared, first in the shape of a young handsome man and later in the shape of a blackish-grey cat or kitten, to Aubrey Grinset. Aubrey Grinset alleges that the Devil, in both forms, sucked blood from a teat on her body. She also claims that the Devil bid her to send her imp against Thomas Spatchet, and would allow her no rest until she did. As she lay dying in prison, she attributes damage to her arms and hands to the Devil coming to her when alone, and dragging her from the bed to under and back again. She keeps two cudgels in her bed to to fight him off with. (18, 27-28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18, 27-28

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears in the form of a human to Lewis Gaudefry and asks him, "What wilt thou with me, for thou hast called me." Gaudefry replies that he desires two things: that "all the women that I shall be in loue withall, doe affect and follow me," and to "gaine estimation and honour aboue all other Priests of this Country, and amongst men of worth and credit." The Devil promises to do these things if Gaudefry gives him "his body, his soule, and his workes." (7)

Appears in:
Machaelis, Sebastien. The Admirable History of the Posession and Conversion of a Penitent Woman. London: 1613, 7

The Devil   Devil

The Devil allegedly appears to Christian Shaw "About the Eighth of December" after she had "had six or seven days respite from her Fits." When the Devil appeared, "in Prodigious and Horrid Shapes," Shaw "fell into a frightful and terrible Relapse." The Devil also allegedly appeared to Shaw a second time, when she was "in a Light-headed-fit," this time taking "the Shape of a man." Upon the Devil's second appearance, Shaw is "struck with great Fear and Consternation," and desired to "Pray with an Audible Voice, The Lord Rebuke thee Satan." (9)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 9

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears to prisoners in the Ipswich prison and haunts, possesses, and torments them. He also appears to various others either to haunt or help them in the practice of witchcraft. (12-18)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12-18

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears in the form of a mouse to William Sommers while in prison and urges him to say his possession was counterfeit. According to the Devil, if Sommers makes this claim then he will save Sommers from being hung. (8)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, 8

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears to Margaret Byrom in the form of Hartlay, a person she will be examined on the following day. The Devil warns Margaret to be careful concerning the things she says about Hartlay, and offers her "silluer and gould," but she does not accept his offer. (7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 7

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears to Richard Dugdale and points "at something which the said Richard had lately done." This alleged appearance leads people to believe that Richard offered "himself to Satan as a Bond, or some other Compact, or Consent to Satan, for satisfying his desires, either of dancing or of some other matter." (Image 6)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, Image 6

The Devil   Devil

The Devil allegedly possesses Richard Dugdale in Surrey near Lancaster, causing Richard Dugdale to experience a number of unnatural fits over the course of a year. These fits are characterized by the vomiting of many objects, his ability to foretell that "which he could know by any ordinary means," his speaking in another voice, extreme weight change, his blasphemy against God, speaking other languages, abnormal lumps in his chest and belly, the transformation of these lumps into animals, strange movements of his body, dancing fits, and the inability to feel pinpricks. The Devil allegedly speaks through Richard Dugdale's body, claiming that Richard Dugdale was in a contract with him "That he might excel all others in Dancing: That the Contract was for 18 months." Once, the Devil appears to Richard Dugdale in one of his fits, causing Richard Dugdale to confess to his contract. The Devil commonly refers to Richard Dugdale as "Dicky" when he speaks through Richard Dugdale during his fits. (45-47)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 45-47

The Devil   Devil

The Devil who appears to Mother Lakeland in that hour, "between sleeping and waking." it speaks to her in "a hollow voyce, telling her, that if she would serve him she should want nothing." Lakeland refuses The Devil numerous times. Finally she agrees to work with him and he "stroke his claw (as she confessed) into her hand, and with her blood wrote the Covenants." (7)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears in the "likeness of a young man" to Rebecca West, and promises "that she should be revenged of all her Enemies" if she denies God. West uses the Devil to seek revenge upon John Star and Thomas Hart. West also claims that "the Devil came to her one Night as she was going to Bed, and told her he would Mary her, and that he then kissed her, but was as cold as Clay." (2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 2-3

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears to Margaret Johnson in the shape of a well dressed (and by extension wealthy) man. He promises to provide for "all her wantes," and "helpe her to kill and revenge her either of men or beeste, if she will give him her soul." She agrees and he asks that she call him Memillion (209)

Appears in:
Keynes, Geoffrey. The Life of William Harvey. Oxford: 1966, 209

The Devil   Devil

The Devil forms a covenent with Mr. Lowes Parson of Brandon, Suffolk, enabling Mr. Lowes Parson to bewitch a ship, and give suck to Imps, an act that leaves "a teat on the crowne of his head, and two under his tongue. This malefic compact also gives Lowes the ability to perform "threescore sermons" while deceiving others. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 3

The Devil   Devil

The Devil appears to a number of witches imprisoned in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. With one in particular (Anonymous 273), he engages in "carnall copulation" so that she conceives twice by him, the offspring of which "run away in most horrid long and ugly shapes." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

The Devil   Devil

The Devil allegedly convinces Mistress Bodenham through much discussion to sign her soul to him "in a bloody scroule," and convinces her to corrupt Anne Styles, so that she too signs over her soul. When Anne Styles attempts to flee to London to repent her action, the Devil stops her at Stockbridge, and "cast her to and froe." While a Gentleman prays for Anne Styles for a period of four days, he torments her, and appears before her in the form of a snake (Anonymous 75). (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Salisbury Assizes. Or the Reward of Witchcraft. London: 1653, 1

The Devil   Devil

The Devil who meets James Day in a field on June 15, 1686 and who convinces him to "sell himself to him for ever, in consideration of seventeen years Life and Happiness," and asks him to write a lease for his soul in blood. However, when James Day takes too long, the Devil "bit him tare it," and drew up a lease himself, which James Day refuses to sign as he does not understand it. The Devil takes James Day to an unknown Tavern and plies him with drink which magically filled themselves, and pressures him to sign the lease. After, the Devil allows James Day to return home with the promise he will return in a week to perfect the lease. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

The Devil   Devil

The Devil who appears before Joseph Buxford, a fifteen year old boy from Devon, and his father, as a carrier with four horses. Joseph Buxford and his father have been arguing, for Joseph Buxford does not desire to apprentice himself to a weaver in Crediton, but instead ran away to the army. Upon returning home, John Buxford threatens to "bind [his son] Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." John Buxford vows to "put the same in execution." The boy further exclaims that he "would rather go to the Devill," than apprentice himself to a weaver in Crediton. A carrier encounters the father and the boy on the road, and inquires as to why the father "did fall a beating of him, so that by meere force compelled him along." The father explains his son's situation, and the carrier, whom the father "had often observed to frequend the roade," to take the boy as an apprentice for eight days. The carrier, who is in fact the Devil in disguise, assures the father that he would put the son "in a way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." As soon as John Buxford leaves, the carrier in a "stupendious Miracle," transforms into a "flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour," (Anonymous 145) who carries the boy over the earth and oceans, and eventually down into Hell. Once in Hell, the horse transforms again, this time into "a more terrible shape then that of the flying Horse." Once in Hell, the Devil tells Joseph Buxford, "Bee not dismayed, thy employment here shall be onely to take a view of divers men, who thou hast formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to me to receive their due recompence for the same." Joseph Buxford is shown the torment of many apparitions in Hell, whom are familiar to him from his time in the army. The Devil also shows Joseph Buxford the torments of Sir Peter Ball, Greevile, Goring, Lady Scot, and Lady Dolkeat. Once the eight days of Joseph Buxford's employment are finished, the Devil delivers Joseph Buxford back to Devon, where the boy is found and confesses to all he had seen. That same day of Joseph Buxford's release from Hell, the Devil also appeared to a number of "stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party," in his previous form of a carrier. When the troopers attempt to rob the Devil as a carrier of his horses, "the Carrier and his Horses suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three of the men, and leaving the rest "so terribly shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone, that they hardly espaced to carry newes in this strange accident." (2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

The Devil   Devil

The Devil who causes the sound of a "great Bell tolling" in Mr. Harlakenden's chamber, built above a "Tomb-House" in Colne's Priory near Colne in the county of Essex. The bell tolls "at Two of the Clock in the Morning," causing Mr. Harlakenden "Fright and Sweat." However, one night, Mr. Thomas Shephard, "with some other Ministers, and good People, spent a Night in Prayer," and paying respects to the place to serve God. This casts out the Devil, and "from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber." (157-158)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 157-158

The Devil   Devil

The Devil who appears to John Palmer when he is unable to avenge himself on his adversaries, and takes advantage of that man, convincing him to join with the Devil. Upon this malefic compact, the Devil gave John Palmer two familiars: one in the form of a dog named George, and the other in the form of a woman named Jezabell. The Devil then made John Palmer draw his blood, "and caused him to write his mark upon the ground with his own hand therewith." John Palmer serves the Devil through witchcraft somewhere between 50 and 60 years. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 2

Tib   Familiar

A familiar from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear in the form of a brown mouse, which allegedly appeared to Anne Desborough one day while she was sleeping, nipped her, then demanded her soul. It disappeared when she began to pray, only to return five or six days later with another mouse-spirit, slightly smaller than the first and with a white belly, this time demanding to suck her blood. Desborough agreed to this, in addition to denying God and promising them her soul on her death. She later named this first mouse-spirit Tib; it promised to hurt men at her bidding, but was never asked to. Tib appeared to her daily to suck her blood. (10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Tibb   Spirit

A familiar from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be a shapeshifter and to belong to Elizabeth Southerns, alias Dembdike. Tibb first appeared to Southerns as she came home from begging, in the form of a boy with a coat half brown, half black. He requested her soul, said she could have anything she asked for in return, and introduced himself. She gave him her soul, but did not ask anything of him for five or six years though he would appear regularly to ask what she would have of him. At the end of six years, Tibb appeared while she was dozing in the sun with a child on her lap; he appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to get blood from under her left arm. She sent him away by invoking Jesus' name, but was left mad for eight weeks after. Southerns claimed to have set Tibb to take revenge from Richard Baldwyn or his family, after he drove her out of his house calling her and her granddaughter Alison Device whore and witches and threatening them with burning and hanging; she had been there to collect payment for some work her daughter Elizabeth Device had done for him at his mill. Anne Whittle claimed that Tibb sometimes appeared in the shape of a spotted bitch, and that he once provided a feast for her and Southerns with her familiar Fancie. Southerns said that she and Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, had witnessed Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter, but that Tibb knocked her into a ditch to prevent her from joining them and vanished. When she headed home, he reappeared in the shape of a hare. (B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Tibb   Familiar

A familiar from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be a shapeshifter and to belong to Elizabeth Southerns, alias Dembdike. Tibb first appeared to Southerns as she came home from begging, in the form of a boy with a coat half brown, half black. He requested her soul, said she could have anything she asked for in return, and introduced himself. She gave him her soul, but did not ask anything of him for five or six years though he would appear regularly to ask what she would have of him. At the end of six years, Tibb appeared while she was dozing in the sun with a child on her lap; he appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to get blood from under her left arm. She sent him away by invoking Jesus' name, but was left mad for eight weeks after. Southerns claimed to have set Tibb to take revenge from Richard Baldwyn or his family, after he drove her out of his house calling her and her granddaughter Alison Device whore and witches and threatening them with burning and hanging; she had been there to collect payment for some work her daughter Elizabeth Device had done for him at his mill. Anne Whittle claimed that Tibb sometimes appeared in the shape of a spotted bitch, and that he once provided a feast for her and Southerns with her familiar Fancie. Southerns said that she and Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, had witnessed Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter, but that Tibb knocked her into a ditch to prevent her from joining them and vanished. When she headed home, he reappeared in the shape of a hare. (B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Tibb   Devil in the shape of

A familiar from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be a shapeshifter and to belong to Elizabeth Southerns, alias Dembdike. Tibb first appeared to Southerns as she came home from begging, in the form of a boy with a coat half brown, half black. He requested her soul, said she could have anything she asked for in return, and introduced himself. She gave him her soul, but did not ask anything of him for five or six years though he would appear regularly to ask what she would have of him. At the end of six years, Tibb appeared while she was dozing in the sun with a child on her lap; he appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to get blood from under her left arm. She sent him away by invoking Jesus' name, but was left mad for eight weeks after. Southerns claimed to have set Tibb to take revenge from Richard Baldwyn or his family, after he drove her out of his house calling her and her granddaughter Alison Device whore and witches and threatening them with burning and hanging; she had been there to collect payment for some work her daughter Elizabeth Device had done for him at his mill. Anne Whittle claimed that Tibb sometimes appeared in the shape of a spotted bitch, and that he once provided a feast for her and Southerns with her familiar Fancie. Southerns said that she and Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, had witnessed Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter, but that Tibb knocked her into a ditch to prevent her from joining them and vanished. When she headed home, he reappeared in the shape of a hare. (B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Tiffy   Familiar

A familiar from the County of Huntingdon, known to take the shape of a white cat, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly gave to Francis Moore for the purpose of killing any person Moore chose to curse. In exchange for Tiffy, Weed had Moore deny God and affirm it with her blood, which Tiffy licked from Moore's pricked finger. Tiffy is said to have killed William Foster at Moore's behest after Foster threatened to hang Moore's children for trying to steal bread. Foster became sick and lay in pain for seven or eight days before finally dying. Moore claimed that she had killed Tiffy the year before her examination, but that the cat had been haunting her, and crept under her clothes after Moore was apprehended to torture her so she couldn't speak to confess freely. (5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Anonymous 214   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad, and is allegedly kept by Mary Smith. This unfortunate amphibian appears in Edmund Newton's shoe making shop ,and is burned alive (for over 15 minutes) as an act of counter magic; it takes over an hour for the toad to burn. (57-58)

Appears in:
Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft. Cambridge: 1590, 57-58

Toad-fish   Other

A monster found by Thomas West while he is fishing in a lake near Wollage. The being "is called a Toad-fish" because "the head and eyes, when it lyes upon its belly, doe perfectly resemble a Toad," but it has "the perfect breast and chest of a man." It is thought that the Toad-fish "swims upright, beating the water with his hands." The size of the Toad-fish leads people to believe it is the Devil. The Toad-fish "is in length well-nigh five foot, in breadth a yard over, having on each side two huge fins, in likenesse much like a Thornback, his taile a foot in lenght, as it were all of Whale-bone." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Relation of a Terrible Monster Taken by a Fisherman near Wollage, 15 July, 1642 . London: 1642, 1-2

Tom   Familiar

A familiar or devil, known to be from Edmonton in the County of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield, which is said to have first appeared to Elizabeth Sawyer eight years before when she was cursing, swearing and blaspheming. He would visit her three times a week, reporting what mischiefs he had done on her behalf, including causing damage to animals and killing two infants. He demanded her soul and her body for his services, and would suck blood from a teat "a little aboue [her] fundiment, and that place chosen by himselfe." He would suck for a quarter of an hour at a time, which caused her no pain. Sawyer refers to this being alternately as the Devil and as Tom; he allegedly comes to her in the form of a dog, sometimes white, sometimes black, and liked her to stroke his back. He would be white, which was also the smaller shape, when she way praying. Tom did not like to hear her praying to Jesus, and taught her another prayer in Latin, "Santibicetur nomen tuum" to pray to him instead. Sawyer claimed that Tom did not visit her in prison. (C2-C4)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, C2-C4

Tom (2)   Familiar

A familiar known to belong to Mother Nokes; when angry with her husband and a tailor's wife for their infidelity and asked to reconcile with them, Nokes declared that "she cared for none of them all, as longe as Tom helde on her side, meanyng her Feende." (16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 16

Tom Boy   Familiar

A familiar that appears in the form of a grey bird, and is gifted to Sarah Cooper by her mother, Anne Cooper (22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

Trullibub   Spirit

A familiar from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, which allegedly belonged to Elizabeth Chandler. Chandler denied having any familiars, though she added "she did call a logg of wood Beelzebub, and a sticke Trullibub" (8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Tyffin   Familiar

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Tyffin appears in the shape of white female lamb, and of her familiars, the "shees were to punishe with lamenes, and other diseases of bodyly harm: and also to destroy cattell." Kempe later confessed "that vpon the falling out betweene Thorlowes wife and her, shee sent Tyffin, the spirite vnto her childe, which lay in the Cradle, and willed the same to [knock] the Cradle ouer, so as the childe might fall out thereof, and breake the necke of it." Unlike Kempe's other familiars, Tyffin speaks several times to Kempe, giving her information on other witches and their familiars: that Mother Bennets had two familiar, "the one of them like a blacke Dogge, and the other redde like a Lyon, and that their names were Suckin and Lyerd"; that one of Ales Hunt's familiars (Jack or Robbin) "had killed Heywarde of Frowicke sixe beastes which were lately dressed of the gargette"; that Annis Glascocke sent on of her familiars to kill Martha Stevens, and that Annis had herself bewitched Charity Page and the Page's other child; informed Kempe about the details of the fight Ales Newman had with John Johnson and that she had (as part of a group, perhaps, the person who plagued Durrant May have been Ales Hunt, bewitched the butcher, Henry Durrant's daughter. Rebecca. Kempe was question specifcally on the reliability of Tyffin's testimony; she replied "that the saide spirite did euer tell her true in any matter shee required of it, and saith, that shee neuer knewe it to tell her otherwise then truth." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Tyttey   Familiar

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Tyttey, appears in the shape of gray male cat; according to Kempe her male familiars "were to punishe and kill unto death." Kempe later confesses as much, stating that she "sent Tyttey to punishe Thorlowes wife." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Vinegar Tom   Familiar

An familiar that appears in the form of a long-legged greyhound with a head like an ox to Elizabeth Clark. Matthew Hopkins describes him as being able to turn into a headless child. Although Vinegar Tom is only ever mentioned by Hopkins, John Sterne, and Edward Parsely as discovered in terms of her being watched, and is not mentioned in the criminal accusations against Clarke, he is named as part of the legal indictment against her, and she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, nd feeding Vinegar Tome, with the "intention of obtaining [its] help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices." Clarke is hanged on a different charge. (6-10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6-10

Willet   Spirit

One of three spirits allegedly kept by Ellen Smith of Maldon. Smiths son claimed that his mother kept the spirits, named Willet, Great Dicke, and Little Dicke, in a wool pack, wicker bottle, and leather bottle respectively. When Smiths house was searched authorities found the bottles and pack, but the spirits had vanished away. (13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 13

William   Other

One of four imps that allegedly belong to Alice Manfield, which were gifted to her by Margaret Grevell. According to information given by Richard Rosse, Manfield called her imps Robin, Jack, William, and Puppet. The imps are described as "two shees" and "two hees," with all four being "like vnto blacke Cats," which Manfield kept "in a boxe with woll" upon a shelf by her bed; the imps are fed with blood they suck from Manfield's body, as well as bread and beer when they do her bidding. The imps perform a variety of tasks for Manfield: Robin and Puppet are sent on separate occasions to plague Joan Cheston's cattle after Cheston and Manfield had a falling out; Jack is sent, two years after Robin is sent to plague cattle, to plague Joan Cheston's husband, Robert Cheston, to death; William informs Manfield, the day before her apprehension, that she will be captured and "called in question," and also destroys stores of food and drink. (61-67)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 61-67

Wynowe   Familiar

One of three black mole shaped familiars which allegedly belongs to Anne Cooper and "suckled on the lower parts of her body." This familiar is allegedly sent by Cooper to kill Gregory and Joan Rous' child, Mary, who was "strangely taken sick, and languishing, and within a short time died. Panu also appears with moles named Jeso and Wynowe. Wynowe may have been presumed to be involved in John Curstissurre's bewitchment. (22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

Anonymous 170   Familiar

The familiar of a woman of "evil fame," (Anonymous 419) residing in Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who approaches a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) after the woman of "evil fame" muttered against the schoolmistress. The familiar is described as "a monstrous great Toad walking on all four like a Cat," and came from the house of the suspect woman. (Anonymous 419) The schoolmistress retires into her house, and gets her husband to "get some Instrument, wherewithal to dispatch that monstrous vermin." Before John H. has the chance to strike it, however, "it rusht suddenly into another room, and was never seen afterwards." (190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 190

Anonymous 171   Familiar

A number of familiars in the form of cats, belonging to a woman of "evil fame" (Anonymous 419) in Winchester in the county of Hampshire. These seven or nine cats appear to a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) "just before the coming of her fit," one by one. They would then "crawl about, and stick against the walls, making a dreadful yelling," as well as "hideous noise." This is continued for a quarter of an hour in the same room as the schoolmistress who is to experience a fit, and then they would disappear, and be followed by a "mighty great light." The two pet cats belonging to the schoolmistress herself would "fly as if they were Devil-drove" if they were in the same room as these familiars. The pet cats would go to the fire, the oven, the chimney, or "any way to avoid the room," and could not rest or eat after an encounter, but instead "pin'd away after a piteous manner." (191)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 191

Anonymous 172   Other

A monster who appears to a falconer (Anonymous 422) in Sherborne, in the county of Dorset, in the shape of a goblin while he is reading "a certain Book." The falconer had not read much in the book, "before he saw something come to the side of the bed," which was a goblin. This "frightful" creature makes the falconer remember a conversation he had had with a huntsman (Anonymous 423) earlier that day, saying that the falconer (Anonymous 422) was always "looking upwards, and Blaspheming," which greatly troubles the falconer. (197 - 198)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 197 - 198

Anonymous 172   Monster

A monster who appears to a falconer (Anonymous 422) in Sherborne, in the county of Dorset, in the shape of a goblin while he is reading "a certain Book." The falconer had not read much in the book, "before he saw something come to the side of the bed," which was a goblin. This "frightful" creature makes the falconer remember a conversation he had had with a huntsman (Anonymous 423) earlier that day, saying that the falconer (Anonymous 422) was always "looking upwards, and Blaspheming," which greatly troubles the falconer. (197 - 198)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 197 - 198

Anonymous 173   Apparition

A monster in the form of a "huge Bear," with "very large flaming Eyes," who appears before Mr. Edmund Ansty one night, as he rode to his home in South Petherton, in the county of Somerset. The bear appears when Mr. Edmund Ansty's horse acts oddly some "dozen miles from home," by rushing "very violently with him against one side of the Bank," and pressing them into the bushes. Then, the "Hedges cracked with a dismal noise," and along the road, approaching Mr. Edmund Ansty was "a large Circle of duskish light, about the bigness of a very large Wheel," within was the "proportion of a huge Bear." The bear passes by Mr. Edmund Ansty, and as he did so, the "horrid Monster looked very gashfully at him, shewing a pair of very large flaming Eyes." When the monster is gone, the horse spurs home with Mr. Edmund Ansty. (200-201)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 200-201

Anonymous 174   Apparition

An apparition of Fairies, who seem to keep a Fair in Blackdown Hills every summer. These fairies appear "like Men and Women of a stature, generally, near the smaller size of Men." They often wear the colours "red, ble, or green, according to the old way of Country Garb, with high crown'd hats." They appear before a man riding to Combe St. Nicholas (Anonymous 425), in Blackdown Hills, as a "great company of People, that seemed to him like Country Folks, Assembled, as at a Fair." The Fair of these fairies includes unusual goods, and "all sorts of Commodities," including "Pewterers, Shoe-makers, Pedlars, and all kind of Trinkets, Fruit, and drinking Booths," as seen at usual fairs. However, whenever the man tried to get close to the fair, "he could discern nothing at all, only seemed to be crouded, and thrust, as when one passes through a throng of people." They all became invisible, but at a distance, he could see them again. Following this encounter, the man (Anonymous 425) had a "lameness [seize] him all on one side," which stayed with him until his death twenty years later. A full fifty years after these events, a man, his wife, and "divers of the Neighbours" (Anonymous 426) still claimed they could see the Fair-keeping in the summer, although none dared "adventure in amongst them, for that every one that had done so, had received great damage by it." (208-209)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 208-209

Anonymous 174   Other

An apparition of Fairies, who seem to keep a Fair in Blackdown Hills every summer. These fairies appear "like Men and Women of a stature, generally, near the smaller size of Men." They often wear the colours "red, ble, or green, according to the old way of Country Garb, with high crown'd hats." They appear before a man riding to Combe St. Nicholas (Anonymous 425), in Blackdown Hills, as a "great company of People, that seemed to him like Country Folks, Assembled, as at a Fair." The Fair of these fairies includes unusual goods, and "all sorts of Commodities," including "Pewterers, Shoe-makers, Pedlars, and all kind of Trinkets, Fruit, and drinking Booths," as seen at usual fairs. However, whenever the man tried to get close to the fair, "he could discern nothing at all, only seemed to be crouded, and thrust, as when one passes through a throng of people." They all became invisible, but at a distance, he could see them again. Following this encounter, the man (Anonymous 425) had a "lameness [seize] him all on one side," which stayed with him until his death twenty years later. A full fifty years after these events, a man, his wife, and "divers of the Neighbours" (Anonymous 426) still claimed they could see the Fair-keeping in the summer, although none dared "adventure in amongst them, for that every one that had done so, had received great damage by it." (208-209)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 208-209

Anonymous 175   Spirit

A spirit from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, known to be white in colour and to belong to Joan Flower, which Joan Willimott claimed during her examination had stricken Sir Francis Manners' son, Henry Lord Rosse. (E2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v

Tom (3)   Familiar

One of two familiars which appear in the shape of a toad, and are allegedly given to Margery Sammon in a "wicker basket, more then half full of white and blacke wooll" by mother, the Widow Barnes on the day she died (February 12, 1582). Sammon confesses she was instructed to feed and keep them (she does not appear to have used them to commit any felonies) and to feed them with milk, lest they get hungry and drink her blood. Sammon "fed them twise out of a dyshe with mylk," but does not claim to have kept them long. Mother Barnes allegedly suggested to Sammon that she should send the familiars to Mother Pechey if she did not want them, and that Pechey "is a Witch, and will bee glad of them." After hearing that Ursula Kempe was apprehended as a witch, Sammon claims to have taken the familiars, in a basket to a field, released them, and "bad them goe to the sayde Mother Pechey," who Sammon claims may well have them. (C4-C4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4-C4v

Jacke (4)   Familiar

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Jacke, appears in the shape of black male cat. Kempe claims that her "two hee spirites were to punishe and kill unto death." This is consistent with the rest of her confessions; Kempe later confessed that "shee was the death of her brother Kemps wife, and that she sent the spirite Iacke to plague her, for that her sister had called her whore and witche." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Anonymous 178   Spirit

A spirit from the Forest of Pendle in the Count of Lancashire, known to be black in colour and about the size of a hare or cat. James Device claimed this spirit came to him one night around midnight and sat heavily on him for about an hour, then left through his bedroom window. (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Anonymous 179   Spirit

A familiar spirit from Gisborne in Craven in the County of York, known to appear in the shape of a white foal with a black spot on its forehead, allegedly belonging to Jennet Preston. (I2v-I3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v-I3

Anonymous 179   Familiar

A familiar spirit from Gisborne in Craven in the County of York, known to appear in the shape of a white foal with a black spot on its forehead, allegedly belonging to Jennet Preston. (I2v-I3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v-I3

Anonymous 180   Apparition

A spirit known to be covered in a white sheet that appeared at Two Bridges on the road between Preston and Salmesbury, which Grace Sowerbutts claimed rescued her from Jennet Bierley. Bierley had taken the shape of a dog with two legs, and tried to convince Sowerbutts to drown herself. Bierley disappeared when Anonymous 180 came. It carried Sowerbutts away and then vanished. (K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

Anonymous 180   Spirit

A spirit known to be covered in a white sheet that appeared at Two Bridges on the road between Preston and Salmesbury, which Grace Sowerbutts claimed rescued her from Jennet Bierley. Bierley had taken the shape of a dog with two legs, and tried to convince Sowerbutts to drown herself. Bierley disappeared when Anonymous 180 came. It carried Sowerbutts away and then vanished. (K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

Anonymous 181   Monster

One of four spirits appearing on the North bank of the river Ribble, and known to be black in appearance, stand upright but look unlike a man in the face. According to Grace Sowerbutts, these spirits were participants in witches' meetings, along with Grace, her grandmother Jennet Bierley, her aunt Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth. They carried the women across the Ribble river, feasted on strange meat with them, and danced with them. After the dancing, Grace claimed that "the said black things did pull downe the said three Women, and did abuse their bodies, as this Examinate thinketh, for shee saith, that the black thing that was with her, did abuse her bodie." (K4v, L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v, L2v

Anonymous 182   Monster

One of four spirits appearing on the North bank of the river Ribble, and known to be black in appearance, stand upright but look unlike a man in the face. According to Grace Sowerbutts, these spirits were participants in witches' meetings, along with Grace, her grandmother Jennet Bierley, her aunt Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth. They carried the women across the Ribble river, feasted on strange meat with them, and danced with them. After the dancing, Grace claimed that "the said black things did pull downe the said three Women, and did abuse their bodies, as this Examinate thinketh, for shee saith, that the black thing that was with her, did abuse her bodie." (K4v, L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v, L2v

Anonymous 183   Monster

One of four spirits appearing on the North bank of the river Ribble, and known to be black in appearance, stand upright but look unlike a man in the face. According to Grace Sowerbutts, these spirits were participants in witches' meetings, along with Grace, her grandmother Jennet Bierley, her aunt Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth. They carried the women across the Ribble river, feasted on strange meat with them, and danced with them. After the dancing, Grace claimed that "the said black things did pull downe the said three Women, and did abuse their bodies, as this Examinate thinketh, for shee saith, that the black thing that was with her, did abuse her bodie." (K4v, L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v, L2v

Anonymous 184   Monster

One of four spirits appearing on the North bank of the river Ribble, and known to be black in appearance, stand upright but look unlike a man in the face. According to Grace Sowerbutts, these spirits were participants in witches' meetings, along with Grace, her grandmother Jennet Bierley, her aunt Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth. They carried the women across the Ribble river, feasted on strange meat with them, and danced with them. After the dancing, Grace claimed that "the said black things did pull downe the said three Women, and did abuse their bodies, as this Examinate thinketh, for shee saith, that the black thing that was with her, did abuse her bodie." (K4v, L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v, L2v

Anonymous 185   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a hare. This spirit appeared to James Device after he saw Thomas, Marie and Anne Redferne with clay images outside their home, and spat fire at him. The circumstances of its appearance suggests the hare may belong to Anne Redferne, who was accused of witchcraft. (O2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O2v

Anonymous 185   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a hare. This spirit appeared to James Device after he saw Thomas, Marie and Anne Redferne with clay images outside their home, and spat fire at him. The circumstances of its appearance suggests the hare may belong to Anne Redferne, who was accused of witchcraft. (O2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O2v

Anonymous 186   Devil

A devil or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, said to take the form of a black dog with fiery eyes and large teeth with a "terrible countenance," allegedly belonging to Alison Device. According to Device's confession, her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns convinced her to accept a familiar, and when Anonymous 186 appeared to her, agreed to give it her soul and allow it to suck from her breasts just under her nipples. The spot where Anonymous 186 sucked remained blue for six months. Device bid her familiar to lame John Law, a pedlar, when he refused to sell or give her pins. Law fell down in the road and lay in great pain, unable to move, and claimed to be tormented day and night thereafter. (R3v-R4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v-R4

Anonymous 186   Familiar

A devil or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, said to take the form of a black dog with fiery eyes and large teeth with a "terrible countenance," allegedly belonging to Alison Device. According to Device's confession, her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns convinced her to accept a familiar, and when Anonymous 186 appeared to her, agreed to give it her soul and allow it to suck from her breasts just under her nipples. The spot where Anonymous 186 sucked remained blue for six months. Device bid her familiar to lame John Law, a pedlar, when he refused to sell or give her pins. Law fell down in the road and lay in great pain, unable to move, and claimed to be tormented day and night thereafter. (R3v-R4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v-R4

Anonymous 187   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Paddiham in the County of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a toad, allegedly belonging to Margaret Pearson. Jennet Booth claimed to have seen this spirit sitting in the fire at Pearson's home the week after Pearson was gaoled. Booth's young daughter carried the toad out of the house in a pair of tongs. (T)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T

Anonymous 188   Spirit

An unknown number of spirits or familiars from MIlton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mary Sutton. According to Mary's son Henry Sutton, they took the form of cats, moles and more, and would suck from the teat found under her left thigh. (C2v-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, C2v-C3

Anonymous 188   Familiar

An unknown number of spirits or familiars from MIlton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mary Sutton. According to Mary's son Henry Sutton, they took the form of cats, moles and more, and would suck from the teat found under her left thigh. (C2v-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, C2v-C3

Anonymous 189   Devil

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 190, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit remained in her, taking the use of her legs, flinging her about in her chair, and attempting to prevent girl from reading from the Bible. It also caused her to ride home facing the rear of her horse. At other times, it was known to levitate her or make her bark like a dog, bellow like a bull or roar. It also prevented her from drinking at a party, and tried to get her to drown herself in the well in the host's yard. It continued to possess her until the time of the account's publication. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 189   Spirit

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 190, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit remained in her, taking the use of her legs, flinging her about in her chair, and attempting to prevent girl from reading from the Bible. It also caused her to ride home facing the rear of her horse. At other times, it was known to levitate her or make her bark like a dog, bellow like a bull or roar. It also prevented her from drinking at a party, and tried to get her to drown herself in the well in the host's yard. It continued to possess her until the time of the account's publication. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 190   Devil

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 189, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit was successfully ejected. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 190   Spirit

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 189, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit was successfully ejected. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 215   Devil in the shape of

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to have appeared to Joan Cariden, alias Argoll, in the form of "a black rugged Dog". Cariden claimed this familiar came to her in the night and "spake to her in mumbling language." He returned the next night to demand that she deny God and rely on him instead, promising her that he would revenge her of anyone she wanted. Caridan agreed and allowed the familiar to suck from her; he did so numerous times thereafter and the sucking did not cause her pain. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 215   Familiar

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to have appeared to Joan Cariden, alias Argoll, in the form of "a black rugged Dog". Cariden claimed this familiar came to her in the night and "spake to her in mumbling language." He returned the next night to demand that she deny God and rely on him instead, promising her that he would revenge her of anyone she wanted. Caridan agreed and allowed the familiar to suck from her; he did so numerous times thereafter and the sucking did not cause her pain. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 216   Other

A thing from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to have appeared late at night to Joan Cariden, alias Argoll. Cariden claimed "in the night there lay a rugged soft thing upon her bosome which was very soft" and which she thought to be alive. She thrust it off her with her hand and thereafter thought she had been forsaken by God, for she was left unable to pray as well as she had before the visitation. (2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 2-3

Anonymous 217   Familiar

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to appear in the form of a mouse and belong to Elizabeth Harris. Harris claimed during her examination that this familiar first appeared to her 19 year before and told her that he would fulfil her desire to be revenged; she called him her Impe. Anonymous 217 demanded that she forsake Christ and rely on him instead, so she scratched her breast with her nails and gave him the blood to write the covenant with. A fortnight later, he sucked from her for the first time and she felt no pain. When she wanted it to revenge her on someone, she would say that "she desired that God would revenge her of him." In this manner, she called on Anonymous 217 to go after Goodman Chilman, who had accused her of stealing a pig. Chilman soon pined away and died. She also bid Anonymous 217 to revenge her on John Woodcott's "High," for her son had drowned while out in it, and soon after the boat was cast away. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 5-6

Anonymous 217   Devil in the shape of

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to appear in the form of a mouse and belong to Elizabeth Harris. Harris claimed during her examination that this familiar first appeared to her 19 year before and told her that he would fulfil her desire to be revenged; she called him her Impe. Anonymous 217 demanded that she forsake Christ and rely on him instead, so she scratched her breast with her nails and gave him the blood to write the covenant with. A fortnight later, he sucked from her for the first time and she felt no pain. When she wanted it to revenge her on someone, she would say that "she desired that God would revenge her of him." In this manner, she called on Anonymous 217 to go after Goodman Chilman, who had accused her of stealing a pig. Chilman soon pined away and died. She also bid Anonymous 217 to revenge her on John Woodcott's "High," for her son had drowned while out in it, and soon after the boat was cast away. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 5-6

Smack   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. This spirit claims to be one of three named Smack, and visits Joan Throckmorton frequently after Agnes Samuel comes to live in the Throckmorton house; it fights with and injures the other spirits. Smack also answers others through Joan, who relays that "There was three which were called by the name of Smackes, the 4. Plucke, the 5. Blew, the 6. Catch, the 7. White, the 8. Callico, the 9. Hardname. Mistres Ioane Throckmorton had himselfe, who was the first of the Smackes, Mistresse Mary had his cozen Smacke, mistresse Elizabeth had his other cozen Smack, mistres Iane had Blew, Mistres Grace had White, and the old woman had Hardname still with her in the Iayle, and what was become of the rest he could not tell." Mother Samuel would feed them all with blood from her chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack   Familiar

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. This spirit claims to be one of three named Smack, and visits Joan Throckmorton frequently after Agnes Samuel comes to live in the Throckmorton house; it fights with and injures the other spirits. Smack also answers others through Joan, who relays that "There was three which were called by the name of Smackes, the 4. Plucke, the 5. Blew, the 6. Catch, the 7. White, the 8. Callico, the 9. Hardname. Mistres Ioane Throckmorton had himselfe, who was the first of the Smackes, Mistresse Mary had his cozen Smacke, mistresse Elizabeth had his other cozen Smack, mistres Iane had Blew, Mistres Grace had White, and the old woman had Hardname still with her in the Iayle, and what was become of the rest he could not tell." Mother Samuel would feed them all with blood from her chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Anonymous 218   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to possess Joan Throchkmorton. Joan claimed, while she is in her fits, that Mother Alice Samuel was responsible for her torments and possession by Anonymous 218. She also claimed that Anonymous 218 "would sound in her eares some thinge which shee would declare in her fit." Among other things, this spirit told her that "there should bee twelve of them which should be bewitched in that house, in one sorte or other, and named them all unto her, being all women kinde, and servantes in the house, her selfe and her Sisters being fiue of the number." This came to pass, as many of the servants of the Throckmorton household began having fits as well. (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Anonymous 219   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be possessing Elizabeth Throckmorton at the behest of Mother Alice Samuel. According to Elizabeth, Anonymous 219 was responsible for her tormenting fits of thrashing, shrieking and sneezing. She claimed that it would not permit her to pray, and she was witnessed falling into fits whenever someone prayed or read the Bible in front of her. This spirit also prevented her from eating, causing her to put "her hand besides her meate and her meate besides her mouth, mocking her, and making her misse her mouth." Elizabeth's uncle, Gilbert Pickering, discovered that he could end her fits by taking her abroad from the house. However, her fits would resume the moment she returned. Later, this spirit became more active. Elizabeth claimed to hear it lapping milk from within her belly, it caused her to thrash and throw books whenever she read anything "good," and it answered questions posed to it by causing her to react or remain quiet. Its responses showed it likes papistry and witchcraft, but despised prayer and gospel: "love you the woord of God: whereas shee was sore troubled and vexed. But love you Witchcraft? it seemed content: or love you the Bible? Againe, it shaked hir, but love you Papistry: it was quiet. Love you praiers: it raged. Love you the Masse: it was stil. Love you the Gospell? againe it heaued up hir belly: so that what good thing soever you named, it miss-liked, but whatsoever concerning the Popes paltrie, it seemed, pleased, and pacified. " (12-15)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 12-15

Anonymous 220   Apparition

An apparition from Titchmarsh in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a black child and to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. Elizabeth Throckmorton claimed to see Mother Samuel standing before her with Anonymous 220 on her shoulder. She begged to be saved from this apparition, and when the fit ended she was rendered unable to speak or eat. (22-23)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 22-23

Anonymous 221   Apparition

An apparition from Ramsey in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. According to Lady Cromwell, Anonymous 221 appeared to her in a nightmare and was sent by Mother Samuel to "pulcke of all the skin and flesh from her armes & body." Lady Cromwell became sick soon after with fits similar to those suffered by the Throckmorton children, and died of them 15 months later. (32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 32-33

Anonymous 222   Spirit

A spirit or spirits from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to appear in the shape of spirit and a dun chicken, to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to appear to Jane, Joan, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace Throckmorton. This spirit claimed to have been sent by Mother Samuel to torment and vex them, and would "declare to the children many things concerning mother Samuell, insomuch that she coulde doo almost nothing at home for a great time, but the spirit woulde disclose." It also accused Mother Samuel of bewitching the children and the servants, and told them that if they went to Mother Samuel's home or had her brought to them, they would emerge from their fits; this proved true, but the fits would resume as soon as they were away from Mother Samuel. By Halloween 1592, Anonymous 222 speaks to the children regularly, predicting the type of fit they are to suffer, conversing with them at the end of their fits and reporting Mother Samuel's doings. It would often afflict them in the morning, at meals, on Sundays and when the church bells rang. The text is unclear on whether this is one spirit or a cooperation of several. (33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 33-35

Anonymous 222   Familiar

A spirit or spirits from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to appear in the shape of spirit and a dun chicken, to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to appear to Jane, Joan, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace Throckmorton. This spirit claimed to have been sent by Mother Samuel to torment and vex them, and would "declare to the children many things concerning mother Samuell, insomuch that she coulde doo almost nothing at home for a great time, but the spirit woulde disclose." It also accused Mother Samuel of bewitching the children and the servants, and told them that if they went to Mother Samuel's home or had her brought to them, they would emerge from their fits; this proved true, but the fits would resume as soon as they were away from Mother Samuel. By Halloween 1592, Anonymous 222 speaks to the children regularly, predicting the type of fit they are to suffer, conversing with them at the end of their fits and reporting Mother Samuel's doings. It would often afflict them in the morning, at meals, on Sundays and when the church bells rang. The text is unclear on whether this is one spirit or a cooperation of several. (33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 33-35

Anonymous 223   Apparition

An apparition from Warboys in the County of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. The Throckmorton children, Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace, claim to see it once Mother Samuel is living in the household. They allege that Mother Samuel sent it, and is only pretending not to see or hear its capers. They tell their father that this spirit is one of several at her command, and that she feeds them with her blood. Robert Throckmorton demands Mother Samuel to confess to this, but she denies it vehemently. (42-44)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 42-44

Anonymous 223   Spirit

An apparition from Warboys in the County of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. The Throckmorton children, Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace, claim to see it once Mother Samuel is living in the household. They allege that Mother Samuel sent it, and is only pretending not to see or hear its capers. They tell their father that this spirit is one of several at her command, and that she feeds them with her blood. Robert Throckmorton demands Mother Samuel to confess to this, but she denies it vehemently. (42-44)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 42-44

Pluck   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Pluck   Familiar

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Catch   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Catch   Familiar

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

White   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was assigned to Grace Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

White   Familiar

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was assigned to Grace Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Anonymous 224   Spirit

A familiar or spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel and then to Agnes Samuel. This spirit possesses Joan Throckmorton after Mother Samuel is imprisoned, and may also be the same spirit that possessed her in her initial fits. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Anonymous 224   Familiar

A familiar or spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel and then to Agnes Samuel. This spirit possesses Joan Throckmorton after Mother Samuel is imprisoned, and may also be the same spirit that possessed her in her initial fits. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Smack (3)   Familiar

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (3) was assigned to Mary Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack (3)   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (3) was assigned to Mary Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack (2)   Familiar

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (2) was assigned to Elizabeth Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack (2)   Spirit

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (2) was assigned to Elizabeth Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Blew   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, said to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel, and then to her daughter Agnes Samuel. According to Joan Throckmorton, this sprit afflicted her with fits of extreme pain in her legs, and would talk to her. It also made her bleed at the nose. When they spoke, Joan would repeat Blew's word back at him. Blew allegedly told her that he would continue to torment her until Agnes Samuel, his "dame," was brought to her end. Her fits would often come to pass as described by this spirit. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Blew was assigned to Jane Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (64-69)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 64-69

Blew   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, said to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel, and then to her daughter Agnes Samuel. According to Joan Throckmorton, this sprit afflicted her with fits of extreme pain in her legs, and would talk to her. It also made her bleed at the nose. When they spoke, Joan would repeat Blew's word back at him. Blew allegedly told her that he would continue to torment her until Agnes Samuel, his "dame," was brought to her end. Her fits would often come to pass as described by this spirit. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Blew was assigned to Jane Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (64-69)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 64-69

Hardname   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. According to the spirit Smack, this spirit will support him in his fights against Pluck, Catch, Blew and White. Smack says "his name standeth upon eight letters, and euery letter standeth for a word, but what his name is we know not." Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Hardname is the one spirit that stayed with Mother Samuel during her imprisonment, and was fed daily with blood from her chin. (71-72)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 71-72

Hardname   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. According to the spirit Smack, this spirit will support him in his fights against Pluck, Catch, Blew and White. Smack says "his name standeth upon eight letters, and euery letter standeth for a word, but what his name is we know not." Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Hardname is the one spirit that stayed with Mother Samuel during her imprisonment, and was fed daily with blood from her chin. (71-72)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 71-72

Calico   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. The spirit Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Calico was fed daily with blood from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (94)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94

Calico   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. The spirit Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Calico was fed daily with blood from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (94)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94

Anonymous 227   Devil in the shape of

A spirit or devil from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to appear in the shape of a black dog. According to John Darrell, this being was seen by numerous witnesses sniffing at William Sommer's head while he was in a senseless fit. Sommers allegedly retracted his claim of having been possessed because "the blacke dogge which brought him the bag of golde, did bidde him say so." (3)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 3

Anonymous 228   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a toad and to belong to Doll Barthram. After Barthram had a falling out with Joan Jordan, Barthram sent a series of three toads to torment Jordan and keep her from sleeping. Anonymous 228 was the first of these toads. When it first appeared in Jordan's chamber, she tossed it into the centre of the room; it returned to her bedside and sat there croaking. She then threw it out the window. (92-93)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-93

Anonymous 229   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a toad and to belong to Doll Barthram. After Barthram had a falling out with Joan Jordan, Barthram sent a series of three toads to torment Jordan and keep her from sleeping. Anonymous 229 was the second of these toads. It appeared a few days after the first, Anonymous 228, was thrown out of Jordan's window. Jordan took Anonymous 229 and burnt it. (92-93)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-93

Anonymous 230   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a toad and to belong to Doll Barthram. After Barthram had a falling out with Joan Jordan, Barthram sent a series of three toads to torment Jordan and keep her from sleeping. Anonymous 230 was the third and last of the toads. Jordan was advised to burn it herself, so she picked it up and went to do so, but she fell down the stairs. Jordan's employer, Symon Fox, put Anonymous 230 in the fire for her, and when it began to burn, saw a massive flame arise at the foot of the stairs. The fire seemed to endanger the house, but did no damage. (92-93)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-93

Tom (4)   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of Tom. According to the familiar Gyles, Tom, Gyles and J. were ordered to hang Caver's wife by Barthram. Tom "brought a rope and put it vnder her chaps" and Gyles pulled her up. (95-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 95-96

J.   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of J. According to the familiar Gyles, J. would tear Joan Jorden to pieces after Gyles killed her. J., Gyles and Tom were ordered to hang Caver's wife by Barthram. Tom "brought a rope and put it vnder her chaps" and Gyles pulled her up. (94-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 94-96

J.   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of J. According to the familiar Gyles, J. would tear Joan Jorden to pieces after Gyles killed her. J., Gyles and Tom were ordered to hang Caver's wife by Barthram. Tom "brought a rope and put it vnder her chaps" and Gyles pulled her up. (94-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 94-96

Anonymous 232   Apparition

An evil spirit from London, believed to be sent by Elizabeth Jackson to torment Elizabeth Burges, a witness who came forth at the trial of Mary Glover, a young girl believed to be bewitched by Elizabeth Jackson. The spirit was sent to torment Elizabeth Burges, after she aided Mary Glover "against this old woman." One day, when Elizabeth Bruges was eating prunes, she was "suddenly so taken, that she was not able to swallow one down," and fell to vomiting for some three weeks whenever presented with meat. The old woman came to visit Elizabeth Burges once and cursed her, saying, "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The next night, Anonymous 232 visits Elizabeth Burges as a vision, "in likenes of a fox." It returns a second night "in likenes of an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her gould enough." Elizabeth Burges still refuses, and so Anonymous 232 visits her a third night "in the likenes of a mouse," which allegedly "troubled her more then any of the former." By praying with her master and mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from the spirit, however. (Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r

Anonymous 231   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Anne Nayler. This spirit caused her to have frenzied tormenting fits. It also told father, Master Nayler "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." (101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anonymous 231   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Anne Nayler. This spirit caused her to have frenzied tormenting fits. It also told father, Master Nayler "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." (101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anonymous 233   Spirit

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Joan Nayler. This spirit was heard to say ""Giue me thy liuer, thy lights, thy heart, thy soule, &c; then thou shalt be released, then I will depart fro[m] thee" and to bid Joan to hang herself. It contorted her body in tormenting fits, during which she accused Anne Kirk of bewitching her. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and thereafter Joan was witnessed to fall into fits whenever in Kirk's presence. (101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Anonymous 233   Familiar

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Joan Nayler. This spirit was heard to say ""Giue me thy liuer, thy lights, thy heart, thy soule, &c; then thou shalt be released, then I will depart fro[m] thee" and to bid Joan to hang herself. It contorted her body in tormenting fits, during which she accused Anne Kirk of bewitching her. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and thereafter Joan was witnessed to fall into fits whenever in Kirk's presence. (101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Anonymous 234   Devil

Possibly Satan in the form of a devil, who in London, possesses the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover after the girl was cursed and threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. During the dispossession of Mary Glover, some witnesses, including John Swan, a student of divinity, believe they see " that ther was a thing creeping under one of her eye liddes, of the bignes of a peason," which then departs the body of the young girl when she is dispossessed. Mary Glover, herself, admits that she never saw the devil leave her, "but she did feele somewhat depart," and upon the leaving of the devil, she "felt such a fredome of all the powers and faculties of soule and body," which brought her great joy. (46-47)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 46-47

Anonymous 235 (Plural)   Other

A number of imps from Suffolk, believed to belong to Anonymous 476, a woman hanged for being a witch in 1645. These imps allegedly sent her imps "to the Army, to kill the Parliaments Souldiers," as well as "the Kings Souldiers." These imps also alleged "caused a mans crop of Corn to fail." (114)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114

Anonymous 237   Devil in the shape of

The devil in the form of a gentleman in black, who appears before the fourteen year old Sarah Bower while she is at a neighbour's house. He speaks "many kind Words to her," and offers her gold and silver, as well as "fine suits of Head-Cloths, and very high Top-knots if she would be his, and let him take some Blood out of her Arm." He then takes out a knife, as though to cut her arm, causing the girl to cry out and her neighbours to come. When they appear, the gentleman in black vanishes. When Sarah Bower attempts to describe what happened, she finds herself speechless, and her neighbours assume that "some Rogue had attempted to Rob the House." On the Thursday following, when Sarah Bower's speech returns, she tells of the gentleman in black's visit, and how "he had sort of broad Feet like a Cow." Later, Sarah Bower predicts that she must visit the Black Man at two in the afternoon. When such time came around, Sarah Bower entered the yard, and "was thrown to the ground in a strange manner," presumably by Anonymous 237, although to witnesses present (Anonymous 100) can see "no form or shape [...] that could occasion her Fall." (3 - 4)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3 - 4

Anonymous 238   Spirit

A devil in the form of an evil spirit, who possesses Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl from Wapping in London. The evil spirit causes her fits "to be somewhat quiet just before any Divine comes into the Room where she is." However it causes her to be "troublesome, sometimes falling out a Laughing," as well as spitting on those who pray for her. The spirit also causes Sarah Bower to "bark like a Dog, or make other most hedious Noise." It also tossed her from one end of the bed to another, and would make her tear her clothes, giving her strength so that "scarce six Men can hold her in." It also causes her to low like a bull, and roar like a lion. The spirit sometimes presents itself to Sarah Bower in the shape "of a Monstrous Fiery Dragon, other whiles a Lyon," and pulls her towards hell, even as an Angel (Anonymous 27) pulls her towards Heaven. (6 - 7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 6 - 7

Anonymous 238   Devil in the shape of

A devil in the form of an evil spirit, who possesses Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl from Wapping in London. The evil spirit causes her fits "to be somewhat quiet just before any Divine comes into the Room where she is." However it causes her to be "troublesome, sometimes falling out a Laughing," as well as spitting on those who pray for her. The spirit also causes Sarah Bower to "bark like a Dog, or make other most hedious Noise." It also tossed her from one end of the bed to another, and would make her tear her clothes, giving her strength so that "scarce six Men can hold her in." It also causes her to low like a bull, and roar like a lion. The spirit sometimes presents itself to Sarah Bower in the shape "of a Monstrous Fiery Dragon, other whiles a Lyon," and pulls her towards hell, even as an Angel (Anonymous 27) pulls her towards Heaven. (6 - 7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 6 - 7

Anonymous 239   Spirit

A deceased woman "from below," who allegedly sent a spirit (Anonymous 240) to possess a woman in Old Gravel Lane (Anonymous 19). The spirit names her to a number of ministers who question him while he possesses the woman of Old Gravel Lane, and stated that he was sent to prevent the woman from convincing her husband (Anonymous 482) to be baptized. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 3

Anonymous 240   Spirit

A spirit in Old Gravel Lane in an unknown area of England, who is sent by "a woman below, (Anonymous 239)" to possess a woman in Old Gravel Lane (Anonymous 19), and prevent her from convincing her husband (Anonymous 482) from being baptized. The spirit converses with a number of ministers (Anonymous 483), telling them that he intend to possess the woman for as long as he could. The ministers believe the spirit is the Devil himself. This spirit speaks through the woman, and prevents her from eating, causing "the Vessels of her throat" to swell, so she could not swallow. When speaking with a number of divines (Anonymous 284), the spirit threatens to force Anonymous 19 to kill herself by throwing her "into the water." He also threatens the divines, claiming that he will make them sick should they fast and pray for the woman, further adding that "Prayers were not effectual, save only in [the] Pulpit." (2 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 2 - 3

Anonymous 243 (Plural)   Spirit

Five spirits, who allegedly possess the young boy, James Barrow. These spirits are seen to depart the boy during his dispossession, an event consisting of prayer and fasting which lasts three days. At the departure of each spirit, "a kind of strange rising upwards to his throat as if he was ready to be choaked, bursting forth with a kind of belching," was observed. As each spirit leaves James Barrow, he counts how many have left him. Once all the spirits are gone, the boy is allegedly dispossessed. (16 - 17)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 16 - 17

Anonymous 242   Other

A familiar in the shape of a rat, who visits the child James Barrow. Upon seeing the rat, James Barrow says "Satan, thou must be burned in hell fire, and all that do obey thee." The child rehearses these words over and over. He also claims the rat told him to "go up stairs, and play with his pretty Rat there." James Barrow often listens, and goes up the stairs, where a "little box with single money in it," would be forced out of his hand. The child was also observed to say "I will not sing, I will sing," but he would sing nonetheless. (7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7

Anonymous 245   Monster

A monstrous evil spirit, is possibly the Devil, who appears in the middle of the night to Stephen Hooper, the entire household, and his bewitched wife Margaret Hooper (who has predicted the devil's arrival). Before it appears, the household hears "a great noise in the street, as if it had beene the comming of foure or five carts." Then, suddenly, upon looking up, Stephen Hooper sees something coming towards the bed, "much like a beare," but without a head or a tail, and much larger in size. At first, Stephen Hooper tries to fight off the monster by throwing a stool at it, but it simply bounces off it as if it were a "feather bed." The monster then turns towards Margaret Hooper, and "strokes her" (or hits her) on the foot three times. It then takes her out of the bed and rolls her around the chamber and under the bed. Finally, the apparition causes Margaret Hooper to put her head between her legs, and rolls her around like a hoop through the house and down the stairs. Her husband does not dare go after at her, but instead weeps to see her carried away. The hall was filled with "an horrible stinke [...] and such fiery flames." Eventually, Margaret Hooper calls out to her husband, claiming the spirit is gone, and she comes up the stairs back to him. Together, with the rest of the household, Stephen and Margaret Hooper pray. (3 - 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 3 - 4

Anonymous 245   Devil in the shape of

A monstrous evil spirit, is possibly the Devil, who appears in the middle of the night to Stephen Hooper, the entire household, and his bewitched wife Margaret Hooper (who has predicted the devil's arrival). Before it appears, the household hears "a great noise in the street, as if it had beene the comming of foure or five carts." Then, suddenly, upon looking up, Stephen Hooper sees something coming towards the bed, "much like a beare," but without a head or a tail, and much larger in size. At first, Stephen Hooper tries to fight off the monster by throwing a stool at it, but it simply bounces off it as if it were a "feather bed." The monster then turns towards Margaret Hooper, and "strokes her" (or hits her) on the foot three times. It then takes her out of the bed and rolls her around the chamber and under the bed. Finally, the apparition causes Margaret Hooper to put her head between her legs, and rolls her around like a hoop through the house and down the stairs. Her husband does not dare go after at her, but instead weeps to see her carried away. The hall was filled with "an horrible stinke [...] and such fiery flames." Eventually, Margaret Hooper calls out to her husband, claiming the spirit is gone, and she comes up the stairs back to him. Together, with the rest of the household, Stephen and Margaret Hooper pray. (3 - 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 3 - 4

Anonymous 246   Other

An apparition in the form of a "little child," who appears to the Hooper household after it is visited by a monster in the shape of a bear (Anonymous 245). Margaret Hooper, who is allegedly bewitched, goes to prayer with the rest of her household after the monster leaves, but is suddenly overtaken by an evil spirit (Anonymous 248) and wraps herself around the post of a window, while a fire burns at her feet, "the stink whereof was horrible." Her husband, Stephen Hooper and his brother try to take her off the window, asking the Lord to help them. Immediately after this, Margaret Hooper claims she can see a little child, Anonymous 246, out of the window. The entire household looks out the window, and see the child who is "with a very bright shinning countenance," and who enters the chamber, outshining the candle there. The household falls "flat to the ground," in thankful prayers to God that he had helped them, and the child vanishes. However, Margaret Hooper is dispossessed. Anonymous 246 cast out the evil spirit (Anonymous 248) living within her. (5 - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 5 - 6

Anonymous 247   Devil in the shape of

The devil in the shape of a snail, who allegedly appears to Margaret Hooper during one of her fits. Margaret claims that the candle in her bedchamber was suddenly burned out, and she saw "a strange thing like unto a snale, carrying fire in a most wonderfull sort" out of her room. Stephen Hooper, her husband, calls for a new candle to be brought in, "seeing the candle was cleene burnt out," and hoping this will calm his wife. He also assembles his household to come sit with her. However, Margaret Hooper remains fearful, claiming that she can still see the Devil. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 6

Anonymous 248   Spirit

An evil spirit allegedly responsible for Margaret Hooper's strange behaviour and thought to possess her. The spirit causes Margaret Hooper to mutter to herself frequently, or to "use much idle talke," as well as causing a number of fits: she is once pinned to her bed and foams at the mouth; in another fit she cries out in the night. The spirit (Anonymous 248) allegedly leaves Margaret Hooper when a child surrounded by light (Anonymous 246) visits her at the Hooper household. (2 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 2 - 3

Anonymous 249   Devil

A devil know to be from Hertfordshire. When a farmer, Anon 489, disagreed with the mower Anon 490 on the matter of Anon 490's wage to mow three half-acres of oats, Anon 489 allegedly proclaimed that "the Devil himself should Mow his Oats before [Anon 490] should have anything to do with them." That night, Anon 490's field burned. In the morning, Anon 490 went to see the extent of the damages, and instead found his oats neatly mowed in precise circles. Anon 489 "is as yet afraid to remove them." (Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

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