View: Event Assertions by Year | Event Assertion Totals by Year and County |
Person Assertions | Person Assertion Totals by Type |
Being Assertions | Being Assertion Totals by Type |

List of all Person Assertions sorted by year


Card Preferred Name Person Type Description
Abraham Chad   Witness

A man from Worcester in the county of Worcestershire, who is allegedly present when Rose Hallybread and Susan Cock when they began tormenting the Peak children from prison. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 5

Abraham Hartley   Demoniac

A boy from Baildon in the county of West Yorkshire, who accuses Mary Armitage of bewitching him. He would have fits, vomit pins and a horse shoe stubb, and would cry out against Mrs. Capp. (208)

Appears in:
Sharpe, James. Instruments of Darkness. Philidelphia: UPenn Press: 1996, 208

Abraham Law   Relative of Victim

A man from Halifax in the County of York, known to be a clothier (tailor) and the son of John Law. He accompanied his father to the Lancaster Assizes to give deposition against Alison Device, who was charged with bewitching John Law. Abraham claimed that he went to his father in Coine after receiving a letter from him, and found John speechless and lamed on his left side with the exception of his eye. Abraham said that once John recovered his speech, he complained of being pricked, and that it had started when Alison Device offered to buy pins from him but had no money to pay; John gave her the pins anyway. John also complained to him that Device lay upon him and troubled him along with an old woman he did not know. (R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3

Abraham Law   Witness

A man from Halifax in the County of York, known to be a clothier (tailor) and the son of John Law. He accompanied his father to the Lancaster Assizes to give deposition against Alison Device, who was charged with bewitching John Law. Abraham claimed that he went to his father in Coine after receiving a letter from him, and found John speechless and lamed on his left side with the exception of his eye. Abraham said that once John recovered his speech, he complained of being pricked, and that it had started when Alison Device offered to buy pins from him but had no money to pay; John gave her the pins anyway. John also complained to him that Device lay upon him and troubled him along with an old woman he did not know. (R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3

Abraham Mechelburg   Victim

A boy from Malmo, Sweden, who is allegedly bewitched and thus has fits and passes stones through his penis. (17-18)

Appears in:
Horneck, Anthony. An Account of What Happen'd in the Kingdom of Sweden in the Years 1669, and 1670. London: 1682, 17-18

Abraham Vandenbemde   Accuser

A man of of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Thomas Cromton and Anonymous 339 in a confederation, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn. (3-4, 5, 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6

Agnes Berden   Witch

A woman from Elsenham in the county of Essex, described as a spinster who is said to allegedly be a witch and enchantress of men, beast and other things. She is indicted at the Easter assize in Chelmsford in 1576 for allegedly enchanting a one and a half year old infant named Thomas Barlee. Barlee languished for about three days after which his body was so vexed and troubled that his life was essentially "despaired of." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3

Agnes Berry   Witch

A widow from Enfield (now the London Borough of Enfield), Berry (Berry alias Whyttingberry) is hanged "for exercising witchcrafts, enchantments, charms and sorceries upon Grace Halsey." ()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Agnes Brigges   Demoniac

A young woman from London, who along with Rachel Pinder, fakes possession. She would vomit foreign bodies and fall into trances. The Devil would also speak through her. (Image 8)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, Image 8

Agnes Brown   Witch

Agnes Browne is a woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, identified as the mother of Joan Vaughan. She is allegedly of "poore parentage and poorer education, one that as shee was borne to no good, was for want of grace neuer in the way to receiue any, euer noted to bee of an ill nature and wicked [dis]position, spightfull and malitious, and many yeeres before shee died both hated, and feared among her neighbours." She and Joan Vaughn feuded with Mistress Belcher after Belcher struck Vaughn and reproached her unseemly behaviour. The two of them are said to have caused Belcher to feel an intolerable pain and become disfigured. Belcher's brother Master Avery, hearing her call out Brown's and Vaughan's names as her tormentors, tried to lure the two out of their home to be scratched, but was barred from approaching the house by an invisible force. He, too, allegedly became tormented for his trouble; this lasted until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. While Brown and Vaughan were imprisoned, Belcher and Avery were permitted to scratch them, ending their torments. Brown was indicted for bewitching Belcher and Avery, and for causing the death of an unnamed child, and though she pleaded innocence, was sentenced to execution. Two weeks prior to her apprehension, Brown was supposedly seen riding a sow with Katherine Gardener and Joan Lucas to visit an old witch named Mother Rhoades. (B2-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B4

Agnes Browne   Victim

A girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be 12 years old and to work in her family's milkhouse. Agnes Brown allegedly refused her Joan Waterhouse bread and cheese one day, for which Joan allegedly summoned her mother's familiar Sathan to frighten the girl. Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle appeared with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter and unlocked the milkhouse. She claimed the dog went in and emerged a while later claiming to have made butter for her. Brown reporting this to her aunt, who fetched a priest; they found the imprint of butter on some of the cheese in the milkhouse. The dog returned twice more over the next week for more butter. The last time, it carried a dagger and threatened to kill her, identifying Mother Waterhouse as its "sweet dame" and the owner of the knife. Mother Waterhouse called Brown a liar for this last, saying she only owned a great knife, not a dagger. Joan was acquitted of bewitching Brown, though the girl allegedly became disabled in her right leg and arm. (18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Agnes Browne   Witness

A girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be 12 years old and to work in her family's milkhouse. Agnes Brown allegedly refused her Joan Waterhouse bread and cheese one day, for which Joan allegedly summoned her mother's familiar Sathan to frighten the girl. Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle appeared with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter and unlocked the milkhouse. She claimed the dog went in and emerged a while later claiming to have made butter for her. Brown reporting this to her aunt, who fetched a priest; they found the imprint of butter on some of the cheese in the milkhouse. The dog returned twice more over the next week for more butter. The last time, it carried a dagger and threatened to kill her, identifying Mother Waterhouse as its "sweet dame" and the owner of the knife. Mother Waterhouse called Brown a liar for this last, saying she only owned a great knife, not a dagger. Joan was acquitted of bewitching Brown, though the girl allegedly became disabled in her right leg and arm. (18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Agnes Burgess   Demoniac

A woman from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, who is allegedly bewitched for several years. She suffers from over twenty fits in one day, during which she voids "Pins, Nails, Quills, Tabacco pipes, and a bended Farthing, with several other things." These items were shown to the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) as proof of her possession. (8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

Agnes Burgess   Victim

A woman from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, who is allegedly bewitched for several years. She suffers from over twenty fits in one day, during which she voids "Pins, Nails, Quills, Tabacco pipes, and a bended Farthing, with several other things." These items were shown to the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) as proof of her possession. (8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

Agnes Collen   Victim

A one year old infant from presumably either Little Wakering or Barling in the county of Essex and the daughter of William Collen, who is allegedly bewitched by WIlliam Skelton and his wife, Margery. She allegedly languished for a long time. ()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Agnes Cryspe   Victim

A one-year-old infant from Kelvedon in the county of Essex, who was thought to have been bewitched by Joan Cocke. The infant "was lame, enfeebled and maimed." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210

Agnes Faulkner   Witness

A witness to the Elizabeth Jennings's miraculous (and temporary) recovery. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Agnes Foster   Witch

A woman from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who is sent to prison for allegedly threatening malfeasance. (7)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 7

Agnes Godfrey   Witch

A spinster from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield), Grodfrey was married to the town yeoman, John Godfrey. Agnes Godfrey is tried for various crimes of witchcraft between 1572 and 1588. She was first tried for allegedly harming a steere, a pig, a little pig and a mare, "of the goods and chattels" of William Durante. She was then tried for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Frances Baker, causing her to become " sick, weak and wasted in body." She, Frances Baker, remained so at the time of the deposition. She then was tried on two separate occasions for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Jasper Tappes and a one year old infant named Thomas Phillippes and an infant named William Harvye, causing their deaths. Agnes Godfrey plead not guilty to all the indictments. She is found guilty of killing William Durante's steere, pig, little pig and mare in accordance with the first indictment, and guilty of killing Thomas Phillippe. She was, however, found not guilty of the other charges. Her sentence for these crimes is unknown. She is also tried for allegedly practicing witchcraft on William Durant and William Coxe, causing them both to languish and their bodies to waste. Coxe eventually dies after languishing for a year. She is also indicted for practicing witchcraft on Robert Coxe and Henry Butterfield, causing them both to languish and then die. She pleads not guilty to all these accusations and is acquitted of all charges. (57-58, 79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58, 79-80

Agnes Nasmith   Witch

A woman from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who is known for being pious, grave, and penitent. She is sent to prison for threatening and malfeasance; A woman who talks to Christian Shaw. Christian Shaw starts having fits shortly after; A woman accused by Christian Shaw of bewitching her and cutting her side. (3)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 3

Agnes Radcliffe   Victim

A woman from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield, known to be married to Mr. Radcliffe, who was allegedly bewitched to death by their neighbour Elizabeth Sawyer. According to Mr. Radcliffe, Sawyer's sow ate some soap belonging to Agnes, and Agnes struck the animal; Sawyer was angered by this and threatened that Agnes would feel the blow as if it had struck her. That night, Agnes is said to have become sick and tormented, foaming at the mouth. She died of it four days later. He alleged that Agnes told him, on her deathbed, "that Elizabeth Sawyer her neighbour, whose Sowe with a washing-Beetle she had stricken, and so for that cause her malice being great, was the occasion of her death." Sawyer denied any involvement in Agnes' demise. (B2)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B2

Agnes Sampson   Witch

Agnis Sampson is an elder witch from Haddington, Scotland. She is accused by Geillis Duncane of practicing witchcraft and taken into custody for torturous questioning. (10)

Appears in:
Carmichael, James. News from Scotland, Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of Doctor Fian a Notable Sorcerer. London: 1592, 10

Agnes Sawen   Witch

A woman from Stock in the county of Essex, described as a spinster who allegedly practices witchcraft on men, cattle and other things. She is indicted at the Assize for allegedly bewitching Christopher Veele. Veele's feet became lamed and curved so that he was in great pain and could barely walk. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Agnes Steadman   Witch

A woman from Halstead in the county of Essex who is indicted at the assize in Chelmsford for three crimes. Firstly, she allegedly bewitched SIbyl Bentall. Bentall was violently ill for twelve days and despaired for her life. She is also indicted for bewitching a cow belonging to Owen Norman causing it to become violently ill. Thirdly, Steadman is indicted for allegedly bewitching three cows belonging to John Rome so that for three days they languished. In all three cases, Steadman pleads not guilty, but is found guilty (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2

Agnes Tompson   Witch

Agnis Tompson is a woman from Edinburgh, Scotland who denies being involved in a devilish plot meaning to destroy the King of Scotland. (12)

Appears in:
Carmichael, James. News from Scotland, Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of Doctor Fian a Notable Sorcerer. London: 1592, 12

Agnes Waterhouse   Witch

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well. (13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse   Relative of Witch

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well. (13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse   Relative of Victim

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well. (13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Whitefield   Witness

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, who was at Grace Barnes' home when Mary Trembles arrived unexpectedly. She allegedly witnessed Grace Barnes accuse Mary Trembles of being "one of them that did torment her," and lament that Tremble "was come now to put her the said Grace out of her Life." (26-28)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 26-28

Alderman of Nottingham   Accuser

A man from Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be the Alderman of Nottingham, who is offended by William Sommer's accusation that his kinswoman is a witch. The Alderman counter-accuses Sommers, and has him thrown into prison. (Image 6)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 6

Ales Baxster   Demoniac

A woman from Little Clacton in the county of Essex and a servant to Richard Rosse. One day, around four o'clock, Baxter recounts having milked eight of the nine cows she was required to milk, the final cow she began to milk became spooked at "stroke downe her paile, and that shee saw all the rest to make a staring and a looking about." Baxster "felt a thing to pricke her vnder the right side, as if she had been striken with ones hande," and later "there came a thinge all white like a Cat, and stroke her at the hart." Baxster found that "shee could not stand, goe, nor speake," and, paralyzed, had to be carried home in a chair by Rosse and some of his staff. Out of the corner of her eye, she saw "the said thing to go into a bush by the style." This testimony, given at the March 1581 Chemlsford Assize, may have been given as evidence against Cecily and Henry Sellis and Ales Manfield, who were accused of and prosecuted for burning Richard Rosse's field or Mother Ewstance, who, according to Manfield has a white feline familiar; it is unclear. The story of Baxster's paralysis is confirmed, however, by Robert Smith, husband to witch-searcher, and grieving mother, Joan Smith. (D5-D5v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D5v

Ales Gilney   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Essex who searches Cysley Sellis for witch's marks. (Image 31)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Image 31

Alex Baker   Witch-Searcher

A surgeon from Surgeon's Hall who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Alex Baker   Surgeon

A surgeon from Surgeon's Hall who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Alex Johnson   Examiner/Justice

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Alexander Amcots   Examiner/Justice

A man from Leicester in the county of Leicestershire, described as a Justice of the Peace. Amcot twice examines Joan Willimott. On February 28, 1618 she confessed to Amcot that she was a cunning woman, that Joane Flower "told her that my Lord of Rutland had dealt badly with her and that they had put away her Daughter," that she had a vision of the Earl of Rutland, Sir Francis Manner, Lord Rosse's son being "striken with a white Spirit," but that she spirit suggested he would "do well," that the previous Friday night, her "Spirit came to her and told her that there was a bad woman at Deeping who had giuen her soule to the Diuell," a piece of information for which it demanded payment, "although it were but a peece of her Girdle," but she refused. On March 2, 1618, she confesses to Amcot how she got her spirit, (form William Berry of Langholme in Rutlandshire who blew it into her mouth), that it was a Fairy "the shape and forme of a Woman," that she did promise it her soul in exchange for services, but that she "neyther did she imploy her Spirit in any thing, but onely to bring word how those did which she had vndertaken to cure." By December 3, 1618, Francis Manners would appoint Alexander Amoct deputy recorder. (13)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 13

Alexander Anderson   Witch

A man from Glasgow, Scotland, who allegedly torments Christian Shaw. (7)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 7

Alexander Eglestone   Witness

A man from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who allegedly witnessed the possession of Margaret Hooper. As part of the Hooper's household, he is also witness to the invasion of the bear-like monster (Anonymous 245) which pushes Margaret Hooper around the house; he is also present at the dispossession of Margaret Hooper, where a child surrounded by bright light (Anonymous 246) appeared while the household prayed together. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, Cover

Alexander King   Preacher/Minister

A man from Renfrewshire in the county of Renfrew, described as a minister who tries to help Christian Shaw during a fit. He pulls her as he claims she is being drawn forcibly down. (13)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 13

Alexander Nyndge   Demoniac

A young man from Herringswell in the county of Suffolk, who was allegedly possessed by an Irish spirit named Aubon, and dispossessed through prayers led by his brother Edward Nyndge. The possession manifested in various ways, foremost in a swelling in his chest and body, accompanied by staring eyes and contortions of his body; at other times he would make strange gestures and engaged in peculiar behaviors such that those with him thought him mad. Alexander was also rendered unable to eat for extended periods, would sometimes have fits of shaking, a lump would be seen moving under his skin, and at times strange flapping noises would be heard from his body. He was prone to fits in which he would curl up under the bedcovers, then bounce up from the bed and beat himself against the ground and bedstead, such that he needed to be restrained to not do himself injury. The spirit is also said to have conversed with Edward Nyndge, and to have grotesquely deformed Alexander Nyndge, caused him to laugh, shriek or cry abundantly, and gave him such strength that five men would be needed to restrain him during these conversations. (A3-A5, A7)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A3-A5, A7

Alexander Read   Surgeon

A man from Surgeon's Hall, described as a surgeon who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Alexander Read   Witch-Searcher

A man from Surgeon's Hall, described as a surgeon who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Alice Astin   Victim

A young woman from Kirby-le-Soken in the county of Essex and daughter of a bricklayer, William Astin. Alice Astin is allegedly bewitched by Mary Coppin and dies instantly. Coppin is convicted of this crime, but not killed. She is held over in jail until at least August 11, 1647. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Alice Aylett   Witch

A woman from Braintree in the county of Essex, described as the wife of a shoemaker named Thomas Aylett and a spinster. Alice Aylett is charged with "being a witch and enchantress as well of men as of animals and other things" at the Assize in Chelmsford in the county of Essex. She is also indicted at the same assize for allegedly enchanting Margery Egles, daughter of Thomas Egles in August of 1589 so that Margery languished until November; enchanting Rachel Skynner, daughter of William Skynner, in August of 1589 so that she too languished until November; and for enchanting Henry Joye in November of 1589, so that he "gravely languished until 1 December"; finally, she is also indicted for allegedly enchanting a child name Susan Parman in March of 1579-80, so that she (Parman) languished and then died. The jurors find Alice Aylett guilty of using enchantments and charms to bewitch and murder "the said Susan and Simon." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Alice Basticke   Victim

A woman from Little Baddow in the county of Essex, who is the wife of William Basticke. She is allegedly bewitched by Alice Swallow so that she languishes and dies. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Alice Chaundeler   Witch

A woman from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the mother of Ellen Smith and wife to John Chaundeler, Alice Chaundleler executed for murder by witchcraft in 1574. After her death, Smith and John Chaundler had a falling out over money Alice had given her daughter that resulted in John Chaundler's death. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Alice Chaundeler   Relative of Witch

A woman from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the mother of Ellen Smith and wife to John Chaundeler, Alice Chaundleler executed for murder by witchcraft in 1574. After her death, Smith and John Chaundler had a falling out over money Alice had given her daughter that resulted in John Chaundler's death. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Alice Chaundeler   Relative of Victim

A woman from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the mother of Ellen Smith and wife to John Chaundeler, Alice Chaundleler executed for murder by witchcraft in 1574. After her death, Smith and John Chaundler had a falling out over money Alice had given her daughter that resulted in John Chaundler's death. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Alice Cleverly   Witch-Searcher

A woman from London, described as one of a jury of five women, including Grace Stockes and Melier Damer, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to reexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked. (28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Alice Coward   Witch

A woman from Shepton Mallet in the county of Somerset, who allegedly bewitches a young boy names Richard Jones. (123)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 123

Alice Dixon   Witch

A widow from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex Alice Dickson allegedly bewitched Thomas Mumford's son to death. She also allegedly discovered that Mary Johnson was responsible for the suffering and death of Elizabeth Otely's child. This act of murder administered through familiar magic: Johnson set her imp, a thing in the shape of a rat with no ears to attack Otely's child; and through contamination: Johnson gave the child an apple and a kiss which made it sicken and die. When Dixon accused Johnson to her face of causing this harm, she allegedly responded: "that if she did it, she did it, she could but receive punishment for it." Alice Dixon was hanged at Chelmsford July 17, 1645. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Alice Dugdale   Witness

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the sister of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects and foretells events. Alice Dugdale testifies that her brother's fits lasted about a year, that he visited two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. She claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date he himself predicted. (59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

Alice Dugdale   Relative of Victim

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the sister of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects and foretells events. Alice Dugdale testifies that her brother's fits lasted about a year, that he visited two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. She claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date he himself predicted. (59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

Alice Duke   Witch

A woman from Wincaunton in the county of Somerset, who confesses to keeping company with Elizabeth Stile. (147)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 147

Alice Eglestone   Witness

A woman from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who allegedly witnessed the possession of Margaret Hooper. As part of the Hooper's household, she is also witness to the invasion of the bear-like monster (Anonymous 245) which pushes Margaret Hooper around the house; she is also present at the dispossession of Margaret Hooper, where a child surrounded by bright light (Anonymous 246) appeared while the household prayed together. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, Cover

Alice Foster   Victim

A woman from Dagenham in the County of Essex and wife of Richard Foster. Alice Foster is allegedly bewitched to death by Joan Upney by virtue of one of her familiar toads. Foster's death was represented as retribution for her husband's claim that Upney was a witch. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331153)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331153

Alice Fowler   Witch

Alice Fowler is a woman from the London parishes of Shadwell and Wapping, described as a widow of ancient mariner of "about the Age of Forescore Years." She is well known as a "malicious ill-natured woman and for many years had been reputed a witch," having so badly frightened a girl she nursed circa 1664 that she never fully recovered and maintained all her life that Fowler was a witch. This girl was not the only one who accused Fowler of being a witch -- her own son, Walter Fowler, did as well. (Walter) Fowler was also a person of ill repute; he was transported to Barbados and eventually hanged there for robbing a house and killing his wife. Alice Fowler was generally seen as a woman who "generally got Drunk, and being a very Debauched and Leud Woman," who is "despised and slighted by the Neighbourhood." Her reputation was further damaged by the fact that she supplements the income she gets by selling biscuits to bawdy houses and by accepting alms from Trinity House. Fowler is discovered dead one day. Her body was cold as clay and her thumbs and toes tied (a sign she had been swum). Her nosy neighbours search strangely stinking body and discover "teats" on her body, "four small ones and one very big, and that they were all of them as black as a Coal." (1-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 1-3

Alice Gooderidge   Witch

A woman from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, who is found to have large black teats on her body and allegedly bewitches Thomas Darling. According to John Darrell, Gooderidge set her familiar Minny on Darling, and confessed to being a witch. (4)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 4

Alice Grey   Witch

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Hunt   Witch

Ales Hunt is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, mother or step mother of Febey Hunt, sister of Margery Sammon, and the daughter of Widow Barnes. According to her daughter, Hunt keeps two familiars, Jack and Robbin, next to her bed in an earthen pot with woll. She feeds them "with milke out of a blacke trening dishe," and sent them at least once to Hayward of Frowicke. Urlsey Kempe picks up this narrative and suggests that "shee asked Tyffin her white spirite, what Hunts wiues spririte had done: And then it told this examinate, that it had killed Heywarde of Frowicke sixe beastes which were lately dressed of the gargette. And sayeth, that her sayde spirite tolde her, that Huntes wiues spirite had a droppe of her blood for a rewarde: but shee sayeth, that shee asked not her spirite vpon what place of her body it was." Kempe appears again in Hunt's narrative, claiming that Hunt and her mother, the Widow Barnes, had bewitched Elizabeth Durrant after her father, Henry, a local butcher, denied them pork. At first, Hunt denies all charges against her. Brian Darcy claims that Hunt, falling on her knees and with tears streaming down her face, confessed to having had Jack and Robbin only six days before she was examined. The two spirits allegedly told her that "the sayde Ursley Kempe woulde bewray her this Examinate, and willed her therefore to shift for her selfe. And so they went from her, and sithence this Examinate saith shee sawe them not." She also informed against her sister, claiming she too kept familiars. Hunt is indicted on the charges of bewitching six of William Hayward's cows to death and bewitching Elizabeth Durrant to death. She pleads not guilty and is found not guilty on both charges. (A5)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A5

Alice Huson   Witch

A woman from Burton Agnes in the County of York, who allegedly had the reputation for being a witch. She is employed by the Corbet family to take care of "small matters" such as tending to the turkeys. She is accused of bewitching Faith Corbet after Faith's gloves go missing from the kitchen, and she suspects that Huson, "the Old Witch had gotten them." Faith has fits that are said to be a result of Huson's witchcraft. (54)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54

Alice Letteridge   Witness

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, whom Samuel Pacy alleged in his deposition approached Amy Denny while she was in the stocks. He claimed that she, along with Jane Buxton, asked Denny what caused Deborah Pacy's illness. Denny responded by suggesting that Samuel Pacy was making too much of a fuss about his daughter, and that she had taken far better care of her own children. (21-22)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 21-22

Alice Manfield   Co-conspirator

Ales Manfield is a sixty-three year old woman from Thorpe in the county of Essex who for approximately twelve years allegedly shared two male and two female familiars in the shape of black cats with Margaret Grevell: Robin, Jack, William, Puppet (alias Mamet) for twelve years which she keeps in a wool lined box on her shelf. Manfield serves as witness against Mother Ewstace, claiming that she had a white, a gray, and a black feline familiar which she used to kill a child. She also stands as witness against Mother Grevell, claiming that Grevell had plagued Mother Ewstance's husband to death. However, more often than not, she claims to have worked with Grevell. Manfield allegedly sends Robin to lame Robert Cheston's bull (circa 1575) and Grevell sends Jack to lame Cheston himself (circa 1580) beginning on his toe, but causing his death. After Joan Cheston refused to give Manfield her curds, she claims to have sent Puppet (alias Mamet) "foure of her Beastes," and after John Sayer ruined her yard with his cart, she has Puppet ensure that the same cart became stuck and would not move (as Sayer tells the story, the cart became stuck when the man thatching his barn refused to thatch Manfield's oven until he got permission to do so). Around Michaelmas, all four familiars allegedly took a trip together to assist Cecily Sellis in the burning of Ross' barn and cattle. Her familiar, William, allegedly gave notice to Manfield for the whole group, claiming that since she would soon be apprehended, they would go to work for Urseley Kempe, Margery Sammon, Ales Hunt, or Mother Torner (aka Joan Turner). Lynd's wife would not give her milk, that her cow would not feed her twenty day old calf (which died). She is indicted as a witch, but not charged as one. Rather, she is charged for arson. She is found guilty of co-conspiring with Cecily Sellis to burn Richard Ross's barn and "field of grain worth 100 marks." (D5-D8)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D8

Alice Manfield   Witch

Ales Manfield is a sixty-three year old woman from Thorpe in the county of Essex who for approximately twelve years allegedly shared two male and two female familiars in the shape of black cats with Margaret Grevell: Robin, Jack, William, Puppet (alias Mamet) for twelve years which she keeps in a wool lined box on her shelf. Manfield serves as witness against Mother Ewstace, claiming that she had a white, a gray, and a black feline familiar which she used to kill a child. She also stands as witness against Mother Grevell, claiming that Grevell had plagued Mother Ewstance's husband to death. However, more often than not, she claims to have worked with Grevell. Manfield allegedly sends Robin to lame Robert Cheston's bull (circa 1575) and Grevell sends Jack to lame Cheston himself (circa 1580) beginning on his toe, but causing his death. After Joan Cheston refused to give Manfield her curds, she claims to have sent Puppet (alias Mamet) "foure of her Beastes," and after John Sayer ruined her yard with his cart, she has Puppet ensure that the same cart became stuck and would not move (as Sayer tells the story, the cart became stuck when the man thatching his barn refused to thatch Manfield's oven until he got permission to do so). Around Michaelmas, all four familiars allegedly took a trip together to assist Cecily Sellis in the burning of Ross' barn and cattle. Her familiar, William, allegedly gave notice to Manfield for the whole group, claiming that since she would soon be apprehended, they would go to work for Urseley Kempe, Margery Sammon, Ales Hunt, or Mother Torner (aka Joan Turner). Lynd's wife would not give her milk, that her cow would not feed her twenty day old calf (which died). She is indicted as a witch, but not charged as one. Rather, she is charged for arson. She is found guilty of co-conspiring with Cecily Sellis to burn Richard Ross's barn and "field of grain worth 100 marks." (D5-D8)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D8

Alice Newman   Witch

Ales Newman is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who is accused of bewitching at least four people: Thorlow's wife (on the knee), John Stratton's wife (on the back -- to her death), Letherdalls' child, Johnson (the tax / alms collector) and his wife (unto the death), Bulter (who languished still in pain), the "late Lorde Darcey, (whereof hee dyed)", and her "ownher husband, William Newman. (Ales) Newman confessed nothing herself and was accused of being obstinate. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Cecily Sellis, Ellen Southern, and Agnes / Annis Glascock at the Colchester Goal. (Image 53)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Image 53

Alice Newman   Co-conspirator

Ales Newman is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who is accused of bewitching at least four people: Thorlow's wife (on the knee), John Stratton's wife (on the back -- to her death), Letherdalls' child, Johnson (the tax / alms collector) and his wife (unto the death), Bulter (who languished still in pain), the "late Lorde Darcey, (whereof hee dyed)", and her "ownher husband, William Newman. (Ales) Newman confessed nothing herself and was accused of being obstinate. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Cecily Sellis, Ellen Southern, and Agnes / Annis Glascock at the Colchester Goal. (Image 53)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Image 53

Alice Nokes   Witch

Mother Nokes is a woman from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex believed to have a daughter and a familiar spirit named Tom. She was tried for witchcraft at the Chelmsford assizes and found guilty. Nokes allegedly used witchcraft to cripple a boy in Thomas Spycer's service (Anonymous 366); a servant of Spycer's (Anonymous 58) had snatched a pair of gloves from her daughter's pocket and ignored Alice Noke's demands to return them, then later sent Anonymous 366 to return the gloves on his behalf. Nokes nevertheless crippled the boy's limbs in revenge. At another occasion, Nokes allegedly caused a tailor's wife's nursing child to die in retaliation for an affair with Noke's husband. She is also said to have caused a plow horse belonging to Thomas Spycer to die when the plowman would not answer her question. Mother Nokes was hanged for murder by witchcraft in April 1579. (15-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 15-17

Alice Norrington   Witness

The mother of alleged demoniac Mildred Norrington. (71)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 71

Alice Nutter   Relative of Victim

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Richard Nutter, and the mother of Myles Nutter. She was charged with bewitching Henry Mytton to death and pronounced guilty. She was elderly, wealthy and of good reputation, and maintained her innocence to the end. Alice is said to be "a rich woman; had a great estate, and children of good hope: in the common opinion of the world, of good temper, free from enuy or malice." According to James Device, Alice conspired with Elizabeth Southerns and Elizabeth Device in Mytton's death after Mytton refused to give Southerns a penny, that Alice had been seen attending a meeting at Southerns' home, and that she had been at a feast of witches held at Malking Tower. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Nutter   Witch

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Richard Nutter, and the mother of Myles Nutter. She was charged with bewitching Henry Mytton to death and pronounced guilty. She was elderly, wealthy and of good reputation, and maintained her innocence to the end. Alice is said to be "a rich woman; had a great estate, and children of good hope: in the common opinion of the world, of good temper, free from enuy or malice." According to James Device, Alice conspired with Elizabeth Southerns and Elizabeth Device in Mytton's death after Mytton refused to give Southerns a penny, that Alice had been seen attending a meeting at Southerns' home, and that she had been at a feast of witches held at Malking Tower. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Poole   Victim

A woman from Hatfield in the county of Hertfordshire, known to be the wife of Richard Poole; Alice Poole is allegedly cursed by Elizabeth Francis as punishment for not lending yeast. She languishes and then dies. Francis is charged for killing Alice "by malice aforethought" at the Chelmsford assizes, and found guilty. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 6

Alice Read   Un-witcher

A woman from Newmarket in the county of Suffok who is asked by Sir Martin Stuteville to go visit a man, Thomas Paman, who suspects he is bewitched (possibly by her). Read is "presumed to be a witch," and violently attacked by Paman upon arrival. Read appears to leave the attack somewhat unscathed and is never prosecuted as a witch; Paman retracts his bewitchment. (198-199)

Appears in:
, Great Britain. Public Record Office. Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles I, 1629-1631. London: 1830, 198-199

Alice Read   Witch

A woman from Newmarket in the county of Suffok who is asked by Sir Martin Stuteville to go visit a man, Thomas Paman, who suspects he is bewitched (possibly by her). Read is "presumed to be a witch," and violently attacked by Paman upon arrival. Read appears to leave the attack somewhat unscathed and is never prosecuted as a witch; Paman retracts his bewitchment. (198-199)

Appears in:
, Great Britain. Public Record Office. Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles I, 1629-1631. London: 1830, 198-199

Alice Smith   Witness

A woman from London, dwelling in Bishop's Gate Street, who witnesses the monstrous birth of a misshapen child in Sandwich, Kent (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News out of Kent of a Monstrous and Misshapen Child. London: 1609, 3

Alice Smythe   Accuser

One of three women (including Katherine Barbor and Mary Aldridge) who bring forward charges in the case against Emma Branch. ()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Alice Swallow   Witch

A spinster from Little Baddow who is indicted at the Essex Assize for four separate separate charges on March 2, 1570. She is firstly indicted for bewitching Alice, the wife of William Basticke who languished and then died. Swallow pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. Her punishment is unknown. Next she is indicted (on the same day) for allegedly bewitching John Daggnell of Little Baddow, a husbandman, so that "his life was despaired of". Swallow pleads not guilty. Next, she is indicted for allegedly bewitching four horses worth twenty marks belonging to John Frank, causing their deaths. She pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. Finally, Swallow is indicted for allegedly bewitching Elizabeth, daughter of William Goores, causing her death. She pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=9)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=9

Alison Device   Witch

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a spinster, the daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister to James Device and Jennet Device, the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, and niece of Christopher Howgate; she was imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft in Lancaster Castle, tried and ultimately executed. Alison comes from a family long suspected of and collectively accused of witchcraft; Southerns alleged that miller Richard Baldwin once called both her and Alison whores and witches. Alison claimed in her confession that Southerns badgered her into accepting a familiar and letting it suck from her. She would often assist Southerns, who was blind, and gave witness against her, drawing on their close association to accuse her of bewitching various people, animals and food items. According to her brother James, Henry Bullocke once accused Alison of bewitching Bullock's child, and that she had not only admitted to it but begged Bullocke's forgiveness. Elizabeth Device was thought to have provided all her children with familiars to assist them. Both Jennet and James claimed during their examinations to have attended a gathering of witches at Southerns' home for the purpose of naming Alison's familiar, but that Alison had not attended; James also claimed that Alison was involved in a plot to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and to blow up the Assizes. Alison stood accused in court of bewitching a peddler named John Law so that he was lamed and his body wasted and consumed. She confessed to having a familiar in the shape of a black dog, and that she gave it her soul and permitted it to suck at her breast just below her nipples, where the skin became blue for the next six months. She claimed that when the peddler refused to sell her pins, the black dog offered to lame him for her, and she agreed. Law claimed that the dog had " fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance." Abraham Law, John Law's son, claimed that his father gave Alison the pins, not refused to sell to her, and that furthermore she had not had the money to pay for them. Alison was found guilty on the strength of her own confession, and condemned to death. (B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Alison Device   Relative of Witch

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a spinster, the daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister to James Device and Jennet Device, the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, and niece of Christopher Howgate; she was imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft in Lancaster Castle, tried and ultimately executed. Alison comes from a family long suspected of and collectively accused of witchcraft; Southerns alleged that miller Richard Baldwin once called both her and Alison whores and witches. Alison claimed in her confession that Southerns badgered her into accepting a familiar and letting it suck from her. She would often assist Southerns, who was blind, and gave witness against her, drawing on their close association to accuse her of bewitching various people, animals and food items. According to her brother James, Henry Bullocke once accused Alison of bewitching Bullock's child, and that she had not only admitted to it but begged Bullocke's forgiveness. Elizabeth Device was thought to have provided all her children with familiars to assist them. Both Jennet and James claimed during their examinations to have attended a gathering of witches at Southerns' home for the purpose of naming Alison's familiar, but that Alison had not attended; James also claimed that Alison was involved in a plot to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and to blow up the Assizes. Alison stood accused in court of bewitching a peddler named John Law so that he was lamed and his body wasted and consumed. She confessed to having a familiar in the shape of a black dog, and that she gave it her soul and permitted it to suck at her breast just below her nipples, where the skin became blue for the next six months. She claimed that when the peddler refused to sell her pins, the black dog offered to lame him for her, and she agreed. Law claimed that the dog had " fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance." Abraham Law, John Law's son, claimed that his father gave Alison the pins, not refused to sell to her, and that furthermore she had not had the money to pay for them. Alison was found guilty on the strength of her own confession, and condemned to death. (B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Amis Willuby   Midwife

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Amis Willuby   Witch-Searcher

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Amy Denny   Witch

A widow from Lowestoft in the county of Essex who was accused, along with Rose Cullender, of bewitching Elizabeth and Ann Durent, Jane Bocking, Susan Chandler, William Durent, and Elizabeth and Deborah Pacey. She pleaded not guilty at her trial, but was found guilty of thirteen counts of witchcraft and sentenced to hang; her execution was carried out March 17, 1662. Numerous people gave deposition against her: Dorothy Durent alleged that Denny caused her infant son William to become sick, and that she also bewitched her daughter Elizabeth to death. Samuel Pacey, father to Elizabeth and Deborah, alleged that his daughters saw Cullender and Denny's apparitions during their fits of soreness, deafness, dumbness, blindness, or coughing pins and nails. He also claimed that the apparitions threatened the girls with torments ten times worse if they told what they had seen, and that Denny prevented the girls from saying Lord, Jesus or Christ. Pacey's sister Margaret Arnold, alleged that the Pacey girls were tormented by imps directed by Cullender and Denny. Denny was brought to Elizabeth Pacey by order of the judge, while Elizabeth's eyes were closed to see if the girl could detect the witch's presence; Elizabeth was seen to attack Denny as soon as their hands touched. Richard Spencer alleged that he heard Denny say that the Devil would not let her rest until she was revenged on Ann Sandeswell; Sandeswell alleged that Denny had killed geese of hers, caused a chimney to fall, and a firkin of fish to be lost into the sea. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 4

Amy Ratcliffe   Witness

A woman from London, dwelling in Shore's Ditch, who witnesses the monstrous birth of a misshapen child in Sandwich, Kent (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News out of Kent of a Monstrous and Misshapen Child. London: 1609, 3

Andrew Aewart   Victim

Andrew Aewart is a man from Ringcroft of Stalking, Scotland whose head is hurt by the spirit allegedly haunting Andrew Mackie's house. (9-10)

Appears in:
Telfair, Alexander. A True Relation of an Apparition Expressions and Actings of a Spirit. Edinburgh: 1696, 9-10

Andrew Byles   Victim

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be wealthy. Elizabeth Francis allegedly desired Andrew Byles as a husband, and was advised by her familiar Sathan to allow him to "abuse" her first. She does so, but Byles refuses to marry her. Francis, desiring revenge, had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later kill him with a touch. After Byles death, Francis finds herself pregnant with his child and ends the pregnancy with a decoction of a herb Sathan recommends to her. (13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Andrew Cansfield   Accuser

A man from London who is paid forty pounds to testify against Margaret Wellam. Wellam is accused upon suspicion "to be a witch and to give sucke or feede evill spirrits." (265)

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937, 265

Andrew Goodwin   Victim

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin. He cares for the Goodwin family accounts, and is married to a most virtuous woman. He suspects Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones of unnatural proceedings, both with his father and Roger Crey. He is also taken away by two bailiffs at the request of Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon, from his own home. His siblings and he file a petition with the Justices of Southwark against the two women, and he is witness to all their trickery. He does not come to the trial, for fear of "these Litigious women." (3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 3

Andrew Mackie   Victim

A man from Ringcroft of Stalking, Scotland whose house is infected with a devilish spirit for over four months (5-6)

Appears in:
Telfair, Alexander. A True Relation of an Apparition Expressions and Actings of a Spirit. Edinburgh: 1696, 5-6

Andrew West   Witness

A man from Little Oakly in the county of Essex, husband to Anne West, and a farmer or specifically a pig farmer. West and his wife Anne testify about a number of odd occurrences which happen, which point to Annis Heard as the generative element. Andrew West falls afoul with Annis Heard after he appears to rescind a deal his wife made with her. Anne has offered to give Heard a pig at below market value because she could not afford to keep it. In the mean time, Andrew, claiming he suspected that Heard no longer wanted it because she never came to pick it up, sold two of his free pigs to another neighbor. Shortly thereafter, one of his best pigs grew frighteningly ill. It "fel vpon a crying as they stood all together before the dore in the yard, and the rest of the pigs we~t away from yt: at the length the pig that cried folowed stackering as though it were lame in the hinder partes." He called his labours from all around and a number of them gave him suggestions which amounted countermagics; "some of them said, burne it, other said, cut of the eares & burn them, and so they did, & then the pig amended by & by." (E8v-Fv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E8v-Fv

Andrew West   Accuser

A man from Little Oakly in the county of Essex, husband to Anne West, and a farmer or specifically a pig farmer. West and his wife Anne testify about a number of odd occurrences which happen, which point to Annis Heard as the generative element. Andrew West falls afoul with Annis Heard after he appears to rescind a deal his wife made with her. Anne has offered to give Heard a pig at below market value because she could not afford to keep it. In the mean time, Andrew, claiming he suspected that Heard no longer wanted it because she never came to pick it up, sold two of his free pigs to another neighbor. Shortly thereafter, one of his best pigs grew frighteningly ill. It "fel vpon a crying as they stood all together before the dore in the yard, and the rest of the pigs we~t away from yt: at the length the pig that cried folowed stackering as though it were lame in the hinder partes." He called his labours from all around and a number of them gave him suggestions which amounted countermagics; "some of them said, burne it, other said, cut of the eares & burn them, and so they did, & then the pig amended by & by." (E8v-Fv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E8v-Fv

Ann Duffield   Accuser

A woman from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how Elizabeth Mallory suffered from various fits for twelve months and how Mallory repeatedly accused Mary Wade of having bewitched her, also threatening Wade that she (Mallory) would be ill and force Wade to be tried before a justice and punished if she did not confess to wronging her. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Ann Duffield   Witness

A woman from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how Elizabeth Mallory suffered from various fits for twelve months and how Mallory repeatedly accused Mary Wade of having bewitched her, also threatening Wade that she (Mallory) would be ill and force Wade to be tried before a justice and punished if she did not confess to wronging her. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Ann Dugdale   Relative of Victim

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the mother of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects and foretells events. Ann Dugdale testifies that her son's fits lasted about a year, that he visited two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. She claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date he himself predicted. (29)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 29

Ann Dugdale   Witness

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the mother of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects and foretells events. Ann Dugdale testifies that her son's fits lasted about a year, that he visited two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. She claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date he himself predicted. (29)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 29

Ann Durent   Demoniac

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Edmund Durent, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender after her mother refused to sell Cullender herrings. According to Edmund Durent's deposition, Durent was afflicted with great pain in her stomach like the pricking of pins, fell into swooning fits, and upon recovery claimed that she had seen an apparition of Cullender which threatening to torment her. She was also said to have vomited pins, was rendered speechless in court, and was observed to fall into violent fits when brought before Cullender during the trial. (33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-35

Ann Durent   Victim

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Edmund Durent, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender after her mother refused to sell Cullender herrings. According to Edmund Durent's deposition, Durent was afflicted with great pain in her stomach like the pricking of pins, fell into swooning fits, and upon recovery claimed that she had seen an apparition of Cullender which threatening to torment her. She was also said to have vomited pins, was rendered speechless in court, and was observed to fall into violent fits when brought before Cullender during the trial. (33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-35

Ann Earle   Witness

A girl (the daughter of Katherine Earle), presumably from Rhodes in the county of Yorkshire, who encounters Henry Hatfield after he has been struck in the neck (by Katherine Earle allegedly). Perplexed, she tells him: "Doth the divell nipp the in the necke? but he will nipp the better yet." (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Ann Holland   Witness

A woman from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who stands as a witness in the trial relating to the nature of Mary Hill's alleged fits, characterized by the vomiting of crooked pins. Ann Holland "upon [her] oath desposited, that they hookt out of the Navel of the said Mary Hill, as she lay in a dead fit, crooked Pins, small Nails, and small pieces of Brass." These were produced and presented in Court to the judge and jury. (75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Ann Langdon   Witness

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with mistress Thomasin Gidly, and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together. (180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Ann Langdon   Victim

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with mistress Thomasin Gidly, and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together. (180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Ann More   Suspect

A woman from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who allegedly appears before Mary Hill during of on her fits, which are characterized by her vomiting up crooked nails. She is described as "an old woman," and appears with another woman, Margery Coombes, to Mary Hill. A warrant is sent out from two Justices of the Peace, and Ann More is "apprehended and brought to the sessions," and committed to the county goal. When she is tried at the "Tannton Assizes, by my Lord Chief Justice Holt," she is acquitted by the Jury (Anonymous 405), "for want of Evidence." (75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Ann Sandeswell   Accuser

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the wife of Cornelius Sandeswell, who gave deposition against Amy Denny in court. In her deposition, Ann Sandeswell claimed that she had bought geese from Denny, but Denny destroyed them when Sandeswell did not come get them fast enough for Denny's liking. Sandeswell also alleged that Denny was a tenant of her husband Cornelius shortly after the incident with the geese, and during her tenancy caused a new chimney to fall down; furthermore, Denny caused Sandeswell's brother to lose a quarter-barrel of fish she had requested into the sea. (55-57)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-57

Ann Sandeswell   Witness

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the wife of Cornelius Sandeswell, who gave deposition against Amy Denny in court. In her deposition, Ann Sandeswell claimed that she had bought geese from Denny, but Denny destroyed them when Sandeswell did not come get them fast enough for Denny's liking. Sandeswell also alleged that Denny was a tenant of her husband Cornelius shortly after the incident with the geese, and during her tenancy caused a new chimney to fall down; furthermore, Denny caused Sandeswell's brother to lose a quarter-barrel of fish she had requested into the sea. (55-57)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-57

Ann Whittaker   Witness

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who witnesses many of Richard Dugdale's alleged curses. She also speaks often with Richard Dugdale, and recounts that Richard Dugdale's fits began on a day he was making Hay, and had to lie down. During his rest, several apparitions appeared to him. The fits Ann Whittaker witnesses include dancing, and foretelling events that Richard Dugdale had no possible way of knowing. (68-69)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 68-69

Anna Ashwell   Midwife

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Anna Ashwell   Witch-Searcher

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Annaball Durrant   Accuser

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the wife of George Durrant. Durrant encountered Johnson one day while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Having eaten the snack, the child strangely "shricked and cried out." Mr. Dawber, a local surgeon, could "find no naturall cause of its lamenesse," and her daughter "continued for the space of eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died." Annaball is herself is "taken with extreme pains in her body," torments which come every day of every few days and last seven or eight months. She describes the pain as "if she had been to be delivered of a child, but was not with child." She is also temporarily, but severely lamed; she recovers just in time to testify against Johnson, an act encouraged by her husband, when her too begins to suffer sweating and paninting "in great extremity," having cried out "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life. Durrant believes that Mary Johnson was the "cause of her childs death: And that she is now the cause of her husbands extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Annaball Durrant   Victim

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the wife of George Durrant. Durrant encountered Johnson one day while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Having eaten the snack, the child strangely "shricked and cried out." Mr. Dawber, a local surgeon, could "find no naturall cause of its lamenesse," and her daughter "continued for the space of eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died." Annaball is herself is "taken with extreme pains in her body," torments which come every day of every few days and last seven or eight months. She describes the pain as "if she had been to be delivered of a child, but was not with child." She is also temporarily, but severely lamed; she recovers just in time to testify against Johnson, an act encouraged by her husband, when her too begins to suffer sweating and paninting "in great extremity," having cried out "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life. Durrant believes that Mary Johnson was the "cause of her childs death: And that she is now the cause of her husbands extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Anne Alderman   Witch

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anne Armstrong   Demoniac

A servant from birks-nooke, Yorkshire (presumably Birks Fell, Yorkshire) who is sent by her master, Mabel Fouler of Burtree House, to go buy eggs from Anne Forster. they could not agree on a price, however, and so Forster desired to look at Armstrong's head. Three days later as Armstrong is back at Burtree house and in the pasture shortly after day break, a man approaches her and asks her where she was the Friday previous. Armstrong relates that she was trying to get eggs from Ann Forster. He responds that the woman who looked at Armstrong's head "should be the first that made a horse of her spirrit, and who should be the next that would ride her ; and into what shape and liknesses she should be changed, if she would turne to there God." Then, Armstrong relates at the deposition that "And withall tould this informer how they would use all meanes they could to allure her: first, by there tricks, by rideing in the house in empty wood dishes that had never beene wett, and also in egg shells ; and how to obtaine whatever they desired by swinging in a rope; and with severall dishes of meate and drinke. But, if she eate not of their meate, they could not harme her. And, at last, tould her how it should be divulgd by eateing a piece of cheese, which should be laid by her when she laie downe in a field with her apron cast over her head, and so left her. As soon as the informant left her, she allegedly fell dead and remained so until six in the morning. She then allegedly starts suffering from these "fits" almost every day and sometimes a few times a day. She would sometimes fall into a fit from evening until dawn and on one such occasion, Anne Forster allegedly came to her and tried to put a bridle on her who was now "in the likeness of a horse." She alleges that after this incident, about a dozen people on horseback appear to her, asking her to sing for them as they danced around her, first in the shape of hares, then cats, then mice and several other shapes. They then returned home on their horses, led by their "protector." They then repeated the even for another six or seven nights. After dancing, they would go to the "Eideing house" where they all sat at a table. In the middle of a room, there was a rope hanging and everyone would touch it several times which made whatever they desired appear on the table, including meat and drink. When Armstrong tried to avoid joining them, they turned into their "own shape" and threatened her. They then never bothered her again. One day, while in the field, she found a piece of cheese and brought it home. After that, she divulged everything " hath disclosed all which she formerly kept secrett". (192-193)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 192-193

Anne Arthur   Witness

A poor woman from Deptford, in the county of Kent, who makes a living by selling cheese cakes and often swears and calls upon the devil. She becomes distracted and disorderly after allegedly meeting with an apparition upon coming home from working in London one evening. Arthur tells divers persons that as she was walking to her home in Deptford after a day of working, a "Human shape, in a dark habit" approached her. At first, she thought it was a man, but given his stern expression and consternation, she began doubting it was the Devil. The apparition followed her as she made her way home. In fear, she began running, but the apparition followed her asking where she was headed. Explaining that she was a poor woman, she was heading home to Deptford after selling cakes in the city. She claims that, in response, the apparition offers her a bag full of silver which she refuses out of fear. The apparition allegedly tried to persuade her to take his offering and even offered her gold. Anne Arthur claims to have then run away screaming until other villagers found her and brought her home. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent. London: 1685, 1-2

Anne Arthur   Victim

A poor woman from Deptford, in the county of Kent, who makes a living by selling cheese cakes and often swears and calls upon the devil. She becomes distracted and disorderly after allegedly meeting with an apparition upon coming home from working in London one evening. Arthur tells divers persons that as she was walking to her home in Deptford after a day of working, a "Human shape, in a dark habit" approached her. At first, she thought it was a man, but given his stern expression and consternation, she began doubting it was the Devil. The apparition followed her as she made her way home. In fear, she began running, but the apparition followed her asking where she was headed. Explaining that she was a poor woman, she was heading home to Deptford after selling cakes in the city. She claims that, in response, the apparition offers her a bag full of silver which she refuses out of fear. The apparition allegedly tried to persuade her to take his offering and even offered her gold. Anne Arthur claims to have then run away screaming until other villagers found her and brought her home. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent. London: 1685, 1-2

Anne Ashby   Witch

Anne Ashby is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who is charged and executed for witchcraft. (3-4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 3-4

Anne Baker   Un-witcher

Anne Baker is a spinster from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire who would allegedly have visions and hear voices from thin air. She described a vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, for which William Fairebarne beat her and broke her head. Another time, she heard a voice say that the next day she and her master would die; the next day a crow beat her master to death, but she prayed him back to life and he was sick for two weeks instead. She was charged of witchcraft on suspicion of bewitching Anne Stannidge's child; Stannidge claimed that, after she consulted with Baker on the child's illness, she needed to burn some of the child's hair and nail parings in order to get Baker to bring the child home and let her go. She was also charged with bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death for give her inferior bread as alms, and of saying Joan Gylle's child was forespoken. She denied causing any deaths, but admitted to diagnosing Gylle's child. Henry Milles accused her of causing him two or three poor nights to which she responded "you should haue let me alone then." She confessed that Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis told her that a rotting glove belonging to Lord Henry had been found, that it was thought that it was buried so that his liver would rot and waste as the glove did. Baker also claimed to have a "white Dogge, which shee calleth her good Spirit." (E1-E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E1-E2

Anne Baker   Prophet

Anne Baker is a spinster from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire who would allegedly have visions and hear voices from thin air. She described a vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, for which William Fairebarne beat her and broke her head. Another time, she heard a voice say that the next day she and her master would die; the next day a crow beat her master to death, but she prayed him back to life and he was sick for two weeks instead. She was charged of witchcraft on suspicion of bewitching Anne Stannidge's child; Stannidge claimed that, after she consulted with Baker on the child's illness, she needed to burn some of the child's hair and nail parings in order to get Baker to bring the child home and let her go. She was also charged with bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death for give her inferior bread as alms, and of saying Joan Gylle's child was forespoken. She denied causing any deaths, but admitted to diagnosing Gylle's child. Henry Milles accused her of causing him two or three poor nights to which she responded "you should haue let me alone then." She confessed that Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis told her that a rotting glove belonging to Lord Henry had been found, that it was thought that it was buried so that his liver would rot and waste as the glove did. Baker also claimed to have a "white Dogge, which shee calleth her good Spirit." (E1-E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E1-E2

Anne Baker   Witch

Anne Baker is a spinster from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire who would allegedly have visions and hear voices from thin air. She described a vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, for which William Fairebarne beat her and broke her head. Another time, she heard a voice say that the next day she and her master would die; the next day a crow beat her master to death, but she prayed him back to life and he was sick for two weeks instead. She was charged of witchcraft on suspicion of bewitching Anne Stannidge's child; Stannidge claimed that, after she consulted with Baker on the child's illness, she needed to burn some of the child's hair and nail parings in order to get Baker to bring the child home and let her go. She was also charged with bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death for give her inferior bread as alms, and of saying Joan Gylle's child was forespoken. She denied causing any deaths, but admitted to diagnosing Gylle's child. Henry Milles accused her of causing him two or three poor nights to which she responded "you should haue let me alone then." She confessed that Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis told her that a rotting glove belonging to Lord Henry had been found, that it was thought that it was buried so that his liver would rot and waste as the glove did. Baker also claimed to have a "white Dogge, which shee calleth her good Spirit." (E1-E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E1-E2

Anne Beaver   Witch

A widow from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield), who is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on six people (Edward Boulton, John Baylie, Thomas Coleman, Josias Boswell, Richard Frisby, and Susan Mason) causing them to become ill and leading to their deaths. Beaver pleads not guilty to all the charges and is acquitted on all counts. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

Anne Benson   Accuser

A woman from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who along with Anne Huggins, John Batty, Margaret Day, Elizabeth Hartridge, and Anne Staines, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became wasted and consumed. (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

Anne Blundy   Witch

A woman from Strood in Kent who is accused of bewitching Mary Griffin so that she "languished until 7 Feb. and then died." (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Anne Bodenham   Magician

A woman who had acted as Dr. Lamb's domestic servant in London circa 1622?, a role for which she earned the moniker "Dr. Lamb's darling," and the place where she claims to have first learned the mystical arts and gained Dr. Lambe's book. In the 1650s, she is in Fisherton Anger, a suburb of Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, and the wife of Edward Bodenham. Here she evidently worked as a teacher, was seen as a papist, a gossip, cunning woman and a wisewoman, willing to "undertake to cure almost any diseases, which she did for the most part by charms and spels, but sometimes used physical ingredients, to cover her abominable practices." Her bread and butter came from "procur[ing] things that were lost, and to restore [stolen] goods. Bodenham practices image, familiar, and word magic. She claims she can control demons, but uses image magic, and basic psychological manipulation, to do her work. She evidently makes the strategic mistake of trying to recruit Anne Styles, a young servant girl with whom she had a number of encounters. In one account, she gave her soul to the Devil "sealed in a bloody scroule," and under his instruction, seduced the maid Anne Styles into also signing over her soul. Mistress Bodenham uses a looking glass to conjure. Anne Styles comes to her afterwards, and says to Mistress Bodenham that "she would flye" to London, which Mistress Bodenham agrees too. Mistress Bodenham also travels to Stockbridge when Anne Styles is there, immediately alleviating Anne Styles' torments caused by the Devil. Mistress Bodenham tries to convince the Gentleman to let her impart "all her art," to him, which he refuses. Bodenham allegedly helps Richard Goddard's lost spoon, helps find three pieces of Thomas Mason's lost gold, helps determine if Elizabeth Rosewel's sister and daughter in law, Sarah Goddard, was trying to poison her, makes a charm protect Master Mason from Master Rawley's mischief and foretells if Mason would win a law suit against Richard Goodard, predicts who Mistriss Rosewel would marry, sends Styles again to Bodenham who have her visit a local apothecary to buy Arsenic to burn as a bit of counter magic to protect Mistress Goddard and provides poison to use against Mistriss Sarah and Mistriss Anne Goddard. Her final mistake is offering Anne Styles, who had been discovered to be the person who bought the arsenic meant to be used against Mistress Goddard, and thus, an attempted murderer, an apprenticeship. Styles soon acted like a woman possessed and shortly thereafter, Anne Bodenham was arrested. She was sentanced to be hanged as a witch. She is executed on March 19, 1653, after she boasts "she knew full well, She should be a great Lady in hel," and refuses to repent. During her execution, "she did nought but curse and sware," as she went to the gallows drunk. When she was allowed to go up the ladder, she attempted to throw herself off the platform. When asked to forgive her executioner, she replied, "Forgive thee? A pox on thee, turn me off; which were the last words she spake." (1)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 1

Anne Bodenham   Witch

A woman who had acted as Dr. Lamb's domestic servant in London circa 1622?, a role for which she earned the moniker "Dr. Lamb's darling," and the place where she claims to have first learned the mystical arts and gained Dr. Lambe's book. In the 1650s, she is in Fisherton Anger, a suburb of Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, and the wife of Edward Bodenham. Here she evidently worked as a teacher, was seen as a papist, a gossip, cunning woman and a wisewoman, willing to "undertake to cure almost any diseases, which she did for the most part by charms and spels, but sometimes used physical ingredients, to cover her abominable practices." Her bread and butter came from "procur[ing] things that were lost, and to restore [stolen] goods. Bodenham practices image, familiar, and word magic. She claims she can control demons, but uses image magic, and basic psychological manipulation, to do her work. She evidently makes the strategic mistake of trying to recruit Anne Styles, a young servant girl with whom she had a number of encounters. In one account, she gave her soul to the Devil "sealed in a bloody scroule," and under his instruction, seduced the maid Anne Styles into also signing over her soul. Mistress Bodenham uses a looking glass to conjure. Anne Styles comes to her afterwards, and says to Mistress Bodenham that "she would flye" to London, which Mistress Bodenham agrees too. Mistress Bodenham also travels to Stockbridge when Anne Styles is there, immediately alleviating Anne Styles' torments caused by the Devil. Mistress Bodenham tries to convince the Gentleman to let her impart "all her art," to him, which he refuses. Bodenham allegedly helps Richard Goddard's lost spoon, helps find three pieces of Thomas Mason's lost gold, helps determine if Elizabeth Rosewel's sister and daughter in law, Sarah Goddard, was trying to poison her, makes a charm protect Master Mason from Master Rawley's mischief and foretells if Mason would win a law suit against Richard Goodard, predicts who Mistriss Rosewel would marry, sends Styles again to Bodenham who have her visit a local apothecary to buy Arsenic to burn as a bit of counter magic to protect Mistress Goddard and provides poison to use against Mistriss Sarah and Mistriss Anne Goddard. Her final mistake is offering Anne Styles, who had been discovered to be the person who bought the arsenic meant to be used against Mistress Goddard, and thus, an attempted murderer, an apprenticeship. Styles soon acted like a woman possessed and shortly thereafter, Anne Bodenham was arrested. She was sentanced to be hanged as a witch. She is executed on March 19, 1653, after she boasts "she knew full well, She should be a great Lady in hel," and refuses to repent. During her execution, "she did nought but curse and sware," as she went to the gallows drunk. When she was allowed to go up the ladder, she attempted to throw herself off the platform. When asked to forgive her executioner, she replied, "Forgive thee? A pox on thee, turn me off; which were the last words she spake." (1)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 1

Anne Bradley   Witch

A widow from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex. Alice Bradley is indicted on four separate instances for witchcraft. Firstly, she is said to have used witchcraft on Robert Philpott so that he languished in his body for over twenty days. A few months later she is charged for having allegedly used witchcraft "against and upon two heafers worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of Philip Barrett, so that she thereby killed and slew the same "juvencas vocat' heafers." She is charged again for she is said to have used witchcraft a few days later "against and upon four hogges worth fifty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Robert James, so that she killed and slew the same hogs." Then, she also allegedly use wicthcraft on Margaret James so that she "languished and wasted in her body for the space of three days, and so has continued and remained." Bradley pleads not guilty to all charges and is acquitted on all charges. (7-8)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 7-8

Anne Butler   Accuser

A woman from Cranbrook in the county of Kent who, along with Samuel Bradshaw and Mary Colman, accuses Elizabeth Scott of murdering John Colman by use of witchcraft. (141-147)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 141-147

Anne Cate (Maidenhead)   Witch

A woman from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex who confesses to having been a witch for some twenty two years. Sometime around 1623, her mother allegedly gave her four imps, James, Prickeare, Robyn, which are mice shaped and Sparrow which was named for its form. These familiar spirits allegedly instructed Cate to "deny God and Christ, which this Examinant did then assent unto," and after which she used them freely to maim and murder. Cate allegedly used these familiars to kill Robert Freeman, John Rawlins's daughter, John Tillet, George Parby's wife, and to kill Samuel Ray's wife and child. These murders avenge the apparent lack of Christian charity in Much Holland. Parby denyed to give this Examinant a pint of Milk. Moreover, they spoke to the critical importance of money to those who have so little. The Rays, mother and child, were killed over Mrs. Ray's refusal to pay back two shillings. Anne Cate was hanged as a witch in Chelmsford in 1645. (34-35)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34-35

Anne Cooper   Witch

A woman from Great Clacton, the wife of John Cooper, the mother of Sara Cooper, and the daughter of Joan Cooper. Anne Cooper allegedly keeps three black mole shaped familars, Wynowe, Jeso, and Panu or (Winne, Jezo, and Panne), a crime for which she is indicted and found guilty, which suck from witch's marks in her nether regions. She likewise allegedly attempts to give her daughter Sara "an Impe in the likenes of a gray Kite." She allegedly "cursed a Colt of one William Cottingams of Clacton aforesaid, and the said Colt broke his neck presently after going out of a gate." Following a disagreement with Joan Rous, she allegedly bewitched her daughter Mary, so that the "said child was strangely taken sick, and languishing, within a short time died." It is not for this murder that she is indicted, however. Cooper was indicted for bewitching two children to death Mary Knights and James Curstissurre. She is found guilty of causing Mary Knight's death. According to one record, Anne is found "dead in gaole," however, this is likely her eighty year old mother, Joan who has died. Anne Cooper appears to be hanged as a witch in 1645. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341138)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341138

Anne Dawse   Victim

A woman from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, who allegedly called Ellen Greene a witch, a whore and a jade. In retribution, Greene sent her familiar HIsse HIsse to bewitch Anne Dawse to death. Dawse died within a fortnight. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anne de Greate   Victim

A woman from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and wife of Michael de Greate, Anne de Great is allegedly bewitched by Mary Wiles and suffers an instantaneous death. Wiles was found guilty of this crime and hanged as a witch in 1645. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2http://seax.essexcc.)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2http://seax.essexcc.

Anne Desborough   Witch

A woman from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a widow who allegedly confessed to have been a witch for 30 years before Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh from some thirty years; she is said to have two mouse-spirits named Tib and Fone which hurt men and cattle respectively. According to Becke and Coysh, she confessed that a brown spirit somewhat larger than a mouse had appeared to her and nipped her while she slept. The spirit then demanded her soul; she prayed to God and it left. Five or six days later, the same mouse-spirit came to her again, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit, and demanded that she permit them to suck her blood. She accepted, and three days later forsook God and Christ and agreed to allow them to take her soul when she died. They would visit her daily thereafter to suck on her body. (10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Anne Fairfax   Demoniac

The infant daughter of Edward Fairfax who dies under mysterious circumstances; she begins bleeding all over her body. (106)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 106

Anne Fairfax   Victim

The infant daughter of Edward Fairfax who dies under mysterious circumstances; she begins bleeding all over her body. (106)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 106

Anne Fellow   Victim

A young woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, daughter of local gentleman Edward Fellow who is allegedly murdered by Temperance Lloyd. Lloyd confessed that "the said black Man or Devil, (or some other black Man or Devil) with her this said Examinant did do some bodily hurt to the said Anne Fellow, and that thereupon the said Anne Fellow did shortly die and depart this life." (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 19

Anne Gamperle   Witch

Anne Gamperle is a woman from Munich, Germany and the alleged the wife of Paule Gamperle-- a man accused of witchcraft and murder. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 6

Anne Goddard   Accuser

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, who is either Richard Goddard's daughter in law, or his daughter, and step daughter to his wife, Mistress Goddard. Mrs Goddard began to suspect that Anne and her sister Sarah, had intended to poison her, a suspicion supported by Mistress Roswell who, along with Goddard herself, sent Anne Styles to visit Anne Bodenham numerous times to get details about this supposed crime. The mode of murder was to be poison, which Bodenham said was hidden under Sarah's bed, then moved to "white Pot set upon the Dresser in the Kitchin" and added to Mistress Goodard's Sage Ale. Styles' suggested there was something odd floating in the Ale. Eventually Anne and her sister Sarah discovered that they were accused off plotting to poison their mother, and " being much moved at it, and to vindicate themselves, that no such aspersion might lie on them (in regard it was also reported, that they should buy one Ounce and halfe of poyson that cost 6 d. at an Apothecaries)" traveled around Salisbury, discovering that Styles had bought the poison herself. Styles was fired and they threatened to press charges against her for slander and attempted murder. (3-9)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 3-9

Anne Godfrey   Demoniac

A woman who is pressured by Thomas Saunders to visit Katherne Malpas during one of her fits. Godfrey begins to experience similar symptoms ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

Anne Goodcole   Witness

A woman in London, wife of Henry Goodcole, and appears to have been a "female physician" in her own right. She claimed under oath to have visited Lady Jennings' daughter, in the company of Lady Fowler, leaving medicine for Elizabeth, but her advise and treatment appear to have been unheeded. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Anne Goodcole   Physician

A woman in London, wife of Henry Goodcole, and appears to have been a "female physician" in her own right. She claimed under oath to have visited Lady Jennings' daughter, in the company of Lady Fowler, leaving medicine for Elizabeth, but her advise and treatment appear to have been unheeded. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Anne Greene   Witch

A woman from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire who allegedly practices witchcraft and who, in John Tatterson's opinion, is in need of salvation. Tatterson testifies (before John Assheton and Egdar Coats) that two weeks before last Christmas, he was "disabled in body." On another night, he was "troubled with ill spiretts" who told him to worship the enemy-- all of which were visible, save Anne Greene, a reputed witch. He was tormented at least four times (possibly on different occasions), but did not give in to their persuasions. Tatterson then approaches Anne Greene, telling her that he was convinced that he needed to purify and sanctify her heart and "worketh out the carnal part," leading her to salvation. During the same trial, Jeannette Hudson of Gargreave claimes that Anne Greene told her that Thomas Tatterson (presumably still John Tatterson) was "overgone with ill tongues." Margaret Wade said that her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed and when she, her mother, came to attend to her, she saw big dog with a dish in its mouth and which had two feet, sitting at the foot of the bed. She then saw three dogs and claimed that Anne Greene was one of them. Then, Anne Greene said of herself that she sometimes used charms to cure the heart. She claims to have used it twice on John Tatterson. She claims to also be able to cure head pains with water and a lock of the sufferer's hair, which she boils together and then throws into a fire to burn. She does not "meddle" with other diseases. (64-65)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64-65

Anne Griffin   Accuser

A woman from Strood in the county of Kent and the mother of Mary Griffin (as well as wife of John Griffin). Anne Griffin is one of four people of accuse Anne Blundy of murdering Mary Griffin. (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Anne Gunter   Demoniac

A young girl who allegedly faked possession under pressure from her father. She had convulsions and vomited pins among other symptoms. She was relatively famous for a short period in the summer and autumn of 1605 when James VI and I interested himself in her alleged possession. Her case attracted the attention of many notable doctors of the time, including William Harvey. (135)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Issue 11, Part 7. London: , 135

Anne Hook   Accuser

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be an Irish cunningwoman, who was allegedly offered money by the confederates to murder Anne Levingston. Hook was also employed to procure witnesses who would swear to the advantage of the confederates; Hook is alleged to have sworn against Levingston herself. (3-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-5

Anne Hook   Cunning-folk

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be an Irish cunningwoman, who was allegedly offered money by the confederates to murder Anne Levingston. Hook was also employed to procure witnesses who would swear to the advantage of the confederates; Hook is alleged to have sworn against Levingston herself. (3-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-5

Anne Howell   Victim

A girl who is allegedly bewitched by Emma Branch. While bewitched, "her whole body and became lame and still so lives." ()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Anne Joad   Accuser

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed." (87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Anne Kirk   Witch

A woman from Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, who was allegedly long suspected of being a witch. She is said to have had a falling out with a woman in the street, and shortly thereafter the woman's child shrieked, pined away and died. The woman's other child met Anne Kirk on the street not long after, and immediately began to suffer tormenting fits, only to recover as soon as Kirk had left. Kirk also tormented a child whose parents had not invited her to its christening; the child remained afflicted until Mother Gillam advised the parents to burn a piece of Kirk's coat with the child's underclothes. She also bewitched an innkeeper's child to death, but not before the innkeeper went to a cunning-man, who identified her as the source of the child's illness. The innkeeper died himself not long after confronting her about it. She also tormented George Nayler and his sister Anne Nayler to death. Master Nayler had money given to the poor at Anne's burial, and Kirk was angered that none was given to her. Kirk began to torment another of Nayler's daughters soon after. Joan Nayler began to be visited by an evil spirit the next night, and began suffering tormenting fits. She accused Kirk of bewitching her while in her fits, and her father procured a warrant from Sir Richard Martin for Kirk's apprehension. Joan was seen to fall into a trance as soon as Kirk came in the door, witnessed by Martin. While Kirk was imprisoned, Martin tried to have her hair cut, having heard that witches' hair could not be. Kirk's hair blunted and spoiled the scissors, proving her a witch. She faced trial on November 30, 1599, and was executed on December 4, 1599 at Tyburn. (99-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 99-103

Anne Lamperill   Witch

A woman from the county of Essex who is imprisoned at Colchester Castle on July 29th, 1639 for being accused and suspected of being a witch. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anne Leech   Witch

A widow from Mistely in the county of Essex accused of witchcraft She admits having a gray imp she used, along with the familiars of Elizabeth Gooding and Elizabeth Clarke to cause harm to the animals of Mr. Edwards, Mr. Bragge, and to murder John, the infant son of Richard Edwards and the daughter of Widow Rawlyns. Anne Leech also admits to reading from a book "wherein she thinkes there was no goodnesse." She was executed 27th of August, 1645. (Cover, 7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 7-8

Anne Levingston   Witch

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, who is accused by Abraham Vandenbemde of hiring Joan Peterson to bewitch her long sick aunt and godmother, Lady Powel. Levingston was thought to have "received from her (the said Peterson) certain powders, and bags of seeds, to help her in her law suits and to provoke unlawfull love." Lady Powel, who had no children of her own, left her estate to Mrs. Levingston. After the accusations of using witchery to gain Lady Powel's estate, Levingston was publicly disgraced and lost the inheritance. After several physicians and surgeons testified that Lady Powel had been afflicted with numerous serious illnesses for many years and that she had therefore died of natural causes, Levingston was vindicated and proclaimed innocent. (3-4, 6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 6-7

Anne Martyn   Witch

Anne Martyn is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who claims to be pregnant by the Devil. She is charged and executed for witchcraft. (6)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 6

Anne Mylner   Demoniac

An eighteen year old maid from the city of Chester in the county of Cheshire who was allegedly possessed by a white spirit that enveloped her. She was possessed for fifteen to sixteen weeks. One day, she came home from the fields very sick and would only eat once every twenty-four hours. When she would eat, she would only eat bread and cheese. She had a fit and was in a trance from hour to hour. She was delivered by having vinegar spit up her nose until she called out for the blood of Christ and made to recite prayers with John Lane. The following day Mylner attends a sermon John Lane preached at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Chester (now St Mary's Centre, then Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill), where she attended. At the time of publication she "remayneth at this prese[n]t (praysed be god) in perfit good health and lyking." (Image 3-4)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, Image 3-4

Anne Mylner   Faster

An eighteen year old maid from the city of Chester in the county of Cheshire who was allegedly possessed by a white spirit that enveloped her. She was possessed for fifteen to sixteen weeks. One day, she came home from the fields very sick and would only eat once every twenty-four hours. When she would eat, she would only eat bread and cheese. She had a fit and was in a trance from hour to hour. She was delivered by having vinegar spit up her nose until she called out for the blood of Christ and made to recite prayers with John Lane. The following day Mylner attends a sermon John Lane preached at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Chester (now St Mary's Centre, then Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill), where she attended. At the time of publication she "remayneth at this prese[n]t (praysed be god) in perfit good health and lyking." (Image 3-4)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, Image 3-4

Anne Nayler   Relative of Victim

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented Anne Nayler to death with an evil spirit, which caused her to have frenzied fits. Before she died, the spirit would talk to Master Nayler, and told him that "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." (101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anne Nayler   Demoniac

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented Anne Nayler to death with an evil spirit, which caused her to have frenzied fits. Before she died, the spirit would talk to Master Nayler, and told him that "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." (101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anne Nayler   Victim

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented Anne Nayler to death with an evil spirit, which caused her to have frenzied fits. Before she died, the spirit would talk to Master Nayler, and told him that "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." (101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anne Neale   Witch

A widow from Gravesend in the county of Kent, Neale is indicted at the Kent assizes in Maidstone in March of 1676 for bewitching and murder. She allegedly bewitched (on separate occasions) Elizabeth Morgan, William Eason, and Walter Warren so that all three languished and then died. In all three cases, the bill was endorsed by different people, but was unable to move forward because of insufficient evidence. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Anne Nutter   Victim

A woman from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Anthony Nutter, whom Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, allegedly bewitched to death. Alison Device claimed that, while visiting Anthony Nutter's home, she and Anne Nutter laughed at Anne Whittle, who was also visiting. Whittle told the two of them "I will be meet with the one of you," and the next day Anne Nutter fell sick. She died three weeks later. (E3v-E4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E3v-E4

Anne Parker   Witch

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one of seven witches living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. She is described as being "young and handsome," and falsely accepts confessions for a monetary fee and after enforcing several articles on confessors. She, and possibly some of the other women living with her, would provide confession and "distraction" to clients in private rooms. Therefore, she was involved in anti-Catholic activities, as well as a con. They may have all been involved in prostitution as well. (1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Anne Pearce   Witch

A woman from Stoke in Ipswich, Suffolk who allegedly exchanges imps with Anne Leech, her sister-in-law. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anne Pearce   Co-conspirator

A woman from Stoke in Ipswich, Suffolk who allegedly exchanges imps with Anne Leech, her sister-in-law. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anne Piers   Witch

A woman from Padstow, in the county of Cornwall, and possibly to wife of one John Piers, described as a "pirate," who is under investigation for having been a practicing witch. Over the course of this investigation, court examines a number of her neighbors of the "better sort and of most credit of the town," in effort to collect evidence against her or to refute the accusation. (29)

Appears in:
Everett Greene, Mary Anne. Calendar of State Papers, Domestic: Edward VI, Mary Elizabeth I, James I: 1581-1590, Volume 2. London: 1865, 29

Anne Pindar   Witness

A woman from St. Paul's Cross in London who was witness to her relative's alleged exorcism, Rachel Pindar. She is also the wife of Peter Pindar. (4-9)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 4-9

Anne Redferne   Witch

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Anne Whittle and the wife of Thomas Redferne. She was charged with bewitching Robert Nutter to death and found guilty. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, gave deposition stating that Nutter had propositioned her daughter, but that Redferne had denied him, which angered Nutter; he departed saying "in a great rage, that if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." Whittle claimed that she was responsible for Nutter's death, not her daughter, and that several other women had conspired with her to kill him. Elizabeth Southerns gave a contrary deposition, however, alleging that she had seen Redferne making images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter. James Robinson gave a deposition stating that Redferne was commonly known to be a witch, Nutter claimed she had bewitched him, and that Nutter had said to Thomas Redferne "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." James Device also implicated Redferne in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Margaret Crooke, Robert Nutter's sister, claimed that Nutter languished ill a long time before dying, and that in his illness "he did a hundred times at the least say, That the said Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." Despite Whittle's best efforts to protect her daughter, Anne Redferne was declared a particularly dangerous witch for the images she was said to have made. (D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Anne Redferne   Relative of Witch

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Anne Whittle and the wife of Thomas Redferne. She was charged with bewitching Robert Nutter to death and found guilty. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, gave deposition stating that Nutter had propositioned her daughter, but that Redferne had denied him, which angered Nutter; he departed saying "in a great rage, that if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." Whittle claimed that she was responsible for Nutter's death, not her daughter, and that several other women had conspired with her to kill him. Elizabeth Southerns gave a contrary deposition, however, alleging that she had seen Redferne making images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter. James Robinson gave a deposition stating that Redferne was commonly known to be a witch, Nutter claimed she had bewitched him, and that Nutter had said to Thomas Redferne "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." James Device also implicated Redferne in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Margaret Crooke, Robert Nutter's sister, claimed that Nutter languished ill a long time before dying, and that in his illness "he did a hundred times at the least say, That the said Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." Despite Whittle's best efforts to protect her daughter, Anne Redferne was declared a particularly dangerous witch for the images she was said to have made. (D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Anne Seares   Accuser

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." (150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Anne Selby   Witness

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. She was present when Margaret claimed receiving two drops of blood from John Hutton had averted seven years of torment. She also heard her accuse Dorothy Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption, her torments and James Faucet's unnatural fits, in addition to her claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. (9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

Anne Smith   Demoniac

A woman from Denham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as an eighteen-year old hysteric who had fits for a period of three years. (20-21)

Appears in:
Harsnett, Samuel. A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures. London: 1603, 20-21

Anne Staines   Accuser

A woman from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who, along with Anne Huggins, John Batty, Margaret Day, Elizabeth Hartridge, and Anne Benson, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became "wasted and consumed." (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

Anne Stannidge   Relative of Victim

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whose young daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Anne Stannidge   Accuser

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whose young daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Anne Starchie   Demoniac

A girl of Cleworth in the county of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the daughter of NIcholas Starchie and the sister of John Starchie, who at the age of nine allegedly began to suffer fits caused by Edmund Hartley. She was first taken with a dumpy and heavy countenance. Anne Starchy is alleged to have been given to scoffing and blasphemy during her fits, and to have caused a loud whupping noise by joining hands with other possessed persons. She described her possessor as being a foul ugly man with a white beard and a head-sized bulge on his chest. It is said that she developed supernatural strength and knowledge, able to foretell her fits. (Image 5, 9, 21)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 9, 21

Anne Starchie   Victim

A girl of Cleworth in the county of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the daughter of NIcholas Starchie and the sister of John Starchie, who at the age of nine allegedly began to suffer fits caused by Edmund Hartley. She was first taken with a dumpy and heavy countenance. Anne Starchy is alleged to have been given to scoffing and blasphemy during her fits, and to have caused a loud whupping noise by joining hands with other possessed persons. She described her possessor as being a foul ugly man with a white beard and a head-sized bulge on his chest. It is said that she developed supernatural strength and knowledge, able to foretell her fits. (Image 5, 9, 21)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 9, 21

Anne Styles   Witch

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life." (7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles   Victim

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life." (7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles   Demoniac

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life." (7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Thurston   Witch

A woman from Great Holland in the county of Essex, the wife of Edward Thurston, a husbandman, Anne Thurston is accused of having two familiar spirits, "one in the from of a bird, the other of a mouse." She is committed for bewitching Aldurton's cow, and found not guilty. She was also committed for the crime of raising spirits, and found guilty, but reprieved and sentenced to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery. Thurston appears to still be in the Colcheter gaol in August 11, 1647, where she is kept until she can be "thence lawfully delivered." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anne Townley   Victim

A woman from the Carre (Carr Hall) in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of gentleman Henry Townley. Henry Townley accused James Device of bewitching Anne to death. James claimed in his examination that Townley accused him and his mother, Elizabeth Device, of stealing from her and had struck him. His familiar Dandy appeared to him a day or two later and bid him to make an image of Townley so that Dandy could kill or destroy her. James did so, dried the image by the fire, and crumbled slowly over the next week. Two days after the image had been crumbled entirely away, Townley is said to have died. (H2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H2

Anne Wakely   Witness

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, wife of Wife of William Wakely, who, by order of Thomas Gist, the Mayor of Devon, searched Temperance Lloyd's body for witch's marks, and found "her Secret Parts two Teats [about an inch long] hanging nigh together like unto a piece of Flesh that a Child had suckt." She asked Lloyd is "she had been suckt at that place by the black Man? (meaning the Devil)," an inquiry to which Lloyd "did acknowledge, that she had been suck'd there often times by the black Man; and the last time that she was suck'd by the said black Man was the Fridy before she was search'd, (which was the 30th day of June last past)." She was also present when Grace Thomas began to suffer from her prickling torments, saw a Magpie fly out of Grace Thomas' window on July 29, 1682, an event she put to Temperance Lloyd as suspect, directly demanding if Lloyd did "know of any Bird to come and flutter at the said Window," prompting Loyd to admit that it "was the black Man in the shape of the Bird." Along with Elizabeth and Thomas Eastchurch and Honor Hooper, Wakely acted as part of a citizen's jury, who, "with the leave and approbation of the said Mr. Gist the Mayor," on July 2th, 1682, brought Temperance to the Parish-Church of Bideford for further examination by the local rector Michael Ogilby. (11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 11-12

Anne Wakely   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, wife of Wife of William Wakely, who, by order of Thomas Gist, the Mayor of Devon, searched Temperance Lloyd's body for witch's marks, and found "her Secret Parts two Teats [about an inch long] hanging nigh together like unto a piece of Flesh that a Child had suckt." She asked Lloyd is "she had been suckt at that place by the black Man? (meaning the Devil)," an inquiry to which Lloyd "did acknowledge, that she had been suck'd there often times by the black Man; and the last time that she was suck'd by the said black Man was the Fridy before she was search'd, (which was the 30th day of June last past)." She was also present when Grace Thomas began to suffer from her prickling torments, saw a Magpie fly out of Grace Thomas' window on July 29, 1682, an event she put to Temperance Lloyd as suspect, directly demanding if Lloyd did "know of any Bird to come and flutter at the said Window," prompting Loyd to admit that it "was the black Man in the shape of the Bird." Along with Elizabeth and Thomas Eastchurch and Honor Hooper, Wakely acted as part of a citizen's jury, who, "with the leave and approbation of the said Mr. Gist the Mayor," on July 2th, 1682, brought Temperance to the Parish-Church of Bideford for further examination by the local rector Michael Ogilby. (11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 11-12

Anne Waldron   Demoniac

A woman who was said to be sick in body and mind. She allegedly bewitched by one Anne Clinche according to Mary Prowting. It was later decided that Waldron had faked possession. (477)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles: 1633-1634. Vol 6. Unknown: 1635, 477

Anne West   Witch

A widow from Lawford in the county of Essex and the mother of Rebecca West, Anne West is described as "the old Beldam Weste," a reputed which who is tried for witchcraft in 1641 and in 1642. Although she is twice acquitted, she is popularly believed to be a witch, and is at the center of the Matthew Hopkins / John Sterne witch-hunt, 1645, when her daughter becomes a key-witness and testifies against her. She allegedly read from a book containing "no goodnesses" with Anne Leech, Elizabeth Gooding, and Elizabeth Clark. She is also believed to have "three or foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," which would be seen "leaping and skipping" by an unnamed man from Manningtree, and may be represented by the image of Sacke and Sugar in the woodcut of Matthew Hopkins, Anne West, and Elizabeth Clark. She is indicted on the charge, however, of having of two familiars, one in the shape of "'a dogg" and another in the form of a kitten with the intention of procuring their help in "withcrafts.'" She would be found guilty of entertaining these two familiars in 1645. Found guilty on the charge of having "bewitched John son of John Culter yeo., whereby he died instatly," a crime in which her own daughter, Rebecca West served as witness, she would be and hanged as a witch in Manningtree, August 1, 1645, (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Anne West (2)   Witness

A woman from Little Oakley in the county of Essex and wife of Andrew West. Anne West and her husband both point testify at Annis Heard's indictment / examination about a number of strange occurrences which appear to involve Heard. Anne West, while in earshot of Annis Heard, lamented that they had more pigs than they could feed, and that she wished to be rid of some. Heard offered to take a sow off of Anne West's hands, a below its market cost, an act which, she reasoned was agreeable, since it would allow Heard to have a pig which might otherwise starve. Anne West agreed to the deal. However, when Heard came back a few days later to claim the pig, Andrew rescinded on the deal Anne made, claiming that since she had never come to collect the pig, they assumed Heard didn't want a pig and had already sold two of them. The next day when Anne sent her nephew to Heard's home with a pound of wool for her to spin, she refused to spin it for her, saying that she was still owed a pig. Within two hours, one of the Wests "best pigs" grew sick, cried (all the other pigs fled from it) and began staggering as though lamed. West's husband consulted his weeders and they advised some countermagic, which appeared to work. However, within two days, meeting Heard, and recounting the story her nephew told her (and presumably the story about the sick pig, West accused Heard of having an "ill tongue" and despite denying that she had skill in witcherie. Having uttered these words, West could no longer brew, despite her best efforts. One of her neighbors (perhaps Bennet Lane who had also used countermagic against Heard's bewitchments) "gaue her counsell to put a hot yron into her mesh fat, the which she did, and then shee could brewe as well as she did before." (E8v-Fv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E8v-Fv

Anne Whittle   Relative of Witch

Anne Whittle is an eighty year old woman woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. She is the mother of Anne Redferne. She was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft, imprisoned at the Castle of Lancaster, found guilty of murder, and finally executed. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, claimed to have been a witch 14 years, and to have been introduced to witchcraft by Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike. The Devil appeared to her in the shape of a man at Southerns' home and demanded her soul; she refused at first but was finally persuaded by Southerns. Whittle also agreed to take the Devil as a familiar under the name of Fancie and permit him to suck from her right side on her ribs. A spirit in the shape of a spotted dog then approached Southerns and offered her "Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will," and offered both of them their fill of " victuals, viz. Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke," but they never felt any fuller no matter how much they ate. Fancie and Southerns' Tibb carried away the remnants. She confessed to helping Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitch Robert Nutter to death. Whittle and Southerns later became rivals. Whittle claimed that Elizabeth Nutter, wife of Robert Nutter, tried to persuade her to kill young Robert Nutter, but that her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she had seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter. James Robinson accused Whittle of spoiling all the drink in his home for several weeks straight, of causing young Robert Nutter to be sick, and of murdering old Robert Nutter. Whittle claimed to be able to help drink that had been forespoken with a prayer, to have used Fancie to kill a cow belonging to John Moore and one belonging to Anthony Nutter. Fancie would allegedly appear sometimes in the shape of a bear, and Whittle claimed he took away most of her sight. James Device accused Whittle of grave-robbing, taking three scalps and eight teeth for use alongside clay images. Alison Device claimed that her father, James Device, had made a deal with Whittle to give her a measure of meal yearly in exchange for not harming his family, but that Whittle had bewitched him to death. Alison also accused Whittle of bewitching Anne Nutter, John Moore's child, Hugh Moore and a cow of John Nutter's to death. John Nutter claimed that, 18 or 19 years before, Whittle and her daughter Anne both confessed to making clay images. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Anne Whittle   Witch

Anne Whittle is an eighty year old woman woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. She is the mother of Anne Redferne. She was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft, imprisoned at the Castle of Lancaster, found guilty of murder, and finally executed. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, claimed to have been a witch 14 years, and to have been introduced to witchcraft by Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike. The Devil appeared to her in the shape of a man at Southerns' home and demanded her soul; she refused at first but was finally persuaded by Southerns. Whittle also agreed to take the Devil as a familiar under the name of Fancie and permit him to suck from her right side on her ribs. A spirit in the shape of a spotted dog then approached Southerns and offered her "Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will," and offered both of them their fill of " victuals, viz. Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke," but they never felt any fuller no matter how much they ate. Fancie and Southerns' Tibb carried away the remnants. She confessed to helping Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitch Robert Nutter to death. Whittle and Southerns later became rivals. Whittle claimed that Elizabeth Nutter, wife of Robert Nutter, tried to persuade her to kill young Robert Nutter, but that her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she had seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter. James Robinson accused Whittle of spoiling all the drink in his home for several weeks straight, of causing young Robert Nutter to be sick, and of murdering old Robert Nutter. Whittle claimed to be able to help drink that had been forespoken with a prayer, to have used Fancie to kill a cow belonging to John Moore and one belonging to Anthony Nutter. Fancie would allegedly appear sometimes in the shape of a bear, and Whittle claimed he took away most of her sight. James Device accused Whittle of grave-robbing, taking three scalps and eight teeth for use alongside clay images. Alison Device claimed that her father, James Device, had made a deal with Whittle to give her a measure of meal yearly in exchange for not harming his family, but that Whittle had bewitched him to death. Alison also accused Whittle of bewitching Anne Nutter, John Moore's child, Hugh Moore and a cow of John Nutter's to death. John Nutter claimed that, 18 or 19 years before, Whittle and her daughter Anne both confessed to making clay images. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Anne Willson   Victim

A girl from Purleigh in the county of Essex, described as the daughter of one Richard Willson who is thought to have been bewitched by Joan Cocke of Hatfield. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210

Anne Wilson   Witch

Anne Wilson is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who is charged and executed for witchcraft. (3-4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 3-4

Anne Wright   Witch

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Annis Dell   Witch

Annis Dell is woman from Hatfield in the county of Hertfordshire, who is executed for the murder of Anthony James Jr. After having ransacked the James family home and killed the parents, a group of nine robbers kidnap the children and take them to the Inn run by Annis Dell. After discussing at length and showing Annis Dell the riches, she decides that the boy should be murdered and the girl have her tongue cut out. the plan is executed that night, Dell cutting out the girls tongue herself. Three weeks later, the murdered boy's body (Anthony James jr.) is found in a pond by men out with their dogs. The boy is recognized as having been at the Dells' Inn three weeks prior and so Annis Dell is questioned. Dell denies everything but is nevertheless suspected of foul play. She is brought to the assizes on several occasions because of this, but without further proof, is not convicted. It is only years later when Elizabeth James who had her tongue cut out is able to speak again and testify against Annis Dell that this woman is convicted and executed for her crimes. (16-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 16-17

Annis Dowsing   Relative of Witch

A seven year old girl from Little Oakley in the county of Essex, the daughter of Annis Heard, and the sister of one brother. Annis Dowsing is made to testify against her mother on March 18, 1582. She is lead through a series of questions, such as "whether her mother had any little things, or any little imps." Dowsing claims that her mother had two boxes of spirits; in one box, she had white and black speckled blackbirds. In another box, she had six spirits, "like Cowes" and as big as rats, crowned with "little short hornes, & they lie in the boxes upon white and blacke wooll." The bird spirits, she claims, are fed with wheat, barley, oats, bread & cheese, and the cow spirits, appropriately fed with "wheat straw, somtime wt barley straw, ote straw and wt hey," watered and given beer. Annis claims, in what must be a bit of confusion, that "her mother gave unto her one of the saide Cowes, whiche was called by teh name of Crowe, which us of colour black & white. and she saith, yt her mother gave to her brother one of them, which she called Donne, & that is of colour red & white." These spirits, she claimed, sucked on her mother, her brother, and herself. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Annis Glascocke   Victim

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the wife of John Glascocke and the sister of Edward Wood. Accusations against Glascocke appear to come from a few sources; one of her former tenants or roommates, according to Michael the shoemaker, reported that Glascocke was "a naughtie woman, and a dealer in witchcrafte," and another person named Sparrow also living with Glascocke complained of "a straunge noise or rumbling since Christmas." However, most of the accusations against her come courtesy of Ursley Kempe. Kempe notes that the same shoemaker said Glascocke "had bewitched his Chylde, whereof it dyed," an accusation confirmed by Kempe's familiar Tyffin. Tyffin also evidently claimed that Glascock had killed Charity Page, described as "the Base childe that Page and his wife haue in keeping." And Kempe herself accused Glacocke of bewitching Fortune's child. Glascocke represents herself as a victim of paranormal events and witchcraft, as opposed to a perpetrator of them. She suggests that when she was twenty years old, that she had been "haunted by" (bewitched or forspoken by) Mrs. Arnold, who "was accompted a witch' and who she suspected of causing "certain ledde~ weights and great stones were cast into the house, and diuers straunge noyses of rumblinges hearde" as a way to scare Glascocke's husband away. Glascocke suggests that she was also "consumed by the space of two or three yeares," by "straung aches in her bones, and otherwise." She saught the help of man named Herring (named to bee a Cawker [or a person who water proofs a ship]) who gave her a poultice, in the form of a "lynnen bagge of the breadth of a groate, full of small thinges like seedes, and willed her to put the same where her payne was most, the which shee proued by sewing it vppon her garmente, neare the place where her greefe was." She is searched by Annis Letherdall and Margaret Sympson did "affyrme vppon their credites, that vpon the left side of the thighe of this Examinate, there be some spots, and vpon the left shoulder likewise one or two Which spottes bee like the sucked spots, that Ursley Kempe hath vppon her bodie." Glascocke is actually charged with bewitching Charity Page, Abraham Hedg, and Martha Stevens. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Ales Newman, Ellen Southern, and Cecily Sellis at Colchester Goal. (Cv-C3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv-C3

Annis Glascocke   Witch

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the wife of John Glascocke and the sister of Edward Wood. Accusations against Glascocke appear to come from a few sources; one of her former tenants or roommates, according to Michael the shoemaker, reported that Glascocke was "a naughtie woman, and a dealer in witchcrafte," and another person named Sparrow also living with Glascocke complained of "a straunge noise or rumbling since Christmas." However, most of the accusations against her come courtesy of Ursley Kempe. Kempe notes that the same shoemaker said Glascocke "had bewitched his Chylde, whereof it dyed," an accusation confirmed by Kempe's familiar Tyffin. Tyffin also evidently claimed that Glascock had killed Charity Page, described as "the Base childe that Page and his wife haue in keeping." And Kempe herself accused Glacocke of bewitching Fortune's child. Glascocke represents herself as a victim of paranormal events and witchcraft, as opposed to a perpetrator of them. She suggests that when she was twenty years old, that she had been "haunted by" (bewitched or forspoken by) Mrs. Arnold, who "was accompted a witch' and who she suspected of causing "certain ledde~ weights and great stones were cast into the house, and diuers straunge noyses of rumblinges hearde" as a way to scare Glascocke's husband away. Glascocke suggests that she was also "consumed by the space of two or three yeares," by "straung aches in her bones, and otherwise." She saught the help of man named Herring (named to bee a Cawker [or a person who water proofs a ship]) who gave her a poultice, in the form of a "lynnen bagge of the breadth of a groate, full of small thinges like seedes, and willed her to put the same where her payne was most, the which shee proued by sewing it vppon her garmente, neare the place where her greefe was." She is searched by Annis Letherdall and Margaret Sympson did "affyrme vppon their credites, that vpon the left side of the thighe of this Examinate, there be some spots, and vpon the left shoulder likewise one or two Which spottes bee like the sucked spots, that Ursley Kempe hath vppon her bodie." Glascocke is actually charged with bewitching Charity Page, Abraham Hedg, and Martha Stevens. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Ales Newman, Ellen Southern, and Cecily Sellis at Colchester Goal. (Cv-C3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv-C3

Annis Heard   Witch

Annis Herd is a woman from Little Oakely in the county of Essex and mother to Annis Dowsing and at least one son, Annis Heard is, according to Andrew West, "ill thought of for witchcraft" and described by Mrs. Harrison as a "light woman, and a common harlot." Head is a mother or at least one child; Bennet Lane references "the girle of the said Annis Herds," speaking to her mother. Having been accused of being a witch, Annis Heard allegedly spoke to John Wade and "prayed him to be a meanes to helpe her, that she might answere the same when the dayes were longer." Wade suggested that he could not help her, and but suggested that she see that "Regester dwelt at Colchester, saying, it must be hee that therein may pleasure thee. Wade recounted that since the investigation into Heard began "he hath had not so fewe as twentie sheepe and lambes that haue died, and e lame and like to die: & hee saith, that hee hath lost of his beasts & other cattell, which haue dyed in a strange sort." Wade was not the only one to speak against Herd, nor was he the only one to suffer. Five more households would speak out against Herd. Two of Thomas Cartwrite's cows died after he annoyed Heard by moving her makeshift road repair; Bennet Lane (William Lane's wife) lost the ability to spin after demanding a dish back and lost the ability to make cream after demanding two pence back from Herd; Andrewe West, having rescinded on a deal to give her a pig, found one of his went mad; having accused her of having an "unhappie tongue," his wife could not brew; Edmond Osborne and his wife also lost the ability to brew, after calling in a loan "iii. d. the which shee owed her for a pecke of Aples." Richard Harrisons' loss, however, was the most heartwrenching. While he was in London, his wife accused Herd of stealing duckling from their nest underneath a cherry tree. Mrs. Harrison did not only lose her ducklings, however. Having gone to Herd to "rate" and "chid" her, Mrs. Harrison soon grew ill, convinced Herd had bewitched her. Within two months, she implored to her husband "I pray you as euer there was loue betweene vs, (as I hope there hath been for I haue v. pretie children by you I thanke God) seeke som remedie for me against yonder wicked beast (meaning the saide Annis Herd). And if you will not I will complaine to my father, and I thinke he wil see som remedie for me, for (said she) if I haue no remedie, she will vtterly consume me." Herd was not charged for Harrison's bewitchment, nor does she even acknowledge it in her confession, although she acknowledges the other charges against her. Despite all the hoolpa, the myriad of witnesses who testify against her (or about strange occurrences which appear to gesture towards her), and her inclusion amongst the "witches" in the March 29, 1582 Assize record, Herd is only indicted on one charge, that of having "bewitched a cow, ten sheep and ten lambs worth 4, belonging to John Wade, to his great damage." She pleads not guilty, is found not guilty. She is therefore3 acquitted. (E6-E7)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E6-E7

Annis Letherdall   Witch-Searcher

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the wife of Richard Letherdall and mother of Elizabeth Letherdall, who accuses Ursula Kempe of bewitching her daughter, Elizabeth Letherdall, after she refused to give Kempes son (Anonymous 185) some scouring sand for her, knowing that Kempe was a "naughtie beast," despite the fact that Kempe had offered to dye a pair of women's hose for her in payment. Kempe muttered at Elizabeth and she developed a "great swelling in the bottome of the belly, and other priuie partes," Letherdall visited a cunning woman who diagnosed the girl as having been bewitched by Kempe. Kempe scoffed at Lethedall claiming that she "would lay her life that she the said Annis had not been with any [cunning folk]," so certain was she, that Kempe "requested a woman being in the house a spinning with the said Ursley, to beare witnesse what shee had said." Letherdall takes the child to Mother Ratcliffe's for treatment, however, at the time of Assize (March 1582), the child was "in most pitious sort consumed, and the privie and hinder partes thereof, to be in most strange and wonderfull case, as it seemed to berye honest women of good judgement, and not likely to live and continue any long time." Elizabeth Letherdall died on February 26, 1582. Despite the bad blood between the women, Letherdall is allowed to / asked to search Annis Glascocke for witch's marks. She, along with Margaret Simpson, discover spots on the the left side of Annis Glascocke's thigh, and some spots on her shoulder, which they conclude looked like they had been sucked. Kemp, believing that she would be afforded some lienance if she confessed, answered the specific questions Brian Darcey demanded of her, confessing to sending her familiar "Pigen [to torment] Letherdalls Childe" and begging "forgiuenesse of the sayde Letherdalls wife." (A2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v

Annis Letherdall   Relative of Victim

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the wife of Richard Letherdall and mother of Elizabeth Letherdall, who accuses Ursula Kempe of bewitching her daughter, Elizabeth Letherdall, after she refused to give Kempes son (Anonymous 185) some scouring sand for her, knowing that Kempe was a "naughtie beast," despite the fact that Kempe had offered to dye a pair of women's hose for her in payment. Kempe muttered at Elizabeth and she developed a "great swelling in the bottome of the belly, and other priuie partes," Letherdall visited a cunning woman who diagnosed the girl as having been bewitched by Kempe. Kempe scoffed at Lethedall claiming that she "would lay her life that she the said Annis had not been with any [cunning folk]," so certain was she, that Kempe "requested a woman being in the house a spinning with the said Ursley, to beare witnesse what shee had said." Letherdall takes the child to Mother Ratcliffe's for treatment, however, at the time of Assize (March 1582), the child was "in most pitious sort consumed, and the privie and hinder partes thereof, to be in most strange and wonderfull case, as it seemed to berye honest women of good judgement, and not likely to live and continue any long time." Elizabeth Letherdall died on February 26, 1582. Despite the bad blood between the women, Letherdall is allowed to / asked to search Annis Glascocke for witch's marks. She, along with Margaret Simpson, discover spots on the the left side of Annis Glascocke's thigh, and some spots on her shoulder, which they conclude looked like they had been sucked. Kemp, believing that she would be afforded some lienance if she confessed, answered the specific questions Brian Darcey demanded of her, confessing to sending her familiar "Pigen [to torment] Letherdalls Childe" and begging "forgiuenesse of the sayde Letherdalls wife." (A2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v

Anonymous 1   Witch

She is a fourteen-year old girl from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London described as a Maidservant of Mr. Freeland who works for him on Petticoat lane, a street in East London. She was suspected of bewitching her master's goods, so that they flew, windows were broken, and beer lost. She was fired and searched for witch's marks; protuberances in the "likeness of Warts (I will not say duggs) very flesh and red" were found. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Anonymous 10   Accuser

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 9 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit. (3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 10   Victim

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 9 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit. (3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Bower (Aunt)   Relative of Victim

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London who is with Sarah Bower during her fits. She is Sarah Bower's aunt. (3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

Bower (Aunt)   Witness

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London who is with Sarah Bower during her fits. She is Sarah Bower's aunt. (3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

John Ballard   Witness

A man from Bungay in the county of Norfolk, whose daughter was bewitched for over two years, resulting in "many strange Fits in day," during which she would vomited stones, crooked-pins, glass, a buckle, buttons, and other things. John Ballard takes these items, and presents them to the Mayor of Norfolk (Anonymous 101) as evidence of his daughter's bewitchment. (7 - 8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7 - 8

John Ballard   Relative of Victim

A man from Bungay in the county of Norfolk, whose daughter was bewitched for over two years, resulting in "many strange Fits in day," during which she would vomited stones, crooked-pins, glass, a buckle, buttons, and other things. John Ballard takes these items, and presents them to the Mayor of Norfolk (Anonymous 101) as evidence of his daughter's bewitchment. (7 - 8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7 - 8

Teecle (Wife)   Witch

A woman from East-Basham in the county of Norfolk, known as Teecle's wife, who allegedly has a familiar (Toad 2) whom she uses to bewitch Jane Walter, causing her tongue to be tied up, and for her to be "full of Pins," and suffering from "many strange Fits, sometimes 20 or more in a day." Teecle's wife has long been suspected of being a witch. When it is offered to burn the toad, the familiar mysteriously vanished. (7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Ballard (Daughter)   Demoniac

A girl from Bungay in the county of Norfolk, known as John Ballard's daughter, who is allegedly bewitched for two years. During this time, she voids stones, crooked pins, glass, a buckle, buttons, and other things from her mouth, while having "many strange Fits in a day." All of these are presented as evidence before the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) by John Ballard. (7-8 )

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7-8

Ballard (Daughter)   Victim

A girl from Bungay in the county of Norfolk, known as John Ballard's daughter, who is allegedly bewitched for two years. During this time, she voids stones, crooked pins, glass, a buckle, buttons, and other things from her mouth, while having "many strange Fits in a day." All of these are presented as evidence before the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) by John Ballard. (7-8 )

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7-8

Anonymous 104   Victim

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as a Groom (Anonymous 104) who mockingly invokes Ann Ashby's spirit Rug to enter him. He later dies close to London. (4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4

Anonymous 104   Witness

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as a Groom (Anonymous 104) who mockingly invokes Ann Ashby's spirit Rug to enter him. He later dies close to London. (4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4

Anonymous 107   Witch

An elderly woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, described as a vagrant who allegedly bewitched a boy by scaring him. She was accused, imprisoned, and tried in short order on the weight of a boy's brief bewitchment, although the town may have been looking for an excuse to be rid of her, seeing her as drain of the parish's charity. (51-52)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51-52

Anonymous 108   Victim

A young boy (Anonymous 108) who, when tending his mother's cow, was allegedly bewitched. He lost his voice, ran from his home, threw pottage in the witch's face, and allegedly beat her apparition away. His accusation appears to have single handedly caused the woman's arrest and trial. (50)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50

Anonymous 109   Witness

A man (Anonymous 109) from Dorwich in the county of Norfolk, described as a jailer who imprisoned a suspected witch (Anonynous 107). He denied her food and water until she would bless the child (which she did). He also acted as a witness at her trial. (51)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51

Anonymous 109   Un-witcher

A man (Anonymous 109) from Dorwich in the county of Norfolk, described as a jailer who imprisoned a suspected witch (Anonynous 107). He denied her food and water until she would bless the child (which she did). He also acted as a witness at her trial. (51)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51

Anonymous 11   Victim

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure. (5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11   Demoniac

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure. (5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11   Faster

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure. (5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 110   Witness

A woman of modest means whose son was allegedly bewitched. She is recorded as owning at least one cow. (50)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50

Anonymous 111   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 111) from Tewkesbury in the county of Gloucestershire who is tried as a witch (circa 1649?) because she allegedly transformed into a pole-cat like creature and stole sow's milk. (51-52)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51-52

Anonymous 112   Witness

A woman (Anonymous 112) who inadvertently discovers a witch when he attacks an pole cat like creature who has been suckling milk from his sow. (51-52)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51-52

Anonymous 112   Un-witcher

A woman (Anonymous 112) who inadvertently discovers a witch when he attacks an pole cat like creature who has been suckling milk from his sow. (51-52)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51-52

Anonymous 113   Witch

A woman, described as a prodigal daughter, who becomes a witch after her husband leaves her, and their seven year old child penniless. (48-49)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 48-49

Anonymous 114   Witness

A woman (Anonymous 114) described as 'serious and religious' who married an honest and sober farmer, and the sister of an alleged witch (Anonymous 113). (48-49)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 48-49

Anonymous 115   Accuser

The seven year old daughter of Anonymous 113 who is allegedly found in her aunt and uncle's bedroom after she is taken there by her mother on a bed staff. She is the main witness against her mother. (49)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 49

Anonymous 116   Witch

A woman from the county of York, called 'the strange woman' who allegedly tormented Edward Fairfax's children, but who was never identified. She could turn herself, according to Helen Fairfax, into a hare and a cat. (34)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34

Anonymous 117   Witness

A woman from London in the county of Greater London, known to be a gentlewoman and the daughter of a lawyer. While John Lambe was imprisoned, she approached him and asked him to show her who her husband would be. When he finally agreed to the request and she had the jailer let her into the room he was confined to, he bid her draw close to the bed and look into his crystal ball, which he set on the ground. She reported seeing numerous people she knew in its depths, and the image finally resolved to a gentleman she did not recognize, dressed all in green. Dr. Lambe told her to take note of him, and said that though they would meet without him intending to make himself a suitor, he would feel compelled to be by the time they parted company. She described this encounter and Dr. Lambe's prediction to numerous of her acquaintances, and a few days later the man in green came to her father's house in the hope of becoming a client. The man in green's horse spooked when he dismounted and kicked him. He was taken into the gentlewoman's home to recover, and the two fell in love while he was under her care. They married not long thereafter. (7-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 7-9

Anonymous 118   Victim

An unknown number of men or boys from an unknown part of the county of York, known to be the sons of the Earl of Moultgrave and brothers to the Lady Fairfax. Dr. Lamb told Lady Fairfax "within this few dayes your heart will ake, by occasion and accident of water," and three days later, her brothers all drowned. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 5

Anonymous 119   Physician

A physician who determines that John Hart was murdered by witchcraft. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3

Anonymous 119   Accuser

A physician who determines that John Hart was murdered by witchcraft. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3

Anonymous 12   Witch

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a beggar. She is said to have begged at the home of Anonymous 11 for bread and beer, and to have given the girl a sorrel leaf. Shortly after Anonymous 11 ate the leaf, she began to suffer suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." After a priest prayed over the child, she began to contort violently and vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Anonymous 11's family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented. Anonymous 12 was apprehended for bewitchment and hanged for it when she confessed. Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on the child. (5-7)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-7

Anonymous 120   Accuser

A child from Manningtree in the county of Essex who identifies Margaret Landis as a witch and calls her "Pegg the Witch." (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3-4

Anonymous 120   Witness

A child from Manningtree in the county of Essex who identifies Margaret Landis as a witch and calls her "Pegg the Witch." (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3-4

Anonymous 122   Un-witcher

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He suffers from hot sweats, cold chills, and twitching limbs and becomes well again after he scratches Johane Harrison's face. (19-29)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-29

Anonymous 122   Victim

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He suffers from hot sweats, cold chills, and twitching limbs and becomes well again after he scratches Johane Harrison's face. (19-29)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-29

Anonymous 123   Demoniac

An English gentlewoman, who suffered from what appeared to be possession by evil spirit as a result of the death of her husband. The disease is referred to as "the Mother." Her ladies in waiting all caught her disease. They were separated from her, and recovered. She was purged of her ill humours, and recovered too. (183)

Appears in:
Digby, Kenelm. Of The Sympathetick Powder. A Discourse in a Solemn Assembly at Montpellier. London: 1669 , 183

Anonymous 124   Victim

A young man from Hartford in the county of Hertfordshire who is allegedly turned into a toad by John Palmer after he kicked Palmer in the shin. The young man was bewitched for many years, "to his great woe and torment." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 5

Anonymous 125   Witch

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to have ridden double on a black horse with a woman (Anonymous 126), whom Master Avery and Mistress Belcher encountered on the road home from Northampton Gaol. He and Anonymous 126 are seen to gesture strangely, causing Avery to cry out that either he and Belcher, or the horses drawing their coach, would presently miscarry. The horses immediately fell down dead. (B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

Anonymous 126   Witch

A woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to have ridden double on a black horse with a man (Anonymous 125), whom Master Avery and Mistress Belcher encountered on the road home from Northampton Gaol. She and Anonymous 125 are seen to gesture strangely, causing Avery to cry out that either he and Belcher, or the horses drawing their coach, would presently miscarry. The horses immediately fell down dead. (B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

Anonymous 128   Witch-Searcher

A woman from London, who examined Jane Kent prior to her appearance at the Old Bailey. Anonymous 128 gave deposition alleging that Kent had a teat on her back and two unusual holes behind her ears. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

Anonymous 128   Witness

A woman from London, who examined Jane Kent prior to her appearance at the Old Bailey. Anonymous 128 gave deposition alleging that Kent had a teat on her back and two unusual holes behind her ears. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

Anonymous 129   Witness

A man from London, known to be a coachman, who gave deposition against Jane Kent in the Old Bailey alleging that his coach was overthrown shortly after he refused to carry Kent and her things. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

Anonymous 130   Examiner/Justice

A Justice of the Peace who presides over the examination, trial, and condemnation of Margaret Thorpe. (87-88)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 87-88

Anonymous 131   Examiner/Justice

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson. (126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 132   Examiner/Justice

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson. (126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 133   Examiner/Justice

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson. (126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 134   Examiner/Justice

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson. (126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 135   Examiner/Justice

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson. (126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 136   Examiner/Justice

The Judge who presided over the arraignment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson, and who dismissed charges against them. (127)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 127

Anonymous 137   Examiner/Justice

A constable (Anonymous 137) who apprehended and carried Margaret Thorpe and Margaret Waite to Edward Fairfax's home. (77)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 77

Anonymous 138   Witch

An old woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who asks Katherine Atkins for a pin. When Atkins offers her victuals and pins as well, the old woman predicts that she will disappear. (7)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 7

Anonymous 139   Witch

A woman (potentially Margaret Russell) from Thistleworth (now the London Borough of Islington) who unexpectedly arrives at her door and begs Elizabeth Jennings for a pin. This moment is seen as the genesis of Jennings' physical and spiritual malaise, and the woman comes to be read as having bewitched Jennings. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Anonymous 140   Physician

A man (Anonymous 140) from London described as a physician who administered treatment to Elizabeth Jennings for her fits and convulsions, the "medicines rather producing contrary effects." Anonymous 140 is one of at least two physicians who treated Jennings. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Anonymous 141   Witch-Searcher

A Scottish Witch Finder imported to Newcaste to try witches there. ()

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796,

Anonymous 141   Celebrity

A Scottish Witch Finder imported to Newcaste to try witches there. ()

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796,

Anonymous 142   Witness

A person possibly from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a stranger who visits Thomas Darling and greatly upsets him by questioning his belief in God, and by proposing that witches do not exist. Darling falls into another set of fits in the strangers presence; it is possible that the stranger is the Devil himself. (15-16)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 15-16

Anonymous 142   Witch

A person possibly from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a stranger who visits Thomas Darling and greatly upsets him by questioning his belief in God, and by proposing that witches do not exist. Darling falls into another set of fits in the strangers presence; it is possible that the stranger is the Devil himself. (15-16)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 15-16

Anonymous 143   Victim

A woman who is tried twice. At first, she is determined to be a witch, but during a second trial, it is determined that she is not a witch. (115)

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796, 115

Anonymous 144   Exorcist

An Irish Roman Catholic from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his possession by putting a cross on the boy's head. James Barrow simply roars at the cross, and Anonymous 144 sends the boy to Lord Abony. (9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 144   Celebrity

An Irish Roman Catholic from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his possession by putting a cross on the boy's head. James Barrow simply roars at the cross, and Anonymous 144 sends the boy to Lord Abony. (9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 145   Witness

A servant from the London Borough of Southwark, who is of Lord Abony who pulls out a cross in the presence of the bewitched boy, James Darling. (9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 145   Exorcist

A servant from the London Borough of Southwark, who is of Lord Abony who pulls out a cross in the presence of the bewitched boy, James Darling. (9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 146   Exorcist

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession. The gentleman (Anonymosu 146) uses holy water, ribbon, a candle, brimstone, and latin prayers in his curing efforts. None of these methods cure the boy of his possession. (9-10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9-10

Anonymous 146   Preacher/Minister

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession. The gentleman (Anonymosu 146) uses holy water, ribbon, a candle, brimstone, and latin prayers in his curing efforts. None of these methods cure the boy of his possession. (9-10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9-10

Anonymous 146   Witness

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession. The gentleman (Anonymosu 146) uses holy water, ribbon, a candle, brimstone, and latin prayers in his curing efforts. None of these methods cure the boy of his possession. (9-10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9-10

Anonymous 147   Astrologer

A man from Winchester Park in the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician or astrologer who provides John Crump a means of curing his bewitched daughter, Hannah Crump. Anonymous 147 suggests that in order to unwitch Hannah, he would have to take the curse on himself. The curse, he suggests, needs to be carried by someone; if not Hannah, than him, if not him the witch who cursed her would have to carry the curse until her familiars could plague someone else with it. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 147   Cunning-folk

A man from Winchester Park in the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician or astrologer who provides John Crump a means of curing his bewitched daughter, Hannah Crump. Anonymous 147 suggests that in order to unwitch Hannah, he would have to take the curse on himself. The curse, he suggests, needs to be carried by someone; if not Hannah, than him, if not him the witch who cursed her would have to carry the curse until her familiars could plague someone else with it. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 148   Witch

A little boy whom Edmund Robinson Jr. witnesses transforming from the form of a brown greyhound, to a human, and then to a white horse. (347-348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 347-348

Anonymous 149   Witch

A boy whom Edmund Robinson Jr. has a physical altercation with. According to Robinson Jr., Anonymous 149 has a cloven foot. (348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 348

Anonymous 15   Witch

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk described as prisoner of witchcraft who confesses that Devil possessed her to avoid repentance. (12)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12

Anonymous 150   Preacher/Minister

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her." (3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Anonymous 150   Physician

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her." (3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Anonymous 150   Witness

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her." (3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

M. Evans   Witness

A man from London, who is employed as a minister to guide fasting and prayer for Mary Glover's dispossession. Mr. Evans is described as an "auncient preacher," who takes turns with other preachers in leading a group of witnesses and neighbours (Anonymous 437) through prayer for the girl, while she is in a violent fit. Mr. Evans is aided by five other preachers: Mr. Skelton, Mr. Lewis Hughes, Mr. Barber, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Bridger. Mr. Evan's prayers as described as "sweete, mylde (according to his disposition) long earnest, and powerfull." Also of "charitably disposed minde," Mr. Evans takes notice of the condition of Mary Glover, and is the first to call for a "little pawse," in the midst of prayers, when the maid is "wax pale coloured, weepinge, and answeringe faintly." He often prays even when Mary Glover herself is prayer, in order to aid with her deliverance. On one occasion, while Mr. Evans prayed "God to rebuke this foule malstious Devill," Mary Glover turns towards him in a fit, and "did barke out froth at him." However, he continued to pray for her regardless. (13-14)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 13-14

M. Evans   Preacher/Minister

A man from London, who is employed as a minister to guide fasting and prayer for Mary Glover's dispossession. Mr. Evans is described as an "auncient preacher," who takes turns with other preachers in leading a group of witnesses and neighbours (Anonymous 437) through prayer for the girl, while she is in a violent fit. Mr. Evans is aided by five other preachers: Mr. Skelton, Mr. Lewis Hughes, Mr. Barber, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Bridger. Mr. Evan's prayers as described as "sweete, mylde (according to his disposition) long earnest, and powerfull." Also of "charitably disposed minde," Mr. Evans takes notice of the condition of Mary Glover, and is the first to call for a "little pawse," in the midst of prayers, when the maid is "wax pale coloured, weepinge, and answeringe faintly." He often prays even when Mary Glover herself is prayer, in order to aid with her deliverance. On one occasion, while Mr. Evans prayed "God to rebuke this foule malstious Devill," Mary Glover turns towards him in a fit, and "did barke out froth at him." However, he continued to pray for her regardless. (13-14)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 13-14

Anonymous 152   Witch

A woman whom Edmund Robinson Jr. sees taking down pictures from a beam in a barn; the pictures have thorns stuck in them. (349)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 349

Anonymous 153   Witch

A woman whom Edmund Robinson Jr. sees taking down pictures from a beam in a barn; the pictures have thorns stuck in them. (349)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 349

Anonymous 154   Witch

An old woman who claims to be a witch and who has a familiar in the shape of a toad. ()

Appears in:
Bickley et al., A.C.. The Gentleman's Magazine Library. London: 1884,

Anonymous 156   Witness

A woman who offers Edmund Robinson Jr. meat, bread, and drink at a feast. Robinson refuses to eat it after tasting one bite. (lxii)

Appears in:
Potts, Edward Bromley (Sir.), James Crossley, Thomas. Potts's Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. Unknown: 1845, lxii

Anonymous 157   Victim

A four year old boy from Warmfield in west Yorkshire who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Morton. According to his mother, Joane, he was in good health until he ate a piece of bread which was offered to him by Margaret Morton. After eating the bread, he became ill, his body began to swell and his flesh became "wasted." When Morton, who was suspected of bewitching the child, came to ask forgiveness and his mother drew blood from him, the child instantly began to get better. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 158   Witch

A woman from Kirkethrope in Yorkshire who is suspected of practicing witchcraft and the mother of Margaret Morton. Her reputation as a witch is used as evidence against Margaret Morton in the case where she allegedly bewitches a four year old boy. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 159   Witch

A woman from Kirkethrope in Yorkshire who is suspected of practicing witchcraft and the sister of Margaret Morton. Her reputation as a witch is used as evidence against Margaret Morton in the case where she allegedly bewitches a four year old boy. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 16   Victim

A man who dies three days after being stroked by an invisible hand while walking in the streets in London. (12-13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12-13

Anonymous 161   Physician

A man from Warwick in the county of Warwickshire, described as a physician who allegedly treats Hanna Crump for the symptoms of possession. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 162   Witch-Searcher

One of an unknown number of women from Northampton in Northamptonshire, known to form the Jury of Women ordered to search Mary/Ann Foster. They found her to have "five several strange and unusual excrescencies which appeared exactly like a Sows Teats, and seemed to be usually suckt by something." (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 6

Anonymous 163   Witch-Searcher

One of a group of women from Bideford in the county of Devon who search Temperance Lloyd for witch's marks. Along with the rest of the group who search Lloyd, she finds two marks like "teats" by her "secret parts" that were "hanging nigh together like unto a piece of Flesh that a Child had suckt. And that each of the said Teats was about an Inch in length." (11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 11

Sir William Pelham   Examiner/Justice

A man from the County of Leicestershire, known to be a knight and a Justice of the Peace, who examined Phillip Flower twice, first on February 4, 1618, and again on February 25, 1618. (F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Anonymous 165   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as one of a jury of women who searches Alice Gooderige for witch's marks. They strip her and find a large surface, like the udder of a ewe, with two marks (like great warts) which appear to have been sucked, a mark behind her arm, and a number towards the top of her shoulder. The searchers leave the marks uncovered; Sir Humfrey, Master Graisley, and others also examine Gooderige's many marks. (9-10)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 9-10

Anonymous 166   Witch-Searcher

One of a jury of women from the county of Suffolk, who searched Aubrey Grinset for witch's marks. The first night a jury of women searched her, they found the mark to which she confessed having. However, the second time she was searched, Anonymous 166 saw her "body was well nigh all over as if scratched with briers and thorns the like hath not been seen; and one that searched before saw this alteration." (11)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 11

Anonymous 167   Witch-Searcher

An unknown number of women from Beckenton in Somersetshire, known to form the Jury of Women who were ordered by a Justice of the Peace to search Anonymous 8 for witches' marks. They found several purple marks on her body that, when pricked with a sharp needle, did not cause her pain. This Jury of Women also swore under oath that Anonymous 8 had "other Marks and Tokens of a Witch" on her body. Their testimony was used to have Anonymous 8 imprisoned until she could be tried at the next assizes. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire. London: 1689, 2

Anonymous 168   Witch-Searcher

One of a jury of women from York who is implied to have searched Katherine Earle for witch's marks; "they discovered a marke founde upon her in the likenesse of a papp." (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Anonymous 169   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, described as one of a jury of women who searched Joan Peterson for witch's marks, who found that "there was a Teat of flesh in her secret parts more then other women usually had[.]" The Jury of Women was called in after an initial search "could find nothing on her body which might create the least suspition in them of her being a witch." This second search is described as being conducted in an unnatural and barbarous manner. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5

Anonymous 17   Victim

A boy who is killed by a spectral woman and a man with trunk breeches that haunted him (13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 13

Anonymous 170   Witch-Searcher

One of a group of women who search Anonymous 121 and the Manningtree Witches for witch's marks. Anonymous 121 is found to have three teats "which honest women have not" and all of the Manningtree witches also allegedly have witch's marks. (2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

Anonymous 171   Witch-Searcher

One of a jury of women who search Doll Bilby and Alice Huson for witch's marks on April 27th, 1644, in the Parish of Burton Agnes in the County of York. (55-56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 55-56

Anonymous 173   Witch-Searcher

A man from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a surgeon who is consulted about a bleeding hole upon Alice Gooderidge's body. Alice Gooderige claimed the wound happened when she accidentally stabbed herself, the Surgeon claimed that the mark was not a fresh wound, but "was like to haue beene so a long time, for it was not festered, and seemed to be sucken." (9)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 9

Anonymous 173   Surgeon

A man from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a surgeon who is consulted about a bleeding hole upon Alice Gooderidge's body. Alice Gooderige claimed the wound happened when she accidentally stabbed herself, the Surgeon claimed that the mark was not a fresh wound, but "was like to haue beene so a long time, for it was not festered, and seemed to be sucken." (9)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 9

Anonymous 174   Witch-Searcher

One of a jury of five women, including Melier Damer, Alice Cleverly, and Grace Stockes, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to reexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked. (28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Anonymous 175   Witch-Searcher

One of a jury of five women, including Melier Damer, Alice Cleverly, and Grace Stockes, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to reexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked. (28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Anonymous 176   Midwife

She is a woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex described as a midwife who, along with a Matron, claims to have searched Rebecca West, Margaret Landis, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread for witch's marks and found "several large Teates in the secret Parts of their Bodies." (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 6-7

Anonymous 176   Witch-Searcher

She is a woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex described as a midwife who, along with a Matron, claims to have searched Rebecca West, Margaret Landis, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread for witch's marks and found "several large Teates in the secret Parts of their Bodies." (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 6-7

Anonymous 177   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a Matron, who along with a Midwife, claims to have searched Rebecca West, Margaret Landis, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread for witch's marks and found "several large Teates in the secret Parts of their Bodies." (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 6-7

Anonymous 178   Midwife

A midwife from the town of Honiton in the county of Devon, who has "skill in Sores and Wounds," and is called on to treat Elizabeth Brooker (who experiences extreme pain in her leg). She "applied her rare Plaister of Venice-Turpentine all that Night, and many other things the next Day, but [Brooker's pain] was still the same." (67-68)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 67-68

Anonymous 179   Witch

A woman, allegedly a witch, from Honiton in the county of Devon, who approaches Elizabeth Brooker, a servant of Mistress Heiron (who worked in her mercer's shop), and asks her for a pin. The woman is unsatisfied with Brooker's gift of a pin from her sleeve, wanting a specific one, leaves in a "great Fume and Rage, and told the Maid, she should hear farther from her, she would e'er long wish she had given her the Pin she desired; with many threatning Speeches." (66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

Anonymous 18   Witch

A woman that causes her neighbour's cows to become ill and who sends her child in the form of a cow to cause more damage to the cows. (14)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 14

Anonymous 180   Physician

A man from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, described as a physician who examined Thomas Darling's urine and "saw no signes of anie natural disease in the Child, vnles it were the wormes." Asked to reconsider his diagnosis when Darling failed to thrive, he again "judged as before, saying further, he doubted that the Childe was be witched." (2)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 2

Anonymous 181   Apothecary

An Apothecary from Salisbury, who sells Anne Styles white arsenic, purportedly to give to Anne Bodenham (who claims she will do counter-magic with it). (5-6)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 5-6

Anonymous 182   Apothecary

An Apothecary (Anonymous 182) who treats a man (Anonymous 183) by giving him six rolls paper, upon which he has written "Do well, or, All is well." He asks the man to swallow these rolls of paper as a way to internalize the cure. (98-99)

Appears in:
Casaubon, Meric. A Treatise Proving Spirits, Witches, and Supernatural Operations. London: 1672, 98-99

Anonymous 183   Witness

A man (183) who, long troubled by fevers, visited an Apothecary (Anonymous 182) who proscribed him a quasi-magical cure. (98-99)

Appears in:
Casaubon, Meric. A Treatise Proving Spirits, Witches, and Supernatural Operations. London: 1672, 98-99

Anonymous 185   Relative of Witch

A boy from St. Osyth in the county of Essex described as the son of Ursley Kempe. who is sent to Annis Letherdall's house to procure scouring sand. Letherdall does not give him scouring sand, and Anonymous 185 thus returns to his mother empty handed. This may or may not be Thomas Rabbett. (A2v-A3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v-A3

Anonymous 186   Witch-Searcher

A woman from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as one of a group of women who searches the fourteen year old maid (Anonymous 1) for witch's marks. They find marks not unlike warts that are "very flesh and red" under her armpits. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 6

Anonymous 187   Witness

A woman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, described as a maid who works for Richard Galis' father during the time of Galis' torments. She is called to bring a candle into Richard Galis' room so that he can better see the Mightie Black Cat which haunted him, but neither are able to see this cat, and the candle burns out. (6)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 6

Anonymous 189   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Berwick-Upon-Tweed in the county of Northumberland, described as one of a jury of women who find a witch's mark on Agnes Sampson. They shave her "privy parts" and allegedly find a mark. (10)

Appears in:
Carmichael, James. News from Scotland, Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of Doctor Fian a Notable Sorcerer. London: 1592, 10

Anonymous 19   Victim

An Anabaptist woman who lived on Old-Gravel lane in an unknown area of England, who was said to be possessed by the Devil and would speak in tongues, meow like a kitten and go suddenly blind. She becomes possessed after trying to convince her husband (Anonymous 482) to become baptized, and suffers from "strange and unusual Gestures, and involuntary Motions both of her Tongue and other Members." Ministers (Anonymous 483) visit her and converse with the spirit (Anonymous 240) possessing her, who admits to being sent from "a woman below." (Anonymous 238) These ministers believe the spirit is the Devil himself. The woman is unable to eat while possessed, as "the Vessels of her throat were stopped" whenever she attempted to eat. The spirit possessing her threatens in front of a number of Divines (Anonymous 484) to "throw her into the water, and so destroy her." It also tells the divines that it will make them sick for attempting to help the woman, and that "Prayers were not effectual, save only in [the] Pulpit." The woman remained possessed. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 2

Anonymous 19   Demoniac

An Anabaptist woman who lived on Old-Gravel lane in an unknown area of England, who was said to be possessed by the Devil and would speak in tongues, meow like a kitten and go suddenly blind. She becomes possessed after trying to convince her husband (Anonymous 482) to become baptized, and suffers from "strange and unusual Gestures, and involuntary Motions both of her Tongue and other Members." Ministers (Anonymous 483) visit her and converse with the spirit (Anonymous 240) possessing her, who admits to being sent from "a woman below." (Anonymous 238) These ministers believe the spirit is the Devil himself. The woman is unable to eat while possessed, as "the Vessels of her throat were stopped" whenever she attempted to eat. The spirit possessing her threatens in front of a number of Divines (Anonymous 484) to "throw her into the water, and so destroy her." It also tells the divines that it will make them sick for attempting to help the woman, and that "Prayers were not effectual, save only in [the] Pulpit." The woman remained possessed. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 2

Anonymous 190   Witness

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be the employer of Ostler of Windsor. Elizabeth Stile comes to Anonymous 190's house looking for alms and becomes angry when there is little to give because she was late. Stile bewitches Ostler of Windsor as a result. (Image 10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Image 10

Anonymous 191   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Knaresborough in the county of North Yorkshire, described as one of a jury of women who search Margaret Thorpe, Peg Wait, and Jennit Dibble for witch's marks. Peg Wait is later identified to have a spot on her face. (78)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 78

Anonymous 192   Witch-Searcher

An unknown number of women from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to form a jury of women whom Master Enger commanded to search Mary Sutton. After Sutton was swum in the mill pond and seen to float, they searched her and "found vnder her left thigh a kind of [te]at, which after the Bastard sonne confest her Spirits in seuerall shapes as Cats, Moales, &c. vsed to sucke her." (C2v-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, C2v-C3

Anonymous 193   Victim

A child from Manningtree in the county of Essex who is allegedly murdered by the imps kept by Mother Benefield, Mother Goodwin, Anne West, and Rebecca West. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Anonymous 194   Witch

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk described as a witch who sends her maid (Anonymous 195) to collect herbs. Anonymous 194 cuts up the herbs and strews them about a room. The following day Anonymous 194's husband (Anonymous 196) discovers twelve or fourteen dead hogs in the yard, which he suspects to be the work of Anonymous 194 and Anonymous 195. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 195   Co-conspirator

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, described as a maid of a reputed witch (Anonymous 194). Anonymous 195 is sent by her Mistress to collect herbs, but is delayed by a "meeting with her sweetheart" and beginning to grow nervous, that she "should bee halfe hanged for staying so long," was told by her lover that she could get the same herbs "in their owne garden." She collected the herbs, and despite her long delay, her mistress was pleased because she brought the herbs back. She spied her employer cut up and "strew the herbs about a room," and the next day witnessed the master of the house cry that he had "found twelve or fourteene great Hogs, being all his owne, dead in the yard, and so for his Sheepe and all his other Cattell." (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 196   Witness

The husband of a reputed witch (Anonymous 194). Anonymous 196 finds twelve or fourteen dead hogs in his yard, and suspects his wife (Anonymous 194) and her maid (Anonymous 195) may be the cause of their death. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 197   Witch

A woman and reputed witch who calls upon God as her witness to pass judgment on her, and is presently struck to the ground on her back because of this declaration. Anonymous 197 then suffers in a most lamentable condition, trembling and crying for two days, after which she confesses to having a malefic compact with the devil, stating that he usually appeared to her in the form of a squirrel. (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 6-7

Anonymous 198   Cunning-folk

A cunning woman who John RIvet consults regarding his wife's (Mrs. RIvet) violent fits. Anonymous 198 informs John Rivet that his wife has been bewitched by two of his neighbours. (5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 199   Physician

A man from Bristol in the county of Bristol, described as one of the physicians consulted about the alleged bewitchment of the Merideth children. The physic provided by the doctor (as well as others) is recorded as having contributed to their admirable recovery. (167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Anonymous 2   Victim

A woman from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, whose house is haunted by an unknown force that moves her bread, kills the cattle, sets hay and a house on fire, and moves meat and cheese from one room to another. Eventually, these incidents force her to move from her house. (2 - 6)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2 - 6

Anonymous 2   Witness

A woman from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, whose house is haunted by an unknown force that moves her bread, kills the cattle, sets hay and a house on fire, and moves meat and cheese from one room to another. Eventually, these incidents force her to move from her house. (2 - 6)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2 - 6

Anonymous 20   Victim

A young woman from Kirkham in the county of Lancashire, who curses individuals and gives birth to a monstrous baby that is born dead. (4-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration of a Strange and Wonderful Monster: Born in Kirkham parish in Lancashire. London: 1646, 4-6

Anonymous 201   Surgeon

A man from Yarmouth in the county of Norfolk, described as a surgeon (Anonymous 201) who is "accompted very skilfull," and whom John Orkton visits to diagnose and treat his persistent limb purification. The surgeon, "perceiuing his labour to bee wholly frustrate, gaue ouer the cure, and the diseased patient still continueth in a most distressed and miserable estate." (48-50)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 48-50

Anonymous 202   Physician

A number of physicians from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, described as being consulted to treat and diagnose Thomas Younges' mysterious wasting illness (allegedly caused by Henry Smith's curse). (58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 58-59

Anonymous 203   Victim

A man from Chester in the county of Cheshire, who identifies Mary Poole as a witch and claims the she allegedly bewitched him and his horse when they crossed paths in Sutors-Hill about seven years earlier. (2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 203   Accuser

A man from Chester in the county of Cheshire, who identifies Mary Poole as a witch and claims the she allegedly bewitched him and his horse when they crossed paths in Sutors-Hill about seven years earlier. (2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 204   Accuser

A man from Chester in the county of Cheshire, who claims that Mary Poole Stole from him. Suspecting that she would steal the money on his counter, he took it in his hand. When she saw him do so, she asked him to cross her with a piece of silver. In doing so, the piece disappears, but he had not the power to cry out after her. (2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 205   Accuser

A person from Chester in the county of Cheshire, described as one of many people who claimed to have been a victim of Mary Poole's thievery. (2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 206   Witch

A witch who restores John Ferralls son (Anonymous 74) back to perfect health after he had allegedly been bewitched by Margaret Simons. (3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

Anonymous 206   Un-witcher

A witch who restores John Ferralls son (Anonymous 74) back to perfect health after he had allegedly been bewitched by Margaret Simons. (3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

Anonymous 209   Victim

A man from Exeter in the county of Devon, who is ill and whose wife (Grace Matthew) believes him to have been bewitched. (150-151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150-151

Anonymous 21   Victim

A woman from Shoelane in London who gives birth on September 16, 1645, to a monstrous baby that has nails coming out of its thighs, no head, and stumps for legs. (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 210   Apothecary

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, who is allegedly able to help Grace Matthew's husband and a former servant of Dr. Browne's. She gives Grace Matthew a remedy to apply to her sick husband. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 211   Suspect

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as Dr. Browne's former servant who warns Grace Matthew. If Grace Matthew should see her, she should give her nothing but say that her husband is bewitched and that a plot is laid for the suspected one. (150)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150

Anonymous 212   Victim

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as a servant-maid who is allegedly bewitched by Joan Baker. She suffered from a wasting illness for over nine months, in grievous pain, until she was consumed "away in her body and soe dyed." During this time, she "often cried out in her sickness that she was bewitched." (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 212   Demoniac

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as a servant-maid who is allegedly bewitched by Joan Baker. She suffered from a wasting illness for over nine months, in grievous pain, until she was consumed "away in her body and soe dyed." During this time, she "often cried out in her sickness that she was bewitched." (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 213   Victim

A boy from Exeter in the county of Devon, who works for Ezekiel Trible, the tobacco pipe maker, and who is allegedly rendered ill by Diana Crosse. (150-151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150-151

Anonymous 214   Victim

A child from Exeter in the county of Devon described as one of Mrs. Dicker's who becomes ill shortly after Mrs. Dicker refuses to help Diana Crosse. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 215   Accuser

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, who testifies against Diana Crosse. She claims that her children (Anonymous 216 & 217) fell sick because she refused Diana Crosse some milk. She also claims her husband (Anonymous 218) fell ill about two years previous, an illness for which she consulted Dr. Browne, who could not diagnose nor cure him. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 216   Victim

A child from Exeter in the county of Devon, who allegedly falls ill because his mother (Anonymous 215) refused Diana Crosse some milk. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 217   Victim

A child from Exeter in the county of Devon, who becomes ill allegedly because his mother (Anonymous 215) refused Diana Crosse some milk. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 218   Victim

A man from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as the husband of Anonymous 215 and a wool-comber by trade, who allegedly is ill. At the time of examination, (Anonymous 218) has been ill for two years. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 219   Witness

A man from Tweedsmouth in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. He attended Margaret Muschamp during a fit after her mother Mary Moore returned home, in which Margaret said that she must have two drops of John Huttons' or Dorothy Swinow's blood within ten days to save her life; if not, she would die or be tormented perpetually. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Anonymous 22   Witch

A woman from Stopham who destroys stores of beer and kills three hogs through witchcraft after a maidservant refuses to give her these items. (2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 2-3

Anonymous 220   Accuser

A man from Exeter who testifies against Diana Crosse. He claims that after he refused to bring the mayor a petition on her behalf, his wife (Anonymous 221) fell ill, suffering from limb pain; his son (Anonymous 222) fell down and broke his arm; and worst of all, his brew "would not run at the 'penn'." (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 221   Victim

A woman from Exeter who allegedly falls ill, suffering from pain in her limbs, as a magical consequence of her husband's (Anonymous 220) refusal to bring a petition to the Mayor on behalf of Diana Crosse. Her son (Anonymous 222) also falls and breaks his arm after this event. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 222   Victim

A boy, the son of (Father: Anonymous 220 and Mother: Anonymous 221), from Exeter who allegedly falls and breaks his arm, an accident read as the magical consequence of his father's refusal to bring a petition to the Mayor on behalf of Diana Crosse. His mother also grows ill with limb pain. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 224   Demoniac

A woman who is allegedly possessed for three years. She would have extraordinary fits or sickness during which her flesh looked as though it had been torn up by hooks,;her belly swelled looking as though it would burst; her limbs contorted themselves; sometimes her body would be flung to the ground; and sometimes she could neither eat nor drink, surviving only on chalk and water. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 4

Anonymous 225   Witch

A woman, described as a "lewd woman" and a "notable witch," likely from Flamstead, in the county of Hertfordshire, who is committed to the goal in Hertford (a town in the parish of Hertfordshire) accused of inflicting "her witchery upon [Mr. Amyce] in such a manner that he was almost consumed to the bone" as retribution for some unexplained slight or crime. ()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Anonymous 226   Physician

One of several physicians who treat Israel Amyce for a mysterious and alleged malefic illness. They "could not tell what to make of it, the manner of it was so strange unto them." They do not provide a cure for Amyce. ()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Anonymous 227   Cunning-folk

A woman, likely an unwitcher, cunning woman, or female physician, described as dwelling "12 miles from Waltham," and having some skill in treating the bewitched, Anonymous 227 prescribed some treatment for Israel Amyce, administered before he went to bed, and enabled him to feel better in the next morning (and perhaps begin on the road to recovery). ()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Anonymous 227   Un-witcher

A woman, likely an unwitcher, cunning woman, or female physician, described as dwelling "12 miles from Waltham," and having some skill in treating the bewitched, Anonymous 227 prescribed some treatment for Israel Amyce, administered before he went to bed, and enabled him to feel better in the next morning (and perhaps begin on the road to recovery). ()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Anonymous 229   Witch

A "poor and base" woman who is sent to prison for allegedly being "the first mover of a mutiny." She is suspected to be witch by her neighbours. In addition, she is sent to prison immediately because hse is too base and poor to appear before Lords. (150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 23   Witch

A witch from Suffolk causes a young woman to give birth to two pieces of flesh after she is offered a cake broken in two. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 4

Anonymous 230   Suspect

One of a group of people who, along with Anonymous 229, are accused of causing "mutinous facts" in the county of Cambridgeshire. (150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 231   Accuser

One of a group of messengers who claim to have been cursed by Anonymous 229 as they were passing by her house in a boat. (150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 231   Victim

One of a group of messengers who claim to have been cursed by Anonymous 229 as they were passing by her house in a boat. (150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 232   Accuser

A waterman who is allegedly "stricken with such a lamentable crick in his back that he was constrained to get help" soon after the group of messengers (Anonymous 231) are allegedly cursed by Anonymous 229. (150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 232   Victim

A waterman who is allegedly "stricken with such a lamentable crick in his back that he was constrained to get help" soon after the group of messengers (Anonymous 231) are allegedly cursed by Anonymous 229. (150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 233   Victim

One of a group of unidentified people from county of Essex who are allegedly bewitched by Joan Haddon. Haddon, however, is acquitted of the charge of witchcraft, but found guilty of getting money from them through fraudulent means. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225

Anonymous 234   Witch

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a miller's wife and one of the two "bad women" who kept Dorothy Swinow's company. She, along with Swinow and the Webster's wife (a weaver; Anonymous 235), allegedly caused the deaths of John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd. (9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Anonymous 235   Witch

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a weaver's wife and one of the two "bad women" who kept Dorothy Swinow's company. She, along with Swinow and a miller's wife (Anonymous 234), allegedly caused the deaths of John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd. (9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Anonymous 236   Relative of Victim

A man from Goswell Street, London who is the brother-in-law of Anonymous 224, a bewitched woman. Anonymous 236 is allegedly able to capture the evil spirit that has bewitched Anonymous 224 in a stone bottle that hung above the fire, after which he hears a roaring noise coming from the bottle. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 6

Anonymous 236   Un-witcher

A man from Goswell Street, London who is the brother-in-law of Anonymous 224, a bewitched woman. Anonymous 236 is allegedly able to capture the evil spirit that has bewitched Anonymous 224 in a stone bottle that hung above the fire, after which he hears a roaring noise coming from the bottle. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 6

Anonymous 236   Witness

A man from Goswell Street, London who is the brother-in-law of Anonymous 224, a bewitched woman. Anonymous 236 is allegedly able to capture the evil spirit that has bewitched Anonymous 224 in a stone bottle that hung above the fire, after which he hears a roaring noise coming from the bottle. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 6

Anonymous 237   Examiner/Justice

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Justice of the Peace. He heard Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland for prosecution, which he denied. The next day, Moore again appeared in the Judge's chamber to beg justice against Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-15

Anonymous 238   Witness

An unknown number of persons from the London borough of Southwark who deposed against Sarah Morduck, alleging that she had "privately been reputed an Ill Liver for many Years." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

Anonymous 239   Witness

An unknown person from the London borough of Southwark who gave a deposition against Sarah Morduck alleging that she said, regarding Richard Hathaway's scratching of her, "It should do him no good, but rather make him worse." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

Anonymous 24   Victim

A woman from Radcliffe who gives birth to a monstrous baby that is a hermaphrodite, has no hands, feet, or legs, and dies shortly after birth. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 241   Examiner/Justice

A justice who does not find Margaret Ganne and Joan Norfolk guilty of murdering John Furmyn by witchcraft so that he languished and died. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anonymous 242   Witch

A women from Boreham in the county of Essex who confesses to (under examination/ compelled by) Archdeacon Cole that she was as witch. She flees shortly thereafter. ()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Anonymous 243   Witch

A woman who is suspected of witchcraft. she is the daughter of Joan Cocke, from Kelvedon (a suspected witch). She is aligned with two acts of witchcraft: property damage and animal damage. Both crimes are concerned with cows/ dairy and both accusations come courtesy of Noble (wife) This woman (Noble's wife) claimed she could not churn butter -- an unfortunate circumsatnce she blamed on Cocke. Noble (wife) also claimed that Cocke (daughter) was responsible for the death of one of Belffilde's wife's cattle (a woman from Linford, Stanford-le-Hope, in the county of Essex) and for causing the other to give "milke of all colour." ()

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4. H.M. Stationery Office: 1885,

Anonymous 244   Witness

An old woman from the county of Essex (Anonymous 244), who lived in Queen Mary' reign, and spoke at some time to Thomas Addy, and taught him a charm she used each night to charm her bed before she fell asleep. The charm allegedly was taught to her by a priest when she was a young woman, "Matthew, Mark, Luke, and Iohn,/ The Bed be blest that I lye on." (58-59)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 58-59

Anonymous 245   Victim

A man from the county of Essex, described as a Butcher (Anonymous 245) who, having lost a cow, went to visit a cunning-man (Anonymous 247). The cunning-man fooled the butcher by asking him to look at the reflections cast in a glass as his "confederate of his covered over with a Bulls Hide, and a pair of horns on his head" attempted to trick him. The butcher figured out the ruse and returned with his boy and his dog, a large mastiff, which the boy released on the confederate (Anonymous 248). (62-63)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62-63

Anonymous 246   Witness

The boy from the county of Essex, described as a servant or son of a butcher who works with (Anonymous 245) to expose a cunning-man and his conferdate who attempts to trick his master /father. His job is to release a large mastiff dog on the confederate of the cunning-man, who dressed in a bull's hide and horns, is meant to represent the devil. The Boy does this and the dog clamps down on one of the cheats, forcing him to expose his ruse. (62)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62

Anonymous 247   Cunning-folk

A man from the county of Essex, described as a cunning-man who is a "notable cousening Knave [..] skilful in the Black Art," a "deceiving Witch," and a "conjurer," who with the help of a "confederate" (Anonymous 248) runs a confidence scam against a local butcher who is seeking help finding a lost cow/ cattle. The cunning-man is exposed when his partner, dressed menacingly like the devil, or a devil, is attacked by the butcher's dog and is forced to revel himself to have the man call off his dog. (62-63)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62-63

Anonymous 248   Cunning-folk

A man from the county of Essex, described as a cunning-man who works with Anonymous 247 to run a confidence scam against a local butcher who is seeking help finding a lost cow/ cattle. His job was to cover himself in a "Bulls Hide, and a pair of horns on his head," and pose as the Devil to terrify the butcher who was meant to be seeing the Devil. The butcher figured out the con and returned with his Boy and a mastiff, who attacked the disguised man and forced him to revel himself in exchange for having the butcher call off his dog. (62)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62

Anonymous 249   Witch

A woman from the town of Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, described as "an honest woman (so always formerly reputed)" who was executed at Cambridge (1645). She appears to have been prosecuted, at least in part, as a witch, because she allegedly had a familiar. Thomas Addy represents this as "keeping a tame Frogge in a Box for sport and Phantasie." (135)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 135

Anonymous 25   Witness

A young woman from Amersfoort in Holland, who is visited by an apparition and is then cured of her lameness. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Two Remarkable and True Histories, which Happened this Present Year, 1619. London: 1620, 5-6

Anonymous 251   Witness

A man, a friend of William Drage, possibly from Baldock in the county of Hertfordshire, claims to have seen two witches being swum. One, he reported "sunk presently down-right; the other, though tyed Toes and Thumbs together, could not be made to sink." ()

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665,

Anonymous 252   Witch

A man from St. Albans in the county of Hertforshire who is imprisoned (presumably for witchcraft) along with Mary-by-chance. When the two of them are made to "shew their Teats," it is revealed hat he "had like a Breast on his side," a protuberance read as a witch's mark. (40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 40

Anonymous 253   Accuser

A maid (Anonymous 253) from Bedford in the county of Bedfordshire who, upon refusing to share her pease porridge with Goodwife Rose, found it had gone mealy. This maid turned accuser against Rose and went so far as to offer to be swum next to her, to prove an honest woman would sink while a witch floated. This is indeed what happened, but as much to the Maid's detriment as to Rose's. While Rose floated sinisterly on the water, the Maid almost drowned, and could hardly be recovered. (41)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 41

Anonymous 253   Victim

A maid (Anonymous 253) from Bedford in the county of Bedfordshire who, upon refusing to share her pease porridge with Goodwife Rose, found it had gone mealy. This maid turned accuser against Rose and went so far as to offer to be swum next to her, to prove an honest woman would sink while a witch floated. This is indeed what happened, but as much to the Maid's detriment as to Rose's. While Rose floated sinisterly on the water, the Maid almost drowned, and could hardly be recovered. (41)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 41

Anonymous 254   Demoniac

A man from the Isle of Ely (now a region around the city of Ely in the county of Cambridgeshire) who is allegedly bewitched. Before his "strange fits" came on, her was allegedly visited by a thing "like a Mouse." He was sent to see a "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician," who gave him an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off." The wizard who helped this man "asked if they were wicked People, else, he said, he could not, or would not help them." The they here is somewhat opaque. It appears that he seems like an unwitcher, but the pronoun confusion allows this to be read as him only taking wicked people as clients. (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 255   Cunning-folk

A man from the Isle of Ely (now a region around the city of Ely in the county of Cambridgeshire) who is described as a "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician." He gave a man tormented with fits (Anonymous 254) an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off." This wizard also asked Anonymous 254 "if they were wicked People, else, he said, he could not, or would not help them." The they here is somewhat opaque. It appears that he seems like an unwitcher, but the pronoun confusion allows this to be read as him only taking wicked people as clients. (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 256   Witch

A woman from the county of Hertfordshire allegedly claimed that regardless of what happened to her in court, she was "sure not to die yet: for all the mischief she had done, was in transforming her self into the shape of a Bumble Boe; and biting the Maids thread often is pieces as she spun; which Maid came in against her." (18-19)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 18-19

Anonymous 257   Divine

A woman who is allegedly a "skryers of the glasse [a person who uses material objects such as mirrors, glass, or crystals for divination purposes]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Anonymous 259   Victim

A boy from the county of Essex (possibly named Simon) who is believed to have been bewitched by Alice Aylett. The boy is said to have languished and then died and Alice Aylett is found guilty of having bewitched and murdered Susan Parman and Simon. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anonymous 26   Victim

A boy from Suffolk who disappeared and was presumed dead, but appeared at home after a month. (440)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Suffolk Miracle. London: 1693, 440

Anonymous 260   Victim

A child from Lutterworth in the county of Leicestershire who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Bell. Anonymous 260 appears to be cured when Bell is scratched. (21)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 21

Anonymous 261   Victim

A maid and servant from Great Bentley in the county of Essex who is called a witch and an old whore by Edward Munt. The woman told Munt who had come to see Anonymous 261 masters, John Harris or his wife, that neither were available at the moment which sent Munt into a fit. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=5)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=5

Anonymous 262   Demoniac

A boy from Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire who is allegedly possessed. His fits arrive at six o'clock each day, when he begins to pull of his head clothes, pull out his hair, and scratch the skin from his face. Dr. Woodhouse first sends him prescriptions for medicines to treat convulsions. When these medicines do not work, Woodhouse goes to visit the boy himself and prescribes him a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," which appears to work as a curative. (38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38-39

Anonymous 263   Witness

A military chaplain who is stationed at or passing through Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire. Along with a captain of the same regiment, he visits Joyce Dovey and "by some discourse, and other informations, strongly imagined, that shee was possessed." This appears to be the first mention of her potential possession. (1-2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 1-2

Anonymous 264   Witness

A military officer who is stationed at or passing through Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire. Along with a chaplain of the same regiment, he visits Joyce Dovey and "by some discourse, and other information, strongly imagined, that shee was possessed." This appears to be the first mention of her potential possession. (1-2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 1-2

Anonymous 265   Witness

A man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, described as Joyce Dovey's "Keeper." This man, supposing that Dovey may have been possessed, allegedly lifted "up his heart to the Lord in prayer, without uttering of words, that if she were possessed, the Lord would be pleased to make it manifest." Dovey responded immediately and violently; the Devil (within her) answered "with swearing, Wounds, Blood, &c". (2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 2

Anonymous 267   Witness

A solider stationed near Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire who, along with two other soldiers, visits Joyce Dovey. While there, they "talk of Papists" making "Crucifixes, and Crosses," appear on Joyce Dovey's breast or throat. They react in terror and The Devil mocks them, laughing "haw, haw, haw." (2-3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 2-3

Anonymous 268   Witness

A solider stationed near Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire who, along with two other soldiers, visits Joyce Dovey. While there, they "talk of Papists" making "Crucifixes, and Crosses," appear on Joyce Dovey's breast or throat. They react in terror and The Devil mocks them, laughing "haw, haw, haw." (2-3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 2-3

Anonymous 269   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 269) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 269 has been alotted a spirit in the likenes of a horse, which made John Smyth "whinny" when it tormented him. The alleged witch would be brought before John Smyth and made to unwitch him by calling their spirits off. Anonymous 269 would, for instance, be made to say "I such a one chardge the hors, yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." Anonymous 269 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 27   Witness

A woman who fell in love with Anonymous 26. The daughter of a nearby farmer. (441)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Suffolk Miracle. London: 1693, 441

Anonymous 270   Witness

A solider stationed near Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire who, along with two other soldiers, visits Joyce Dovey. While there, they "talk of Papists" making "Crucifixes, and Crosses," appear on Joyce Dovey's breast or throat. They react in terror and The Devil mocks them, laughing "haw, haw, haw." (2-3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 2-3

Anonymous 271   Witch

An old woman from Suffolk, who confesses at a session held in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk to being "a Witch the space of above fifty yeares," during which time she bewitched both cattle and corn, and gave suck to her imps "which came to her in severall shapes". She also confessed to bewitching "seven persons of one family to death" of a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285) and their five children (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). She may be any of: Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Susan Manners or Mary Skipper. She is tried, convicted and condemned by the judge and justices at the session, one among eighteen others. She is executed August 27, 1645. (Cover, 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3

Anonymous 272   Witch

A woman from Suffolk, described as "another of the women witches" who confesses at a session held in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk to: being a witch "above five and twenty yeares,"; bewitching a child (Anonymous 283) to death; bewitching cattle and corn; and many other "such like evill deeds." She may be any of: Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Susan Manners or Mary Skipper. She is tried, convicted and condemned by the judge and justices at the session, one among eighteen others. She is executed August 27, 1645. (Cover, 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 4

Anonymous 273   Witch

A woman from Suffolk imprisoned with 120 others at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk as a suspected witch in 1645. She confessed that she "had carnall copulation with the Devill," while her husband was still alive, and by the Devil, conceived twice. As soon as the offspring was born, "they run away in most horrid long and ugly shapes." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 274   Witch

A woman from Suffolk imprisoned with 120 others at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk as a suspected witch in 1645. She confessed that had a grudge against a gentleman (Anonymous 281) and his wife (Anonymous 282), and so send "one of her impes in the likenesse of a little black smoth dog" to play with their only son (Anonymous 275). The imp drowned the boy "to the great grief of the parents." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 275   Victim

A young boy and the only child of a gentleman and his wife in Suffolk. He plays with an imp "in the likenesse of a little black smoth dog" sent by a woman (Anonymous 274) who was offended when the family expressed displeasure at her frequent visits. At first, the boy "refused to play with it," but it persisted until "the Child made much of it" and the imp brought the child to water, "and there drowned the said child to the great grief of the parents." The woman is imprisoned at Bury St. Edmunds in 1645. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 276   Witch

A woman in prison at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645 for witchcraft, who is sentenced to be burned. She is penitent for her "former lewd and abominable indevours," and asks for "Petitions put up to divers godly Ministers that they would be pleased to pray in their severall Congrefations," so that her imps will have no further power to hurt others. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 277   Witch-Searcher

A man from Suffolk appointed with three others (Anonymous 278, Anonymous 279, Anonymous 280) to be witch-searchers. He is to identify "those men who are suspected to be Witches" in the county of Suffolk during 1645. He finds teats or dugs "which their impes used to suck" on four of eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds: Mr. Lowes parson, Thomas Evererd, Ian Limstead, and Ian Rivert. (Cover - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover - 6

Anonymous 278   Witch-Searcher

A man from Suffolk appointed with three others (Anonymous 277, Anonymous 279, Anonymous 280) to be witch-searchers. He is to identify "those men who are suspected to be Witches" in the county of Suffolk during 1645. He finds teats or dugs "which their impes used to suck" on four of eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds: Mr. Lowes parson, Thomas Evererd, Ian Limstead, and Ian Rivert. (Cover - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover - 6

Anonymous 279   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Suffolk appointed with three others (Anonymous 277, Anonymous 278, Anonymous 280) to be witch-searchers. She is to identify "those women that are supposed to be Witches" in the county of Suffolk during 1645. She finds teats or dugs "which their impes used to suck" on fourteen of eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds: Mary Evererd, Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Susan Manners, Mary Skipper, and Anne Leech. (Cover - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover - 6

Anonymous 28   Victim

A girl from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to have been sixteen or seventeen years old at the time of her possession. She is said to be "descended of honest Parents of good [repute], and by them carefully educated in the Principles of Christianity; nor was there a young maid of a more lovely innocent Beauty, sweet Carriage, or virtuous Disposition." Her father allegedly had a falling out with an unnamed woman with an "evil name" and not long after, she began to have strange fits. Two egg-sized bunches would rise in her throat and a strange voice, rough and guttural, would be heard within her speaking blasphemies; this voice would often converse with bystanders. Through these conversations, it was learned that there were two spirits possessing her, and that they had been sent into her by two women when the spirits found her father praying and were unable to enter him. Her father engaged five ministers to fast and pray to exorcise her (only four came, as predicted by the evil spirits), succeeding in removing one of the two. The spirit that remained inside her began tossing her about, taking the use of her legs, and contorting both her body and her face; it also caused her to ride home facing the rear of the horse. At other times, it would cause her to make a dog's barks, a bull's bellows or to roar. She is also said to have once attended a party, at which she lost the use of her legs to prevent her from drinking and tried to make her drown herself in the well in the yard. Her possession was still in effect at the time of the account's publication, about 13 years later. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 28   Demoniac

A girl from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to have been sixteen or seventeen years old at the time of her possession. She is said to be "descended of honest Parents of good [repute], and by them carefully educated in the Principles of Christianity; nor was there a young maid of a more lovely innocent Beauty, sweet Carriage, or virtuous Disposition." Her father allegedly had a falling out with an unnamed woman with an "evil name" and not long after, she began to have strange fits. Two egg-sized bunches would rise in her throat and a strange voice, rough and guttural, would be heard within her speaking blasphemies; this voice would often converse with bystanders. Through these conversations, it was learned that there were two spirits possessing her, and that they had been sent into her by two women when the spirits found her father praying and were unable to enter him. Her father engaged five ministers to fast and pray to exorcise her (only four came, as predicted by the evil spirits), succeeding in removing one of the two. The spirit that remained inside her began tossing her about, taking the use of her legs, and contorting both her body and her face; it also caused her to ride home facing the rear of the horse. At other times, it would cause her to make a dog's barks, a bull's bellows or to roar. She is also said to have once attended a party, at which she lost the use of her legs to prevent her from drinking and tried to make her drown herself in the well in the yard. Her possession was still in effect at the time of the account's publication, about 13 years later. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 280   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Suffolk appointed with three others (Anonymous 277, Anonymous 278, Anonymous 279) to be witch-searchers. She is to identify "those women that are supposed to be Witches" in the county of Suffolk during 1645. She finds teats or dugs "which their impes used to suck" on fourteen of eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds: Mary Evererd, Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Susan Manners, Mary Skipper, and Anne Leech. (Cover - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover - 6

Anonymous 281   Victim

A man from Suffolk, who along with his wife (Anonymous 282) offended a woman (Anonymous 274) by expressing discontent at her frequent visits, causing her to send her imp in the form "of a little black smoth Dog" to play with their young and only son. The imp brings the son to water and drowns him, " to the great grief of the parents." The woman is imprisoned at Bury St. Edmunds in 1645. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 282   Victim

A woman from Suffolk, who along with her husband (Anonymous 281) offended a woman (Anonymous 274) by expressing discontent at her frequent visits, causing her to send her imp in the form "of a little black smoth Dog" to play with their young and only son. The imp brings the son to water and drowns him, " to the great grief of the parents." The woman is imprisoned at Bury St. Edmunds in 1645. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 283   Victim

A child who is allegedly bewitched to death by "another of the women Witches" (Anonymous 272). The woman is later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover, 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 4

Anonymous 284   Victim

A man from Suffolk who was allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his family: his wife and five children, by an old woman (Anonymous 271), who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover, 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3

Anonymous 285   Victim

A woman from Suffolk, married to a man (Anonymous 284) and having five children (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290) who was allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of her family by an old woman (Anonymous 271). The old woman was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover, 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3

Anonymous 286   Victim

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 287   Victim

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 288   Victim

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 289   Victim

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 290   Victim

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 291   Witness

A man, described as "one of Cromwell's Soldiers being on his Watch" stationed on his watch near the Queen's Chapel of St. James' Palace, who has an encounter with an unknown apparition (Apparition 1) that throws him to the ground. The soldier apparently told the apparition (Apparition 1) to stop and stand or else he would shoot it, at which point the apparition (Apparition 1) "ran upon him, and threw him over the way far off." (57-58)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57-58

Anonymous 291   Victim

A man, described as "one of Cromwell's Soldiers being on his Watch" stationed on his watch near the Queen's Chapel of St. James' Palace, who has an encounter with an unknown apparition (Apparition 1) that throws him to the ground. The soldier apparently told the apparition (Apparition 1) to stop and stand or else he would shoot it, at which point the apparition (Apparition 1) "ran upon him, and threw him over the way far off." (57-58)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57-58

Anonymous 292   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 292) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 292 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a dog. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 292 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 292 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 293   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 293) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 293 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a cat. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 293 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 293 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 294   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 294) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 294 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a pullemar (fullmart?). As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 294 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 294 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 295   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 295) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 295 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a fish. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 295 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 295 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 297   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 297) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 297 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a code (cod?). As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 295 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 297 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 298   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 298) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 298 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 299   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 299) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 299 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 3   Witch

A magician in a dream who preforms witchcraft (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Magical Vision, or, A Perfect Discovery of the Fallacies of Witchcraft. London: 1673, 5

Anonymous 300   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 300) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 300 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 301   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 301) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman, allegedly admitted to the jailer that she was working in concert with her familiar, and with the other accused witches, to bewitch Smyth. She begged him not to reveal her secret, lest the other women torment her for speaking against them. In very short order, five of these women were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. One woman, however, Anonymous 301, died in jail before this happened, evidently within hours of confessing her crimes. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 302   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 302) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 302 was one of the women who was released. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 303   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 303) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 303 was one of the women who was released. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 304   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 304) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 304 was one of the women who was released. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 305   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 305) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 304 was one of the women who was released. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 306   Witch

A woman (Anonymous 306) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 306 was one of the women who was released. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 307   Victim

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is visited in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two allegedly wicked women. After the death of Roger Crey, widely believed to have been caused by the administrations of these two women, the parents of the virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307) refuse that their daughter should take anything from them. Anonymous 207 dies of grief, "having her heart broke by the occasion of the practices of these women." (14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 308   Victim

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the father of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. His wife and him "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief. (14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 308   Witness

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the father of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. His wife and him "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief. (14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 309   Victim

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the mother of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. Her husband and her "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief. (14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 309   Witness

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the mother of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. Her husband and her "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief. (14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 310   Witness

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is Lord General. Mrs. Pigeon "applyes her self" to him, and "with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army," allowing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

Anonymous 310   Victim

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is Lord General. Mrs. Pigeon "applyes her self" to him, and "with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army," allowing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

Anonymous 310   Examiner/Justice

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is sent for by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women, along with his colleague, Anonymous 312, to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin, in the dead of night from his own home. Using an iron crow, he forces the bedchamber doors of Andrew Goodwin's room open in order to retrieve him. (20 - 21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20 - 21

Anonymous 312   Examiner/Justice

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is sent for by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women, along with his colleague, Anonymous 311, to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin, in the dead of night from his own home. Using an iron crow, he forces the bedchamber doors of Andrew Goodwin's room open in order to retrieve him. (20 - 21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20 - 21

Anonymous 313   Accuser

A person from Strood in Kent and one of four people who accuse Anne Blundy of murdering Mary Griffin. (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Anonymous 314   Accuser

One of an unknown number of Gentlemen of the county of Suffolk who questioned Aubrey Grinset, an accused witch who allegedly bewitched John Collet of Cokely and Henry Winson of Walpool to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich. A group of gentlemen first heard her confess that she had a familiar spirit, had been the death of some, and that she bewitched Thomas Spatchet. She later confessed again to two gentlemen (who may have been in the first group or different gentlemen entirely); this time she admitted to harming Spatchet but denied causing the deaths of Collet and Winson. (19-20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19-20

Anonymous 315   Witch-Searcher

A neighbour of Alice Fowler who searches her for witch's marks. The neighbours find five black teats near her private parts. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 3

Anonymous 316   Witness

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the wife of Anonymous 321 and the mother of Anonymous 11. She witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 316   Relative of Victim

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the wife of Anonymous 321 and the mother of Anonymous 11. She witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 317   Witness

One of an unknown number of Credible Persons of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, who offered to give testimony against Aubrey Grinset of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. She stood accused of bewitching John Collet of Cokely in the county of Suffolk and Henry Winson of Walpool in the county of Suffolk to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. (19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

Anonymous 317   Accuser

One of an unknown number of Credible Persons of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, who offered to give testimony against Aubrey Grinset of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. She stood accused of bewitching John Collet of Cokely in the county of Suffolk and Henry Winson of Walpool in the county of Suffolk to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. (19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

Dr. Thomas Mounford   Physician

A man from London, who serves as the second physician of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl mysteriously afflicted with fits after being cursed by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Dr. Mounford takes over Dr. Shereman in the caretaking of Mary Glover early in her fits, after Dr. Shereman proved unable to cure or identify Mary Glover's illness, instead stating "that som cause beyond naturall was in it." The parents of Mary Glover then seek Dr. Mounford, who treated the girl for "the space of almost three monthes." Dr. Thomas Mounford was a very distinguished doctor, "seven times President of the College of Physicians, and an expert on melancholy, which was another natural disease widely believed like hysteria to produce apparently supernatural symptoms." However, Dr. Mounford is also unable to identify the cause of Mary Glover's illness, or to cure it. He concludes that the disease is not hysteria, but another natural illness, which he cannot identify. This differing opinion from Dr. Shereman began a "division of medical opinion," that lasted throughout the rest of Mary Glover's case. However, interestingly enough, on November 13, 1602, Dr. Mounford is among the doctors that Elizabeth Jackson petitions the College to confront. However, Dr. Mounford is away during that time, and unable to account for his alleged accusations against the old woman. (Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r

Anonymous 318   Preacher/Minister

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a preacher. He comes to help the young maid, Anonymous 11, who is suffering from convulsive fits. However, his prayers only cause her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 318   Witness

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a preacher. He comes to help the young maid, Anonymous 11, who is suffering from convulsive fits. However, his prayers only cause her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 319   Physician

A number of men from an unknown area of London, who attend to Anonymous 224, a woman with "unusual symptoms" residing at Goswell Street. They agree that it is unlikely that Anonymous 224 suffers from Melancholy, Hysterical Passions, "or Fits of the Mother." They prescribe her medication, however, "both Cathartick and Emetick," but her condition never improves, even when they double their dosage. These physicians are then led to conclude that she was bewitched. (2 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 2 - 3

Anonymous 32   Demoniac

A young maid from Arpington in the county of Kent, who allegedly has two devils (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) inside of her, causing her to have several fits. During fits, her face would be deformed so that she was unrecognizable. Her "Nerves, Joynts and Sinews, after so wonderful a manner, that they had almost drawn her out of human Shape," although generally, it was agreed she was a comely woman. Her face becomes so contorted that it is believed not her ever relatives would recognize her. She is further described as having a set jaw, and strained eyes, with "her Eye-balls an incredibly way into her Head." Doctor Boreman prays over her, which allegedly slightly improves her condition. Her condition attracts people (Anonymous 449) from far away who all say they have never seen anything like it. The spirits can be heard to groan inside of her belly, causing many spectators to run in fear and surprise. However, one witness, Mrs. Hopper and Doctor Boreman, hear one of the spirits within Anonymous 32 say "weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker" four times over before ceasing to speak. Both these two witness it when the spirits made the maid bark like a dog. At another occasion, when Doctor Boreman prayed over the maid during one of her fits, "a live and seeming substance forc'd its way out of her mouth in likeness of a large Serpent," (Anonymous 18) which then flew around Doctor Boreman's neck. It remains here until some witnesses take it off him, when it vanishes and is never seen again. However, despite being dispossessed by one spirit, Anonymous 32 is still under possession of a spirit (Anonymous 88) which causes her face to contort, and which makes noise whenever the maid moves, both answering questions and making "a hideous murmuring, as if it disliked its present habitation." It seems the maid is never completely dispossessed. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 2-3

Anonymous 32   Victim

A young maid from Arpington in the county of Kent, who allegedly has two devils (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) inside of her, causing her to have several fits. During fits, her face would be deformed so that she was unrecognizable. Her "Nerves, Joynts and Sinews, after so wonderful a manner, that they had almost drawn her out of human Shape," although generally, it was agreed she was a comely woman. Her face becomes so contorted that it is believed not her ever relatives would recognize her. She is further described as having a set jaw, and strained eyes, with "her Eye-balls an incredibly way into her Head." Doctor Boreman prays over her, which allegedly slightly improves her condition. Her condition attracts people (Anonymous 449) from far away who all say they have never seen anything like it. The spirits can be heard to groan inside of her belly, causing many spectators to run in fear and surprise. However, one witness, Mrs. Hopper and Doctor Boreman, hear one of the spirits within Anonymous 32 say "weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker" four times over before ceasing to speak. Both these two witness it when the spirits made the maid bark like a dog. At another occasion, when Doctor Boreman prayed over the maid during one of her fits, "a live and seeming substance forc'd its way out of her mouth in likeness of a large Serpent," (Anonymous 18) which then flew around Doctor Boreman's neck. It remains here until some witnesses take it off him, when it vanishes and is never seen again. However, despite being dispossessed by one spirit, Anonymous 32 is still under possession of a spirit (Anonymous 88) which causes her face to contort, and which makes noise whenever the maid moves, both answering questions and making "a hideous murmuring, as if it disliked its present habitation." It seems the maid is never completely dispossessed. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 2-3

Anonymous 320   Physician

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a Professing Physick, treated alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet for his fits. From his observations of Spatchet's fits, he concluded that they were no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion. When the fits wore off, he observed that Spatchet would sometimes be left stretched out like a dead man. (26)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 26

Anonymous 320   Witness

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a Professing Physick, treated alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet for his fits. From his observations of Spatchet's fits, he concluded that they were no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion. When the fits wore off, he observed that Spatchet would sometimes be left stretched out like a dead man. (26)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 26

Mistress Lumas   Witness

A woman from London, who is allegedly breathed upon by the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover during the early days of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon people in this state, they are usually injured; in the case of Mistress Lumas, Mary Glover breathed upon her face, "and caused it to be very sore." This leaves Mistress Lumas quite sick, and "held a noysome impression in her a great while after." (Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v

Mistress Lumas   Victim

A woman from London, who is allegedly breathed upon by the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover during the early days of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon people in this state, they are usually injured; in the case of Mistress Lumas, Mary Glover breathed upon her face, "and caused it to be very sore." This leaves Mistress Lumas quite sick, and "held a noysome impression in her a great while after." (Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v

Anonymous 321   Relative of Victim

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the husband of Anonymous 316 and the father of Anonymous 11. He witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 321   Witness

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the husband of Anonymous 316 and the father of Anonymous 11. He witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 322   Witch

A woman from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who is the wife of a cunning man (Anonymous 487) and neighbour to Jane Stretton. Anonymous 322 is angry on her husband's behalf, when he gets into an argument with Thomas Stretton. Within a month of this argument, Anonymous 322 comes to visit Jane Stretton, Thomas Stretton's daughter, sharing for a pot of drink. Almost immediately after, the girl is taken by a violent fit. Later, Anonymous 322 visits Jane Stretton, asking for a pin. After Jane Stretton gives a pin to the woman, Jane Stretton is again taken with a violent fit, this time her body swelling painfully. When it is discovered that Thomas Stretton had an argument with Anonymous 487, he and his wife are taken before Jane Stretton, who has been suffering from fits thought to be caused by witchcraft for some nine months. Upon being brought to see Jane Stretton, Anonymous 322 proclaims that "she could not have stayed any longer from her." (3 - 4)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 3 - 4

Anonymous 324   Witness

An elder who accompanies Mr. Patrick Simpson on his visit to Christian Shaw. (12-13)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 12-13

Anonymous 325   Witness

An elder who accompanies Mr. Patrick Simpson on his visit to Christian Shaw. (12-13)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 12-13

Anonymous 326   Witness

An elder who accompanies Mr. Patrick Simpson on his visit to Christian Shaw. (12-13)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 12-13

Anonymous 326 (Plural)   Cunning-folk

A group of "wizards" from Knaresborough forest in North Yorkshire who allegedly practice and teach countermagic. (34-35)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34-35

Anonymous 326 (Plural)   Un-witcher

A group of "wizards" from Knaresborough forest in North Yorkshire who allegedly practice and teach countermagic. (34-35)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34-35

Anonymous 326 (Plural)   Magician

A group of "wizards" from Knaresborough forest in North Yorkshire who allegedly practice and teach countermagic. (34-35)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34-35

Anonymous 327 (Plural)   Witness

A group of people from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as the friends of Thomas Darling who are asked to pray for Darling in hopes of cruing him of violent fits. (3)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 3

Anonymous 327 (Plural)   Exorcist

A group of people from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as the friends of Thomas Darling who are asked to pray for Darling in hopes of cruing him of violent fits. (3)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 3

Anonymous 328 (Plural)   Exorcist

A group of friars from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempt to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession by making him pray to St. James. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers. (10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 10

Anonymous 328 (Plural)   Preacher/Minister

A group of friars from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempt to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession by making him pray to St. James. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers. (10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 10

Anonymous 328 (Plural)   Witness

A group of friars from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempt to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession by making him pray to St. James. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers. (10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 10

Anonymous 33   Victim

A young maid from Taunton in Somersetshire who suffer from strange fits. She lost her health and languished when bewitched by Julian Cox in 1663. ()

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681,

Anonymous 330 (Plural)   Examiner/Justice

A person from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, described as one of several Commisioners hired by the King (presumably James II) to look into the problem of witches and witchcraft in Renfrew. They put several women on trial and perform tests such as pricking and search for witch's marks. (3)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 3

Anonymous 331   Demoniac

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the servant of Robert Turner, and a demoniac. The servant of Robert Turner suffers from terrible and ongoing fits, and demonstrates inhuman strength, a condition allegedly caused by familiar spirits sent by Rose Hallybread, Susan Cock, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes after Robert Turner "refused to give to this Examinant a sack full of chips." According to Joybe Boanes, it was her Imp that "made the said servant to barke like a Dog; the Imp of the said Rose Hallybread inforced him to sing sundry tunes in his great extremity of paines; the Imp of the said Susin Cock, compelled him to crow like a Cock; and the Imp of Margaret Landish made him groan in such an extraordinary manner. (33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33

Anonymous 332   Victim

A child from Dedham in the county of Essex, described as the child of a clothier who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Clarke. The child dies within a week of being bewitched (or March 18, 1645). (8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

Anonymous 333   Examiner/Justice

A man from St. Paul's Cross in London who accepts the confessions of Rachel Pindar and Agnes Brigges as having "counterfeiringes" of being possessed by Satan, on August 15, 1574. (2-3)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 2-3

Anonymous 334   Witness

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who allegedly suggests to Richard Dugdale that he lie down and take drink on a morning he experiences "some heaviness." She is described as "a Neighbourwoman of good Repute," and a servant. (62-63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63

Anonymous 335   Apothecary

A man from Manchester in the county of Greater Manchester, who is summoned to treat Richard Dugdale during one of his alleged fits in Surrey near Lancashire. He and his colleague, Mr. Ainsworth, were unable to help Richard Dugdale recover from his perceived lifeless state. (56)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 56

Anonymous 335   Witness

A man from Manchester in the county of Greater Manchester, who is summoned to treat Richard Dugdale during one of his alleged fits in Surrey near Lancashire. He and his colleague, Mr. Ainsworth, were unable to help Richard Dugdale recover from his perceived lifeless state. (56)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 56

Anonymous 336   Victim

A man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as a servant to Francis Stock. This man allegedly gets into fisticuffs with John Hatting, son of accused witch, Sara Hatting. The day after this altercation "hee was taken sick, and so continued in a pining and languishing condition, crying out often of the said Sarah, that she had bewitched him, and was the cause of his death, which soon after ensued." (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Anonymous 337   Victim

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk who allegedly attempts to call in a one shilling loan from and will not give a needle to Mother Lakeland. Mother Lakeland allegedly sends her familiar moles "to torment her and take away her life." (8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 338   Witness

A man from near Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who stays with Richard Dugdale at his request overnight, as a junior minister. The junior minister is witness to one of Richard Dugdale's fits, during which the Devil speaks through him, claiming that Richard Dugdale was in a contract with him, "That he might excel all others in Dancing: That the Contract was for 18 months." (75)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 75

Anonymous 338   Preacher/Minister

A man from near Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who stays with Richard Dugdale at his request overnight, as a junior minister. The junior minister is witness to one of Richard Dugdale's fits, during which the Devil speaks through him, claiming that Richard Dugdale was in a contract with him, "That he might excel all others in Dancing: That the Contract was for 18 months." (75)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 75

Anonymous 339   Accuser

An unknown number of persons of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Abraham Vandenbemde and Thomas Cromton, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn. (3-4, 5, 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6

Anonymous 34   Victim

A woman who allegedly gives birth to two deformed bits of flesh after giving a known witch only half the bread she desired (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 4

Anonymous 340   Witness

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to have been afflicted by a chronic headache, for which the doctors could do nothing; he approached Joan Peterson for help and was given a drink that cured him after three doses. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4

Anonymous 341   Victim

An unknown number of persons from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be neighbors of Joan Peterson, who allegedly witnessed strange things attributed to her. In one instance, a black cat repeatedly come to rock the cradle of a young child; the parents engaged various neighbors to help them watch the child, and two women agreed to watch the child one night. One of them managed to kick the cat, suffering a swollen leg for her actions. In another instance, a man living by Peterson was talking with her by the fireside when they both saw a black dog go directly to Peterson and put its head under her armpit; he was so unnerved by this he ran out of the house. (5-6, 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6, 7

Anonymous 341   Witness

An unknown number of persons from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be neighbors of Joan Peterson, who allegedly witnessed strange things attributed to her. In one instance, a black cat repeatedly come to rock the cradle of a young child; the parents engaged various neighbors to help them watch the child, and two women agreed to watch the child one night. One of them managed to kick the cat, suffering a swollen leg for her actions. In another instance, a man living by Peterson was talking with her by the fireside when they both saw a black dog go directly to Peterson and put its head under her armpit; he was so unnerved by this he ran out of the house. (5-6, 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6, 7

Anonymous 342   Witness

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a cow keeper, who approached Jane Peterson for help in un-witching her cow; Peterson used divination to discover who had bewitched the animal and advised her on how to undo the bewitchment. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

Anonymous 342   Victim

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a cow keeper, who approached Jane Peterson for help in un-witching her cow; Peterson used divination to discover who had bewitched the animal and advised her on how to undo the bewitchment. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

Anonymous 343   Witness

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a baker and the servant of one of Joan Peterson's neighbors, who saw a big black cat that frightened him; he alleged the cat to be Joan Peterson and responsible for bewitching a sick child. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6

Anonymous 344   Victim

A woman from Wapping in the county of greater London, known to be a maidservant to Joan Peterson, who alleged that Joan Peterson was visited by a squirrel in the night; the squirrel is thought to be Joan Peterson's familiar, and they were heard talking into the night but the maidservant was bewitched so that she could not recall a word of it. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6

Anonymous 344   Witness

A woman from Wapping in the county of greater London, known to be a maidservant to Joan Peterson, who alleged that Joan Peterson was visited by a squirrel in the night; the squirrel is thought to be Joan Peterson's familiar, and they were heard talking into the night but the maidservant was bewitched so that she could not recall a word of it. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6

Anonymous 345   Witch

A woman likely from Great-Holland in the county of Essex and mother of Anne Cate (Maidenhood). Sometime around 1623, this woman allegedly gives her daughter Cate the four familiars spirits, James, Prickeare, Robyn, and Sparrow, which she uses to torment and kill her neighbors. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Anonymous 346   Victim

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as "very honest" and unwilling to "speake an untruth," and maybe a glover. This man, whose testimony is presented at court second hand by Sir Thomas Bowes, Knight, claims to have encountered four of Anne West's familiar spirits one morning at four AM, outside her home. He launches off on a prolonged and intensive attempt to kill them; braining one, strangling one, attempting to drown one, only to discover it had disappeared. This man accuses West of sending these spirit to torment him, a crime she denies, by allegedly suggesting that they were scouts, sent out on another mission. This anecdotal evidence is the last narrative in _A True and Exact Relation of the Severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, Arraigned and Executed in the County of Essex_, suggesting its importance in the whole narrative. (39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

Anonymous 346   Accuser

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as "very honest" and unwilling to "speake an untruth," and maybe a glover. This man, whose testimony is presented at court second hand by Sir Thomas Bowes, Knight, claims to have encountered four of Anne West's familiar spirits one morning at four AM, outside her home. He launches off on a prolonged and intensive attempt to kill them; braining one, strangling one, attempting to drown one, only to discover it had disappeared. This man accuses West of sending these spirit to torment him, a crime she denies, by allegedly suggesting that they were scouts, sent out on another mission. This anecdotal evidence is the last narrative in _A True and Exact Relation of the Severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, Arraigned and Executed in the County of Essex_, suggesting its importance in the whole narrative. (39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

Anonymous 347   Examiner/Justice

A judge in the case against Alice Swallow. He find Swallow guilty of bewitching/murdering Alice Basticke. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anonymous 348   Examiner/Justice

A man presiding as the judge at "a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke," who condemns eighteen witches to die on the 27th of August, 1645. The names of the witches are: Mr. Lowes Parson, Thomas Evererd, Mary Evererd, Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Ian Limstead, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Ian Rivert, Susan Manners, Mary Skipper, and Anne Leech. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 350   Examiner/Justice

A justice of the peace in the case agasint Margaret Stanton who finds her not guilty of bewitching a white gelding worth 3 and a cow worth 40s causing them to languish and die. This conclusion is contrary to the jurors on the same case. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anonymous 351 (Plural)   Witness

A large number of people from Stockbridge in the county of Hampshire, who witness Anne Styles being tossed "to and froe" by the Devil, as well as her conversational exchange with him. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Salisbury Assizes. Or the Reward of Witchcraft. London: 1653, 2

Anonymous 352   Witness

A man from Stockbridge in the county of Hampshire, who takes "great paines" to help Anne Styles at her request, after she is "cast to and froe" by the Devil and signed her soul to the Devil. He prays for her over a period of four days, and she confesses to him her contract with the Devil and her association with "the old witch" Mistress Bodenham. When Mistress Bodenham visits Stockbridge, she attemps to seduce the Gentleman into "all her art," but he refuses, leading to her execution. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Salisbury Assizes. Or the Reward of Witchcraft. London: 1653, 2

Anonymous 353   Witness

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is a journey-man smith working under Master Roger Day, a master shared by the apprentice, James Day. He confesses to telling James day to "shake hands with the Old Gentleman, tho in Jest." James Day claims he took these words to heart, and sought out the Devil and almost signed his soul over, although this story is later revealed to be false. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 354   Co-conspirator

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who approaches James Day on June 15, 1686 while James Day is collecting water from a well. The unrecognized man, described as being "in colour'd Cloths," allegedly tells James Day that a "Gentleman," likely the Devil, is waiting for James Day in the fields, and bids him bring a knife, a piece of paper, and a pen to the field with him. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 355 (Plural)   Witness

A number of people from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who are witness to the false confession of James Day to his encounter with the Devil. They advise James Day that there is nothing he can do if he promised to meet the Devil, except to uphold his agreement. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 356   Witness

A number of people from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who are witness on June 16, 1686, to the discovery of "torn Paper written in blood," that James Day confesses is a torn contract between him and the Devil. When the paper is put together again, "they could read the date of the Months and Year, and the words Promise and Law." The discovery of this evidence lends credibility to the story of James Day's encounter with the Devil, which is later revealed to be a fabrication to aid James Day in changing from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 356   Neighbor

A number of people from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who are witness on June 16, 1686, to the discovery of "torn Paper written in blood," that James Day confesses is a torn contract between him and the Devil. When the paper is put together again, "they could read the date of the Months and Year, and the words Promise and Law." The discovery of this evidence lends credibility to the story of James Day's encounter with the Devil, which is later revealed to be a fabrication to aid James Day in changing from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 357   Co-conspirator

A young girl from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is sent by James Day's aunt to find Father Branwell, to help James Day change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 358   Suspect

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly dressed "with a Friar's Mantle like a Fryars Habit," and tells James Day at his Uncle Dawson's house that she had died and gone to Heaven, only to rise from the dead again. She tries to persuade James Day to change his religion, for "Mass was Celebrated in as good English as was used, either in Church or Meeting." When the minister Mr. Travers investigates, it is revealed that the old woman "lived in the end of the Town," and that she was simply "a begger Woman that came in by accident"; she is part of a fraud to get James Day to change religions. When a warrant is issued for her arrest by the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, the old woman is unable to be located. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 358   Co-conspirator

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly dressed "with a Friar's Mantle like a Fryars Habit," and tells James Day at his Uncle Dawson's house that she had died and gone to Heaven, only to rise from the dead again. She tries to persuade James Day to change his religion, for "Mass was Celebrated in as good English as was used, either in Church or Meeting." When the minister Mr. Travers investigates, it is revealed that the old woman "lived in the end of the Town," and that she was simply "a begger Woman that came in by accident"; she is part of a fraud to get James Day to change religions. When a warrant is issued for her arrest by the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, the old woman is unable to be located. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 359   Witness

A man from St. Andrew's Parish in Dublin, who allegedly served as witness to the the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. The con is accomplished by fabricating a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and this man swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by" the story, so that others might never "discover the secret." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 359   Co-conspirator

A man from St. Andrew's Parish in Dublin, who allegedly served as witness to the the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. The con is accomplished by fabricating a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and this man swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by" the story, so that others might never "discover the secret." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360   Suspect

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360   Co-conspirator

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360   Preacher/Minister

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361   Co-conspirator

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361   Suspect

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361   Preacher/Minister

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath." (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 362   Witness

A woman from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar's wife, who was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while her husband was away and denied the request; Staunton is said to have touched their little son causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of the Vicar's return, their son recovered perfectly and resumed playing. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 362   Relative of Victim

A woman from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar's wife, who was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while her husband was away and denied the request; Staunton is said to have touched their little son causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of the Vicar's return, their son recovered perfectly and resumed playing. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 363   Victim

A child from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar's son, whose mother was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while his father was away and denied the request; Staunton is said to have touched the little boy causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of his father's return, the child recovered perfectly and resumed playing. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 364   Preacher/Minister

A man from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar, whose wife was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while the Vicar was out and denied the request; while visiting the house Staunton is said to have touched their little son causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of the Vicar's return, his son recovered perfectly and resumed playing. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 364   Relative of Victim

A man from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar, whose wife was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while the Vicar was out and denied the request; while visiting the house Staunton is said to have touched their little son causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of the Vicar's return, his son recovered perfectly and resumed playing. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 365   Witness

A woman likely from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a tailor's wife, who allegedly had an affair with Mr. Nokes, husband to Mother Nokes; in revenge for the infidelity, Mother Nokes is said to have caused the tailor's wife's nursing child to die. (16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 16

Anonymous 365   Relative of Victim

A woman likely from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a tailor's wife, who allegedly had an affair with Mr. Nokes, husband to Mother Nokes; in revenge for the infidelity, Mother Nokes is said to have caused the tailor's wife's nursing child to die. (16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 16

Anonymous 366   Victim

A boy from Lambert End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a servant of Thomas Spycer, who was asked to return a pair of gloves another servant (Anonymous 58) had snatched from Mother Nokes' daughter; Nokes allegedly robbed him of the use of his limbs, causing him to be bedridden for eight days. His master, Thomas Spycer, had to have him transported home in a wheelbarrow. (15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 15-16

Anonymous 367   Victim

A man from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a servant in the service of Thomas Spycer, who allegedly refused to answer a question put to him by Mother Nokes, for which she caused the horse he was plowing with to develop a swollen head. (17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 17

Anonymous 367   Witness

A man from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a servant in the service of Thomas Spycer, who allegedly refused to answer a question put to him by Mother Nokes, for which she caused the horse he was plowing with to develop a swollen head. (17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 17

Anonymous 368   Witness

An unknown number of men from the London Borough of Southward, known to be friends of Richard Hathaway, who allegedly recalled some words Mrs. Morduck said to him, brought her to him, and convinced him to scratch her. The scratching restored Hathaway's ability to see, eat and drink, but left him passing pins in his stool. They brought him to a woman known to have some skill (Anonymous 370), who advised them to boil Hathaway's urine in a stone bottle, but the bottle burst into pieces when they did so, returning Hathaway to his former state even though none of the shards touched him. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Anonymous 369   Physician

An unknown number of doctors and surgeons from the London Borough of Southwark, known to practice in St. Thomas' Hospital, under whose care Richard Hathaway stayed while allegedly afflicted by Mrs. Sarah Morduck. They were unable to cure him of his blindness nor his inability to eat and drink. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Anonymous 369   Surgeon

An unknown number of doctors and surgeons from the London Borough of Southwark, known to practice in St. Thomas' Hospital, under whose care Richard Hathaway stayed while allegedly afflicted by Mrs. Sarah Morduck. They were unable to cure him of his blindness nor his inability to eat and drink. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Anonymous 37   Victim

A man from Munich, Germany, described as an innkeeper who was allegedly suffered so badly from his bewitchment by Anne Gamperle that he killed himself by smothering himself in a vat of pork. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 9

Anonymous 370   Cunning-folk

A woman from the London borough of Southwark, known to be a cunning-woman, whom Richard Hathaway and his friends (Anonymous 368) consulted when he was cured of his blindness and inability to eat or drink, but left passing pins in his stool. She advised them to boil Hathaway's urine in a stone bottle, but the bottle burst into pieces when they did so, returning Hathaway to his former state even though none of the shards touched him. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Anonymous 371   Witness

A woman from the London borough of Southwark, known to have been a witness at the examination of Richard Hathaway and Mrs. Sarah Morduck; she alleged in her deposition that she had seen him void a large stool with pins in it, and that she had seen him scratch Morduck, then consume food and drink after some time without. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

Anonymous 372   Witness

A man from the London borough of Southwark, known to be a watchman employed by the Officers of the Parish, who was tasked with watching Richard Hathaway from Saturday, April 12th to Thursday, April 17th and on Sunday, April 20th, and gave deposition as a witness during the examination of Hathaway and Mrs. Sarah Morduck; he alleged in his deposition that he never once saw Hathaway eat or drink, but on both the 17th and the 20th he observed Hathaway void pins from his mouth. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

Anonymous 373   Witch

Two unknown women of Penzance in the county of Cornwall, who allegedly appeared to John Tonken in the company of Old Woman (Anonymous 6); as with Old Woman, Tonken is the only person who can see them. They accompanied Old Woman on her last visit to Tonken, in which she bid him farewell, saying she would trouble him no more. Two women were arrested on suspicion of witchcraft on Tonken's testimony: Jane Noal, and Betty Seeze. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 5-6

Anonymous 374   Witness

A woman of Yowell in the county of Surrey, whom Mr. and Mrs. Farmer and several others alleged in their depositions was present when Joan Buts entered the Farmer home; she is said to have questioned Buts on why she looked so ill and what she was doing at the home. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1-2

Anonymous 375 (Plural)   Witness

As many as 19 or 20 unknown persons from Yowell in the county of Surrey who gave deposition alleging that Joan Buts had caused Mary Farmer's violent illness, caused pins to be stuck in Farmer, and came when the person causing the harm was summoned; one also alleged he heard Buts say "That if she had not bewitched her, if all the Devils in Hell could help her, she would bewitch her." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1-2

Anonymous 376   Relative of Victim

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie's uncle and the owner of an Estate, who took Sawdie to a cunning person named Condy in an effort to cure him of his possession. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 3

Anonymous 376   Witness

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie's uncle and the owner of an Estate, who took Sawdie to a cunning person named Condy in an effort to cure him of his possession. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 3

Anonymous 377   Witness

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, who advised John Roberts to bind alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie. When Anonymous 377 came into the house to see Sawdie, the boy confronted him angrily about the suggestion of binding, and later claimed that Anonymous 377's conversation with Roberts had been reported to him by the Devil. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 6

Anonymous 378   Victim

A man from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who is made ill for a month (March 7 - April 7, 1575) and dies after Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft upon him. (79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

Anonymous 379 (Plural)   Preacher/Minister

A number of Roman Catholic ministers from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who attempt to aid Richard Dugdale with his fits, allegedly believed to be the work of the Devil. This includes the reading of a paper which was thought to cure Richard Dugdale but did not. Two of these ministers fled during one of Richard Dugdale's fits; a third was "strong and old, but was thrown down, and in great danger of being kill'd by the Demoniack." (21-22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 21-22

Anonymous 38   Victim

A woman from Munich, Germany, described as an innkeeper's wife who, when bewitched, runs into a hot oven and burns to death. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 9

Anonymous 380 (Plural)   Witness

A number of people from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who allegedly pull Richard Dugdale as a demoniack off of a Roman Catholic minister, "with great difficulty." They are all witness to the alleged possession of Richard Dugdale. (21-22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 21-22

Anonymous 381   Witness

A man from the country of Holland, who visits Lancaster in the county of Lancashire as a stranger. He touches a lump which appears on Richard Dugdale's body, and the lump allegedly speaks to him, warning him that as a Doctor of Physick, there is nothing he can do for Richard Dugdale, who can only be attended by Doctors of Divinity. It is revealed that the stranger is a physician. (42)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 42

Anonymous 381   Physician

A man from the country of Holland, who visits Lancaster in the county of Lancashire as a stranger. He touches a lump which appears on Richard Dugdale's body, and the lump allegedly speaks to him, warning him that as a Doctor of Physick, there is nothing he can do for Richard Dugdale, who can only be attended by Doctors of Divinity. It is revealed that the stranger is a physician. (42)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 42

Anonymous 382   Witch

A woman from an unknown area of Kent, who allegedly possesses Margaret Gurr as a witch on several instances throughout July and August of 1681. She enters Margaret Gurr and tempts "not to Pray, but Curse and Sware." She instructs Gurr to "Do as I say, and do as I would have you, and be as I am, for I am a Witch, a Witch. I am a Witch, do as I say and be as I am, and you shall be well," moreover, she emphasizes that "you shall be as well as ever you were in your Life." However, this wellness comes from possession and bewitchment alone; she counsels Margaret Gurr against seeking the help of Dr. Skinner, saying "take none of his Physick." Her possession of Margaret Gurr also causes Margaret Gurr "a most lamentable pain in my Limbs." The witch is cast out of Margaret Gurr by Dr. Skinner, along with two other devils (Anonymous 15 and Anonymous 16). (3-4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 3-4

Anonymous 383 (Plural)   Witness

A number of people from Tunbridge in the county of Kent, who refuse to come near Margaret Kent upon "hearing how I was tempted and tortured with Witches and Devils." Even when she is well, her friends do not speak to her, "being still afraid of me, so that I have no comfort from them." (6-7)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6-7

Anonymous 384   Demoniac

A young man from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who is the seventeen year old servant of Henry Chowning. The young man allegedly encounters a spirit in the form of a greyhound, who instructs him to go to Virginia before disappearing. Following this encounter, the boy returns home to master, "in a great fright," and "amazed." He falls ill, and his condition continues to deteriorate, so that observers "fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," because he was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." His master seeks the help of Dr. Skinner to treat him. Dr. Skinner sees that the boy is "melancholy," and likely possessed by the Devil in the shape of a greyhound, "for, it was as it were in amaze, and his eyes were always fixed in his head," and it was difficult to get him to speak. Once the boy did speak, he confessed to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea, and matters that he was not able to mention." As well, "he spoke through the Nose (as we call it) for it was not his own speech, but the Spirit or Devil within him." After assessing the pain he was under, Dr. Skinner "understood what the means must be that must relieve him." The boy is administered medicines, which "he was very willing to take." The boy's mother finds him "much ammended" within a week. The boy complains of a "pain in his belly," so that Dr. Skinner sent him more medicine, and he was cured within "18 days time." After this, the boy is dispossessed and cured of his illness, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." decides that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," as Anonymous 384 confesses to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea," to great pain, and can speak in a voice "not his own speech." The young servant boy seems to be better when around Dr. Skinner, who then gives him medicine, leading to him being "made perfectly well in 18 days time." (8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 384   Victim

A young man from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who is the seventeen year old servant of Henry Chowning. The young man allegedly encounters a spirit in the form of a greyhound, who instructs him to go to Virginia before disappearing. Following this encounter, the boy returns home to master, "in a great fright," and "amazed." He falls ill, and his condition continues to deteriorate, so that observers "fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," because he was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." His master seeks the help of Dr. Skinner to treat him. Dr. Skinner sees that the boy is "melancholy," and likely possessed by the Devil in the shape of a greyhound, "for, it was as it were in amaze, and his eyes were always fixed in his head," and it was difficult to get him to speak. Once the boy did speak, he confessed to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea, and matters that he was not able to mention." As well, "he spoke through the Nose (as we call it) for it was not his own speech, but the Spirit or Devil within him." After assessing the pain he was under, Dr. Skinner "understood what the means must be that must relieve him." The boy is administered medicines, which "he was very willing to take." The boy's mother finds him "much ammended" within a week. The boy complains of a "pain in his belly," so that Dr. Skinner sent him more medicine, and he was cured within "18 days time." After this, the boy is dispossessed and cured of his illness, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." decides that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," as Anonymous 384 confesses to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea," to great pain, and can speak in a voice "not his own speech." The young servant boy seems to be better when around Dr. Skinner, who then gives him medicine, leading to him being "made perfectly well in 18 days time." (8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 385 (Plural)   Witness

A number of people from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who are witness to a young servant boy of Henry Chowning's illness, allegedly caused by a devil in the form of a greyhound. The boy "grew worse and worse," and began to lose his power to speak, causing these neighbours to suppose "him to be under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." They resolve to seek help for him, which eventually comes in the form of Dr. Skinner. (8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 386   Relative of Victim

A woman from Hadlaw in Kent, who is the mother of a young servant boy of Henry Chowning, allegedly possessed by a devil in the form of a greyhound. Dr. Skinner orders her to visit him after medicine had been administered to the young servant, which she does, bringing "news he was much ammended." (9-14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 9-14

Anonymous 387 (Plural)   Physician

A number of doctors from areas around the county of Kent, who attempt to treat Susan Woldredge for her mysterious illness, but who never find a cure. (14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14

Anonymous 388   Victim

A woman from West Grinstead in Sussex, who seeks out a cure of a mysterious "Evil in her Throat" from Dr. Skinner. She encounters him at a fair, and promises to call upon him. When she fails to show, Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she did not come, and "the Woman said she had no need, for she found her self begin to mend from that same time," and is miraculously cured thereafter, having only needed to encounter Dr. Skinner in person. (12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

Anonymous 389   Relative of Witch

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a neighbor of Dorothy Durent and a kinswoman of Amy Denny. Durent gave deposition alleging that the day after Durent found a toad in her son William's blanket and had it held into the fire, Anonymous 389 told her that her aunt, Amy Denny, "was in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire." (9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 9-10

Anonymous 389   Witness

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a neighbor of Dorothy Durent and a kinswoman of Amy Denny. Durent gave deposition alleging that the day after Durent found a toad in her son William's blanket and had it held into the fire, Anonymous 389 told her that her aunt, Amy Denny, "was in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire." (9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 9-10

Anonymous 389   Neighbor

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a neighbor of Dorothy Durent and a kinswoman of Amy Denny. Durent gave deposition alleging that the day after Durent found a toad in her son William's blanket and had it held into the fire, Anonymous 389 told her that her aunt, Amy Denny, "was in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire." (9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 9-10

Anonymous 390   Demoniac

A man from Crediton in the county of Devon, who is allegedly the Devil disguised as a carrier with four horses. The carrier is "one whom [John Buxford] had often observed to frequend the Roade." Happening upon John Buxford using "meere force" to compel his son on the road to Crediton on November 5, 1645, the carrier "very courtiously demanded of him why he used such severitie towards the boy." John Buxford explains his son's "unwillingnes to take any good course of life, or honest vocation for his future maintainance." The carrier placates the father, agree that "it was a pitty the Boy should miscarry by undertaking a forced service upon him." He offers to take the boy, if the boy is willing, to find him a master, "and such employment as would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." The father and son agree to these terms, as long as the boy should be sent "backe [...] in eight daies time at the furthest, if he should not take likeing of the promised service." As soon as John Buxford leaves, however, "the Hourses and Packes vanished," and the carrier "metamorphosed in a trice from a man to a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The carrier is revealed to be the Devil in disguise. At a later date, on November 13, 1645, the Devil resumes his disguise as a carrier, and comes "upon the way by stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party." When the troopers attempt to rob him of his horses, "the Carrier and his Horses suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three troopers, and leaving the rest "so terribly shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone," that they were barely able to escape and share their story. (2-3)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2-3

Anonymous 391   Neighbor

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 392), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food. (5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 391   Witness

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 392), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food. (5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 392   Witness

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 391), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food. (5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 392   Neighbor

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 391), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food. (5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 393 (Plural)   Victim

A number of men from an unknown area of Devon, who are "stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party." They encounter the Devil disguised as a carrier with four horses, which were so "faire" they "made themselves sure of rich purchase, and presently addressed themselves to plunder." But as they made to attack the carrier, he and his horses "suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three of them, and leaving the rest "so shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone," they barely escaped to retell the news. (6)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 6

Anonymous 394 (Plural)   Witness

A number of people from Evesham in the county of Worcester, who are known as the "Friends of Mary" Ellins, a young girl who is has fallen ill, allegedly because of witchcraft caused by Catherine Huxley. These friends serve as witness to the trial of Catherine Huxley, and prosecute Catherine Huxley, leading to your condemnation and execution. Upon her execution, Mary Ellins because "perfectly well." (45)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 45

Anonymous 395   Victim

A man from Evershot in the county of Dorset-shire, who is "a poor Labouring Man," neighbour to two ministers. This man finds "a Shilling under his Door," every morning, which for a long time he tells no one about. This money allows him to buy "some Sheep or Swine, and seeming Rich," his neighbours "marvelled" and wondered how he had this money. When he confesses to the methods, he "was suddenly struck Lame and Bed-rid," as witnessed by his neighbours. (46)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 46

Anonymous 396 (Plural)   Neighbor

A number of people from Evershot in the county of Dorset-shire, who are neighbours to "a poor Labouring Man" (Anonymous 395). This group of people includes two ministers. They collectively "marvelled" at how the man, being "a poor Labouring Man" managed to afford buying "some Sheep or Swine." He admits to them eventually that he "found a Shilling under his Door" every morning, and upon admitting this, he "was suddenly struck Lame and Bed-Rid," as witnessed by the neighbours. (46)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 46

Anonymous 396 (Plural)   Witness

A number of people from Evershot in the county of Dorset-shire, who are neighbours to "a poor Labouring Man" (Anonymous 395). This group of people includes two ministers. They collectively "marvelled" at how the man, being "a poor Labouring Man" managed to afford buying "some Sheep or Swine." He admits to them eventually that he "found a Shilling under his Door" every morning, and upon admitting this, he "was suddenly struck Lame and Bed-Rid," as witnessed by the neighbours. (46)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 46

Anonymous 397   Accuser

A woman from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is the servant of Joseph Cruttenden. The girl is allegedly approached by an old woman (Anonymous 398), who tells her that "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." The girl is further warned that if she tells anyone of this prediction, "the Devil would tear her to pieces." Some time after Anonymous 398's predictions come to pass, the girl "told her Dame the former story of the Womans Discourse," leading to the apprehending, examination and searching of the old woman, although the girl refuses to identify the woman apprehended as the same woman who approached her, saying "she is like the Woman, but I think will not swear it is the same." (54)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 54

Anonymous 397   Witness

A woman from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is the servant of Joseph Cruttenden. The girl is allegedly approached by an old woman (Anonymous 398), who tells her that "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." The girl is further warned that if she tells anyone of this prediction, "the Devil would tear her to pieces." Some time after Anonymous 398's predictions come to pass, the girl "told her Dame the former story of the Womans Discourse," leading to the apprehending, examination and searching of the old woman, although the girl refuses to identify the woman apprehended as the same woman who approached her, saying "she is like the Woman, but I think will not swear it is the same." (54)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 54

Anonymous 398   Witch

An old woman from Brighling in the county of Sussex, who is allegedly a witch. She comes to a servant girl of Joseph Cruttenden, and tells her, "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them" and further explains to the girl that "if she spake of what she had told her, the Devil would tear her to pieces." After the woman's predictions come to pass, the girl "told her Dame the former story of the Womans Discourse," and so the old woman is "sent for, and Examined before Captain Collins, Mr. Busbridge," as well as searched and watched for a full twenty four hours. The servant girl (Anonymous 397) however, claims that while "she is like the Woman," she "will not swear it is the same." The old woman "was formerly suspected to be a Witch, had to Maidstone about it, but got away," and moved to Burwast, where she lived for some time. The old woman later sends "some meal" to her neighbours (Anonymous 401), to make into bread. However, they "could not make it into Loaves, but it was like Butter." When they put it in the oven, "it would not bake," but when it came out, it was "as it went in." (54)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 54

Anonymous 399   Victim

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who passes by the hut that Joseph Cruttenden and his wife must abide in, full of bewitched goods. The hut is "without Doors," and a "Wooden Tut came flying out of the Air," which struck the man. After, a horseshoe, "which was by some laid away," rose of its own accord, flew to the man, "and strook him in the midst of a hundred People." The man later confesses that "he had be a Theif," and that he was hiding "under the colour of Religion." (56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Anonymous 4   Witch

Anonymous 4 is a woman from Newbury in the county of Berkshire who allegedly walks on water without aid and is executed by army soldiers. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Most Certain, Strange, and True Discovery of a Witch. Unknown: 1643, 4

Anonymous 40   Witch-Searcher

A woman from London, known to be a matron, who was brought in to Newgate Prison with two other women (Margaret Weaver and Anonymous 41) to search Elizabeth Sawyer for witch's marks. Sawyer is said to have " behaued her selfe most sluttishly and loathsomely towards them, intending thereby to preuent their search of her." Nonetheless, they allege that "they a little aboue the Fundiment of Elizabeth Sawyer the prisoner, there indited before the Bench for a Witch, found a thing like a Teate the bignesse of the little finger, and the length of halfe a finger, which was branched at the top like a teate, and seemed as though one had suckt it, and that the bottome thereof was blew, and the top of it was redde." (B3-B4)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B3-B4

Anonymous 400   Witness

A number of people (possibly one hundred) from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who are witness to a horseshoe rising "of its own accord to rise again and fly to" a man passing by the hut that the bewitched goods belonging to Joseph Cruttenden and his wife are stored in. They see the horseshoe also hit him. (56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Anonymous 401 (Plural)   Neighbor

A number of people from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who are given "meal" from an old Woman (Anonymous 398) suspected of witchcraft. They attempt to turn the meal into bread, but "they could not make it into Loaves," and it was instead "like Butter." Putting it into the oven, "it would not bake, but came out as it went in." (57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 402   Witness

A woman from Thrapston in the County of Northampton, known to be a maidservant in Mistress Moulsho's service. The morning after Moulsho searched Hellen Jenkenson, Anonymous 402 found Moulsho's laundry, and particularly Moulsho's smock, covered in snakes and other ugly creatures. She reported this immediately to Moulsho, who marched over to Jenkenson's and threatened to scratch Jenkenson's eyes out unless she returned the linen to its former state. (D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Anonymous 403   Victim

A man from St. James's in the city of London, who was once a servant to a man who "carried Stockins and such ware about to sell." Anonymous 403 murders his master "for his money," and buried him near St. James's. After, he runs away to Ireland to become a soldier under Colonel Hill, which takes him back to London. Yet, "when ever he lay alone," his master appeared to me in the form of a "headless Man," and stood by his bed, asking "Wilt thou yet confess?" Eventually, the spirit appears to Anonymous 403 in the form of a "bed-fellow," still asking "Wilt thou yet confess?" The soldier, during this time, looks "pale and sad, and pined." He confesses the murder to Colonel Hill. (57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 404   Examiner/Justice

Two men from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who serve as Justices of the Peace in the apprehending of Margery Coombes and Ann More, who allegedly appeared to the girl Mary Hill during one of her fits, characterized by the vomiting of crooked nails. (75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Anonymous 405   Examiner/Justice

A number of people from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who serve as a jury for the trial surrounding the nature of Mary Hill's alleged fits, characterized by the vomiting of crooked nails. The jury acquits both Ann More and Margery Coombes who allegedly appear before May Hill in her fits, "for want of Evidence." The jury also examines a number of "crooked Pins, small Nails, and small pieces of Brass" presented as evidence of the nature of Mary Hill's fits by Susanna Belton, Ann Holland, Mr. Francis Jesse, and Mr. Christopher Brewer. (75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Anonymous 406   Witness

A woman from Beckington in the county of Somerset, whom is called upon by the minister Mr. John Humphreys after Mary Hill visits him and experiences a fit where she "threw up a great piece of Brass," followed by much blood. The woman "opened her Mouth," and "took out as much Blood, as she could hold in the hollow of her hand." (79)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 79

Anonymous 407   Demoniac

A man from Colchester in the county of Essex, who allegedly "in a Bravado, and Defiance of the Devil," walked at night in a churchyard, where the Devil appeared to him, and "met him in the shape of a Black Dog with terrible Eyes." This encounter brought "Terrors," so that "he was never quiet in his Mind till he got into good Society." Upon this, Anonymous 407 decides to go to Colne, in the county of Essex, where he is taken in at Mr. Shepherd's house by Mr. Harlakenden. While staying in Colne, Anonymous 407 would pray, and during his prayers, "the Black Dog was seen by the Man as if he would have torn Mr. Harlakenden's Throat out," but Mr. Harlakenden seemed to never notice these apparitions, which also sometimes came to him "as a Fly or a Flea." This apparition haunted Anonymous 407 for the rest of years, making him "a most ferious Christian," so that even at his death, "lying long sick, had great Peace and Victory over the fear of Death, and was so joyful and desirous to be dissolved, that this Dog or Flea made no impression upon him." (153)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 153

Anonymous 408   Preacher/Minister

A number of ministers and "good people" from Colne, in the county of Essex, who come with Mr. Thomas Shepherd to pray at Colne's Priory. In Colne's Priory is built a chamber above a "Tomb-House," and every night "At Two of the Clock in the Morning there was always the sound of a great Bell tolling," After praying and giving "some respect to the place, serving to God," the Devil is cast out, and "from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber." (158)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 158

Anonymous 408   Neighbor

A number of ministers and "good people" from Colne, in the county of Essex, who come with Mr. Thomas Shepherd to pray at Colne's Priory. In Colne's Priory is built a chamber above a "Tomb-House," and every night "At Two of the Clock in the Morning there was always the sound of a great Bell tolling," After praying and giving "some respect to the place, serving to God," the Devil is cast out, and "from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber." (158)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 158

Anonymous 409   Demoniac

A woman from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who is allegedly seized by "strange Histerical Fits." These fits began by the "Stoppage of the Mestrua." Anonymous 409 seeks help from Richard Baxter, who provides her with "Castory and Rad. Ostrutii, and Sem. Dauci on Forestus Commendation," all of which she took and "began to be better." However, after Richard Baxter and the Pastor Mr. Robert Morton must leave her and Bewdley, "she was left without help, and grew worse than ever." Eventually, her fits culminate in a "suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis," and she "seemed possest by the Devil." Anonymous 409's fits are typically characterized by: her increase in strength far above her own, so that "many could not hold her" ; her requests for "Needles and Pins, and Cords," so that she might kill herself; her ability to foretell that a papist would come to cure her, and her laughter "at his Holy Water" ; her "Swear[ing], Curs[ing], and Rage against any that were Religious, and Hugg[ing] of those that were Vicious, and be merry with them." Her fits continued for many years, between 1642 and 1647. When Richard Baxter is able to return to Bewdley, he calls on her, and "Prayed by her." After this, her neighbours are encouraged and "resolved to joyn with some of Bewdley, to Fast and Pray by her, till she was recovered." During prayers, Anonymous 409 is "in a violent Rage, and after thankt them." During the prayers of Mr. Thomas Ware, "she fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone; The Black Dog is gone." After this incident, Anonymous 409 "never had a Fit." One young man (Anonymous 411) in particular who cared for her during her fits succumbed to his lust in "an Act of Wicked Compassion," as "in her Fits, [she would] toss her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." After they sinned together, Anonymous 409 seemed eased, which "enticed him the more to do it." However, Richard Baxter believes this only served to "Enrage her Disease." After Anonymous 409 is cured, the young man (Anonymous 411) comes forth and admits to his sins. "He Marryed her, and professed deep Repentance." Richard Baxter believes that Anonymous 409 had at first "the furor uterinus," which were the cause of her fits, but "in punishment of their Sin," she also became the victim of "a Real possession." (193-194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193-194

Anonymous 41   Witch-Searcher

A woman from London, known to be a matron, who was brought in to Newgate Prison with two other women (Margaret Weaver and Anonymous 40) to search Elizabeth Sawyer for witch's marks. Sawyer is said to have " behaued her selfe most sluttishly and loathsomely towards them, intending thereby to preuent their search of her." Nonetheless, they allege that "they a little aboue the Fundiment of Elizabeth Sawyer the prisoner, there indited before the Bench for a Witch, found a thing like a Teate the bignesse of the little finger, and the length of halfe a finger, which was branched at the top like a teate, and seemed as though one had suckt it, and that the bottome thereof was blew, and the top of it was redde." (B3-B4)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B3-B4

Anonymous 410 (Plural)   Neighbor

A number of people from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who are the "praying Neighbours" of a "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409) who is alleged seized by "Histerical Fits," caused by both a devil and "a suror uterinus." These people are encouraged by the prayers of Richard Baxter by the young maid, and resolved to "Fast and Pray by her, till she was recovered." During their prayers, the maid is "usually in violent Rage, and after thankt them." They continued this for many days, until she was cured. (194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

Anonymous 411   Neighbor

A young man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who watches among other people "in Charity" over a "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409), and prays with her during her "Histerical strange fits." This young man was "more with her than the rest," and often observed her during her Fits, where she would "toss her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." His "Lust was provoked," and on numerous fits, they sinned together. This did seem to ease the maid for a time, which "enticed him the more to do it," as "an Act of (Wicked) Compassion." In fact, it is believed this did nothing but "Enrage the Disease." When the maid is healed of her fits, the young man comes forth and "made known" what they had done. Richard Baxter believes that the maid was originally afflicted by "a suror uterinus," and then gained "a Real possession," as a "punishment of their Sins." The young man marries the maid, and "professed deep Repentance." However, Richard Baxter still advises that the young man not be received to Church Communion. (195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

Anonymous 411   Co-conspirator

A young man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who watches among other people "in Charity" over a "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409), and prays with her during her "Histerical strange fits." This young man was "more with her than the rest," and often observed her during her Fits, where she would "toss her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." His "Lust was provoked," and on numerous fits, they sinned together. This did seem to ease the maid for a time, which "enticed him the more to do it," as "an Act of (Wicked) Compassion." In fact, it is believed this did nothing but "Enrage the Disease." When the maid is healed of her fits, the young man comes forth and "made known" what they had done. Richard Baxter believes that the maid was originally afflicted by "a suror uterinus," and then gained "a Real possession," as a "punishment of their Sins." The young man marries the maid, and "professed deep Repentance." However, Richard Baxter still advises that the young man not be received to Church Communion. (195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

Anonymous 412   Relative of Victim

A woman from Totnes in the county of Devon, who was the sister of the father of Mr. Philip Furze, master of the servant, Francis Frey. When Francis Frey is visited by the ghost of Mr. Furze, the father of Mr. Philip Furze and brother to Anonymous 412, he is directed to "carry Twenty Shillings" to this gentlewoman, as this legacy was not fulfilled in the original testament. Francis Fey visits the gentlewoman in Totnes, "but she utterly refused to receive" the twenty shillings, as she feared it was "sent her from the Devil." She allows the young man to stay in her house overnight, however, and when he returns under the instructions of the ghost of Mr. Furze with a ring worth twenty shillings, bought in Totnes, for the gentlewoman, she receives this gift. (178)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178

Anonymous 412   Witness

A woman from Totnes in the county of Devon, who was the sister of the father of Mr. Philip Furze, master of the servant, Francis Frey. When Francis Frey is visited by the ghost of Mr. Furze, the father of Mr. Philip Furze and brother to Anonymous 412, he is directed to "carry Twenty Shillings" to this gentlewoman, as this legacy was not fulfilled in the original testament. Francis Fey visits the gentlewoman in Totnes, "but she utterly refused to receive" the twenty shillings, as she feared it was "sent her from the Devil." She allows the young man to stay in her house overnight, however, and when he returns under the instructions of the ghost of Mr. Furze with a ring worth twenty shillings, bought in Totnes, for the gentlewoman, she receives this gift. (178)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178

Anonymous 413   Witness

A man from Totnes in the county of Devon, who is witness to the appearance of "the resemblance of the second wife of the old Gentleman," (Anonymous 169) before Francis Fey. The specter "threw the young man off his horse," and did so "with such violence to the ground," that there was a "resounding great noise." This caused "great astonishment" and "amazement" in the companion of Francis Fey, who was in fact a servant of a Gentlewoman who was a sister to the deceased husband of the ghost haunting Francis Fey. The gentlewoman's servant is also a witness to the leaping of Francis Fey's horse 25 feet into the air. (180)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180

Anonymous 414   Witness

A small child from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. The child is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Mistress Thomasine Gidly, and Ann Langdon, where they all live in together. (180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Anonymous 414   Victim

A small child from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. The child is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Mistress Thomasine Gidly, and Ann Langdon, where they all live in together. (180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Anonymous 414   Witness

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is a maid in the household of Mr. Philip Furze, alongside Francis Fey, a servant who is haunted by the spirit of Philip Furze's deceased father's deceased second wife. One day, Francis Fey's "shoe-strings was observed (without the assistance of any hand) to come of its own accord" and fly across the room. The second shoe-string "was crawling after it," and the maid, seeing this, "with her hand drew it out." Upon doing so, "it strangely clasp'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel, or Serpent." (182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

Anonymous 414   Victim

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is a maid in the household of Mr. Philip Furze, alongside Francis Fey, a servant who is haunted by the spirit of Philip Furze's deceased father's deceased second wife. One day, Francis Fey's "shoe-strings was observed (without the assistance of any hand) to come of its own accord" and fly across the room. The second shoe-string "was crawling after it," and the maid, seeing this, "with her hand drew it out." Upon doing so, "it strangely clasp'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel, or Serpent." (182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

Anonymous 416   Witness

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is witness to two events caused by the specter of Mr. Philip Furze's father's second wife's ghost (Anonymous 169). The first is when the shoestrings of Francis Fey "come of its own accord out of his Shoe," and fling themselves across the room. When a maid (Anonymous 415) attempts to pick them, up, they "strangely clasp'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel or Serpent." The second occasion is when the woman found one of Francis Fey's gloves, which had been torn in his pocket while she was close to him. The gloves ere "so dexterously tatter'd, and so artificially torn, that it is conceived a Cutler could not have contrived an Instrument, to have laid it abroad so accurately." This woman was "a Lady of considerable Quality, too great for exception." (181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 181

Anonymous 417 (Plural)   Witness

A number of people from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who accompany Francis Fey to Crediton, when it is found that part of his body "which had been on the mud in the Quagmire," was "somewhat benummed, and seemingly deader than the other." When Francis Fey is left for a little while after being bled, he was found again "with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to a great bigness." When Francis Fey is out of his fit, he tells the company that a large bird threw a stone at his forehead. The Company search for the stone, but instead found "a weight of Brass or Copper," which they believed a Daemon (Anonymous 169) used against Francis Fey. They broke the weight "in pieces, every one taking a part, and preserving it in memory of so strange an Accident." (185-186)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 185-186

Anonymous 42   Victim

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, described as a maid who was allegedly killed by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland confessed the murder was based on annoyance; the maid had refused to give Lakeland a pin and was irate with Lakeland who had yet to pay her back a borrowed shilling. (8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 43   Witch

A woman from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 44 stood accused of bewitching two young girls, Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, so that they vomited wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives. The Jury was satisfied with the evidence against them, but the Judges were not wholly convinced and "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit orchestrated by the Anonymous 9 and 10. (3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 44   Witch

A woman from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 43 stood accused of bewitching two young girls, Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, so that they vomited wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives. The Jury was satisfied with the evidence against them, but the Judges were not wholly convinced and "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit orchestrated by the Anonymous 9 and 10. (3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 45   Victim

The maid servant of a pork farmer (Anonymous 45) from Swaffham in the county of Norfolk, who is frightened and bewitched after refusing to give a woman, who appears dressed and mounted like a gentlewoman (Anonymous 22), beer and bacon. She makes the woman vanish with a pious invocation, but quakes and tremble and can not speak for two hours after the incident ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645,

Anonymous 45   Witness

The maid servant of a pork farmer (Anonymous 45) from Swaffham in the county of Norfolk, who is frightened and bewitched after refusing to give a woman, who appears dressed and mounted like a gentlewoman (Anonymous 22), beer and bacon. She makes the woman vanish with a pious invocation, but quakes and tremble and can not speak for two hours after the incident ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645,

Anonymous 45   Un-witcher

The maid servant of a pork farmer (Anonymous 45) from Swaffham in the county of Norfolk, who is frightened and bewitched after refusing to give a woman, who appears dressed and mounted like a gentlewoman (Anonymous 22), beer and bacon. She makes the woman vanish with a pious invocation, but quakes and tremble and can not speak for two hours after the incident ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645,

Anonymous 46   Victim

A man from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, who is bewitched to death by his wife, Mother Lakeland. He allegedly "lay in great misery for a time, and at last dyed." it was his death that ultimately caused Lakeland's own. She convicted of petty treason and was "burned to death, because she was the death of her husband." (7-8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 47   Witness

An unknown number of men from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of female physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 47   Physician

An unknown number of men from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of female physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 48   Witness

An unknown number of women from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of male physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 48   Physician

An unknown number of women from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of male physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl. (5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 50   Witness

A man from Wimbish in the county of Essex, known to be a gentleman and a guest of Richard and Mrs. Saunder who was at the home when Mrs. Saunder refused to give Mother Staunton yeast; Mother Staunton allegedly left offended and murmuring, after which Saunder's infant child became violently sick. The cradle continued to rock of its own accord when Mrs. Saunder picked up the child to comfort it, and would not stop until Anonymous 50 stabbed it with his dagger. (11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 11

Anonymous 51   Witness

A person from Maldon in the county of Essex, described as a neighbor of John Eastwood, who allegedly assists Eastwood in holding a spirit in the form of a toad in tongs and thrusting it into the fire until the fire burns blue and almost goes out. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 8

Anonymous 53   Victim

A woman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who is employed by Lanckforde and was allegedly killed at the same time as her employer, by Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham), Mother Deuell, Mother Margaret and Mother Dutton through image magic. ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579,

Anonymous 54   Victim

A boy from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who threw a stone at Elizabeth Stile's home when he came to collect water from a nearby well; Stile bewitched him so that his hand turned clear around. Mother Dutton later reversed the bewitchment. (B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, B2

Anonymous 55   Witness

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be the father of a boy who was bewitched by Elizabeth Stile after the boy threw a rock at her house when sent to collect water at a nearby well. He was unable to turn his son's hand back around the right way, and appealed to Mother Dutton for help. (B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, B2

Anonymous 57   Witness

A man from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a brewer-servant, (Anonymous 57), who witnesses Freeland's beer overflow. He testifies to the author that there was little he could do to slow or stop the flood. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4-5

Anonymous 58   Victim

A man from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the County of Essex, described as the servant of Thomas Spycer, who snatched gloves from Mother Noke's daughter and was allegedly robbed of the use of his limbs for the offense. Unable to move, he sent another servant, Anonymous 366, to return the gloves, for which Mother Nokes also afflicted Anonymous 366. (15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 15-16

Anonymous 59   Witness

A person from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a laborer who is hit in the back with pieces of tile and brick while working in Mr. Freeland's yard; the objects were thrown by an unknown force. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Anonymous 59   Victim

A person from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a laborer who is hit in the back with pieces of tile and brick while working in Mr. Freeland's yard; the objects were thrown by an unknown force. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Anonymous 6   Witch

A woman in Penzance in the county of Cornwall, who allegedly appears to John Tonken before his vomiting fits; Tonken claims that she sometimes appears in the form of a cat, and would tell him what he would vomit or put things into his mouth. Tonken is the only person who can see her, and describes her as wearing a blue jerkin and a red petticoat patched in yellow and green. At one time, when Tonken was having a particularly violent fit, he reported that she had told him she would kill him if it were in her power to do so. The last time she appeared to him, she was accompanied by two other women (Anonymous 373), and bid him farewell, saying she would trouble him no more. Two women were arrested on suspicion of witchcraft on Tonken's testimony: Jane Noal, and Betty Seeze. (2-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 2-6

Anonymous 60   Victim

A person from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a labourer who is hit in the back with peices of tile and brick while working in Mr. Freeland's yard; the objects were thrown by an unknown force. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Anonymous 60   Witness

A person from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a labourer who is hit in the back with peices of tile and brick while working in Mr. Freeland's yard; the objects were thrown by an unknown force. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Francis Lord Willoughby   Examiner/Justice

A man from Ersby in the county of Lincolnshire, known to be a lord, who assisted in the examination of Phillip Flowers on February 25, 1618. (F4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v

Anonymous 64   Victim

A young boy from Sisted in the county of Essex whose foot is pricked by one of Joan Cunny's familiars after he steals wood from Cunny's grandson. ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Anonymous 65   Victim

A man from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the town baker, who Ellen Greene claims had "called her Witch & stricken her." For this act, Greene sent her familiar Pusse to bewitch him to death; he died within a fortnight. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anonymous 66   Victim

A woman from the Devonshey hundred in the county of Essex and the wife of Antony James. One evening, eight anonymous men and an anonymous woman decide to ransack the James family home. Displeased with the amount the bounty found in the house, the robbers decide to first murder Anthony James by stabbing him with daggers. They then turn to his wife who is calling out to her husband as he dying and the anonymous woman, described as being in a state of rage, stabs the woman in the stomach, thus killing her as well as her unborn baby. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 3-4

Anonymous 67   Neighbor

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown three of Anonymous 67's geese. (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 67   Victim

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown three of Anonymous 67's geese. (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 68   Victim

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse who refused to give Mother Waterhouse butter. In revenge, Mother Waterhouse caused her to "lose the curdes" two or three days later. (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 68   Neighbor

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse who refused to give Mother Waterhouse butter. In revenge, Mother Waterhouse caused her to "lose the curdes" two or three days later. (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 7   Witch

A cunningwoman from Pannier Alley, a street in the city of London, who appears to a maid, tells her fortune, and sells her a love powder (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Pannier-alley, or, A True Relation of some Pranks the Devil hath Play'd with a Plaster-pot There. London: 1687, 4-5

Anonymous 7   Cunning-folk

A cunningwoman from Pannier Alley, a street in the city of London, who appears to a maid, tells her fortune, and sells her a love powder (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Pannier-alley, or, A True Relation of some Pranks the Devil hath Play'd with a Plaster-pot There. London: 1687, 4-5

Anonymous 70   Neighbor

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as neighbor of a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He helps the Yeoman concoct a plan where by he can lure Harrison to his home (not the Yeoman's) so the Yeoman can scratch her to unwitch himself. (19-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-20

Anonymous 70   Co-conspirator

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as neighbor of a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He helps the Yeoman concoct a plan where by he can lure Harrison to his home (not the Yeoman's) so the Yeoman can scratch her to unwitch himself. (19-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-20

Anonymous 70   Witness

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as neighbor of a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He helps the Yeoman concoct a plan where by he can lure Harrison to his home (not the Yeoman's) so the Yeoman can scratch her to unwitch himself. (19-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-20

Anonymous 71   Witness

A woman from York in the county of Yorkshire, described as the wife of a neighbor to the Yeoman (Anonymous 70) who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison. Anonymous 71 aids her husband (Anonymous 70) by luring Harrison to thier home so the Yeoman can scratch Harrison. (19-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-20

Anonymous 72   Victim

A woman from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, whose baby was allegedly murdered by Johane Harrison after she sprinkled dirty laundry water on Harrison while she was walking by; evidently the sprinkled water was done by accident. (20-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 20-21

Anonymous 72   Witness

A woman from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, whose baby was allegedly murdered by Johane Harrison after she sprinkled dirty laundry water on Harrison while she was walking by; evidently the sprinkled water was done by accident. (20-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 20-21

Anonymous 73   Witness

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as a Yeoman whose cattle are allegedly bewitched to death by Johane Harrison after he tries to help his bewitched sister by riding to Cambridge to seek out a scholar. (21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 21

Anonymous 73   Victim

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as a Yeoman whose cattle are allegedly bewitched to death by Johane Harrison after he tries to help his bewitched sister by riding to Cambridge to seek out a scholar. (21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 21

Anonymous 74   Victim

A young boy, and the son of John Ferrall, who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Simons after attacking her dog with a knife. He becomes very ill five days after the incident occurs, but recovers with the help of another witch. (3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

Anonymous 75   Witch

An archer, of the town Malling in Kent, who is accused of playing with a fly devil or familiar that enhances his skill in archery. The archer won two or three shillings as a result of his advanced abilities, and was then severely punished by authority figures to appease the other angered archers and to overthrow witchcraft. (52)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 52

Anonymous 75   Victim

An archer, of the town Malling in Kent, who is accused of playing with a fly devil or familiar that enhances his skill in archery. The archer won two or three shillings as a result of his advanced abilities, and was then severely punished by authority figures to appease the other angered archers and to overthrow witchcraft. (52)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 52

Anonymous 76   Victim

A man from the county of Kent, described as an "honest yeoman," who is approached by a con-man (Anonymous 77) who, believing that the Yeoman's "estate and humour to be convenient in this purpose" finally "came a wooing (as they say) to his daughter, to whom he made love cunningly in words." However, seeing that cheating the Yeoman would be a faster way of making money than marrying his daughter, Anoymous claimed he could multiply him money chemically, taking "one angell [to] make two or three." In truth, after a great deal of pomp and ceremony which looked like magic, the Alchemist takes the Yeoman's money, leaving him with a lump of lead. (252-253)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 252-253

Anonymous 77   Magician

An man from the county of Kent described as a "a notable cousening varlet, who professed Alchymistry, juggling, witchcraft, and conjuration." Believing that the Yeoman's "estate and humour to be convenient" for providing him a comfortable lifestyle, he originally "came a wooing (as they say) to his daughter, to whom he made love cunningly in words." However, seeing that cheating the Yeoman would be a faster way of making money than marrying his daughter, Anonymous 77 claimed he could multiply him money chemically, taking "one angell [to] make two or three." In truth, after a great deal of pomp and ceremony which looked like magic, the Alchemist takes the Yeoman's money, leaving him with a lump of lead. (252-253)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 252-253

Anonymous 78   Preacher/Minister

A parson of Slangham in Sussex who T. E. entrusts to keep safe an Anglo-Saxon book written by Sir John Malborne, a divine of Oxenford. Reginald Scot writes to the parson asking him to send the book, but the parson will not allow it leave his company. (337-338)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 337-338

Anonymous 78   Witness

A parson of Slangham in Sussex who T. E. entrusts to keep safe an Anglo-Saxon book written by Sir John Malborne, a divine of Oxenford. Reginald Scot writes to the parson asking him to send the book, but the parson will not allow it leave his company. (337-338)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 337-338

Anonymous 79   Accuser

A woman who presumably lived somewhere between the London parishes of Wapping and Shadwell who as a girl was nursed by Alice Flower (circa 1664). As the girl grew into a woman, she "was still fearful and apprehensive of her, until the time of her Death." The narrator suggest that Anonymous 79, who had "been affrighted by some of [Alice Fowler's] Tricks when she was Young," had a terrible life thereafter, living always in the "greatest Dread and Terror imaginable." She appears to have died by the time of publication. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

Anonymous 79   Victim

A woman who presumably lived somewhere between the London parishes of Wapping and Shadwell who as a girl was nursed by Alice Flower (circa 1664). As the girl grew into a woman, she "was still fearful and apprehensive of her, until the time of her Death." The narrator suggest that Anonymous 79, who had "been affrighted by some of [Alice Fowler's] Tricks when she was Young," had a terrible life thereafter, living always in the "greatest Dread and Terror imaginable." She appears to have died by the time of publication. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

Anonymous 8   Witch

An old woman from Beckenton in Somersetshire, known to be about 80 years old and to live in the Alms-House. She was allegedly taunted by William Spicer, who "would call her Witch, and tell her of her Buns;" enraged, she appealed to a Justice of the Peace. Spicer was "so frightened, that he humbled himself to her, and promised never to call her so again." A few days later, Spicer began to have strange fits lasting two weeks in which he vomited crooked pins and claimed to see Anonymous 8 laughing at him and striking with her fist. Anonymous 8 also fell afoul of Mary Hill, who demanded Anonymous 8's ring and threatened her for it. Hill later refused to escort Anonymous 8 to Froom to look for work, and to give her an apple; the girl began to have fits days later in which she, too, vomited up strange objects. The townsfolk, moved to pity by Hill's condition, apprehended Anonymous 8 and brought her to Hill's home; Hill, despite not knowing that Anonymous 8 was present, was observed to fall into a violent fit. On this evidence, a Justice of the Peace ordered Anonymous 8 searched by a jury of women. The jury of women found several purple spots on her body that felt no pain when pricked by a needle. Anonymous 8 was also found in the search to have "other Marks and Tokens of a Witch." She was sent to the count gaol to await the next assizes. Later, Anonymous 8 was taken to the river and thrown in with her legs tied; she was allegedly seen to "lie upon her Back, and did Swim like a piece of Cork." She was swum three times, each with the same result. One account claims Hill identified Anonymous 8 as Elizabeth Carrier, while another claims it was actually two women, Margery Coombes and Ann More. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire. London: 1689, 1

Anonymous 80   Witness

A woman who lived in between the London parishes of Shadwell and Wapping, described as a "poor woman." Anonymous 80 is a neighbour of Alice Flower's who comes to take care of Alice when she is ill. She locked the door behind her, having left Fowler to run an errand for her, "and took the Key with her, leaving no body there save the aforesaid Alice sick in her Bed." Anonymous 80, however, came back to find the corpse of Alice Fowler, "dead and cold as Clay laying on the Floor on her Back, and having her two great Toes ty'd together, and a Blanket flung over her. This woman "called in the Neighbours who were all in great astonishment," but who after a brief discussion, had to leave, "in that there was so great a stink when they stir'd the Corps that they could hardly endure the Room." (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 3-4

Anonymous 81   Victim

An infant from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield. Elizabeth Sawyer alleged in her confession that the Devil, called Tom, killed this child and one other, Anonymous 82, on her behalf. (C2)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, C2

Anonymous 82   Victim

An infant from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield. Elizabeth Sawyer alleged in her confession that the Devil, called Tom, killed this child and one other, Anonymous 81, on her behalf. (C2)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, C2

Anonymous 85   Neighbor

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the husband of Anonymous 86. He and his wife allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill him with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 85   Victim

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the husband of Anonymous 86. He and his wife allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill him with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 86   Relative of Victim

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the wife of Anonymous 85. She and husband allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill Anonymous 85 with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 86   Neighbor

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the wife of Anonymous 85. She and husband allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill Anonymous 85 with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 87   Relative of Victim

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be Agnes Browne's aunt and to oversee the family's milkhouse. When Agnes came to her claiming that a thing like a large black dog had demanded butter from her and gone into the milkhouse, Anonymous 87 called for a priest to have Agnes recite prayers. When Agnes claimed the next day that the thing had returned, Anonymous 87 took back the milkhouse key from Agnes and had the girl show her the print in butter Agnes claimed the thing had left on the cheese. (28-36)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 28-36

Anonymous 88   Victim

A woman from Molesworth in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a maidservant in the employ of Mr. Say, whom John Winnick allegedly set his bear spirit on in order to intimidate her into stealing food from her Master for him. (4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 4

Anonymous 89   Witness

A man from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be an old servant of Master Enger. He caught Henry Sutton throwing stones and filth at other children while playing at the Mill dam, and struck him the ears when he would not desist. Henry went crying home to his mother Mary Sutton; in revenge, she caused a black sow to madden Anonymous 89's carthorses on the way to the market the next day. Anonymous 89 observed the sow go into Mother Sutton's home later that day. This same servant later repeated stories he had heard of Mary and Mother Sutton's misdeeds and was stroked by a beetle (Anonymous 155), causing him to fall into a trance. Afflicted and bedridden thereafter, he reported that Mary habitually came in through a window to knit at the foot of his bed or stare at him; she allegedly told him that he would be restored to health if he consented to bed her. He berated her for her behaviour and bastard children instead, and she left the way she came. The next day, Master Enger found her tending her hogs and tried to persuade her to come with him; when she refused he took her by force to Anonymous 89. Anonymous 89 drew blood from her and became well again for a short time, but was afflicted all the worse once she left. (B-B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B-B2

Anonymous 89   Victim

A man from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be an old servant of Master Enger. He caught Henry Sutton throwing stones and filth at other children while playing at the Mill dam, and struck him the ears when he would not desist. Henry went crying home to his mother Mary Sutton; in revenge, she caused a black sow to madden Anonymous 89's carthorses on the way to the market the next day. Anonymous 89 observed the sow go into Mother Sutton's home later that day. This same servant later repeated stories he had heard of Mary and Mother Sutton's misdeeds and was stroked by a beetle (Anonymous 155), causing him to fall into a trance. Afflicted and bedridden thereafter, he reported that Mary habitually came in through a window to knit at the foot of his bed or stare at him; she allegedly told him that he would be restored to health if he consented to bed her. He berated her for her behaviour and bastard children instead, and she left the way she came. The next day, Master Enger found her tending her hogs and tried to persuade her to come with him; when she refused he took her by force to Anonymous 89. Anonymous 89 drew blood from her and became well again for a short time, but was afflicted all the worse once she left. (B-B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B-B2

Anonymous 9   Accuser

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 10 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit. (3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 9   Victim

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 10 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit. (3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 90   Witness

A man from the North, known to be a gentleman and a friend of Master Enger. This man, Anonymous 90, stopped at Milton on the way to London and found him wracked by grief at the loss of his son. Enger was persuaded to tell his tale, and Anonymous 90 advised him on how to determine whether his misfortunes were truly the result of Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton's witchcraft. He told Enger to take the Suttons and swim them in deep water with their clothes stripped, their arms bound, and ropes around their middles. If they sunk, the ropes would allow Enger's men to save them from drowning. If they floated, they should be searched for marks and thrown into the water again, this time bound thumb to toe; if they floated again, they were witches. Anonymous 90 claimed this was how it was done in the North country. (Cv-Cv2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv-Cv2

Enger (son)   Victim

A child from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be the seven year old son of Master Enger. He heard reports of Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton's wicked behaviour, and, seeing Mother Sutton go to the mill to grind corn, threw stones at her and called her a witch. In revenge, Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton set their familiars Dicke and Jude on the boy and had him tormented to death. (C-Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, C-Cv

Anonymous 92   Co-conspirator

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 92 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-6

Anonymous 92   Witch

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 92 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-6

Anonymous 93   Witch

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry and servant of William Harrison who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 93 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging from chains; his body is left on display after death for others to see. (5-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-7

Anonymous 93   Co-conspirator

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry and servant of William Harrison who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 93 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging from chains; his body is left on display after death for others to see. (5-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-7

Anonymous 94   Victim

A young, pregnant woman seen traveling in the count of Kent, described as "handsome, and decently apparelled," who is given lodging by Mother Watts. Anonymous 94 feels possessed by an evil energy and, with the help of a midwife, Goodwife Hatch, gives birth to a baby described as an "abbortiue and prodigious fruit." It resembles a lump of flesh with deformed facial features, arms growing out of its shoulder with no joints, and fourteen toes on its feet. (Aiii - Biii)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News out of Kent of a Monstrous and Misshapen Child. London: 1609, Aiii - Biii

Anonymous 95   Witch

A young girl with scabs on her face who appears along with Christian Shaw's tormentors. (14)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 14

Anonymous 96   Witness

A woman who claims, along with Christian Shaw's mother, of seeing something as big as a cat stir under Christian Shaw's covers. (15)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 15

Anonymous 97   Witch

A woman wearing a red coat who is seen walking in the Shaws' garden. (17)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 17

Anonymous 98   Witch

A man who comes to Bargarren and who is immediately accused by Christian Shaw of being one of her tormentors. (21-22)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 21-22

Anonymous 99   Witness

A surgeon who is sent to examine Sarah Bower after her first fit. He bloods her, which allows her some relief and returns her from a state where she seems close to death. However, her limbs remain numb, and "in a manner Dead." (3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

Anonymous 99   Surgeon

A surgeon who is sent to examine Sarah Bower after her first fit. He bloods her, which allows her some relief and returns her from a state where she seems close to death. However, her limbs remain numb, and "in a manner Dead." (3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

Anothony Blowers   Victim

A boy from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and Edward Blowers, Anthony Blowers is allegedly bewitched by Mary Wiles and suffers an instantaneous death. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anthony   Victim

A man from the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by accused wizard, John Samond. Anthony languishes from May 8th to May 29th (1560) and then dies. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anthony James   Victim

A wealthy yeoman from the Hundred of Devonshey in the county of Essex. Antony James is robbed and murdered by a group of eight men and one woman. The group had initially planned to simply ransack the house, but were disappointed with what they found. They killed Anthony James by stabbing him and proceeded to stab his wife and kidnap his children (one of whom they later murdered and the other, mutilated). (Image 3 - 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, Image 3 - 4

Anthony James (Jr.)   Victim

A seven year old boy from the county of Essex and the son of Anthony James who is murdered by George and Annis Dell. After his parents are murdered by the Dells, the children are kidnapped by the Dells and taken to Bishops Hatfield in Hartforshire. It is here that the Dells, after having cut out this sister's tongue (Elizabeth James), throw Anthony James Jr. into a pond to die. Three weeks later, his body is found by men whose dogs had sniffed James' body from under some weeds in the pond. After taking the boy out and laying him down on the ground and telling the town about the strange ordeal, a group of people came to see the body and many recognized the boy, having seen him with the Dells a few weeks earlier. When Annis Dell is called to come see the boy, she denies ever having seen him. She is suspected of lying, however, and upon this discovery is asked to appear at the next Assizes. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 4

Anthony Nutter   Relative of Victim

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the father of Anne Nutter. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, confessed to using her familiar Fancie to bewitch his cow to death for preferring Elizabeth Southerns to her. Alison Device claimed that Whittle also bewitched his daughter Anne do death for laughing at her. (E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Anthony Nutter   Victim

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the father of Anne Nutter. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, confessed to using her familiar Fancie to bewitch his cow to death for preferring Elizabeth Southerns to her. Alison Device claimed that Whittle also bewitched his daughter Anne do death for laughing at her. (E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Anthony Smith   Victim

A man from Horkesley in the county of Essex, whose wife gives birth to a monstrous male baby that has no limbs or tongue. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The True Reporte of the Forme and Shape of a Monstrous Childe, borne at Muche Horkesleye. London: 1562, 1

Anthony Smith (2)   Author

Anthony Smith, a surgeon from Kingston Devon, who applies a plaster, and does surgery on Elizabeth Brooker, finding under her skin, despite its invisibility, a pin which was magically inserted into her muscle. Smith is the author of the full account of Brooker's bewitchment. (66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

Anthony Smith (2)   Surgeon

Anthony Smith, a surgeon from Kingston Devon, who applies a plaster, and does surgery on Elizabeth Brooker, finding under her skin, despite its invisibility, a pin which was magically inserted into her muscle. Smith is the author of the full account of Brooker's bewitchment. (66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

Anthony Westgrath   Witness

A man from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who allegedly witnessed the possession of Margaret Hooper. As part of the Hooper's household, he is also witness to the invasion of the bear-like monster (Anonymous 245) which pushes Margaret Hooper around the house; he is also present at the dispossession of Margaret Hooper, where a child surrounded by bright light (Anonymous 246) appeared while the household prayed together. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, Cover

Archbishop of Yorke   Celebrity

A man of Yorke in the County of Yorkshire, known to be Archbishop of Yorke, who receives the depositions taken by the high Commission on William Sommers' possession. On seeing the depositions, he is satisfied that Sommers is truly possessed, and demands that Mr. John Darrell keep his insistence that the Devil might be driven out of a person through prayer and fasting to himself, as it is Darrell's opinion only. The Archbishop declines to enlighten Darrell on how the Devil might be better driven out, preferring to leave Darrell with the demand to cease claiming that prayer and fasting are effective. (Image 7)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 7

Arnold's Wife   Cunning-folk

A woman who is identified by a local boat-cawker / cunning-man named Herring as the witch who "haunted" Annis Glascocke. (Cv, C2-C2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv, C2-C2v

Arthur Bill   Witch

Arthur Bill is a man from Raunds in the country Northampton and the son of two witches, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father). Arthur Bill was accused of bewitching Martha Aspine and suspected of bewitching numerous cattle. He was "publiquely knowne to b[e]e of an euill life and reputation, together with his father and mother." He, along with his parents, was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water; it is said that all three floated, which was thought to confirm their guilt. Arthur was sent to the Northhampton Gaol by Sir Gilbert Pickering. There, he and his mother allegedly bewitched a round ball into his father's throat to prevent him from confessing. His father nevertheless became a witness against him. Arthur is said to have had three familiars, named Grissill, Ball, Jacke. While he was imprisoned, many tried to bring him back into the fold of the Church and pray for his confession and contrition, but he maintained his innocence unto his execution. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Arthur Bill   Relative of Witch

Arthur Bill is a man from Raunds in the country Northampton and the son of two witches, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father). Arthur Bill was accused of bewitching Martha Aspine and suspected of bewitching numerous cattle. He was "publiquely knowne to b[e]e of an euill life and reputation, together with his father and mother." He, along with his parents, was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water; it is said that all three floated, which was thought to confirm their guilt. Arthur was sent to the Northhampton Gaol by Sir Gilbert Pickering. There, he and his mother allegedly bewitched a round ball into his father's throat to prevent him from confessing. His father nevertheless became a witness against him. Arthur is said to have had three familiars, named Grissill, Ball, Jacke. While he was imprisoned, many tried to bring him back into the fold of the Church and pray for his confession and contrition, but he maintained his innocence unto his execution. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Arthur Robinson   Witness

A man from Totnam in the county of Middlesex, now the London Borough of Haringey, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who is said to have long held the suspicion that Elizabeth Sawyer was a witch. Seeing the sudden inexplicable deaths of nursing infants and cattle, he stole thatching from Sawyer's roof to test whether she was a witch. He alleged that, wherever some of the thatching was burnt, Sawyer would shortly be seen. He also claimed that some of her neighbours had told him Sawyer had witch's marks on her body, and petitioned the Bench to have her searched by a jury of women. (A3-B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, A3-B1

Arthur Robinson   Accuser

A man from Totnam in the county of Middlesex, now the London Borough of Haringey, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who is said to have long held the suspicion that Elizabeth Sawyer was a witch. Seeing the sudden inexplicable deaths of nursing infants and cattle, he stole thatching from Sawyer's roof to test whether she was a witch. He alleged that, wherever some of the thatching was burnt, Sawyer would shortly be seen. He also claimed that some of her neighbours had told him Sawyer had witch's marks on her body, and petitioned the Bench to have her searched by a jury of women. (A3-B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, A3-B1

Baldwin (Daughter)   Victim

A young girl from Weethead within the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Richard Baldwin, who was allegedly betwitched to death by Elizabeth Southerns. According to Alison Device's deposition, Southerns had a falling-out with Richard Baldwin, and once had Device take her to Baldwin's home late at night. The next morning, Device heard that Baldwin's daughter was sick. The child was said to "languish afterwards by the space of a yeare, or thereaboutes, and dyed." Device was convinced that Southerns had caused the girl's death. (C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

Aubrey Grinset   Witch

A woman from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a witch and a bastard. Aubrey Grinset, alias Thrower due to her illegitimate birth, is accused of witching John Collet and Henry Winson to death, and of causing the fits of Thomas Spatchet. She is tried in Suffolk, but it is found that there is insufficient evidence to do anything to her under the law. During one of Spatchet's fits, he seemed to catch a hand and bit the thumb, which ended the fits. After this, Aubrey Grinset was seen to wear an unusually large shoe and was found to have a saw-like impression on her toe. A year later, Spatchet suffered fits in which he felt as if someone was holding him and groping his crotch, also attributed to her. In the fall of 1665, Aubrey Grinset confessed that she had afflicted Thomas Spatchet and many others, that she had made league with the Devil and had been a witch for twenty years, and bewitched John Collet of Cookly and Henry Winson of Walpool to death. The Devil had appeared first in the form of a handsome young man and later in the form of a blackish grey cat or kitten, and sucked blood from a teat. She admitted to employing an imp and sending it to Spatchet. When searched by a jury of women, her teat was found where she had said it would be, but no other marks. A second search a few days later found her covered in scratches; many nights she was seen wandering far from her cell. She was called before gentlemen to confess, and credible persons offered testimony. Questioned a third time, she confessed to hurting Spatchet, but denied killing anyone. Spatchet was urged to scratch her, but was too tender-hearted. A week before her death, she was visited by Thomas Spatchet at the urging of Mr. R., a Conformist, but Spatchet was unable to get close. When he tried, he met resistance and was forced to curtsey back away from her again. After this, Mr. R. visited her in Spatchet's place. He found her ill, with the skin of her hands and arms torn off. She told him that it was too late for her to repent, that she was damned. When he asked why she had two cudgels on her bed, she answered that they were to fight the Devil, for he would wait until she was alone and drag her out of the bed, under and back again. Before her death, she said that Spatchet would not be free on her death as others had him in hand as well. She died around Easter of 1667. (17-20, 23, 27, 28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 17-20, 23, 27, 28

Augustine Styward   Physician

A man from Thetford in the county of Norfolk, and possibly to son of Augstine Steward, alderman of Norfolk, Styward acts as a physician and examines alleged demoniac Joan Harvey. Harvey attributed her "divers fits" to being bewitched by Margaret Fraunces, however Styward concludes that she suffers from "nothing else but a disease called the Mother commonly, or as Phisicke calleth it uteri suffocatio or strangulatio which hath her natural cause. After this examination Styward writes to Sir Gawry and beseeches him to release Mother Fraunces from jail. (71)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report on the manuscripts of the family of Gawdy, formerly of Norfolk. . London: 1885, 71

Aurelia Mollins   Midwife

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Aurelia Mollins   Witch-Searcher

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Avice Cunny   Witch

A woman from Stisted in the county of Essex, daughter of Joan Cunny, and sister to Margaret Cunny, Avice Cunny is described as a "lewde Daughter," who was "no better then a naughty pack" and mother to a ten or twelve year old bastard son (who turns, as does his cousin, witness against his mother, aunt, and grandmother. Avice Cunny is found guilty "of murder by incantation," but pleads her belly and after being examined and found pregnant, is remanded. (A3, A4 )

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3, A4

Barbara Bartle   Witch

A widow from Stepney, in the county of Middlesex (now part of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets), described as a "common witch and inchantrix," who allegedly practices witchcraft "upon and against Elizabeth Gyan." As a result, Elizabeth Gyan "languished in her body and "was wasted consumed pined and lame and likewise speechless" from the said 17th of June "until the day of the taking of this inquisition, to witt the twelfth day of July then next following." Barbara Bartle is tried and pleads not guilty. ()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

Barbara Cena   Accuser

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." (150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Barbor (Wife)   Relative of Victim

A woman from an unknown area of London, whose husband returned home from a visit to a conjurer with a chip "into his Pocket." The same day, at night, when the family is sleeping, "all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered, as to awaken and affright them all." Mr. Barbor's wife turned to him then, and said, "you told me you was at Dr. Lamb's this Day, and I fear you medled with something." Her husband tells her that he took a wood chip from Dr. Lamb's, and she asks him to "fling it out," for fear, "we shall have no Quiet." After her husband does as she says, the "VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," so the family was able to sleep again. (156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

Barbor (Wife)   Witness

A woman from an unknown area of London, whose husband returned home from a visit to a conjurer with a chip "into his Pocket." The same day, at night, when the family is sleeping, "all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered, as to awaken and affright them all." Mr. Barbor's wife turned to him then, and said, "you told me you was at Dr. Lamb's this Day, and I fear you medled with something." Her husband tells her that he took a wood chip from Dr. Lamb's, and she asks him to "fling it out," for fear, "we shall have no Quiet." After her husband does as she says, the "VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," so the family was able to sleep again. (156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

Barbor (Wife)   Victim

A woman from an unknown area of London, whose husband returned home from a visit to a conjurer with a chip "into his Pocket." The same day, at night, when the family is sleeping, "all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered, as to awaken and affright them all." Mr. Barbor's wife turned to him then, and said, "you told me you was at Dr. Lamb's this Day, and I fear you medled with something." Her husband tells her that he took a wood chip from Dr. Lamb's, and she asks him to "fling it out," for fear, "we shall have no Quiet." After her husband does as she says, the "VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," so the family was able to sleep again. (156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

Bargarren   Witness

A man to which the old highland fellow seeks lodging. (21-22)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 21-22

Bargarren (Plural)   Victim

A family on whom Catherine Campbell allegedly places a curse. (10)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 10

Barnaby Griffen   Victim

A man who is physically hurt by Joan Cunny's imps Jack and Jill (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 8

Bartholomew Hobson   Examiner/Justice

A man who determines that Anonymous 143 is not a witch. He then moves to Northumberland where he works as a witch-finder charging three pounds per case. (116)

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796, 116

Bartholomew Hobson   Witch-Searcher

A man who determines that Anonymous 143 is not a witch. He then moves to Northumberland where he works as a witch-finder charging three pounds per case. (116)

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796, 116

Bedell (Child)   Victim

A child from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon of unknown gender, known to be the child of Henry Bedell. Elizabeth Weed alleged that she had her familiar Lilly kill this child three days after Lilly was unable to kill Henry Bedell. (2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Belfild's Wife   Victim

A woman from Liford in the county of Essex who has a cow that died and two "miche neate" (dairy cows) that gave milk of "all colours." Joan Cocke's daughter (Anonymous 243) is suspected of having used "witcherie" to bewitch these cows. ()

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4. H.M. Stationery Office: 1885,

Benjamin Howes   Victim

A man from Little-Clacton in the county of Essex whose sow is allegedly killed by one of Rebecca Jones' familiars (circa 1620). (36, 37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37

Bennet Lane   Accuser

A woman likely from Little Oakly in the county of Essex and wife of William Lanes, and a liberal users of countermgics. Bennet Lane testifies at the Annis Herd's indictement/ examination after a series of strange incidents happen in her home, following uncomfortable encounters with Annis Heard. Two or three weeks after having given Heard a pint of milk, Lane wanted to know from Heard's daughter, Annis Dowsing, when she might get her container back. Although the girl returned with the dish, Lane suspected foul play: "she could no lo~ger spin nor make a thread to hold," despite sharping her needle. She finally used a bit of countermagic, firing her needle and found it cured. This was not the last encounter which called for countermagic, however. Lane, having called in a loan from Heard, found her dairy processing came to a halt, no matter what she did, she could not seperate the milk and cream: "ye next day she would haue fleet hir milk bowle, but it wold not abide ye fleeting but would rop & role as it werethe white of an egge." She tried scoring the bowl with salt; she tried scaling it, but to no avail. The milk would burn and stink. She finally heated up a milk horseshoe, and submerged it in the milk and "shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before." Lane does not act as an accuser, per say, but as a witness to these events. Moreover, she provides an excellent example of the accessibility of countermagics. the white of an egge, also the milk being on the her it did not so soone seath but it would quaile, burne by and stincke, the which shee saide shee thought might be lo~g of y^ feeding of her beasts, or els that her vessels were not sweete, wherevpon she saith, she scalded her vessels, and scoured them with salt, thinking that might helpe, but it was neuer the better but as before: then she saith, shee was full of care, that shee shoulde loose both milke and creame, then shee saith it came into her minde to approoue another way, which was, shee tooke a horse shue and made it redde hote, and put it into the milke in the vessals, and so into her creame: and then she saith, shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before. (E7v-E8v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E7v-E8v

Bennet Lane   Witness

A woman likely from Little Oakly in the county of Essex and wife of William Lanes, and a liberal users of countermgics. Bennet Lane testifies at the Annis Herd's indictement/ examination after a series of strange incidents happen in her home, following uncomfortable encounters with Annis Heard. Two or three weeks after having given Heard a pint of milk, Lane wanted to know from Heard's daughter, Annis Dowsing, when she might get her container back. Although the girl returned with the dish, Lane suspected foul play: "she could no lo~ger spin nor make a thread to hold," despite sharping her needle. She finally used a bit of countermagic, firing her needle and found it cured. This was not the last encounter which called for countermagic, however. Lane, having called in a loan from Heard, found her dairy processing came to a halt, no matter what she did, she could not seperate the milk and cream: "ye next day she would haue fleet hir milk bowle, but it wold not abide ye fleeting but would rop & role as it werethe white of an egge." She tried scoring the bowl with salt; she tried scaling it, but to no avail. The milk would burn and stink. She finally heated up a milk horseshoe, and submerged it in the milk and "shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before." Lane does not act as an accuser, per say, but as a witness to these events. Moreover, she provides an excellent example of the accessibility of countermagics. the white of an egge, also the milk being on the her it did not so soone seath but it would quaile, burne by and stincke, the which shee saide shee thought might be lo~g of y^ feeding of her beasts, or els that her vessels were not sweete, wherevpon she saith, she scalded her vessels, and scoured them with salt, thinking that might helpe, but it was neuer the better but as before: then she saith, shee was full of care, that shee shoulde loose both milke and creame, then shee saith it came into her minde to approoue another way, which was, shee tooke a horse shue and made it redde hote, and put it into the milke in the vessals, and so into her creame: and then she saith, shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before. (E7v-E8v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E7v-E8v

Bessie Weir   Witch

A woman from Pollok, Scotland who allegedly meets with the devil; together they do image magic. They make wax dolls and stick pins in them (11-12)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 11-12

Betty Muschamp   Relative of Witch

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp   Demoniac

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp   Victim

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Seeze   Witch

A woman of Penzance in the county of Cornwall, who was arrested on suspicion of witchcraft along with Jane Noal following alleged demoniac John Tonken's testimony regarding the women who had appeared to him during his fits. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 6

Bill (Father)   Relative of Witch

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill (Father)   Witch

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill (Father)   Witness

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill (Mother)   Relative of Witch

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the mother of Arthur Bill, and allegedly both a witch and the wife of witch Bill (Father). When her son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, she was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Father). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol, but she was permitted to visit Arthur in his cell; the two of them used the opportunity to bewitch a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing. While imprisoned, she feared being condemned to death by hanging so greatly that she cut her own throat. It is said that, before her death, she railed against her damnation and cursed her birth and conception. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill (Mother)   Witch

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the mother of Arthur Bill, and allegedly both a witch and the wife of witch Bill (Father). When her son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, she was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Father). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol, but she was permitted to visit Arthur in his cell; the two of them used the opportunity to bewitch a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing. While imprisoned, she feared being condemned to death by hanging so greatly that she cut her own throat. It is said that, before her death, she railed against her damnation and cursed her birth and conception. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Blanche of Marseille   Witch

A woman from Marseille that allegedly uses charms of gold and silver to bewitch a woman named Magdalene (320)

Appears in:
Machaelis, Sebastien. The Admirable History of the Posession and Conversion of a Penitent Woman. London: 1613, 320

Bonham Spencer   Examiner/Justice

A man from Shorne in the county of Kent, Spencer is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Brett Netter   Examiner/Justice

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, Netter is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Brian Darcey   Examiner/Justice

A Justice of the Peace who examines the women and records many of the trials of the witches of S.Osyth. Darcy become sheriff of Essex in 1585 (3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 3

Brian Darcey   Author

A Justice of the Peace who examines the women and records many of the trials of the witches of S.Osyth. Darcy become sheriff of Essex in 1585 (3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 3

Bridget Gilbert   Accuser

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." (150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Bridget Mayers   Witch

A woman from Holland (now Great Holland) who allegedly had a familiar spirit in the form of a mouse named Prickeares. She is found guilt of this charge and condemned to die as a witch, at Chemlsford in 1645, but is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." She appears again as one of the prisoners at the Colchester gaol, in August 11, 1647, having been committed for felony-to be kept in gaol until she can be "lawfully delivered." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=12)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=12

Bridget Peacock   Victim

A woman from the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by John Samond. Samond allegedly bewitched her with the intention of killing her. She languishes from the 28th of May until the 29th of August (1659 or 1560) and dies. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Bridget Prankard   Witch-Searcher

A woman who, along with Elizabeth Tordwood, Mary Day, Mary Bolster, and Catharine White, searches Elizabeth Stiles for witch's marks. When the women find a mark on Stiles, they prick it with a pin in order to show others. (145)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 145

Bridget Reynolds   Witch-Searcher

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as a midwife, and wife of Edward Reynolds. Bridget Reynolds searched Sara Hatting, Marion Hocket, and Elizabeth Harvey as witches. She found "foure Teats, or Bigges in those parts, almost an inch long, and as bigge as this Informants little fingers" in Hatting's genitals. She found "three such Bigges, and about the said scantling," on Elizabeth Harvey. Reynolds did not find any marks in Marian Hocket that were not "found in the same parts not like other honest women." Reynolds later testified against Sara Hatting, claiming that she "did enterteine, employ and feede" teo evil spirits in the form "of a mowsse," and that Elizabeth Harvey "did enterteine, employ and feede" three evil spirits in the form "of a red mousse." (30)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30

Bridget Reynolds   Midwife

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as a midwife, and wife of Edward Reynolds. Bridget Reynolds searched Sara Hatting, Marion Hocket, and Elizabeth Harvey as witches. She found "foure Teats, or Bigges in those parts, almost an inch long, and as bigge as this Informants little fingers" in Hatting's genitals. She found "three such Bigges, and about the said scantling," on Elizabeth Harvey. Reynolds did not find any marks in Marian Hocket that were not "found in the same parts not like other honest women." Reynolds later testified against Sara Hatting, claiming that she "did enterteine, employ and feede" teo evil spirits in the form "of a mowsse," and that Elizabeth Harvey "did enterteine, employ and feede" three evil spirits in the form "of a red mousse." (30)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30

Bullocke (child)   Victim

A child from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the child of Henry Bullocke, who was allegedly bewitched by Alison Device. According to James Device's deposition, when Bullocke accused Alison of the bewitchment, Device confessed and begged forgiveness. (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Burgiss (Mother)   Relative of Victim

A woman from Yowel in the county of Surrey, known to be the mother of Elizabeth Burgiss, who allegedly confronted Joan Buts and "fell foul upon her, and so evilly Treated her, that she fetcht out some of her Hellish Hellish Blood." The result of this altercation is not provided in the account. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Yowel in Surry giving a True and Just Account of One Elizabeth Burgiss. London: 1681, 5-6

Captain Brown   Victim

A Captain from Shropshire who is brutally murdered byt his servant and appears as an apparition before two Gentlewomen (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of a Most Horrid and Barbarous Murder and Robbery Committed on the Body of Captain Brown. Edinburgh: 1694, 1-2

Captain Collins   Examiner/Justice

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who sends for an old woman (Anonymous 398) accused of witchcraft in the case of Joseph Cruttenden and his wife, whose goods are bewitched to fly and hit people of their own accord, and causing the houses they stay in the burn. When the old woman is apprehended, Captain Collins examined her with Mr. Busbridge, and she is also "searched and watched 24 Hours." The old woman "had to Maidstone about it, but got away," and lives in Burwast afterward. (56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Carter (Son)   Un-witcher

A tall, lusty thirty six year old man from Thorpe in the county of Essex and son of John Carter, a local brewer. Carter's sone broke the spell Margaret Grevell allegedly put on the local beer production when thrice he shot an arrow into the beer barrel as an act of counter magic. When he was able to make the the third arrow "sticke in the brewinge Fatte," beer production was able to restart. (C2v-C3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C2v-C3

Carter (Son)   Witness

A tall, lusty thirty six year old man from Thorpe in the county of Essex and son of John Carter, a local brewer. Carter's sone broke the spell Margaret Grevell allegedly put on the local beer production when thrice he shot an arrow into the beer barrel as an act of counter magic. When he was able to make the the third arrow "sticke in the brewinge Fatte," beer production was able to restart. (C2v-C3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C2v-C3

Cartwright (Child 2)   Victim

A child from Much-Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, and a child of Thomas Woodward who is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of her imp. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Cartwright (Child)   Victim

A child from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex and one of John Cartwrights' child, this person, along with their sibling, is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of one of her imps. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Catharine White   Witch-Searcher

A woman who participates along with four others in searching Elizabeth Stile for witch's marks. The women find a mark which they prick with a pin. They leave the pin in the mark to show others. (145)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 145

Catherine Campbell   Witch

A maid from Erskine, Renfrewshire who allegedly says words about the devil thus bewitching Christian Shaw into flying around the room (1-2)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 1-2

Catherine Green   Witch

A woman from Brewham, Somerset who convinces Christian Green to give her soul to the devil (156)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 156

Catherine Gualter   Victim

A fifteen year old girl who is allegedly bewitched and has fits, fevers, and vomits hair, bones, membrane, wood, stones, walnuts, and pieces of wall with lime on them (94-95)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 94-95

Catherine Huxley   Witch

A woman from Evesham in the county of Worcestershire, who is a "single Woman," beiieved to be around forty years old, and allegedly a witch. Children, including Mary Ellins, throw stones at her, calling her "Witch." It is believed that Catherine Huxley is responsible for causing the young Mary Ellins to become ill, for she yells after the young girl, "Ellins, you shall have stones enough in your ---", even though Mary Ellins was "so affrighted," she could not throw stones at Huxley. When Mary Ellins falls ill, she is "so weak and Languishing," that her friends feared she would not recover, and she voids "stones by the urinary passages." The voiding of stones is accompanied by extreme pain, and after "one or two months" passed, Huxley is apprehended "upon some strong suspitions of Witchcraft." Huxley is examined and searched, and it was found that "at [her] Beds Head there was found several stones, such as the said Mary voided." Huxley is sent to Wocester, where at the Summer Assizes in 1652, "she was upon the Prosecution of the Friends of the said Mary, Condemned and Executed," resulting the "perfect recovery" of Mary Ellins. (44)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 44

Caytiffe Greenvile   Victim

A man from an unknown area of the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon his death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. Greenvile is tortured with his companion Goring, for both were in the "Malignant Army" that Joseph Buxford was once part of. These two are located in Hell, close to Sir Peter Ball. They are attended by "three furies" also known as the "Ladies of Scalding," who pour "Acomite downe their belching throats." (4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Cecily Bayle   Victim

A woman from Norfolk, described as a servant who has a disagreement with Mary Smith. Smith calls Bayles "a great fattail'd sow," and promises her that she would not be fat for long. Bayles is soon struck with a wasting illness which lasts six months and does not end until Bayles quits her employment (and by implication moves far away from Smith). (55-57)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 55-57

Cecily Sellis   Witch

A woman from Little Clacton, the wife of Henry Sellis, and the mother of Henry Sellis Jr., John Sellis, and at least one daughter. Sellis is accused of conspiring with Ales Newman (to commit arson against Richard ) and Mary Barker (to bewitch Mary Death) and a number of other crimes by her neighbors and by her own sons. Her sons, John and Henry both alleged that she had familiars which she pampered, feeding them with milk and tucking them into sleep on a bed of wool, nestled into the roots of a crab apple tree. They also suggest that she allowed or did not prevent at least one of these familiars from attacking her own son John; he was plagued, they attested, by the black male familiar named Hercules, and had an imperfect toe as proof of the assault. Relations became strained inside her family as a result, but they also became strained outside of her family and between her family and her neighbor Richard Rosse's family. Following the death of two of his plow horses, which died while her husband worked them, Rosse began to suspect the Sellis family of witchcraft. This suspicion was supported by two verbal altercations. One where Sellis used "hard words" against Richard, when their negotiation over the cost of malt when sour, and one where, in a "great anger," Cecily have his wife "lewd speeches," after Mrs. Rosse beat Sellis' cattle out of her pasture. Although Rosse could not confirm the Sellis' involvement in the burning of his barn, he did heat the "youngest sonne of the saide Henrie and Cisley, should say heere is a goodly deale of corne, and a man vnknowen shoulde answere there was the diuell store." Cecily and Henry Sellis are tried and found guilty of this arson. Ales Manfield, however, did confirm that Cecily Sellis was involved in that arson. She suggested that her own imps implored that they should be allowed to "goe vnto little Clapton to Celles, saying, they woulde burne Barnes, and also kill Cattell." They were allegedly "fedde at Cels house by her al ye time they were away," and fed with Manfield's beer and blood when they returned. It was property damage for which Sellis was in the most trouble, however. Sellis was implicated in the causing the Joan and Robert Smith's child to die, John Death to die, and Mary Death to sicken. The death of the Smith child is the most tenuous accusation, Joan herself seems to be relating the narrative reluctantly, suggesting that she would not accuse the Sellis' over overs-peaking her child, but would pray God forgive them if they had. In the case of the Death family, Cecily Sellis plays a staring role. The death of four year old John Death (circe 1580) is recorded as happening following and disagreement between Mrs. Death and Cecily Sellis over who would act as wet nurse to George Battell's infant. His death is recorded as one aspect in a series of tragedies: John was well and then he was dead. However, the narrative weight given to the swine which had been well before the leap and skipped to death, and the weight given to the fat calf who had been well and then was dead, suggests that John's death was one of a series of debilitating attacks against the Death family; its importance is illustrated legally, as opposed to textually; it is for this death that Cecily is found guilty and remanded. The narrative which follows Mary Death's illness, however is both long and complicated; it helps that she is old enough to tell some of the tale herself and that it drags on long enough to create some narrative tension. Mary becomes, for all intents and purposes, a hysterical demoniac; suffering in an incurable "most pitious" condition. Only after Thomas Death visits a cunning man who presumably forces Cecily Sellis and Mary Barker to appear before her (as corporeal beings, or as apparitions) is she cured. For her own part, Sellis denies all charges against her, including the allegation that she accused Mother Tredsall of making her a witch. She is searched as one, however, and "vpon her body many spots very suspitious [were seen], and the said Margaret [Simpson] saith, that they bee much like the sucked spots, that shee hath seene vpon the body of Ursley Kempe and seuerall other[s]." She is found guilty of her crimes and remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Ales Newman, Ellen Southern, and Agnes / Annis Glascock, at Colchester Goal. (C8-D)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C8-D

Charity Page   Victim

A girl from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the (possibly illegitimate) daughter of William Page. According to Ursley Kempe, Annis Glascock bewitched Charity Page. Page grew ill at the beginning of March, 1580 and died May 8, 1580. Her mother later visited Ursley Kempe to seek a cure for her own bewitchment. This may or may not be the "base child" which purportedly lived with the Pages. (Appendix)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Appendix

Childer (Daughter)   Relative of Victim

A girl from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her mother Mrs. Childer by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths. (S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer (Daughter)   Victim

A girl from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her mother Mrs. Childer by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths. (S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Christian Green   Witch

A woman who confesses to conspiring with the devil (156)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 156

Christian Shaw   Victim

A twelve-year old girl who starts having violent fits and who is possessed by many evil spirits and devils; A young girl from Erskine, Renfrewshire who is allegedly bewitched by Catherine Campbell. (Image 6)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. A True Narrative of the Sufferings and Relief of a Young Girle; Strangely Molested, by Evil Spirits and their Instruments. Edinburgh: 1698, Image 6

Christian Shaw   Demoniac

A twelve-year old girl who starts having violent fits and who is possessed by many evil spirits and devils; A young girl from Erskine, Renfrewshire who is allegedly bewitched by Catherine Campbell. (Image 6)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. A True Narrative of the Sufferings and Relief of a Young Girle; Strangely Molested, by Evil Spirits and their Instruments. Edinburgh: 1698, Image 6

Christian Shaw's Mother   Witness

A woman from Erksine who is Christian Shaw's mother. (9)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 9

Christopher Elderidge   Witness

A man from Tunbridge in Kent, who is the master of the young servant girl, Margaret Gurr. His servant becomes allegedly possessed by two devils and a witch. Her condition becomes so severe, that property damage extends to his household, "as if the Chairs and Stools had been thrown about the Chamber, as if the whole house had been falling down." It is concluded that if Margaret Gurr is not "speedily cured," that Christopher Elderidge "and all the whole family must have been forced to have left the house." Christopher Elderidge and his wife engage in praying often for their servant, "yet all did not good," and with Margaret Gurr's "strange actions and amazing frightful looks, they were always Terrified." (4-5)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4-5

Christopher Mills   Examiner/Justice

A man from Herne in the county of Kent, Mills is is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Christopher Morgan   Divine

A man, plasterer, and the husband of Mrs. Morgan from Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane (now Beach Street, near the Barbican complex in the City of London) who is said to "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Christopher Morgan   Co-conspirator

A man, plasterer, and the husband of Mrs. Morgan from Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane (now Beach Street, near the Barbican complex in the City of London) who is said to "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Christopher Nutter   Relative of Witch

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter   Victim

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter   Relative of Victim

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Veele   Victim

A man from Stock in the county of Essex, the son of Roger Veele, who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Sawen so that his feet are lamed and curved so that he suffers great pains and can barely walk. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Christopher Wilson   Victim

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, who is alleged in Margaret Austin's indictment against Joan Peterson to have first been cured of an illness by Peterson and then made ill again through witchcraft when he is unable to pay for her services. According to Austin, Peterson warned Wilson that if he didn't pay his illness will return. Wilson was then afflicted with "very strange fits, and for twelve hours together would rage and wave like a mad man." The fits continue for another twelve hours and last for days, leaving him ill and "languishing." Contrary to Austin's testimony, Wilson does not complain of any such treatment. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Clifton   Midwife

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Clifton   Witch-Searcher

A midwife who examines Frances Dickenson, Mary Spencer, Margaret Johnson, and Jennet Hargreaves at Surgeon's Hall under the supervision Dr. William Harvey. (129-130)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 129-130

Colonel Busbridge   Examiner/Justice

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who offers one of his houses in the same parish to Joseph Cruttenden and his wife after their own house burns down. However, as soon as the Cruttenden's goods are brought in, the house burns as well, and although "endeavours are made by many to quench it," nothing helps until the goods are taken out, causing the fire to "cease with little or no help." Colonel Busbridge also examines and searches an old woman (Anonymous 398) suspected of witchcraft. It is believed she might be the cause of the fire, as she told a servant girl of Joseph Cruttenden that "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." The woman is also watched for some twenty four hours, "had to Maidstone about it, but got away," and moves to "Burwast, some time since." (55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Colonel Nathaniel Rich   Witness

A man from Stondon Hall, Stondon Massey in the county of Essex, who takes in Mr. Tyro, a preacher, after he was "exercised," and fell ill. Mr. Tyro heard a voice speak to him once, which told him he should die before his turned thirty-five. Colonel Rich believes this confession of Mr. Tyro, because of "some Discourse I had with him afterwards, during his Sickness." (197-198)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 197-198

Colonel Swinow   Relative of Witch

A man from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be a military officer holding the rank of Colonel and husband of Dorothy Swinow. Colonel Swinow died while Dorothy was facing accusations of witchcraft. (6)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6

Condy   Cunning-folk

A man of Stoke Climsland in the county of Cornwall, known to be a cunning person, to whom alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie's uncle (Anonymous 376) came for a cure for Sawdie's fits. Condy declaired Sawdie to be "overlookt" and first prescribed a plaster, a powder and a little bag to hang around the boy's neck. When this failed to cure him, Condy next prescribed only a powder and the promise of a cure; the third time, he simply charged Sawdie's family with watching him carefully and not to let the boy out of their sight. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 3

Constable   Examiner/Justice

A man from Well-Close in London, described as a Constable who helps in the apprehension of the witch, Sarah Griffith, and the prevention of her escape by knocking her down when she attempted to jump a wall. The Constable takes Sarah Griffith to the Justice. (1)

Appears in:
Greenwel, Thomas. A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,. London: 1704, 1

Corbet (Daughter 2)   Witness

A woman, the sister of demoniac Faith Corbet, she allowed her sister to stay with her twice at her home in Dalby Dale (in Dalby Forest), in Pickering, North Yorkshire. This Corbet daughter was pregnant the second time her sister stayed with her (1663, March 22). (54-55)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54-55

Cornelius Sandeswell   Witness

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the husband of Ann Sandeswell. According to Ann's deposition in court, he rented a home to Amy Denny. When she moved in, she told Cornelius that the new chimney on the house would fall if it wasn't looked after. The chimney fell shortly thereafter, as predicted. (55-56)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-56

Corner (child)   Victim

A child from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known as the child of William and Mrs. Corner, who was then allegedly taken with sweat and chills, and started shrieking and staring, and wringing and writhing, after Mrs. Corner refused to provide Mother Staunton with items she had demanded. The child's affliction was so extreme that those who saw it were uncertain it would live. (12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 12

Countess Lendrik   Witness

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Countess. She witnessed Margaret Muschamp in her tormenting fits, and saw that despite the child's inability to eat, she did not lose any weight. (3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Countess Cecily Manners   Victim

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Countess Cecily Manners   Relative of Victim

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Countess Cecily Manners   Celebrity

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Countess of Essex   Victim

A woman from Glamorgan, Wales who is the wife of the Earl of Essex and haunted by a apparition that takes the form of her husband. (24)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 24

Crab (Daughter)   Witness

A girl who lives outside the west gate of the city of Exeter in the county of Devonshire (now commemorated on the site St Mary's Steps Church in Exeter), the daughter of Zacheus Crab and Mrs. Crab, and the brother of Nathan Crab, a boy who suffers from unexplained falling-fits and foaming at the mouth. She, along with her father, visits Mr. Gibs, a man whom they believe may be able to cure Nathan of his ailments. (47-52)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 47-52

Cruttenden (Wife)   Witness

A woman from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is, along with her husband, the victim of witchcraft. An old woman predicts that Joseph Cruttenden and his wife will have many "sad Calamaties," including that "their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." Their troubles begin one night, when lying in bed with her husband, "Dirt, and Dust, &c. was thrown at them, but they could not tell whence it came." Joseph Cruttenden's wife and himself rise to pray, which abates the "trouble," but when they went to bed again, they found "the same trouble." At night, "a part of one end of their House Fired," and "flashed somewhat like Gunpowder." This fire was seemingly unnatural: as soon as it stopped in one place, "it began in another place, and thence to another," until the entire house was burned down, although the fire itself "flamed not." Some of the household of Joseph Cruttenden claimed to see a black bull in association with the fire. When Joseph Cruttenden and his wife relocate to a house offered to them by Colonel Busbridge, and their goods are transferred into it, the same misfortune before the house, and it was "fireth." Nothing could put out the fire, until the Goods were taken out, which made the fire "cease with little or no help." After this, no one would let Joseph Cruttenden and his wife into their houses, and the couple "abide under a Hut," wherein their goods are seemingly bewitched and "thrown upside down," including "Peuter-dishes, Knives, Brickbrats," which also strike their owners and two ministers who come to pray, although not during the length of prayers. One of these goods rises up and hits a passing thief as well. After these events, one of Joseph Cruttenden's servant girls comes to his wife, and tells her "the former story of the Womans Discourse," leading to the apprehension, examination, and searching of the old Woman (Anonymous 398), who was "formerly suspected to be a Witch." Once four ministers, Mr. Bennett, Mr. Weller, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Gold "kept a Fast," Joseph Cruttenden's wife experiences "not of any trouble." (55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Cruttenden (Wife)   Victim

A woman from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is, along with her husband, the victim of witchcraft. An old woman predicts that Joseph Cruttenden and his wife will have many "sad Calamaties," including that "their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." Their troubles begin one night, when lying in bed with her husband, "Dirt, and Dust, &c. was thrown at them, but they could not tell whence it came." Joseph Cruttenden's wife and himself rise to pray, which abates the "trouble," but when they went to bed again, they found "the same trouble." At night, "a part of one end of their House Fired," and "flashed somewhat like Gunpowder." This fire was seemingly unnatural: as soon as it stopped in one place, "it began in another place, and thence to another," until the entire house was burned down, although the fire itself "flamed not." Some of the household of Joseph Cruttenden claimed to see a black bull in association with the fire. When Joseph Cruttenden and his wife relocate to a house offered to them by Colonel Busbridge, and their goods are transferred into it, the same misfortune before the house, and it was "fireth." Nothing could put out the fire, until the Goods were taken out, which made the fire "cease with little or no help." After this, no one would let Joseph Cruttenden and his wife into their houses, and the couple "abide under a Hut," wherein their goods are seemingly bewitched and "thrown upside down," including "Peuter-dishes, Knives, Brickbrats," which also strike their owners and two ministers who come to pray, although not during the length of prayers. One of these goods rises up and hits a passing thief as well. After these events, one of Joseph Cruttenden's servant girls comes to his wife, and tells her "the former story of the Womans Discourse," leading to the apprehension, examination, and searching of the old Woman (Anonymous 398), who was "formerly suspected to be a Witch." Once four ministers, Mr. Bennett, Mr. Weller, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Gold "kept a Fast," Joseph Cruttenden's wife experiences "not of any trouble." (55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Cunning Man   Cunning-folk

A man from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a cunning man who comes to Robert Toones home to help cure Toones nephew, Thomas Darling. The cunning man sends for the Witch of Stapen Hill, and attempts to coerce a confession by putting her in painful and constricting shoes. (24-25)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 24-25

Cunny (Grandson/Son 2)   Accuser

A young boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person allegedly serves as one of the chief witness against his grandmother, although his testimony is not recorded. (A4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4

Cunny (Grandson/Son 2)   Relative of Witch

A young boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person allegedly serves as one of the chief witness against his grandmother, although his testimony is not recorded. (A4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4

Cunny (Grandson/Son)   Accuser

A ten or twelve year old boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person serves as chief witness against his grandmother. He testifies that while on her way to Braintree Market, Cunny stopped by Harry Finches' house, "to demaund some drink, his wife being busie and a brewing, tolde her she had no leysure to giue her any." Cunny allegedly cursed Mrs. Finch for her poor manners; Mrs. Finch stricken by head and side pain, died within a week (Cunny allegedly confessed to sending her familiar Jill to torment her). He also blamed another boy for stealing a bundle of wood, which he was meant to have collected; an act of theft allegedly punished by laming the boy (who testified against her). The boy finally claimed that, on his grandmother's instructions, took her familiar Jack, to Sir Edward Huddlestone's property, where the familiar summoned a wind which blew his oak tree down, on an otherwise calm day. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3-4

Cunny (Grandson/Son)   Relative of Witch

A ten or twelve year old boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person serves as chief witness against his grandmother. He testifies that while on her way to Braintree Market, Cunny stopped by Harry Finches' house, "to demaund some drink, his wife being busie and a brewing, tolde her she had no leysure to giue her any." Cunny allegedly cursed Mrs. Finch for her poor manners; Mrs. Finch stricken by head and side pain, died within a week (Cunny allegedly confessed to sending her familiar Jill to torment her). He also blamed another boy for stealing a bundle of wood, which he was meant to have collected; an act of theft allegedly punished by laming the boy (who testified against her). The boy finally claimed that, on his grandmother's instructions, took her familiar Jack, to Sir Edward Huddlestone's property, where the familiar summoned a wind which blew his oak tree down, on an otherwise calm day. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3-4

Cunny (Grandson/Son)   Witness

A ten or twelve year old boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person serves as chief witness against his grandmother. He testifies that while on her way to Braintree Market, Cunny stopped by Harry Finches' house, "to demaund some drink, his wife being busie and a brewing, tolde her she had no leysure to giue her any." Cunny allegedly cursed Mrs. Finch for her poor manners; Mrs. Finch stricken by head and side pain, died within a week (Cunny allegedly confessed to sending her familiar Jill to torment her). He also blamed another boy for stealing a bundle of wood, which he was meant to have collected; an act of theft allegedly punished by laming the boy (who testified against her). The boy finally claimed that, on his grandmother's instructions, took her familiar Jack, to Sir Edward Huddlestone's property, where the familiar summoned a wind which blew his oak tree down, on an otherwise calm day. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3-4

Cuthbert Nicholson   Witch-Searcher

A man who travels from village to village to prick women in order to determine whether or not they are witches. (113)

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796, 113

Daniel   Witness

A man from London in the county of Greater London, described as a speaker in George Giffords A Dialogue Concerning Witches, who claims that if a person is haunted with a fayrie, or a spirit: he must learne a charme compounded of some straunge speaches, and the names of God intermingled to combat such forces. (38)

Appears in:
Gifford, George. A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcraftes. London: 1593, 38

Daniel Craven   Witness

A servant from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire who tried to stop Jenet and George Benton from trespassing. Craven is servant on the Bunny Hall farm through which the Bentons allegedly trespass. On one occasion, during a fight over whether or not the Bentons are allowed to pass, George Benton throws a stone at Daniel Craven, causing his upper lip to bleed and two of his teeth to break. (74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Daniel Woodgate   Examiner/Justice

A man from Hawkurst (now the in the borough of Tundridge Wells) in the county of Kent, Woodgate is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Darcy (Child)   Victim

A young person from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and a child of Mistress Darcy. This person is allegedly tormented by Rebecca Jones' familiar, Margaret. The torment presumably ended when Jones recalled Margaret. (36, 37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37-38

David Jones   Victim

A man from Cork, Ireland who is bewitched to death by Florence Newton (185-186)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 185-186

Davie Thurlowe   Victim

A young boy from St. Osyth in county of Essex, the son of Grace Thurlowe and John Thurlowe, and the brother of an infant sister. Davie is "strangely taken and greatly tormented" around February, 1581. His "handes were turned where the backes shoulde bee, and the backe in the place of the palmes." According to his mother, Davie was cured by word magic, or counter-magic administered by Ursley Kempe. Kempe took Davie by the hand tooke "saying, A good childe howe art thou loden and so went thrise out of the doores, and euery time when shee came in shee tooke the childe by the hands, and saide A good childe howe art thou loden." Kempe reassured Thurlow that night that her some would do "well enough," a statement she reiterated the next day, "I warrant thee it shall doe well" when Thurlowe went out of her way to report on Davie's condition. Davie appears to have been successfully healed. (A-Av)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A-Av

Dawson (Aunt)   Suspect

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who was the aunt of James Day, of the Roman Catholic church and therefore a papist. James Day visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and his Aunt Dawson sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) to fetch Father Barnwell. She "frequently Advis'd and Press'd this Boy their Nephew, to come over to their Religion," and she was in on the fabricated story where James Day encounters the Devil. She is arrested with her husband by order of Sir Humphrey Jervise when the fabricated story is revealed. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Dawson (Aunt)   Co-conspirator

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who was the aunt of James Day, of the Roman Catholic church and therefore a papist. James Day visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and his Aunt Dawson sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) to fetch Father Barnwell. She "frequently Advis'd and Press'd this Boy their Nephew, to come over to their Religion," and she was in on the fabricated story where James Day encounters the Devil. She is arrested with her husband by order of Sir Humphrey Jervise when the fabricated story is revealed. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Deborah Pacy   Demoniac

A girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Samuel Pacy and sister to Elizabeth Pacy, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender and Amy Denny at the age of nine; she was too sick to attend their trial. Her father claimed in his deposition that her fits started with lameness, and progressed to extreme pain in her stomach and shrieking at the very moment Samuel Pacy refused to sell Amy Denny herring for the third time. After that time, Deborah was afflicted with a variety of fits, in which she would be unable to breathe, have a soreness in her entire body, be lame on one side, become deaf, dumb or blind, or cough pins and nails. During these fits, she is said to have seen apparitions of Cullender and Denny, to have been tormented by their imps, and to have been threatened by them with torments ten times worse if she told what she'd seen or heard. Denny allegedly made her able to speak the name of Satan or the Devil, but would not permit her to say Lord, Jesus or Christ. While in the care of her aunt Margaret Arnold, Arnold suspected her to be faking and removed all pins from her clothing, but she nevertheless continued vomiting pins; Deborah would claim that bees had forced the pins into her mouth. Arnold also alleged in her deposition that Deborah would see things Arnold could not, catch them and throw them in the fire. (15, 17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 15, 17

Deborah Pacy   Victim

A girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Samuel Pacy and sister to Elizabeth Pacy, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender and Amy Denny at the age of nine; she was too sick to attend their trial. Her father claimed in his deposition that her fits started with lameness, and progressed to extreme pain in her stomach and shrieking at the very moment Samuel Pacy refused to sell Amy Denny herring for the third time. After that time, Deborah was afflicted with a variety of fits, in which she would be unable to breathe, have a soreness in her entire body, be lame on one side, become deaf, dumb or blind, or cough pins and nails. During these fits, she is said to have seen apparitions of Cullender and Denny, to have been tormented by their imps, and to have been threatened by them with torments ten times worse if she told what she'd seen or heard. Denny allegedly made her able to speak the name of Satan or the Devil, but would not permit her to say Lord, Jesus or Christ. While in the care of her aunt Margaret Arnold, Arnold suspected her to be faking and removed all pins from her clothing, but she nevertheless continued vomiting pins; Deborah would claim that bees had forced the pins into her mouth. Arnold also alleged in her deposition that Deborah would see things Arnold could not, catch them and throw them in the fire. (15, 17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 15, 17

Diana Bocking   Relative of Victim

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of Jane Bocking, who gave deposition in court alleging that her daughter had suffered fits at the hands of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to her deposition, Jane was afflicted with swooning fits and the daily vomiting of crooked pins. During her fits, Jane would be found to hold crooked pins clenched in her hands, or, once, a lath-nail. At other times, Jane would talk as if conversing to someone, but take no notice of anyone in the room with her, or complain that Cullender and Denny were standing at the head or foot of her bed. After had recovered from being struck dumb for several days, Diana asked why she had been unable to speak, to which Jane answered "Amy Duny would not suffer her to speak." Diana produced the lath-nail and pins as evidence in court. (35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

Diana Bocking   Accuser

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of Jane Bocking, who gave deposition in court alleging that her daughter had suffered fits at the hands of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to her deposition, Jane was afflicted with swooning fits and the daily vomiting of crooked pins. During her fits, Jane would be found to hold crooked pins clenched in her hands, or, once, a lath-nail. At other times, Jane would talk as if conversing to someone, but take no notice of anyone in the room with her, or complain that Cullender and Denny were standing at the head or foot of her bed. After had recovered from being struck dumb for several days, Diana asked why she had been unable to speak, to which Jane answered "Amy Duny would not suffer her to speak." Diana produced the lath-nail and pins as evidence in court. (35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

Diana Bocking   Witness

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of Jane Bocking, who gave deposition in court alleging that her daughter had suffered fits at the hands of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to her deposition, Jane was afflicted with swooning fits and the daily vomiting of crooked pins. During her fits, Jane would be found to hold crooked pins clenched in her hands, or, once, a lath-nail. At other times, Jane would talk as if conversing to someone, but take no notice of anyone in the room with her, or complain that Cullender and Denny were standing at the head or foot of her bed. After had recovered from being struck dumb for several days, Diana asked why she had been unable to speak, to which Jane answered "Amy Duny would not suffer her to speak." Diana produced the lath-nail and pins as evidence in court. (35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

Diana Crosse   Witch

A witch who allegedly commits arson to Mr. Ezekiel Trible's house, renders him unable to properly smoke his pipe, and makes a boy ill. She also allegedly made Mrs. Dicker's child sick after the latter allegedly called her an old witch when Crosse had come to her begging. Other similar testimonies reaffirm that family members and acquaintances became sick after the appropriate accuser refused Crosse when she begged them. Crosse was pricked twelve times by Mary Cleake but did not draw blood. (250)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 250

Dick Warren   Victim

A man who is allegedly murdered by Alice Huson by means of the evil eye and ill intent. (59)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 59

Doll Bartham   Witch

A woman from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to have numerous familiars, including Gyles, J. , Tom and three unnamed toads. She allegedly had a falling out with Joan Jorden when Jorden refused to give her some of Symon Fox's goods. Bartham first sent three toads to torment Jorden and keep her from sleeping, but the first was thrown out the window, and the next two burnt in the fire. She then sent her cat, Gyles, to Jorden. He made strange noises in the night, would pin her down and kiss her, and talked often both to her and to anyone who would hear him. Gyles told the onlookers that he came for Jorden's life, to have belonged to Doll Barthram for as long as 20 years, and that Barthram gave him her life and her soul. He also said that he, Tom and J. hanged Caver's wife at Barthram's command. Barthram also ordered Gyles to kill a child in its mother's womb, kill a man by entering him and tearing his heart to pieces, tear John Sheereman to pieces, and kill Symon Fox, plus his wife, children and cattle. Bartham also caused Jorden to have fits in which a lump arose and moved about her body and she struggled so hard she broke a chair and needed six men to restrain her. During one of her fits, Jordan cried out " Barthram, thou hast killed mee" before numerous witnesses. Barthram was apprehended and tried on charges of witchcraft. She was executed on July 12, 1599. (92-98)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-98

Doll Bilby   Witch

A woman implicated in the fits suffered by demoniac Faith Corbet. It is unclear when and why Corbet began accusing Bilby of tormenting her-- she is first mentioned in relation to events in 1663. Alice Huson implicates Bilby during her confession. (54, 56-57, 58)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54, 56-57, 58

Doll Freeman   Witch

A woman from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a kinswoman of the Alderman of Nottingham, whom William Sommers accuses of being a witch. The Alderman of Nottingham is offended by this allegation and makes a counter-accusation against Sommers, which results in Sommers being imprisoned for witchcraft himself. John Darrell, during his trial, claimed that Sommers accused Freeman out of malice. (Image 6)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 6

Dorcas Coleman   Victim

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon and wife of a local mariner named John Coleman. Coleman allegedly begins suffering from tormenting Pains, "by pricking in her Arms, Stomach, and Heart," in August 1680, and sees the form of Susanna Edwards in her room "at the time of her tormenting Pains." Coleman had her neighbor, Thomas Bremincom, request a local physician, Doctor Beare, to come examine her, to try to get some remedy for her chronic pain. However, "upon view of her Body he did say, that it was past his skill to ease her of her said Pains; for he told her that she was Bewitch'd." Coleman also allegedly hears Edwards confess that she had bewitched [Grace Barnes], and done her some bodily harm by bewitching of her," a crime for which she fell on her knees a begged that Coleman pray for her. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 1-2

Dorothy Durent   Relative of Victim

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of William and Elizabeth Durent, and a neighbor of Amy Denny. Dorothy gave deposition in court that Denny had bewitched both of her children and that Elizabeth had died as a result. She alleged that they had argued when Dorothy asked Denny to watch William and returned to find that Denny had suckled him against her express wishes, and that William had become sick with fits that same evening. William recovered after Dorothy consulted with Dr. Jacob, a known unwitcher, and burned a toad that fell out of William's blanket when Dorothy followed Dr. Jacob's directions. Elizabeth became sick soon after with similar fits, however. Dorothy claimed that she had returned from the apothecary one day to find Denny at her home on the excuse of giving Elizabeth some water and, when Dorothy ejected her from the house, prophesied that Elizabeth would not live long. Two days later, Elizabeth died. Dorothy also claimed that after Elizabeth's death, she suffered a lameness in her legs, and was seen to be on crutches at the trial. After the indictment, Dorothy was allegedly restored the use of her legs. (5-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-14

Dorothy Durent   Accuser

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of William and Elizabeth Durent, and a neighbor of Amy Denny. Dorothy gave deposition in court that Denny had bewitched both of her children and that Elizabeth had died as a result. She alleged that they had argued when Dorothy asked Denny to watch William and returned to find that Denny had suckled him against her express wishes, and that William had become sick with fits that same evening. William recovered after Dorothy consulted with Dr. Jacob, a known unwitcher, and burned a toad that fell out of William's blanket when Dorothy followed Dr. Jacob's directions. Elizabeth became sick soon after with similar fits, however. Dorothy claimed that she had returned from the apothecary one day to find Denny at her home on the excuse of giving Elizabeth some water and, when Dorothy ejected her from the house, prophesied that Elizabeth would not live long. Two days later, Elizabeth died. Dorothy also claimed that after Elizabeth's death, she suffered a lameness in her legs, and was seen to be on crutches at the trial. After the indictment, Dorothy was allegedly restored the use of her legs. (5-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-14

Dorothy Durent   Witness

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of William and Elizabeth Durent, and a neighbor of Amy Denny. Dorothy gave deposition in court that Denny had bewitched both of her children and that Elizabeth had died as a result. She alleged that they had argued when Dorothy asked Denny to watch William and returned to find that Denny had suckled him against her express wishes, and that William had become sick with fits that same evening. William recovered after Dorothy consulted with Dr. Jacob, a known unwitcher, and burned a toad that fell out of William's blanket when Dorothy followed Dr. Jacob's directions. Elizabeth became sick soon after with similar fits, however. Dorothy claimed that she had returned from the apothecary one day to find Denny at her home on the excuse of giving Elizabeth some water and, when Dorothy ejected her from the house, prophesied that Elizabeth would not live long. Two days later, Elizabeth died. Dorothy also claimed that after Elizabeth's death, she suffered a lameness in her legs, and was seen to be on crutches at the trial. After the indictment, Dorothy was allegedly restored the use of her legs. (5-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-14

Dorothy Fairfax   Witness

Mother of the bewitched Fairfax children and wife of Edward Fairfax (50)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 50

Dorothy Fairfax   Accuser

Mother of the bewitched Fairfax children and wife of Edward Fairfax (50)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 50

Dorothy Magicke   Witch

A woman from the county of Middlesex who is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Thomas Poole and Thomazine Heathe. Magicke pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. She is sentenced to a minimum of four years in prison and the pillory. (218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 218

Dorothy Marsh   Witch

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one of seven witches living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. She is described as being "young and handsome," and falsely accepts confessions for a monetary fee and after enforcing several articles on confessors. She would also possibly provide "distraction" to clients, alone or alongside other women living with her, when in rooms alone with the client. She and the women living with her were involved in an anti-Catholic con, and possibly prostitution. (1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Dorothy Rodes   Witness

A widow from Boiling, Yorkshire (now part of Bradford in West Yorkshire), who testifies against Mary Sykes claiming that her daughter was tormented by Mary Sykes. She claims that she laid in bed with her daugher, Sara Rodes, on Sunday evening when, after being aslee for only a short while, Sara begans "quakeing and holding her hands together." When asked what she was doing, Dorothy Rodes explains, Sara allegedly said "A, mother, Sikcs wife came in att a hole att the bedd feete, and upon the bedd, and tooke me by the throate, and wold have put her fingers in my mowtli, and wold needes clioake me." Dorothy says that when she asked her daugther why she did not speak then, her daughter replied that she could not, or Mary Sykes was holding her throard and "tooke her left syde," rendering her unable to speak. (28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Dorothy Sawdie   Witness

A woman of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be the mother of alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie, who watched over her son during his fits and finally pressed him into confessing that he had made a compact with the Devil. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 1

Dorothy Sawdie   Relative of Victim

A woman of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be the mother of alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie, who watched over her son during his fits and finally pressed him into confessing that he had made a compact with the Devil. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 1

Dorothy Swinow   Witch

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Colonel Swinow. Dorothy Swinow was accused and gaoled for bewitching Mary Moore's children from her first marriage, Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp, and bewitching Moore's infant daughter from her second marriage, Sibilia Moore, to death. Swinow was accused initially by Margaret, who was seen to write "Jo Hu. Do. Swo. have beene the death of one deare friend, consume another, and torment mee." Mary Moore's niece claimed that Swinow had visited the children when Moore was away and had spoken harshly of Moore to them. Swinow was also accused by John Hutton, the man also implicated in Margaret's writing, when Hutton told Moore "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." Hutton also accused her of causing the death of Lady Margery Hambleton. Margaret later accused her of causing James Fauset's fits as well. Swinow was apprehended and gaoled not long after; her husband the Colonel died around the same time. She was released on bail, then reapprehended to await trial in the Common Gaol at Morpeth. (5-6)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 5-6

Dorothy Waters   Witch

A woman from Clacton in the county of Essex and wife of Robert Waters. Dorothy Waters is accused of having, employing, and feeding "an evil spirit in the form of a dun coloured mouse. She is found guilty of this charge and condemned to die as a witch, at Chemlsford in 1645, but is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." She appears again as one of the prisoners at the Colchester gaol, in August 11, 1647, having been committed for felony-to be kept in gaol until she can be "lawfully delivered." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3

Dr. Bates   Physician

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Goddard and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death. (6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

Dr. Bourn   Cunning-folk

A man from Yowell in the county of Surrey, known to be a doctor and a cunning-person, whom the parents of Mary Farmer allegedly consulted on the matter of her bewitchment. He is said to have confirmed that Mary was "under an ill tongue" and advised Mr. and Mrs. Farmer to save Mary's urine, close it in a bottle and bury it in the earth, then burn Mary's clothes, and that this would draw out the witch who had afflicted her. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1

Dr. Bourn   Physician

A man from Yowell in the county of Surrey, known to be a doctor and a cunning-person, whom the parents of Mary Farmer allegedly consulted on the matter of her bewitchment. He is said to have confirmed that Mary was "under an ill tongue" and advised Mr. and Mrs. Farmer to save Mary's urine, close it in a bottle and bury it in the earth, then burn Mary's clothes, and that this would draw out the witch who had afflicted her. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1

Dr. Brisbane   Witness

A man who observes Christian Shaw vomit "coal-finders" the size of chesnuts. (4)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 4

Dr. Brisbane   Un-witcher

A man who observes Christian Shaw vomit "coal-finders" the size of chesnuts. (4)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 4

Dr. Brisbane   Physician

A man who observes Christian Shaw vomit "coal-finders" the size of chesnuts. (4)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 4

Dr. Browne   Physician

A man who gives Grace Matthew "physical directions" (medical advice) to help her husband who has been ill for the past three years and whom she believes has been bewitched. (149-150)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 149-150

Dr. Burcot   Physician

A famous physician and alchemist in England who infamously sold purgatives. Likely Queen Elizabeth's German physician, Burchard Kranich, who was often referred to by contemporaries as Dr. Burcot. The same Burcot who also appears in Henry Chettle's Kind Harts Dream. Burcot allegedly 'bought' a familiar spirit from Thomas Hilles (aka Feats), with which he "thought to have wrought miracles, or rather to have gained good store of money." The combination of his purgatives and his move into magics make one think he may have practiced exorcisms. (107)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 107

Dr. Burges   Physician

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is called upon as a physician by Mrs. Pigeon to treat her husband, Mr. Pigeon, after she drugs him and he "became altogether senselesse, feeble and irrationall, so that she feared he would never returne to his reason againe." He vomits Mr. Pigeon twice, bringing him close to death, but Mr. Pigeon eventually recovers. (5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 5

Dr. Burnet   Physician

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is consulted as a physician in secret by Andrew Goodwin, Mr. Goodwin's son. Andrew Goodwin brings the water of an ailing apprentice, Roger Crey, to Dr. Burnet after his father refuses to allow a doctor to see Roger Crey instead of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. Roger Crey's condigion is continually declining, but Dr. Burnet "at the first sight of the water he tells him, the party was a dead man, past all recovery; and that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well." (14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

Dr. Casaubon   Accuser

A Doctor who, in his book, accuses Dr. Dees of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time." (8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. Casaubon   Physician

A Doctor who, in his book, accuses Dr. Dees of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time." (8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. Casaubon   Author

A Doctor who, in his book, accuses Dr. Dees of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time." (8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. Chew   Physician

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who Richard Dugdale visits with his father, Thomas Dugdale, and his uncle. Dr. Chew administers "physicks" to Richard Dugdale for his violent fits. When no effect is had, Richard Dugdale seeks out another doctor, Dr. Crabtree, and eventually a minister, Mr. Jolly. However, Richard Dugdale then returns to Dr. Chew, "And says likewise that he had a Fit on the 24th of March, at Evening, and on the 25th of March, in the Morning, he took Physick from Dr. Chew, and says, that the Physick worked well with him, and since that time, he says, he never had any fit: But says that the strange things that befel him, occasions him to believe that the Disease was not ordinary. " (63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 63

Dr. Clether   Physician

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Clether. Dr. Clether, with Mrs. Clether, was present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Mary Moore begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (15-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15-16

Dr. Clether   Witness

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Clether. Dr. Clether, with Mrs. Clether, was present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Mary Moore begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (15-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15-16

Dr. Colledon   Physician

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Mary Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Bates, Dr. Goddard and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death. (6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

Dr. Corbet   Physician

A man from Hull in the county of York, described as a physician who Henry Corbet hired in 1660 to help treat his daughter Faith's fits. Dr. York would appear again on April 24, 1663, when he consulted with Drs. Taylor and Whitty about Faith's health and then spoke with the girl themselves. (54, 56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54, 56

Dr. Crabtree   Physician

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who treats Richard Dugdale's fits as his doctor for some time. Dr. Crabtree is sought out by Richard Dugdale's father, but after his attentions, Richard Dugdale's fits become more violent. Dr. Crabtree concludes that, "if the Spirit in Richard Dugdale was a Water-Spirit, there was no cure for it." (59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

Dr. Edward Jorden   Witness

A man from High Halden in the county of Kent, described as an doctor and chemist. Dr. Jorden is most famously known for having been chief doctor in the cases of Mary Glover and Anne Gunter, two demoniacs. In both cases, Dr. Jorden refuted witchcraft as being the cause of their symptoms. During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, he came forward with another doctor, Dr. Argent, despite not having been asked to appear by the court. This was likely devised by Bishop Bancroft, a man who believed Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. Dr. Jorden testified during the trial, attempting to provide evidence with Dr. Argent that Glover's "ailment was not supernatural." Dr. Jorden claimed that the girl was likely afflicted with "passio hysterica." However, when pressed by the judge, Jorden "would not confirm that the disease could be cured," and further declined to treat the girl. He admitted during the trial that he did not thing Mary Glover was counterfeiting, prompting the judge, Lord Anderson to reply, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall; for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." Elizabeth Jorden was found guilty of witchcraft despite his attempt to intervene. This prompted Dr. Jorden to write his first text, "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." (1603) The text was written to show how "diuers strange actions and passions of the body of a man, which in the common opinion, are imputed to the Diuell, haue their true naturall causes, and do accompanie this disease." This text spurred a huge controversy, prompting fellows from both the College of Physicians such as Dr. Stephen Bradwell, and students of divinity, such as John Swan, to write their own texts, accusing Dr. Jorden of being a fearful scholar, unwilling to identify Mary Glover in his works, and dividing the opinion of physicians with "misconceipts." Dr. Bradwell further explains that Dr. Jorden "found, that neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." Yet, the first text he published, "A Briefe Discourse," was "the first book by an English physician which reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine." Because of this, it was a notable text, that was responsible for dividing opinions at the College in London. Historically, the text has also been noted for its "transfer of the seat of all hysterical manifestations from the uterus to the brain," which was a "major turning point in the history of hysteria." Despite the trying of Elizabeth Jackson as a witch, and the response to his first published text, Dr. Jorden "played a major part in events that began the decline of witchcraft." The King came to value his opinion; the impression that Dr. Jorden left claiming that "much apparent witchcraft and possession was caused by hysteria," was strong. King James would call upon Dr. Jorden in 1605, when a young woman in Berkshire named Anne Gunter claimed to be bewitched. Her symptoms were similar to those of Mary Glover, save that Anne Gunter was thought to vomit pins - a classical sign of possession. Dr. Jorden immediately suspected that Gunter was conterfeit, giving her "neutral potions" that he claimed were powerful medicine. When Gunter reported that these "greatly relieved her symptoms," Dr. Jorden was more convinced. He next tested the woman using a test that was performed on Mary Glover: reciting the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed. Anne Gunter reacted with "expected convulsions," but only when the prayers were spoken in English, not Latin. This confirmed Anne Gunter's counterfeit, as the Devil was believed to be "an expert Latinist," resulting in Anne Gunter's confession. Dr. Jorden would publish a second text in his lifetime, "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes, and Minerall Waters" (1631). "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes" was a much more successful book than the former, going through five editions in the seventeenth century. Dr. Jorden was in fact a Fellow at the College of Physicians at the time of the publishing of both his texts, although he spent much of his practice in Bath. During his work, he gained the confidence of King James, and was allowed the treat the Queen on her visits to Bath, although he was never a Royal Physician. The physician married into the gentry, and wed his daughter to a mayor of Bath. (12-13)

Appears in:
Jorden, Edward. A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters. London: 1669, 12-13

Dr. Edward Jorden   Physician

A man from High Halden in the county of Kent, described as an doctor and chemist. Dr. Jorden is most famously known for having been chief doctor in the cases of Mary Glover and Anne Gunter, two demoniacs. In both cases, Dr. Jorden refuted witchcraft as being the cause of their symptoms. During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, he came forward with another doctor, Dr. Argent, despite not having been asked to appear by the court. This was likely devised by Bishop Bancroft, a man who believed Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. Dr. Jorden testified during the trial, attempting to provide evidence with Dr. Argent that Glover's "ailment was not supernatural." Dr. Jorden claimed that the girl was likely afflicted with "passio hysterica." However, when pressed by the judge, Jorden "would not confirm that the disease could be cured," and further declined to treat the girl. He admitted during the trial that he did not thing Mary Glover was counterfeiting, prompting the judge, Lord Anderson to reply, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall; for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." Elizabeth Jorden was found guilty of witchcraft despite his attempt to intervene. This prompted Dr. Jorden to write his first text, "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." (1603) The text was written to show how "diuers strange actions and passions of the body of a man, which in the common opinion, are imputed to the Diuell, haue their true naturall causes, and do accompanie this disease." This text spurred a huge controversy, prompting fellows from both the College of Physicians such as Dr. Stephen Bradwell, and students of divinity, such as John Swan, to write their own texts, accusing Dr. Jorden of being a fearful scholar, unwilling to identify Mary Glover in his works, and dividing the opinion of physicians with "misconceipts." Dr. Bradwell further explains that Dr. Jorden "found, that neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." Yet, the first text he published, "A Briefe Discourse," was "the first book by an English physician which reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine." Because of this, it was a notable text, that was responsible for dividing opinions at the College in London. Historically, the text has also been noted for its "transfer of the seat of all hysterical manifestations from the uterus to the brain," which was a "major turning point in the history of hysteria." Despite the trying of Elizabeth Jackson as a witch, and the response to his first published text, Dr. Jorden "played a major part in events that began the decline of witchcraft." The King came to value his opinion; the impression that Dr. Jorden left claiming that "much apparent witchcraft and possession was caused by hysteria," was strong. King James would call upon Dr. Jorden in 1605, when a young woman in Berkshire named Anne Gunter claimed to be bewitched. Her symptoms were similar to those of Mary Glover, save that Anne Gunter was thought to vomit pins - a classical sign of possession. Dr. Jorden immediately suspected that Gunter was conterfeit, giving her "neutral potions" that he claimed were powerful medicine. When Gunter reported that these "greatly relieved her symptoms," Dr. Jorden was more convinced. He next tested the woman using a test that was performed on Mary Glover: reciting the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed. Anne Gunter reacted with "expected convulsions," but only when the prayers were spoken in English, not Latin. This confirmed Anne Gunter's counterfeit, as the Devil was believed to be "an expert Latinist," resulting in Anne Gunter's confession. Dr. Jorden would publish a second text in his lifetime, "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes, and Minerall Waters" (1631). "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes" was a much more successful book than the former, going through five editions in the seventeenth century. Dr. Jorden was in fact a Fellow at the College of Physicians at the time of the publishing of both his texts, although he spent much of his practice in Bath. During his work, he gained the confidence of King James, and was allowed the treat the Queen on her visits to Bath, although he was never a Royal Physician. The physician married into the gentry, and wed his daughter to a mayor of Bath. (12-13)

Appears in:
Jorden, Edward. A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters. London: 1669, 12-13

Dr. Edward Jorden   Author

A man from High Halden in the county of Kent, described as an doctor and chemist. Dr. Jorden is most famously known for having been chief doctor in the cases of Mary Glover and Anne Gunter, two demoniacs. In both cases, Dr. Jorden refuted witchcraft as being the cause of their symptoms. During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, he came forward with another doctor, Dr. Argent, despite not having been asked to appear by the court. This was likely devised by Bishop Bancroft, a man who believed Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. Dr. Jorden testified during the trial, attempting to provide evidence with Dr. Argent that Glover's "ailment was not supernatural." Dr. Jorden claimed that the girl was likely afflicted with "passio hysterica." However, when pressed by the judge, Jorden "would not confirm that the disease could be cured," and further declined to treat the girl. He admitted during the trial that he did not thing Mary Glover was counterfeiting, prompting the judge, Lord Anderson to reply, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall; for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." Elizabeth Jorden was found guilty of witchcraft despite his attempt to intervene. This prompted Dr. Jorden to write his first text, "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." (1603) The text was written to show how "diuers strange actions and passions of the body of a man, which in the common opinion, are imputed to the Diuell, haue their true naturall causes, and do accompanie this disease." This text spurred a huge controversy, prompting fellows from both the College of Physicians such as Dr. Stephen Bradwell, and students of divinity, such as John Swan, to write their own texts, accusing Dr. Jorden of being a fearful scholar, unwilling to identify Mary Glover in his works, and dividing the opinion of physicians with "misconceipts." Dr. Bradwell further explains that Dr. Jorden "found, that neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." Yet, the first text he published, "A Briefe Discourse," was "the first book by an English physician which reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine." Because of this, it was a notable text, that was responsible for dividing opinions at the College in London. Historically, the text has also been noted for its "transfer of the seat of all hysterical manifestations from the uterus to the brain," which was a "major turning point in the history of hysteria." Despite the trying of Elizabeth Jackson as a witch, and the response to his first published text, Dr. Jorden "played a major part in events that began the decline of witchcraft." The King came to value his opinion; the impression that Dr. Jorden left claiming that "much apparent witchcraft and possession was caused by hysteria," was strong. King James would call upon Dr. Jorden in 1605, when a young woman in Berkshire named Anne Gunter claimed to be bewitched. Her symptoms were similar to those of Mary Glover, save that Anne Gunter was thought to vomit pins - a classical sign of possession. Dr. Jorden immediately suspected that Gunter was conterfeit, giving her "neutral potions" that he claimed were powerful medicine. When Gunter reported that these "greatly relieved her symptoms," Dr. Jorden was more convinced. He next tested the woman using a test that was performed on Mary Glover: reciting the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed. Anne Gunter reacted with "expected convulsions," but only when the prayers were spoken in English, not Latin. This confirmed Anne Gunter's counterfeit, as the Devil was believed to be "an expert Latinist," resulting in Anne Gunter's confession. Dr. Jorden would publish a second text in his lifetime, "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes, and Minerall Waters" (1631). "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes" was a much more successful book than the former, going through five editions in the seventeenth century. Dr. Jorden was in fact a Fellow at the College of Physicians at the time of the publishing of both his texts, although he spent much of his practice in Bath. During his work, he gained the confidence of King James, and was allowed the treat the Queen on her visits to Bath, although he was never a Royal Physician. The physician married into the gentry, and wed his daughter to a mayor of Bath. (12-13)

Appears in:
Jorden, Edward. A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters. London: 1669, 12-13

Dr. Faber   Physician

A doctor from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." (150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Dr. Feavor   Witness

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a Doctor of Physick, whom Samuel Pacy consulted for advice when his daughter Deborah Pacy began having strange fits. Dr. Feavor gave deposition in court stating that he had examined Deborah and observed her in her fits, but could not diagnose their cause. (20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 20

Dr. Feavor   Physician

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a Doctor of Physick, whom Samuel Pacy consulted for advice when his daughter Deborah Pacy began having strange fits. Dr. Feavor gave deposition in court stating that he had examined Deborah and observed her in her fits, but could not diagnose their cause. (20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 20

Dr. Fian / John Cunningham   Magician

Doctor Fian is a Socerer and master of the School at Saltpans in the town of Tranent in the county of East Lothian, in the country of Scotland who is accused of charming and tortured for a confession. (18)

Appears in:
Carmichael, James. News from Scotland, Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of Doctor Fian a Notable Sorcerer. London: 1592, 18

Dr. Fox   Physician

A London physician who brought Elizabeth Jennings to London in 1622 to administer treatment for her fits and convulsions. Dr. Fox in one of at least two physicians who treated Jennings. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Dr. Frier Sebastian Michell   Witness

A man from Marseille, France, described as a doctor of divinity who observes Magdalen of the Marish's fits over a period of five weeks. (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Life and Death of Lewis Gaufredy. London: 1612, 19

Dr. Frier Sebastian Michell   Physician

A man from Marseille, France, described as a doctor of divinity who observes Magdalen of the Marish's fits over a period of five weeks. (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Life and Death of Lewis Gaufredy. London: 1612, 19

Dr. Genison   Witness

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Genison. Dr. Genison witnessed Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland, which was met with denial and the Counsellor's refusal to meddle in the matter. She heard Margaret Muschamp claim that Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and justices against Moore, and her statement of determination to take up the matter with the judge again the next day. Dr. Genison invited Moore and her children to his house, which was next door to the Judge's chamber to wait for another appointment. He, along with Mrs. Genison, was also present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Moore again begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-16

Dr. Genison   Physician

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Genison. Dr. Genison witnessed Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland, which was met with denial and the Counsellor's refusal to meddle in the matter. She heard Margaret Muschamp claim that Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and justices against Moore, and her statement of determination to take up the matter with the judge again the next day. Dr. Genison invited Moore and her children to his house, which was next door to the Judge's chamber to wait for another appointment. He, along with Mrs. Genison, was also present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Moore again begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-16

Dr. George Beare   Physician

A Doctor whom Dorcas Coleman appeals to for a remedy for her physical pains. Beare cannot heal Coleman and informs her that she has been bewitched. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 2

Dr. George Beare   Witness

A Doctor whom Dorcas Coleman appeals to for a remedy for her physical pains. Beare cannot heal Coleman and informs her that she has been bewitched. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 2

Dr. Goddard   Physician

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Bates and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death. (6-7,10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7,10-11

Dr. Gresham   Witch

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as the doctor of Ann Ashby. Dr. Gresham is imprisoned and not allowed to speak with anyone. (4-5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4-5

Dr. Gresham   Physician

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as the doctor of Ann Ashby. Dr. Gresham is imprisoned and not allowed to speak with anyone. (4-5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4-5

Dr. Ha[w]ks   Cunning-folk

A man from Spitalfields in the borough of Greater London, known to be a doctor, to whom Mr. Chamblet came for advice on un-witching his wife Mrs. Chamblet after the death of their daughter Elizabeth; Dr. Ha[w]ks advises that Mr. Chamblet boil a quart of Mrs. Chamblet's urine with parings from her nails and some of her hair. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

Dr. Ha[w]ks   Physician

A man from Spitalfields in the borough of Greater London, known to be a doctor, to whom Mr. Chamblet came for advice on un-witching his wife Mrs. Chamblet after the death of their daughter Elizabeth; Dr. Ha[w]ks advises that Mr. Chamblet boil a quart of Mrs. Chamblet's urine with parings from her nails and some of her hair. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

Dr. Heron   Physician

A professor of Physic and Surgery, presumably from Rochester in the county of Kent, who allegedly taught Mother Bungy about human anatomy and surgery (341-342)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 341-342

Dr. Hooker   Physician

A doctor from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." (150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Dr. Jacob   Cunning-folk

A man from Yarmouth in the County of Suffolk, known to be an unwitcher or cunning-person, whom Dorothy Durent alleged that she had consulted in her deposition. She claimed that she went to him after her infant son William developed fits due to his reputation for helping bewitched children. According to Durent's deposition, he had advised her to "hang up the Childs Blanket in the Chimney corner all day, and at night when she put the Child to Bed, to put it into the said blanket, and if she found any thing in it, she should not be afraid, but to throw it into the Fire." When she did so, a great toad fell out of William's blanket, which made a horrible noise and flashed like gunpowder when held in the fire before disappearing. (8-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 8-10

Dr. Jacob   Un-witcher

A man from Yarmouth in the County of Suffolk, known to be an unwitcher or cunning-person, whom Dorothy Durent alleged that she had consulted in her deposition. She claimed that she went to him after her infant son William developed fits due to his reputation for helping bewitched children. According to Durent's deposition, he had advised her to "hang up the Childs Blanket in the Chimney corner all day, and at night when she put the Child to Bed, to put it into the said blanket, and if she found any thing in it, she should not be afraid, but to throw it into the Fire." When she did so, a great toad fell out of William's blanket, which made a horrible noise and flashed like gunpowder when held in the fire before disappearing. (8-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 8-10

Dr. John Dee   Astrologer

A Doctor who is accused by Dr. Casaubon of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time." (8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. John Dee   Magician

A Doctor who is accused by Dr. Casaubon of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time." (8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. John Dee   Celebrity

A Doctor who is accused by Dr. Casaubon of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time." (8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. John Skinner   Author

A man from Westram in the county of Kent, who is a "Student of Physick and Astrology." He writes about his "marvelous cures" accomplished in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Dr. Skinner attends to Margaret Gurr who is "afflicted with Devils," which "entred into her, and spake in her, and tempted her to Kill her self;" as well as flown through the air by these devils and a witch. Dr. Skinner allegedly "cast out the Devils and Witch," essentially exorcising the demons from Margaret Gurr and curing her "of the scurvy and gout," she suffered from, within "the compass of twelve days, in which time with a Physical, Natural, and other means used, [she] was perfectly restored to [her] former health." The devils and witch never "attempted to meddle with [her] since." As well, as a result of Dr. Skinner's administrations, Margaret Gurr was granted the miracle of being able to read the Bible, "which before [she] could not." Dr. Skinner is also responsible for curing a young male servant of Henry Chowning, in Kent. The boy was allegedly visited by a spirit in the form of a greyhound, and came home "in a great fright" and "amazed." When the boy turns ill, he "grew worse and worse," and his speech began to fail, causing people around him to "resolve to look out for help, for the fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," as he suffered from an "extream melancholy." It was believed that the boy was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." It was upon this decision to seek help that Henry Chowning called upon Dr. Skinner, "hearing of the many Cures I have done," and Dr. Skinner "examined the business and well consider'd of it." He decides the boy is "possest with the Devil," as his eyes were fixed, and the boy confesses to Dr. Skinner "that he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea." The boy also "seemed to ammend while he was in the room with" Dr. Skinner, and Dr. Skinner fells he "understood what the means must be that must relieve him, and gave order for the putting up of Medicines." These are administered quickly, and the doctor tells the boy's mother to visit him in a week. When she does, she tells him that the boy was "much ammended, to the admiration of many that heard how it was." Dr. Skinner provides more medicine for the boy when the boy complains of "a pain in his belly," and the boy is made well in "18 days time," so that "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." This is the second dispossession Dr. Skinner successfully treated with medicine. Dr. Skinner also treats Susan Woldredge in Sussex, who suffered from "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Her father, Mr. Woldredge seeks out Dr. Skinner after several other doctors failed to help her, and upon finding Dr. Skinner, he is advised "she would be well and [to] go home." Mr. Woldredge did so, and at first, his daughter was "in extream misery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously "on a sudden it began to mend." Her father visits the doctor again, and the doctor "send her a purge with some other matter," and she was made "perfectly well and continued every since." Her friends reward Dr. Skinner. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of a woman in West Groustead in Sussex, who suffered from an "Evil in her Throat." She encounters Dr. Skinner at a fair, and although he had "nought to give her," he bids her to come over. She promises to, and fails to show. Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she never visited him, and finds that from the moment she met Dr. Skinner "she found her self begin to mend," and was cured. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of Goody Halle in Sevenoaks, Kent, who suffered from "the most lamentable pain in her head," which was so severe, she could not sleep. Several doctors fail to treat her, yet when she visited Dr. Skinner, "she was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," by the use of medicines Dr. Skinner provided. She remained afterward "in vivide and perfect health." (Cover)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, Cover

Dr. John Skinner   Exorcist

A man from Westram in the county of Kent, who is a "Student of Physick and Astrology." He writes about his "marvelous cures" accomplished in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Dr. Skinner attends to Margaret Gurr who is "afflicted with Devils," which "entred into her, and spake in her, and tempted her to Kill her self;" as well as flown through the air by these devils and a witch. Dr. Skinner allegedly "cast out the Devils and Witch," essentially exorcising the demons from Margaret Gurr and curing her "of the scurvy and gout," she suffered from, within "the compass of twelve days, in which time with a Physical, Natural, and other means used, [she] was perfectly restored to [her] former health." The devils and witch never "attempted to meddle with [her] since." As well, as a result of Dr. Skinner's administrations, Margaret Gurr was granted the miracle of being able to read the Bible, "which before [she] could not." Dr. Skinner is also responsible for curing a young male servant of Henry Chowning, in Kent. The boy was allegedly visited by a spirit in the form of a greyhound, and came home "in a great fright" and "amazed." When the boy turns ill, he "grew worse and worse," and his speech began to fail, causing people around him to "resolve to look out for help, for the fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," as he suffered from an "extream melancholy." It was believed that the boy was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." It was upon this decision to seek help that Henry Chowning called upon Dr. Skinner, "hearing of the many Cures I have done," and Dr. Skinner "examined the business and well consider'd of it." He decides the boy is "possest with the Devil," as his eyes were fixed, and the boy confesses to Dr. Skinner "that he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea." The boy also "seemed to ammend while he was in the room with" Dr. Skinner, and Dr. Skinner fells he "understood what the means must be that must relieve him, and gave order for the putting up of Medicines." These are administered quickly, and the doctor tells the boy's mother to visit him in a week. When she does, she tells him that the boy was "much ammended, to the admiration of many that heard how it was." Dr. Skinner provides more medicine for the boy when the boy complains of "a pain in his belly," and the boy is made well in "18 days time," so that "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." This is the second dispossession Dr. Skinner successfully treated with medicine. Dr. Skinner also treats Susan Woldredge in Sussex, who suffered from "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Her father, Mr. Woldredge seeks out Dr. Skinner after several other doctors failed to help her, and upon finding Dr. Skinner, he is advised "she would be well and [to] go home." Mr. Woldredge did so, and at first, his daughter was "in extream misery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously "on a sudden it began to mend." Her father visits the doctor again, and the doctor "send her a purge with some other matter," and she was made "perfectly well and continued every since." Her friends reward Dr. Skinner. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of a woman in West Groustead in Sussex, who suffered from an "Evil in her Throat." She encounters Dr. Skinner at a fair, and although he had "nought to give her," he bids her to come over. She promises to, and fails to show. Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she never visited him, and finds that from the moment she met Dr. Skinner "she found her self begin to mend," and was cured. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of Goody Halle in Sevenoaks, Kent, who suffered from "the most lamentable pain in her head," which was so severe, she could not sleep. Several doctors fail to treat her, yet when she visited Dr. Skinner, "she was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," by the use of medicines Dr. Skinner provided. She remained afterward "in vivide and perfect health." (Cover)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, Cover

Dr. John Skinner   Physician

A man from Westram in the county of Kent, who is a "Student of Physick and Astrology." He writes about his "marvelous cures" accomplished in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Dr. Skinner attends to Margaret Gurr who is "afflicted with Devils," which "entred into her, and spake in her, and tempted her to Kill her self;" as well as flown through the air by these devils and a witch. Dr. Skinner allegedly "cast out the Devils and Witch," essentially exorcising the demons from Margaret Gurr and curing her "of the scurvy and gout," she suffered from, within "the compass of twelve days, in which time with a Physical, Natural, and other means used, [she] was perfectly restored to [her] former health." The devils and witch never "attempted to meddle with [her] since." As well, as a result of Dr. Skinner's administrations, Margaret Gurr was granted the miracle of being able to read the Bible, "which before [she] could not." Dr. Skinner is also responsible for curing a young male servant of Henry Chowning, in Kent. The boy was allegedly visited by a spirit in the form of a greyhound, and came home "in a great fright" and "amazed." When the boy turns ill, he "grew worse and worse," and his speech began to fail, causing people around him to "resolve to look out for help, for the fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," as he suffered from an "extream melancholy." It was believed that the boy was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." It was upon this decision to seek help that Henry Chowning called upon Dr. Skinner, "hearing of the many Cures I have done," and Dr. Skinner "examined the business and well consider'd of it." He decides the boy is "possest with the Devil," as his eyes were fixed, and the boy confesses to Dr. Skinner "that he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea." The boy also "seemed to ammend while he was in the room with" Dr. Skinner, and Dr. Skinner fells he "understood what the means must be that must relieve him, and gave order for the putting up of Medicines." These are administered quickly, and the doctor tells the boy's mother to visit him in a week. When she does, she tells him that the boy was "much ammended, to the admiration of many that heard how it was." Dr. Skinner provides more medicine for the boy when the boy complains of "a pain in his belly," and the boy is made well in "18 days time," so that "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." This is the second dispossession Dr. Skinner successfully treated with medicine. Dr. Skinner also treats Susan Woldredge in Sussex, who suffered from "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Her father, Mr. Woldredge seeks out Dr. Skinner after several other doctors failed to help her, and upon finding Dr. Skinner, he is advised "she would be well and [to] go home." Mr. Woldredge did so, and at first, his daughter was "in extream misery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously "on a sudden it began to mend." Her father visits the doctor again, and the doctor "send her a purge with some other matter," and she was made "perfectly well and continued every since." Her friends reward Dr. Skinner. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of a woman in West Groustead in Sussex, who suffered from an "Evil in her Throat." She encounters Dr. Skinner at a fair, and although he had "nought to give her," he bids her to come over. She promises to, and fails to show. Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she never visited him, and finds that from the moment she met Dr. Skinner "she found her self begin to mend," and was cured. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of Goody Halle in Sevenoaks, Kent, who suffered from "the most lamentable pain in her head," which was so severe, she could not sleep. Several doctors fail to treat her, yet when she visited Dr. Skinner, "she was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," by the use of medicines Dr. Skinner provided. She remained afterward "in vivide and perfect health." (Cover)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, Cover

Dr. Lamb   Magician

A man from an unknown area of London, who is alleged a "Conjurer," and "killed by the Mob," in 1640. Dr. Lamb meets Sir Miles Sands and Mr. Barbor one morning, in the street, "and invited them to go and drink their Mornings Draught at his House." There, he speaks to them about his art, and "he told them, if they would hold their Tongues, and their Hands from medling with any thing," he would "shew them some Sport." Dr. Lam "falling to his Practice," conjured up a tree, which springs up in the middle of the room. Following that "appeared three little Fellows, with Axes on their Shoulders, and Baskets in their Hands, who presently fell to work, cut down the Tree, and carried all away." After this, Sir Miles Sands and Mr. Barbor depart from Dr. Lamb's company, although Mr. Barbor takes a chip away with him. This chip causes Mr. Barbor's doors and windows in his house to "open and clatter," frightening and waking his family. Once the chip from Dr. Lamb's is disposed of, all was "quiet," and the windows and doors "were presently shut," allowing the family to sleep. (155-156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 155-156

Dr. Pordage   Victim

A man from Bradfield in the county of Berkshire, described as a doctor who is allegedly haunted by three spirits. They take the form of "a Spirit in the shape of Everard," a known conjurer who had worked or Pordage and been in his home, a dragon "which seemed to take up most part of a large Room, appearing with great Teeth and open Jaws, whence he often ejected fire" and a giant "with a great Sword in his Hand." He claims he received assistance against the evil spirits by the "Ministration of the Holy Angels." (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Dr. Redman   Cunning-folk

A man from Amersham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as "Conjurer," or an "honest and able Physician," Redman appears to be an untrained, but practicing physician / cunningman, who was "once sent to Prison" for either practicing medicine without a license, or witchcraft. Mary Hall's possessing spirits suggest Redman could help heal her. Redman instructs her parents to "take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length, and the Child suddenly recovered." Although Redman appears to heal, in part with the aid of astrology, his pratice seems based on sympathetic magic. He once advised a client to urinate in a hole in the crossroads to cure himself of Ague and another to boil an egg in urine and bury it in an ant hill to cure his distemper. Although his practice crosses magic, medicine, and folklore, it is not actually witchcraft. (39-40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39-40

Dr. Redman   Physician

A man from Amersham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as "Conjurer," or an "honest and able Physician," Redman appears to be an untrained, but practicing physician / cunningman, who was "once sent to Prison" for either practicing medicine without a license, or witchcraft. Mary Hall's possessing spirits suggest Redman could help heal her. Redman instructs her parents to "take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length, and the Child suddenly recovered." Although Redman appears to heal, in part with the aid of astrology, his pratice seems based on sympathetic magic. He once advised a client to urinate in a hole in the crossroads to cure himself of Ague and another to boil an egg in urine and bury it in an ant hill to cure his distemper. Although his practice crosses magic, medicine, and folklore, it is not actually witchcraft. (39-40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39-40

Dr. Robinson   Physician

A doctor from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." (150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Dr. Stephens   Witness

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician. He stayed with Margaret Muschamp during the last of her tormenting fits, and witnessed her final speech. (18, 24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 18, 24

Dr. Stephens   Physician

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician. He stayed with Margaret Muschamp during the last of her tormenting fits, and witnessed her final speech. (18, 24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 18, 24

Dr. Taylor   Physician

The primary care physician to Faith Corbet. Dr. Taylor first provided Henry Corbet medical advice by post in 1660. He took Faith Corbet in and she lived in his care from some time in 1662 until May 21 1663. On April 3 1664 sent 'Cordials and other Physick.' On April 24 1663, Dr. Taylor met with Dr. Whitty and Dr. Corbet about Faith, and then spoke with her. (53-54, 55-56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 53-54, 55-56

Dr. Theodore Gulston   Physician

A physician who prescribed Katheren Malpas some kind of drink to treat her fits. ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

Dr. Thomas Cole   Witness

Doctor Cole is a man from Stanford Rivers in the County of Essex, known to be a Reverend, a Doctor of Divinity and as of 1599 the Archdeacon of Essex. He and Master Henry Fortescue heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown., (9)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9

Dr. Thomas Cole   Examiner/Justice

Doctor Cole is a man from Stanford Rivers in the County of Essex, known to be a Reverend, a Doctor of Divinity and as of 1599 the Archdeacon of Essex. He and Master Henry Fortescue heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown., (9)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9

Dr. Whittaker   Witness

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who refuses to treat Richard Dugdale as a doctor, and who believes that Richard Dugdale's fits are "more than a Natural Distemper." (65)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 65

Dr. Whittaker   Physician

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who refuses to treat Richard Dugdale as a doctor, and who believes that Richard Dugdale's fits are "more than a Natural Distemper." (65)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 65

Dr. Whitty   Physician

A man from Beverley in the county of York, described as a physician who Henry Corbet hired him to help treat his daughter Faith's fits. Dr. Whitty was consulted in 1660, when he stayed the night in the Corbet home, where he 'admiring' Faith's fits and gave her 'one thing or another' as treatment. He was called on again, along with Dr. Taylor and Dr. Whitty, on April 24th, where the three physicians consulted one another and then spoke with Faith herself. (54, 56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54, 56

Dr. William Harvey   Physician

A physician/ surgeon who dissects a familiar in an attempt to prove that witchcraft does not exists. (282-285)

Appears in:
Bickley et al., A.C.. The Gentleman's Magazine Library. London: 1884, 282-285

Dr. William Harvey   Surgeon

A physician/ surgeon who dissects a familiar in an attempt to prove that witchcraft does not exists. (282-285)

Appears in:
Bickley et al., A.C.. The Gentleman's Magazine Library. London: 1884, 282-285

Dr. Woodhouse   Physician

A physician from Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire, known as a man "famous in curing bewitched persons," who spent the better part of a year attempting to cure Mary Hall from a bewitchment by two spirits which belonged to Goodwife Harod and Goodwife Young. Throughout the course of her bewitchment, Hall was plagued by shaking limbs, convulsions, and startling speech acts; Woodhouse treated her with a myriad of different techniques. He administered an emetic, in the form of "stinking suffumigations," (used in exorcisms) he cut off her fingernails and hung them by the fireplace (as a form of coutermagic), administered her "some Liquor" which made her faint (medical / exorcism), restrained her "in her Chair" (exorcism), and gave her opium (medical). He remained convinced that Hall was possessed, a conviction based, at least in part on the erudite agreement of two medical colleagues who had visited the Nuns at Loudan. (32, 34, 36, 37, 38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38-39

Dugdale (Uncle)   Relative of Victim

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who Richard Dugdale calls upon during one of his violent fits to accompany him to the local doctor, Dr. Chew. (63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 63

Dugdale (Uncle)   Witness

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who Richard Dugdale calls upon during one of his violent fits to accompany him to the local doctor, Dr. Chew. (63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 63

Durrant (Child)   Victim

A two year old child from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex, daughter of Annaball and Goerge Durrant. This child was the unwitting victim of an act of instrumental magic (one of malefic contamination and poisoning) allegedly administered by Mary Johnson. The child had been walking with her mother from Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe when she was stopped by Johnson, who called her a pretty child, stroked her cheek, and gave her a piece of bread and butter to eat. and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Shortly after she ate the food, she "shricked and cried out." Her mother sought medical advice from a local surgeon named Mr. Dawber a Chirurgeon, but there appeared to be "no naturall cause [for her] lamenesse." The Durrant child would not survive for much longer: the last eight days of her life were spent in torment, described as "eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died. Her mother and father were also allegedly bewitched, but appear to survive their ordeals. (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

E. G. Gent   Witness

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who witnesses the trial of the six witches in Maidstone Kent; he records the events which become the basis for the pamphlet. (1, 5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 1, 5

E. G. Gent   Author

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who witnesses the trial of the six witches in Maidstone Kent; he records the events which become the basis for the pamphlet. (1, 5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 1, 5

Edgar Coats   Examiner/Justice

A juror in the trial against Anne Greene. (64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Edmond Osborne   Accuser

A man from Little Oakley in the county of Essex and Husband of Godlife Osborne. Edmond returned home from Manningtree with some good malt, which he wished his wife to brew into a quality beer. She set out to do so the next day, but after attempting to call in a loan from Annis Heard, was foiled. The beer was not salvageable and given to the swine. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Fv-F2

Edmond Osborne   Witness

A man from Little Oakley in the county of Essex and Husband of Godlife Osborne. Edmond returned home from Manningtree with some good malt, which he wished his wife to brew into a quality beer. She set out to do so the next day, but after attempting to call in a loan from Annis Heard, was foiled. The beer was not salvageable and given to the swine. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Fv-F2

Edmund Bacon   Examiner/Justice

A man from the County of Suffolk, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who ordered Rose Cullender searched for witch's marks at the request of Samuel Pacy. At his order, six women were appointed to the task, including Mary Chandler. The searchers allegedly found Cullender to have four teats, one on her lower belly about an inch long, and three smaller on her privy parts. The larger teat is said to have had a hole in its tip, to have shown signs of having been recently sucked, and to have secreted a milky substance when handled. (38-40)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 38-40

Edmund Durent   Relative of Victim

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the father of Ann Durent; he gave deposition alleging that Rose Cu