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17 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific city

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
77

Sir Francis Manners succeeds his brother as the Earl of Rutland and takes up residence at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Joan Flower, and her daughters Margaret and Phillip, are hired as charwomen to assist with the household's upkeep. Margaret earns a residency as both a poultry-keeper and a laundress. This lasts until the Countess hears accusations that the Flower women have been engaged in various misdemeanors during their employment.(C2-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
78

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Joan Flowers, the mother, is said to be "a monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious, and for any thing they saw by her, a plaine Atheist; besides of late dayes her very countenance was estranged, her eyes were fiery and hollow, her speech fell and enuious, her de[m]eanour strange and exoticke, and her conuersation sequestred; so that the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse."(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
79

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Phillip Flower, one of the daughters, is said to rob the Lady and maintain debauched and base company. Phillip is also accused of being "lewdly transported with the loue of one Th: Simpson" and to have bewitched Thomas so that "hee had no power to lea[v]e her, and was as hee supposed maruellously altred both in m[in]de and body."(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
102

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Margaret Flower, one of the daughters, is said to have "often resorted from the Castle to her Mother, bringing such prouision as they thought was vnbefitting for a seruant to purloyne, and comming at such vnseasonable houres, that they could not but coniecture some mischiefe between them." She is also accused of robbing the Lady and maintaining debauched and base company.(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
103

Sir Francis Manners, the Earl of Rutland, develops a dislike of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower and ceases to hear their complaints. The Countess, the Earl's wife, eventually discharges Margaret for "[i]ndecencies both in her life and neglect of her businesse." Margaret is turned out of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle with a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. In the aftermath, Joan Flower is "exprobrated by her neighbours for her Daughters casting out of dores, and other conceiued displeasures" and "many times cursed them all that were the cause of this discontentment, and made her so loathsome to her former familiar friends, and beneficiall acquaintance."(C4-C4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C4-C4v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
104

Henry Lord Rosse allegedly sickens strangely and dies. Joan, Margaret, and Phillip Flowers are suspected of bewitching him to death.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
621

The Devil allegedly "perceiued the inficious disposition of this wretch, and that she and her Daughters might easily bee made instruments to enlarge his Kingdome, and bee as it were the executioners of his vengeance" and offered his services to Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower. The Flower women are said to have agreed to give their souls in exchange for the service of spirits and the knowledge of incantations, spells and charms. The conditions of the agreement are sealed through "abhominable kisses, and an odious sacrifice of blood, not leauing out certaine charmes and coniurations with which the Diuell deceiued them, as though nothing could bee done without ceremony, and a solemnity of orderly ratification."(C4v-Dv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C4v-Dv

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
624

Francis Lord Rosse is allegedly afflicted by strange sickness, which causes him to be "most barbarously and inhumanely tortured," following the death of his brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected to have bewitched him.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
625

Lady Katherine begins to suffer "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" leaving her "many times in great danger of life" following the death of her brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected of bewitching her.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
628

Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners are allegedly afflicted such that they are unable to have any more children, resulting in a miscarriage before Christmas. However, they do not connect this misfortune to the actions of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower until later.(Dv-D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
629

Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are apprehended around Christmas and imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol on suspicion of bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death, causing the illnesses of Francis Lord Rosse and Lady Katherine, and Countess Manners' miscarriage. (D2-D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2-D2v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2441

Joan WIllimott alleges during her examination that she had met with Joan and Margaret Flower a week before their apprehension, and that the three of them had gone to Joan Flower's house, where Willimott saw two spirits, one in the shape of an owl and one in the shape of a rat, suck from Joan Flower under her right ear. According to Willimott, Joan Flower then told her "that her spirits did say that shee should neyther be hanged nor burnt."(E5v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E5v-F

1618, March 17 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2442

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that she saw Joan Flowers take up some earth, spit on it, work it in her fingers and put it in her purse. Willimott claimed Flowers then said that "though shee could not hurt the Lord himselfe, yet shee had sped his Sonne, which is dead," referring to Sir Francis Manners and his son Henry Lord Rosse.(E5v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E5v-F

1618, March 17 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2455

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that four or five years before, her mother Joan Flower sent her to take Henry Lord Rosse's right hand glove. After she did so, her mother asked her to bring her another glove or personal item from Henry Lord Rosse. Margaret asked what they were for, and Joan replied they were to hurt Lord Henry with. Joan stroked her familiar Rutterkin with the glove, dipped it in hot water and pricked it; Margaret claims that Lord Henry fell sick within a week and became tormented.(F3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v

1613 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2456

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that two or three years before, she found one of Francis Lord Rosse's gloves on a dung-hill and delivered it to her mother, Joan Flower. Joan put the glove in hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bade Rutterkin to go upwards. Joan then buried the glove in the yard, and said "a mischiefe light on him, but he will mend againe."(F3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2457

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that she, her sister Phillip Flower and their mother Joan Flower all agreed to bewitch Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners so that they would not have any more children. Margaret claimed it was retribution for Countess Manners turning her out four years before, and for Sir Francis' refusal to take Joan's part in a dispute. To bewitch them, Joan took wool from a mattress that was included in Margaret's severance, and a pair of gloves, and put them both into warm water mixed with blood, stirring it all together. Joan then took the wool and gloves out of the mixture, rubbed them on her familiar Rutterkin's belly, and said "the Lord and the Lady should haue more Children, but it would be long first."(F3v-F4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v-F4

1614 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2458

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that she, by her mother Joan's command, stole a handkerchief from Lady Katherine, Sir Francis Manner's daughter. Joan put the handkerchief into hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bid him to fly and go. However, "Rutterkin whined and cryed Mew: whereupon shee said, that Rutterkin had no power ouer the Lady Katherine to hurt her."(F3v-F4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v-F4

1618, January 22 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England