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19 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific city

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
310

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her examination before Justices Robert Bernard and Nicholas Pedley that the Devil had appeared to her in the form of a young man 21 years before, along with two spirits in the form of puppies. The Devil asked her to renounce God and Christ, which she did, and told her she must sign a covenant giving him her soul at the end of 21 years. In exchange, he would give her his services to do mischief as she required him.(1-2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1-2

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
311

Elizabeth Weed alleged in her confession that the spirit in the form of a young man returned to her a week later at about 10 o'clock at night with a paper and asked if she was willing to seal their covenant. When she said she was, he pricked her under her left arm to draw blood, and had her sign with the blood. The spot pricked became a large lump. After she signed, the spirit bedded her for the first time, and the two puppy spirits joined them in bed to suckle from her.(1-2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1-2

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
730

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that the spirit in the form of a young man and the two puppy spirits became her familiars. She named the white puppy Lilly and the black puppy Priscill; Lilly's purpose was to hurt men, women and children, while Priscill's purpose was to hurt cattle. The purpose of the man-spirit was to "lye with her carnally, when and as often as she desired, and that hee did lye with her in that manner very often."(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
731

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that she once became angry with Henry Bedell and sent her familiar Lilly to kill him, but that Lilly returned claiming it lacked the power to do so; she sent Lilly out again three days later to kill Bedell's child instead and this time the familiar succeeded.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
732

Elizabeth Weed alleged in her confession that she once sent her familiar Lilly to Edward Musgrave, but that Lilly returned claiming not to have the power. Instead, Weed sent out Priscill to kill two of Musgrave's horses, and one belonging to John Musgrave, plus a cow of William Musgrave's and another cow of Thomas Thorp's; Priscill succeeded where Lilly had failed.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
733

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that her 21 years was almost up: Her contract was set to expire on the next Low-Sunday.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
734

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that she "had a desire to be rid of that unhappy burthen which was upon her," and that to that end she had been attending Church regularly. She said that she was pleased with the minister, Mr. Poole, and his preachings, to the extent that she had been going to his house for repetitions.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
735

Peter Slater alleges, in his statement, that he visited Francis Moore after he heard she had been taken into custody for witchcraft, and questioned her on the death of his wife. He claims that Moore confessed to cursing his wife, causing her to die.(6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 6

1646, April Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
736

Mary Darnell gives a statement before Justice Robert Bernard alleging that, a year ago, Elizabeth Chandler bewitched her daughter Katherine Darnell to death. Darnell claims that Katherine and a child of Chandler's had a falling out while eating furmity at a neighbor's home one day, and that Katherine came home complaining that Chandler had boxed her ear. Katherine was sick for the next three weeks, complaining the whole time of pain in her ear and that Chandler was appearing to her; she would cry out that Chandler wanted to kill her. She died of the illness, at the age of nine.(8-9)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8-9

1645 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
740

Francis Moore, at her examination before Justice Nicholas Pedley, alleges that she had received her first familiar eight years before from Margaret Simpson. The familiar was in the form of a little black puppy Simpson had named Pretty, and Simpson instructed her to keep Pretty with her all her life. If she did, and she ever cursed any cattle, she could set Pretty on them, and the cattle would soon die.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

1638 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
741

Frances Moore alleges in her confession that, eight years before, she received a second familiar from Elizabeth Weed, in the form of a white cat Weed had named Tiffy. Weed told Moore that, in order to receive Tiffy's services, she must renounce God and affirm it with blood. If she did so, she could set Tiffy on anyone she cursed, and they would soon die. Moore renounced God, pricked her finger with a thorn, and allowed Tiffy to lick the blood. (5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

1638 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
742

Frances Moore, in her confession, recalled that 16 years before William Foster had threatened to hang her children for stealing bread. Six years ago, two after receiving Tiffy from Elizabeth Weed, she allegedly decided to curse Foster for it. Tiffy went to Foster and caused him become sick; he lay in pain for seven or eight days before dying. Moore claimed, however, not to remember what exactly she had instructed Tiffy to do to him..(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

1640 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
743

Frances Moore alleged in her confession that, five years before, Edward Hull's cow got into her grain. She cursed it and set Pretty on it, causing the cow to swell and die.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

1641 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
744

France Moore alleged in her confession that, five years before, one of Peter Brown's cows went into her corn; she cursed the cow and set Pretty on it, causing the animal to die two or three days later.(5-6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5-6

1641 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
745

Frances Moore alleged in her confession that she had killed her familiars Tiffy and Pretty the year before, but that they had been haunting her since. She claimed that, when she was apprehended, they had crawled under her clothes and had been tormenting her so that she couldn't speak freely to confess.(6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 6

1646, April 9 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
748

Peter Slater gives a statement before Justice Robert Bernard, alleging that his wife had a falling out with Francis Moore 21 years before. Not long after, his wife gave birth to their child, and a week after the birth his wife suddenly got sick and died. He says that ever since that day, he has suspected Moore of witchcraft.(6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 6

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
749

William Searle gives a statement before Justice Robert Bernard alleging that, three or four years before, Francis Moore had requested to bake a loaf of bread at his home, and he refused her. In retribution, she set her familiar Pretty on his chickens, causing them to flutter, refuse to eat and die.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

1642 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
750

William Searle gives a statement alleging that, three or four years before, Francis Moore had caused one of his hogs to die in retribution for some of his servants setting a dog on one of her hogs.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

1642 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
767

Frances Moore allegedly pricked her finger with a thorn, drawing blood, which she used to seal the contract with her cat familiar Tissy.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

1638 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England