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263 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific county

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
341

Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike, confesses before Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell. In her confession, she alleges that twenty years before, she was coming home from begging and, near the Stonepit in Gouldshey in the Forest of Pendle, a devil or spirit appeared to her in the shape of a boy wearing a coat half-brown, half-black. This spirit told her that if she gave him her soul, she could have anything she requested. Southerns demanded his name; he said he was called Tibb. Tempted by his promises, she agreed to give him her soul.(B2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2

1592   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
344

Elizabeth Southerns alleges in her confession that the best way to kill someone through witchcraft is to make a clay image of the person and dry it thoroughly. She says that if you want them to be afflicted in one place more than another, to take a thorn or pin and prick that part of the image. If you want a part of their body to be consumed away, take that part of the image and burn it. To consume their whole body, take the remainder of the image and burn it; this will cause them to die.(B2v-B3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3v

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
345

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that she, Elizabeth Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitched Robert Nutter to death. She claims that Southerns also showed her that she had bewitched Richard Ashton to death.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

1612, May 19   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
346

James Device alleges during his examination that, around the last Saint Peter's Day, Henry Bullocke came to Elizabeth Southerns and accused her granddaughter, James' sister, Alison Device, of bewitching his child, and demanded that Alison come with him to his house. Alison did, and when they got there, James claims he saw her fall on her knees, beg forgiveness, and confess to bewitching the child. (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

1611, June 29   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
347

Anne Whittle's confession and examination is heard by Justice of the Peace for Lancashire Roger Nowell on April 2, 1612 at the fence in the Forest of Pendle. (E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
348

James Device alleges during his examination that the teeth Henry Hargreaves and he found buried at the west end of Elizabeth Southerns' house are the same teeth Anne Whittle gave Southerns twelve years before. He says they also found a clay image near the teeth, almost withered away, of Anne Nutter, Anthony Nutter's daughter.(E3v-E4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E3v-E4

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
349

Alison Device is examined at Reade on March 30, 1612 before Justice of the Peace for Lancashire Roger Nowell.(E4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4

1612 Reade  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
350

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, after Mrs. Moore chided her for using a charm to amend some drink, Whittle called for her familiar, Fancie, and instructed him to bite the Moores' cow on the head and make it go mad. Fancie turned into a brown dog and bit the cow, which died within six weeks.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
351

James Device alleges during his examination that, twelve years before, Anne Whittle took three scalps and and eight teeth from people buried in the graveyard of the new church in Pendle. Whittle is said to have kept four teeth for herself, and to have given the other four to Elizabeth Southerns, who showed them to Device. (E3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E3v

1600   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
354

Alison Device alleges during her examination that, about eleven years before, the family's firehouse was broken into and all or most of their linen, half a peck of cut oatmeal and a quantity of meal was stolen, all worth about twenty shillings. The following Sunday, Alison says she went to Anne Redferne and took a parcel of the same from her, claiming they were the goods stolen from her family. (E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1601   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
355

Alison Device alleges during her examination that her father, John Device, was afraid of Anne Whittle, and made a deal to pay her a measure of meal every year if she would not harm his family. This lasted until he died, eleven years before; Alison claims that he said on his deathbed that "Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, did bewitch him to death, because the said meale was not paid the last yeare. "(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1601   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
356

James Device is arraigned and tried before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley at Lancaster Assizes on August 18, 1612. He stands accused of bewitching Anne Townley and John Duckworth to death.(Hv-H2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Hv-H2

1612, August 18 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
357

James Device alleges during his examination that, the previous Lent, John Duckworth promised him an old shirt, but when he went to collect it two weeks later, Duckworth denied it to him. As he left Duckworth's house, his familiar Dandy appeared to him and said "Thou didst touch the said Duckworth." Device denied it, but Dandy insisted that "thou didst touch him, and therfore I haue power of him[.]" Device finally agreed, and bid Dandy to kill Duckworth. A week later, the man was dead.(H3-H4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H4

1611, April   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
358

Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley, and Jane Southworth are tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize for Lancaster Edward Bromley. They stand accused of bewitching Grace Sowerbuts so that she wasted and consumed.(K3-K4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3-K4

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
359

Grace Sowerbutts is examined under oath. She claims that, for the last several years, she has been haunted and vexed by some women. She names them as her grandmother Jennet Bierley, her aunt Ellen Bierley, Jane Southworth and Old Doewife. (K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
360

Grace Sowerbutts accuses Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley, Jane Southworth and Old Doewife of dragging her violently by her hair and laying her on top of Henry Bierley's hay-mow.(K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
361

Grace Sowerbutts accuses Jennet Bierley of turning into a dog to torment her. Sowerbutts alleges the Bierley knocked her over while in the shape of a dog, but did not hurt her. She claims that after this incident, she told her father about how Bierley had been tormenting her. When asked why she hadn't said anything sooner, Sowerbutts claimed that she had wanted to, but could not.(K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
362

Anne Redferne is arraigned and tried at Lancaster Assizes for witchcraft on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley.(N3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, N3v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
363

Anne Redferne is acquitted of bewitching Robert Nutter to death, but tried a second time on charges of bewitching Christopher Nutter to death. She pleads not guilty.(N3v-N4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, N3v-N4

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
364

Katherine Hewit is arraigned and tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley. She stands charged of bewitching Anne Foulds to death.(P3-P3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P3-P3v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
365

John Bulcock and his mother, Jane Bulcock, are arraigned and tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley. They stand accused of bewitching Jennet Deane until she wasted and consumed, and became mad.(Q2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q2v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
366

James Device gives deposition alleging that both Jane Bulcock and John Bulcock attended the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday.(Q3v-Q4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q3v-Q4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
367

James Device gives deposition that, at the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower, he heard John Bulcock and Jane Bulcock confess to bewitching Jennet Deane, and give their consent to bewitching Master Thomas Lister and Leonard Lister to death.(Q3v-Q4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q3v-Q4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
410

Anonymous 20 of Kirkham gives birth to a stillborn monster baby(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration of a Strange and Wonderful Monster: Born in Kirkham parish in Lancashire. London: 1646, 4

1646   Kirkeham  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
443

A baby is born in Allington, Lancashire with two four legs and arms, two bellies, one back, two faces and one head.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Stranges News of a Prodigious Monster Born in the Township of Allington. Unknown: 1613, 6

1613 Adlington  Standish  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
460

Anne Starchie allegedly suffers her first fit at the age of nine, in which she is taken with a heavy and dumpish countenance, and suffers a fearful starting and pulling of her body. These fits become extreme, lasting 9-10 weeks.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5

1594, February Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
461

Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Eleanor Holland, and Elizabeth Hardman allegedly have a fit during which they crawl on their knees until the afternoon, fleeing from family and neighbors into other rooms while calling them "devils with horns" that creep under the bed. Once they regain the use of their feet, they can no longer speak.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6

1598, March 19 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
462

Eleanor Holland and Elizabeth Hardman have a fit lasting three days and three nights during which they cannot eat nor can they talk to anyone but each other, "to ther lads. saue that their lads gaue them leaue (as the said) the one to eate a toast & drink, the other a sower milk posset." Despite the permission, they say that Hartley is angry they ate, and made them vomit it up again. On the last night, Eleanor Holland is made to take up a distaff and spin faster and a finer thread than she ever has before, which she did for an hour and a half straight.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6

1598, March 21 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
463

Margaret Byrom is allegedly thrown into the kitchen fire, under a table, and numerous other places, but suffers no injuries.(Image 6-7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6-7

1598, January 10 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
464

Edmund Hartley is condemned and hanged at the assizes of Lancaster for allegedly causing the possession of Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Byrom and Jane Ashton.(7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 7

1634 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
465

John Darrell has Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Byrom and Jane Ashton brought together for observation, noting that of all of them Jane Ashton and the Starchie children are most grievously tormented. Satan is said to have exceeded for cruelty with John Starchie in particular. During the observation, three or four of them scoffed and blasphemed. At one point, they allegedly all join hands to cause a strange and supernatural loud whupping noise in the house and grounds, driving Darrell and his companion George More from the room.(9)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 9

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
547

Richard Dugdale is determined to be possessed by the Devil when he visits Mr. Jolly in Pendle Hill. He is seized with violent fits and rages when Mr. Jolly prays and reads the Bible.(1-2)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 1-2

1689, August Pendle Hill    Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
552

Janet Preston of Gisburne is alleged to be the first of several noted cases of witchcraft in the North in 1612.(28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

1612 Gisburne  Gisburne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
907

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that the third time her familiar Ball appeared to her, he was in the shape of a brown dog; this was four years before. Ball urged her to make a clay image of John Robinson, which Device did in her mother's house, drying it with the fire. She crumbled the image over the course of a week, and about a week after it was gone, Robinson died. Device claimed she did it because Robinson had "chidden and becalled" her for having a bastard child. (F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4v

1608   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
909

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that "she doth verily thinke, that the said Bulcockes wife doth know of some Witches to bee about Padyham and Burnley."(Q4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q4v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
910

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that she heard Katherine Hewit and John Bulcock give their consent to assist Jennet Preston in murdering Master Lister at the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower.(Q4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
911

Jennet Device points out Jane Bulcock and John Bulcock in court and alleges that they attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. She details where Jane sat and who sat next to her. Device claims that John turned the spit for the feast. She also reports on their conversations.(R)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
913

Jennet Device alleges during her deposition that her brother, James Device, has been a witch for three years, ever since a familiar in the shape of a black dog appeared to him at their mother, Elizabeth Device's, house. The familiar's name is Dandy.(H3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3v

1609   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
915

From all the depositions given in court, a partial guest list for the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday is drafted. This list includes Elizabeth Device, Alice Nutter, Katherine Hewit, John Bulcock, Jane Bulcock, Alice Grey, Jennet Hargraves, Elizabeth Hargraves, Christopher Howgate, Christopher Hargraves, Grace Hay, Anne Crunckshey, Elizabeth Howgate and Jennet Preston. (Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Rv-R2

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
917

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Mrs. Moore, wife to John Moore, once sent for her to amend some drink that had been forspoken. Whittle recited the charm she used, which successfully unwitched the drink. Mrs. Moore was offended by the charm and chided Whittle.()

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613,

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1125

Jennet Preston is reported executed at Yorke for the murder of Master Thomas Lister. This report appears in the list of witches alleged to have attended the feast at Malking Tower.(Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Rv-R2

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1198

Elizabeth Device is examined at Read in Lancashire by Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell on March 30, 1612. During her examination, she claims that her mother, Elizabeth Southerns, "hath had a place on her left side by the space of fourty yeares."(C2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v

1612, March 30 Reade  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1199

Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell orders Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike, Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, Alison Device and Anne Redferne imprisoned at the Castle at Lancaster to await their trials. They are imprisoned on the strength of their examinations and the accusations against them.(C2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v

1612, April 2 Reade  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1200

About a week after imprisoning Elizabeth Southerns, Anne Whittle, Anne Redferne and Alison Device at Lancaster Castel, Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell becomes aware of a meeting at Malking Tower in the Forest of Pendle. He hears that at this meeting, numerous people plotted to murder Thomas Cowell and Thomas Lister, and to blow up Lancaster Castle before the next Assizes.(C2v-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v-C3v

1612, April 9   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1201

The witchcraft trials begin at Lancaster Assizes on Tuesday, August 17, 1612. Lord Bromley, Justice of Assize for Lancaster, begins the trials with a "generall Proclamation, that all Iustices of Peace that had taken any Recognisaunces, or Examinations of Prisoners, should make Returne of them: And all such as were bound to prosecute Indictmentes, and giue Euidence against Witches, should proceede, and giue attendance: For hee now intended to proceed to the Arraignement and Tryall of VVitches."(C4v-D)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4v-D

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1202

Anne Whittle stands trial indicted of witchcraft and of bewitching Robert Nutter to death. She pleads not guilty, and Lord Bromley commands the jury to enter the court. Robert Nowell is then called upon to read the evidence against her.(D2v-D3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D2v-D3

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1203

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, starting fourteen or fifteen years before, a spirit would come to her in the shape of a man for four years. When he came, he would ask her for her soul. At the end of the four years, Whittle finally agreed, and the spirit promised that "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list." He commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie, and to call that name whenever she wanted anything of him. Not long after, Fancie tried to convince her to let him hurt Richard Baldwyn's wife, but she would not let him.(D3-D3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D3v

1597   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1204

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Robert Nutter desired to have his pleasure of her daughter, Anne Redferne, and became angry when she denied him. He left in a rage, saying "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard of this, she called her familiar Fancie to her. Fancie came in the shape of a man, and Whittle told him to go revenge her of Robert Nutter. Nutter died three months later.(D4-D4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D4v

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1205

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Elizabeth Nutter, grandmother to Robert Nutter, approached her, Widow Lomeshaw and Jane Boothman to request their assistance in killing Robert, so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle claims that all three agreed initially, but that she backed out after her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Lomeshaw was angry with Redferne when Whittle withdrew her support, but was calmed down by Mr. Baldwyn, the schoolmaster for Covlne, and Redferne's gift of a capon. Whittle added that she thought Lomeshaw and Boothman did what they could to kill Robert. This took place before Robert made advances on Anne Redferne.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1206

Elizabeth Southerns alleges during her examination that one midsummer day, about half a year before Robert Nutter died, she went to Thomas Redferne's house, and saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne on either side of the ditch outside the house. Whittle was making two clay images, and Redferne one. Southerns asked her familar, Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, what they were doing. Tibb told her they were making pictures of Christopher Nutter, Robert Nutter, and Robert's wife Marie Nutter. When Southerns would not join them, Tibb became angry and shoved her into the ditch, spilling her can of milk, and vanished. Tibb reappeared in the shape of a hare once Southerns was a quarter mile from the Redferne house.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1207

James Robinson alleges during his examination that, six years before, his wife hired Anne Whittle to card wool. While Whittle worked, she drew drink several times. For the next eight or nine weeks, all the drink in the house was found to be spoiled; Robinson accused Whittle of causing the spoilage.(E2-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E2v

1606   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1210

James Robinson alleges during his examination that, eighteen years before, he lived with Robert Nutter the elder. During this time, Robert Nutter the younger fell ill, and Robinson heard him complain several times that "he verily thought that the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and the said Redfernes wife, had bewitched him." Shortly after that, just before Nutter departed for Wales with his master, Sir Richard Shattleworth, Robinson heard him speaking to Thomas Redferne; Nutter told Redferne that "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." Nutter died on his way home, before Candlemas of the same year.(E2-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E2v

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1214

The Judges who will be presiding over the trials of the twenty people suspected of being witches arrive at Lancaster from Kendall. Thomas Cowell presents them with the full list of prisoners imprisoned in the castle of Lancaster as of August 16th, 1612. The trials are scheduled to begin the following day. Cowell's report shows that Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike, has died in prison.(C3v-C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C3v-C4

1612, August 16 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1215

James Robinson claims during his examination that "Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches."(E2-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E2v

1612, August 17   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1216

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that she called on Fancie, who was in the shape of a man, and bid him to kill Anthony Nutter's cow; the cow died not long after. Whittle claims that she did it because she thought Nutter favoured Elizabeth Southern over her.(E2-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E3

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1217

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that her familiar, Fancie, is responsible for her loss of most of her sight.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1218

Anne Whittle alleges that her familiar, Fancie, came to her one night the previous summer in the shape of a bear and gaped at her. He had appeared to her in this shape many times since. The last time he appeared to her, midsummer last, he was in this shape; Whittle would not speak to him and Fancie pulled her down.(E2v-E3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3v

1611, June   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1221

Allison Device alleges during her examination that, two years before, she heard that Anne Whittle was suspected of bewitching John Moore's drink, and that Whittle had said she would "meet with the said Iohn Moore, or his."(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1222

Alison Device alleges during her examination that she had seen Anne Whittle with a clay image of John Moore Jr, child of John Moore. The child fell sick, languished for half a year and died. (E4-F)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-F

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1223

Alison Device alleges during her examination that, two years before, she was visiting with Anne Nutter, Anthony Nutter's daughter at their home, when Anne Whittle came to call. Device and Anne laughed at Whittle, and Whittle said to them "I will be meet with the one of you." Anne Nutter became sick the next day and died three weeks later. (E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1224

Allison Device alleges during her examination that, six or seven years before, Anne Whittle had a falling out with Hugh Moore when Moore accused her of bewitching his cattle. Whittle is said to have cursed Moore and said she would be revenged of him. He fell sick not long after, languished for about six months, and died. On his deathbed, Moore allegedly said that Whittle had bewitched him to death. (E4-F)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-F

1605   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1225

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that she, Elizabeth Southerns and Alice Nutter joined together to bewitch Henry Mytton to death.(F4-F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4-F4v

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1226

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that her mother, Elizabeth Device, is a witch, and she knows this because she has seen a familiar spirit come to her numerous times at her home of Malking Tower. The spirit takes the shape of a brown dog, and is called Ball. When Ball came, he would ask her mother what she would have him do.(F4v-Gv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4v-Gv

1612, August 17   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1227

James Device alleges during his examination that, two years before, his grandmother Elizabeth Southerns urged him to go to the new church in Pendle the day before Good Friday and take Communion, but not to eat the bread. Instead, he was to deliver it to whatever thing met him on the way back home. He went to church as requested, but decided to eat the Communion bread. On the way home, he met a thing in the shape of a hare, which demanded to know whether he had brought the bread. When Device answered that he had not, the hare threatened to pull him to pieces. It vanished when Device crossed himself.(H3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3

1610, April 8   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1228

James Device alleges during his examination that, four days after his grandmother sent him to get communion bread, a spirit appeared to him in the shape of a brown dog. The spirit asked for his soul, offering him revenge against anyone he desired in return. James replied that "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it."(H3-H3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H3v

1610, April 12   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1229

James Device alleges during his examination that two or three days after his familiar first appeared to him, he went to the Carre-Hall, where he argued with Anne Townley. Townley accused him and his mother Elizabeth Device of theft and kicked him out, hitting him between the shoulders on the way. A day or two after that, the spirit came again, this time in the shape of a black dog and calling itself Dandy, and urged him to make a clay image of Townley. Dandy said that if Device did, he would kill her for him. The next morning, Device made the clay image, dried it by the fire, and crumbled it over the course of the next week. Two days after the image was gone, Townley was dead. (H3-H3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H3v

1610, April 15   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1230

Jennet Device alleges during her deposition that two years before, her brother James Device called his familiar Dandy in her presence and asked the familiar to help him kill Anne Townley. A week later, Jennet claims she saw Townley in the kitchen of the the Carre-Hall looking unwell, and she thinks that James and Dandy are responsible.(H4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H4v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1231

James Device is indicted on two more counts of murder for bewitching to death John Hargraves and Blaze Hargreaves. He pleads not guilty to both.(I-Iv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I-Iv

1612, August 18   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1232

Grace Sowerbutts alleges in her deposition that this last April, on her way home from Pelham, Jennet Bierley appeared to her in the shape of a dog with two legs and tried to convince her to drown herself. She was rescued by a spirit in a white sheet, which carried her away. Its present made Bierley vanish.(K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

1612, April 4 Preston    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1233

Grace Sowerbutts alleges during her examination that, the same night she was rescued by the spirit Anonymous 180, Jennet Bierley reappeared in the shape of a black dog and carried her to Hugh Walshman's barn. Bierley lay her on the barn floor, covered her with straw and hay, and lay on top of her for a long time. She robbed Sowerbutts of her speech and senses, and when Sowerbutts awoke, it was two nights later and she was in Walshman's home. She had been found in the barn and carried to the house by friends. The next night, her father fetched her home. (K4v-Lv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-Lv

1612, April 4   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1234

Grace Sowerbutts alleges during her examination that at Two Brigges between Preston and Salmesbury, Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley appeared to her in their own shapes, caused her to fall down, and robbed her of speech for the next several days. They appeared to her again while she lay in her father's house, but did nothing at that time.(K4v-Lv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-Lv

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1235

Grace Sowerbutts accuses Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley of going into Thomas Walshman's house at night and stealing Walshman's child from their bed. Grace alleges that Jennet and Ellen set the child down by the fire and pierced its navel with a nail, then set a pen in the wound and sucked from it. They returned the child to the bed after. Grace claims the child did not cry when it was hurt, but it languished thereafter and died. The night after the child's burial, Jennet and Ellen dug it up from the churchyard. They boiled some of it in a pot and broiled the rest on the coals, and ate it. Grace said that they tried to get her and Ellen's daughter to eat as well, but both refused. After, they rendered fat from the child's bones to anoint themselves with so they could change shapes. They said they would return the bones to the grave the next night, but Grace did not know whether they did.(K4v-L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L2v

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1236

Grace Sowerbutts alleged in her deposition that her grandmother, Jennet Bierley, brought her to meetings of witches on the north bank of the river Ribble six months before. Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth were also there; these meetings took place every Thursday and Sunday for two weeks. Four black things, going upright but not like men in the face, carried them across the water to feast. Grace claimed that she had never seen such meat, and refused to eat of it. They all danced afterward with the black things. After the dancing, "the said black things did pull downe the said three Women, and did abuse their bodies, as this Examinate thinketh, for shee saith, that the black thing that was with her, did abuse her bodie."(K4v, L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v, L2v

1612   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1237

Grace Sowerbutts alleges in her deposition that Jane Southworth repeatedly came to her, set her in haylofts and ditches, and robbed her of speech and senses. (K4v, L2v-L4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v, L2v-L4

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1239

Grace Sowerbutts alleges in her deposition that after the black things carried her back across the Ribble, many other women came to the riverbank to meet, but she did not recognize any of them. She did not see them eat or dance, just watched; Grace thought they must live on the north side of the river, for she did not see them coming out of the water either.(K4v, L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v, L4v

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1242

Thomas Walshman gives deposition stating that he did have a year-old child who died around Lent of the previous year, after a sickness lasting about three weeks. However, he could not say what the cause of its death had been.(L4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4

1611, April   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1243

Thomas Walshman gives deposition confirming that Grace Sowerbutts was found in his father Hugh Walshman's barn under some straw around April 15 of that year. He says that Sowerbutts was carried to his home, and lay there until the following Monday night. She did not speak the whole time, just lay there as if dead.(L4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4

1612, April 15   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1244

Alison Device is found guilty of witchcraft, and convicted on the strength of her own confession. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging. (S3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S3

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1245

John Bulcock and Jane Bulcock are found not guilty of felony by witchcraft.(S3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S3

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1246

Alison Device is arraigned and tried for bewitching John Law so that his body wasted and consumed. When brought into the court, she is said to have "humbly asked forgiuenesse for her offence."(R2v-R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R2v-R3

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1248

Alison Device alleges in her confession that two years before, her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns persuaded her to allow a familiar to appear to her. Southerns advised her to allow it to suck on some part of her so that she might command it to do her bidding. Not long after, a thing like a black dog appeared to her and asked her to give it her soul. She agreed, and allowed the familiar to suck at her breasts below her nipples. The spot was blue for six months after. (R3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1249

Alison Device alleges in her confession that her familiar (Anonymous 186) appeared to her in the form of a black dog this last March, when she tried to buy some pins from a pedlar, John Law, and was refused. Her familiar asked what she would have him do to Law, and she instructed him to lame him. Law fell down in the road.(R3v-R4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v-R4

1612, March 18 Coln  Colne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1250

Alison Device alleges in her confession that, five days after she bid her familiar (Anonymous 186) to lame John Law, she went begging and the familiar appeared to her again. Anonymous 186 asked her to "Stay and speake with me" but she would not, and the familiar had not appeared to her since.(R3v-R4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v-R4

1612, March 23   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1253

John Law gives deposition alleging that this last March, he walked through Colne with his pack of wares and there met Alison Device. Device demanded pins, but he would not give her any, and she became angry. When he left her, he fell down lame. After some time, he was able to make it to a nearby ale-house, and lay there in great pain unable to stir his limbs. He saw a great black dog standing by him, with fiery eyes, large feet and a "terrible countenance." Device came shortly thereafter, looked at him for a short time, and left. He claims that he was tormented day and night by Device thereafter, and remained lame.(R4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R4v

1612, March 18 Coln  Colne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1254

Abraham Law gives deposition on March 30 before Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell, alleging that two Saturdays before, he had received a letter from his father John Law saying that John was speechless and had been lamed on his left side. Abraham went to his father, finding him recovered somewhat in his speech and complaining of a sensation of being pricked since Alison Device had tried to buy pins from him but could not pay; John claimed that he had given her the pins nevertheless. Abraham reported hearing his father say that Device was responsible for his hurt and lameness through witchcraft, and lay upon him to trouble him along with an old woman John did not know.(S-Sv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S-Sv

1612, March 30 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1255

Alison Device is questioned in court as to whether she can help John Law to his former health. She replies that cannot; her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns would have been able to had she lived. John Law is seen in court to have "his head is drawne awrie, his Eyes and face deformed, His speech not well to bee vnderstood; his Thighes and Legges starcke lame: his Armes lame especially the left side, his handes lame and turned out of their course, his Bodie able to indure no trauell."(Sv-S2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Sv-S2

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1260

John Webster recalls the confession of Alison Device, where Device stated that her grandmother (Elizabeth Southerns) persuaded her to let a devil or familiar appear to her, a creature which Device then allowed to suck from her body.(35-36)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 35-36

1677 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1261

Edmund Robinson Jr. is questioned about the witchcraft he had reported seeing, but is stopped from answering by two men who felt the questions were unnecessary.(277)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 277

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1262

Edmund Robinson Jr. witnesses Dickensons Wife transform from a black greyhound into her human form. Dickensons Wife attempts to bribe Robinson Jr. with a silver coin to remain silent about what he saw, but he refuses and calls her a witch. (347)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 347

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1263

Dickensons Wife allegedly uses a bridle to transform a little boy (Anonymous 148), whom she had been traveling with as a pair of greyhounds, into a white horse, an animal that is then used to carry Edmund Robinson Jr.(347-348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 347-348

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1264

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims that Loinds Wife and Dickensons Wife chased him after he witnessed them pulling on ropes and making strange faces in a barn.(348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 348

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1265

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims that he saw Loinds Wife sitting on a cross piece of wood in his fathers chimney. When Robinson Jr. called for Loind's Wife to come down to him, she went up the chimney out of his sight.(348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 348

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1266

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he was involved in a physical altercation with a boy (Anonymous 149) who has a cloven foot.(348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 348

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1280

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he was hit on the back by a boy who has a cloven foot (Anonymous 149).(349)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 349

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1281

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he saw Loinds Wife and two other women (Anonymous 152 and Anonymous 153) take six pictures (which were riddled with thorns) down from a beam in a barn. (349)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 349

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1282

Edmund Robinson Jr's testimony leads to the imprisonment of seven witches. While in prison, three died and one became deathly ill. One of these witches was named Margaret Johnson and another is named Mary Spencer.()

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911,

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1283

Margaret Johnson of Lancaster repeatedly confesses to being a witch for the last six years.()

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911,

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1284

Mary Spencer denies ever practicing witchcraft. ()

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911,

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1285

Frances Dickenson denies any involvement with witchcraft. She claims to have been wrongly accused by Edmund Robinson Jr.()

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911,

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1286

Edmund Robinson Jr. admits having made up his testimony possibly in an attempt to avoid repercussions from his father for his own delinquencies or to help his father make money or for fear of repercussions from his mother. ()

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911,

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1295

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he saw a woman (Anonymous 155) pricking a picture with thorns.(349 (unnumbered page))

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 349 (unnumbered page)

1633, February Wheatley Lane in Pendle  Pendle  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1296

The author asserts that Edmund Robinson Jr.s claims align with what King James I claims about witches in Daemonologia.(207)

Appears in:
Keynes, Geoffrey. The Life of William Harvey. Oxford: 1966, 207

1633, February Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1299

Margaret Johnson confesses that the Devil approached her in the shape of a man wearing a black suit and offered her whatever she wanted if she gave him her soul. Johnson accepted at which point the Devil asked her to call him Memillion. (78)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 78

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1303

Edmund Robinson Jr. is re-examined. He allegedly constructed his last testimony from things he heard his neighbours say about certain women they knew, including Mary Spencer, Frances Dickenson, Margaret Johnson and Jenet Hergreaves, primarily that they were witches.(153)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 153

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1304

Edmund Robinson, the elder, is re-examined and denies ever having identified Frances Dickenson or any other woman from the area (Lancaster) as a witch.(153)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 153

1634, July 16 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1306

Edmund Robinson Jr. and his father allegedly went from church to church where Edmund Robinson Jr. would identify witches in order to make a living.(lix)

Appears in:
Potts, Edward Bromley (Sir.), James Crossley, Thomas. Potts's Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. Unknown: 1845, lix

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1377

Eleanor Holland and Elizabeth Hardman fortell how many fits they will have the next day before they go to sleep. Eleanor Holland alleges that she will have her fit before noon, and that it will last three hours. When the time comes, she insists an hourglass be set to record the length of the fit; her companions do so in a place where she cannot see it. Though senseless, she accurately states the quarter and half hours, and bid them turn the glass as the last sand runs down three times. When Eleanor is asked how she was able to do this, she says a white dove told her.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1379

MIstress Starchie questions the five children (Anne and John Starchie, Margaret and Elizabeth Hardman, and Eleanor Holland) on how they have been handled, hoping for information she can take to preachers; they tell her that an angel came from God in the shape of a dove came to them and said they must follow it to heaven through a hole it would draw them through. They ran under the beds, where Elizabeth Hardman begins to make a hole, believing there is a boy on the other side who would help her do so.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6

1598, Winter Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1451

Edmund Robinson testifies to George Long that that he did not believe his son (Edmund Robinson Jr.) when he first came to him and his wife telling of witches. However, his son's persistence and his tears made Edmund Robinson begin to wonder whether the boy had had a vision of sorts concerning witches in the area.(144)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 144

1634, July 12   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1979

Richard Dugdale, a young man from Lancashire, begs leave of his master to go to a rushbearing, or a rural festival at the dedication of a church, in Whalley. The following morning, returning to work, Richard Dugdale "being troubled in Mind, he thought that he saw several Apparitions, but could not tell the resemblance thereof."(62)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62

1690 Whalley  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1980

Richard Dugdale of Lancashire becomes ill while making hay, and upon the advice of a well reputed neighbour and serving woman, goes to take a drink and lie down in the Hall he works at. After "some time being laid down upon the Bed, the Chamber-Door opened of it self," and several apparitions appear to him. First, smoke or mist, then a "Hard-favoured man" he mistakes for a fellow servant or a Black man, which turns into a naked child. "All this was done when he was awake." The apparitions disappear after dancing in front of him, in a burst of flame.(62-63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63

1690 Gisburne  Gisburne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1981

Upon a violent fit, where Richard Dugdale of Lancashire could scarce be held down, his uncle and family take him to see the neighbouring doctor, Dr. Chew. After "taking the physick from Dr. Chrew, " he had "to the best of his knowledg, [...] little advantage by the first Physick."(59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1982

Richard Dugdale of Lancaster consults Dr. Crabtree after his first Physick from Dr. Chew fails to cure his fits, but was amazed at Richard Dugdale's "precise fore-telling various sorts of Weather." Even though he was "blooded several times, the first of which was as black as Ink," Richard Dugdale's fits continually worsen. His father, Thomas Dugdale, stops the treatments. Dr. Chew concludes that " if the Spirit in Richard Dugdale was a Water-Spirit, there was no cure for it," and that the disease is not natural, leading to his recommendation to seek out ministers.(49)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 49

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1986

Richard Dugdale returns to see Dr. Chew concerning his fits, which have yet to resolve themselves after having seeing Dr. Crabtree and the minister, Mr. Jolly. He takes "Physick from Dr. Chew, and says, that the Physick worked well with him, and since that time, he says, he never had any Fit," allowing him to marry and continue with his gardening profession, although it is agreed his "disease was not ordinary."(63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 63

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1991

Richard Dugdale experiences a number of Fits, believed to be caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by his ability to foretell things "which he could not possibly know by any ordinary means." This includes predicting the weather, when visitors will come to call, where persons might travel to, and the time and length of his next fit. These various fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly; James Abbot; Thomas Dugdale, his father; Nathaniel Waddington; John Fielding; William Livesay; Ann Whittaker; and Joshua Thomason.(45)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 45

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1999

Richard Dugdale of Lancaster experiences a number of fits, where "his ability of body is beyond the Joint Strength of many Lusty men." His fits are deemed beyond ordinary, possibly caused by the Devil, and witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly; the apothecary Mr. Ainsworth; another apothecary (Anonymous 335); John Whitehead; and John Walmsly.(45)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 45

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2000

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits characterized by his ability to speak in "another Voice, besides his own," and further, his voice can be heard at great distances. Sometimes, noises arise from Richard Dugdale that are not human, but animal or strange. These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, John Walmsly, William Loond, John Fielding, Thomas Core, Grace Whalley, Nathaniel Waddington, John Fletcher, and Edmund Haworth.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2001

Richard Dugdale is allegedly seized by fits possibly caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by extreme weight change, being at "one while as heavy as a Lump of Lead of that bigness, and other while as light as a Bag of Feathers of 14 or 16 pound weight." These fits are also characterized by his lifeless appearance for a considerable amount of time. Witnesses to Richard Dugdales fits of this nature include: the minister Mr. Jolly, his father Thomas Dugdale, John Walmsly, John Livesay, William Livesay, John Smalley, John Hindle, Joseph Hargreaves, Thomas Booth, John Grimshaw, and William Sellars.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2004

Richard Dugdale, allegedly suffers from many fits thought to be caused by Satan characterized by "his diabolical rage and blasphemy against God, and Christ," and at other times, "Satan sometimes in his Fits, transform himself into an Angel of Light," and recited sermons and scriptures that he had never heard. These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, John Livesay, and Nathaniel Waddington.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2005

Richard Dugdale is allegedly seized by a number of fits possibly caused by the Devil, characterized by his ability to "his speaking several languages, which he never learned." These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, William Fort, and Robert Waddington.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2006

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from lumps on his chest and stomach, which sometimes become mice, or rats, and at other times sounds like "a little dog." This is witnessed by Mr. Jolly and John Fletcher.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2007

Richad Dugdale allegedly vomits a number objects during his fits which are believed to be caused by the Devil, including gold, silver, and brass rings; a hair button; stones; and a curtain-ring. These fits were witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly; Richard Dugdale's father, Thomas Dugdale; Edmund Hayworth; Grace Whalley; and John Hindle.(49)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 49

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2008

Richard Dugdale suffers from a number of alleged fits, during which objects such as goose-dung and stones appear in his hands, although there are none near. Further, these stones are often warm to the touch. Both Thomas Dugdale, Richard Dugdale's father, and John Whalley are witness to these fits.(49)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 49

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2009

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, possibly caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by strange contortions of his body, "begun in the Calf of his Leg, and wrought upwards into the Chest of his Body, and then he was thrown down." As well, he engaged in strange movements during the length of these fits, as witnessed by John Walmsly, William Loond, John Fletcher, William Fort, and Joshua Thomason. After these strange contortions of the body, Richard Dugdale apparently looks "in far better liking, when out of his Fits, then ever he was before," however, Richard Dugdale allegedlly cannot recall what transpires during his fits.(51)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 51

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2010

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, possibly caused by The Devil, characterized by "dancing and roreing hidiously." These fits are witnessed by Ann Whittaker, John Walmsly, William Livesay, John Fletcher, and Henry Page.(54-55)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 54-55

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2011

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, during which time John Hindle "prickt a large pin in his Feet, and he neither stirred nor complained at all." John Fletcher was witness.(57)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 57

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2012

Dr. Whittaker refuses to treat Richard Dugdale for his fits, "for that he concluded it to be more than a Natural Distemper."(65)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 65

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2013

Richard Dugdale visits the minister Mr. Jolly in Lancaster, where a fit seized him while Mr. Jolly read and prayed. This fit was violence and strange, and "he raged as if the Devil had been in his bodily Shape."(72)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 72

1689, April 29 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2014

Richard Dugdale visits the minister, Mr. Jolly, when he is seized by a fit, and "the Devil raged in the young Man exceedingly," and discovering things by "Diabolical Means."(74)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 74

1689, August 13 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2015

During a fit in front of a junior minister (Anonymous 338), Richard Dugdale confesses to having a contract with the Devil, "That he might excel all others in Dancing," in order to gain the favour of a young woman at a rushbearing. Richard Dugdale allegedly could not dance before his fits seized him, but could afterward. When Richard Dugdale is not in a fit, he does not confess to having any knowledge of a contract with the Devil.(75)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 75

1689, September 6 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2016

Richard Dugdale is seized by a fit, during which he allegedly tells the minister Mr. Jolly "the young Man was his own." Mr. Jolly believes a spirit spoke through Richard Dugdale.(76)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 76

1689, October 11 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2018

Richard Dugdale confesses to seeing an apparition of the Devil while "in his Drink," and so "The Devil, in his Drink, drew him into a blind Consent, and Compact, to satisfy his curiosity, and Dancing Humour."(79)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 79

1690, Feb 20 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2019

Richard Dugdale suffers a violent fit on March 24, 1690, as he previously predicted in another fit. After this fit, "the Evil Spirit took it's leave of him." The spirit does so, by crying out, "Now Dicky, I must leave thee, and must afflict thee no more as I have done, I have troubled thee thus long by Obsessions, and also by a Combination, that never shall be discover'd as long as the World endures." This fit also occurs after Richard Dugdale's confession to a contract with the Devil, that was thought to expire after eighteen months. This was his final fit, after which he was freed.(79)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 79

1690, March 24 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2027

John Starchie allegedly suffers his first fit at the age of ten, a week after his sister Anne suffers her first fit, in which he is compelled to shout on the way to school. These fits become extreme, lasting 9-10 weeks.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5

1594, February Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2028

NIcholas Starchie hires Edmund Hartley, reputed to be a conjurer with certain papist charms and herbs at his disposal, who alleges he can keep Anne and John Starchie from having fits. For the first year and a half of Hartley's employment, the Starchie children are quiet and seem to be well. (Image 5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5

1594, April Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2029

John Starchie allegedly has a fit in which he falls to bleeding when Edmund Hartley pretends he is leaving Lancashire and is setting out on his way. Nicholas Starchie has Hartley stopped and returned to Cleworth; Hartley claims that no man but him could have staunched John's bleeding. Several similar incidents follow.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5

1595, October Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2030

Edmund Hartley convinces Nicholas Starchie that he is indispensible to the well-being of the Starchie children by September 1596, but is dissatisfied with the terms Starchie offers him; he sends a loud whupping noise in his anger. Starchie had first given him room and board, then promised and annual pension in writing, effective Michaels Day (September 25) of 1598. Hartley demanded a house and ground, which Starchie refused. By mid-November, the fits and strange events resumed.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5

1596, September Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2031

Edmund Hartley travels with NIcholas Starchie to visit his father and is tormented all night; the next day he goes into the woods and makes a circle divided in four with a cross in each part. When finished, he fetches Starchie and attempts to get Starchie to walk the circle in his place; Starchie refuses.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5

1596 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2032

Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman and Eleanor Holland are asked for testimony against Edmund Hartley by Justice of Peace Hopwood, but they are all rendered speechless whether questioned together or individually. The most they will say is that Hardman will not suffer them to speak against him.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2033

Jane Ashton, a maidservant in the Starchie household, allegedly begins to bark and howl when she tries to give testimony against Edmund Hartley to Justice of the Peace Hopwood. Though Jane is prevented from speaking, others in the house recall that this is the second time she has been afflicted - she had become sick and vomited blood a year before after going into Hartley's chamber and looking in his chest.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2036

Margaret Byrom travels from Cleworth to Salford with Edmund Hartley, where Hartley is made to take her before two Justice of the Peace to take her testimony against him; she is struck speechless and cast backward to the ground three times. To explain, she alleges to see a great black dog with a monstrous tail and a chain in its mouth, which runs at her and casts her into the fire, keeping her from speaking but leaving her able to use her eyes and hands. A short time later, a large black cat stared at her, knocked her down once more, and took the use of her eyes and hands. A half hour later, she is visited by an apparition in the shape of a big mouse, which knocks her down and takes her tongue, eyes and senses. (Image 7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 7

1598. January Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2041

Margaret Byrom allegedly suffers six instances in as many weeks in which the spirit possessing her will not permit her to eat or drink. If urged to by others, the spirit causes Byrom and the food or drink to be cast to the ground together. When able to eat, she does so greedily and feels hungry no matter how much she has consumed.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 7

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2042

Margaret Byrom allegedly suffers a fit in which she feels as if she is being pulled to pieces, and a stinking smoke emerges from her mouth. Her voice and the sound of her crying changes, and she reeks so badly for a day and a night that no-one can bear to come near her.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 7

1598, February 10 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2043

The Devil appears to Margaret Byrom in the shape of Edmund Hartley two nights in a row, promising her silver and gold if she takes heed what she says and speaks the truth during her forthcoming examination regarding Hartley. Thinking it's Hartley, Byrom tells him that she already has told the truth, and she will not favor him now for silver nor gold. The second night he leaves her with the words "do as thou wilt." She is troubled by fits the day before Hartley's execution, causing her to go to the morning prayer daily thereafter.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 7

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2044

Nicholas Starchie consults with preachers for advice on the possessions within his household, and is eventually referred to John Darrell. Starchie writes to Darrell twice requesting help, the second time with a letter of reference from a Justice of the Peace. After the second letter, Darrell agrees to consult on the matter.(8)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 8

1598, February Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2045

John Darrell arrives at the Starchie household in the company of George More; at dinner, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman and Eleanor Holland suffer fits in which they are thrown about. their faces disfigured and their bodies swell. One of them is heard to say, regarding Edmund Hartley's recent execution, "Do you think you can hang the Devil?"(8)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 8

1598, March 16 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2046

John Darrell, accompanied by George More, local pastor Mr. Dickens, and 30 others, gathers Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Byrom and Jane Ashton in the parlor for a day of prayer and fasting; all seven have fits throughout the day and six are allegedly successfully dispossessed. At the end, the seven are extremely tormented, beating their bodies and needing to be held, crying in a supernatural manner and lying as if dead. Margaret Byrom is the first dispossessed, followed by John Starchie. Jane Ashton allegedly pretends to be dispossessed at the end of the day, but has not truly been.(10-11)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 10-11

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2047

Jane Ashton allegedly suffers a howling fit the night of John Darrell and George More's arrival. Darrell declares this proof of her possession, coupled with an account of how her belly had swollen to the size of late pregnancy earlier that day.(9)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 9

1598, March 16 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2048

John Darrell takes accounts from Margaret Byrom, John Starchie, Anne Starchie, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Hardman and Elizabeth Hardman, asking them to describe how the Devil looked when he left them. Byrom alleges that she felt something come up from her belly to her breast and saw a dark mist emerge from her throat that left a foul smell behind, and went out the window in a flash of fire. John Starchie alleges it left him like an ill-favored hunchbacked man; Margaret Hardman says the same. Anne Starchie alleges he left like a foul ugly man with a white beard and a bulge on his breast the size of a man's head; Eleanor Hardman says she saw the same thing save the beard. Eleanor Hardman alleges it was like an urchin, who left through a tiny hole only to return in a foul shape promising gold; he threatened her when she refused and left again in the urchin shape.(11)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 11

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2049

The Devil appears to Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Elizabeth Hardman, Margaret Hardman and Eleanor Holland in the night immediately after their dispossession, and attempts to get their permission to repossess them with gold and threats. He appears to them variously as a hunchbacked man, a man with a bulge at his neck, a bear with fire in its mouth, an ape and a dove.(11-12)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 11-12

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2050

Jane Ashton is alleged to still be possessed the day after the exorcism of Margaret Byrom, John Starchie, Anne Starchie, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Hardman and Elizabeth Hardman; she is observed to be tormented, vomiting, shaking and weeping. She lays as dead for a while after John Darrell performs another exorcism on her, and rises up giving thanks for her deliverance. She claims that the Devil rose up in her throat and bid her to say that he was gone from her, promising not to hurt her any longer and to ensure that she lacked for nothing if she did. (12-13)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 12-13

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2051

John Darrell alleges that the Devil returned over the next few days following the exorcisms to torment Margaret Byrom, John Starchie, Anne Starchie, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, and Jane Ashton. It throws them down, deprives them of the use of their limbs, promises worldly goods and makes threats to try to get them to consent to repossession. They resist, and are not tormented further to his knowledge.(13)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 13

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2189

The young man, Richard Dugdale, upon being seized by a number of strange fits, asks the minister Mr. Jolly to "set apart a Day of Fasting," in order to help him alleviate his fits.(2)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 2

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2190

While at a rushbearing, a rural festival at the dedication of a church, in Whalley, Richard Dugdale allegedly offers himself to the Devil, "on condition the Devil would make him a good Dancer." He makes this deal in order to gain the favour a young woman at the festival.(2)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 2

1688, July 25 Whalley  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2191

Upon returning to the home of his father, Thomas Dugdale, after a rushbearing in Whalley, Richard Dugdale's side is "suddenly seiz'd as with a burning pain, as if it had been whipt and stung with Nettles, or stab'd with Needles." Almost immediately afterward, "several Apparitions presented themselves, and after Vanish'd before him."(2)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 2

1688 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2260

Richard Dugdale allegedly saw "an Apparition of the Devil pointing at something which the said Richard had lately done," leading Mr. Jolly to assume that Richard Dugdale had formed some sort of malefic compact with the Devil.(3)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 3

1688 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2261

On August 1, 1688, Richard Dugdale is seized by a fit in the presence of the minister Mr. Jolly, during which time he speaks in "Latin, Greek, and other Languages very well," as well as declaring himself against "the sins of the place and time."(7)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 7

1688, August 1 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2262

Richard Dugdale is seized by a fit on August 13, 1688, while fasting, during which he foretells the coming of Mr. Carrington, "when he was about Two Fields off the Barn" where Richard was located.(7)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 7

1688, August 13 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2263

Mr. Jolly engages in a set pattern of "exercise" when helping Richard Dugdale with his fits, which are allegedly caused by the devil. This consists of preaching or reading the Bible; questioning the demoniack during fits; and praying when Richard Dugdale goes quiet during a fit. At the end of almost all of these exercises, Richard Dugdale allegedly foretold "precisely and punctually" when his next fit would be. (8)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 8

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2264

During a fit, Richard Dugdale cried out for "Carlisle, Carlisle," and demanded to speak with Carlisle. Upon being denied by the minister Mr. Jolly, Richard Dugdale allegedly flew into a "seemingly extraordinary rage."(11)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 11

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2265

The minister Mr. Jolly tells Richard Dugdale during one of his alleged fits caused by the Devil, that he will "never let thee alone till thou be gone from him." Richard Dugdale's face contorts upon hearing this, and as a Demoniack, "very furiously flung to and fro."(18)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 18

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2266

Richard Dugdale is attended by seven Roman Catholic ministers during one of his alleged fits, including the reading of a paper which was thought to cure Richard Dugdale but did not. Two of these ministers fled during one of Richard Dugdale's fits; a third was "strong and old, but was thrown down, and in great danger of being kill'd by the Demoniack." Bystanders aided this minister, by pulling off Richard Dugdale "with great difficulty."(21-22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 21-22

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2267

Robert Waddington concludes that Richard Dugdale is allegedly possessed by a "Dumb and Deaf Devil," who explains that Richard Dugdale will be deaf and dumb for a month by paper to Mr. Jolly. This allegedly comes to pass.(22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 22

1689, September 26 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2268

After one of his Fits, Richard Dugdale allegedly "fell upon his knees and prayed with Tears in his Eyes."(22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 22

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2269

Robert Waddington submits a written confession stating his witness to Richard Dugdale's alleged fits, during which time, Richard Dugdale foretells the weather, vomited stones, foretold the death of a child, and dances in a way that "surpasseth, I suppose, any Artist."(23)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 23

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2270

During one of his fits, Satan allegedly speaks through Richard Dugdale, claiming that there was "a Parchment Contract which Dicky entred into with him."(26)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 26

1689, September 19 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2271

On September 3, 1689, Richard Dugdale experiences a fit while fasting, during which Satan allegedly said "that he would spare Dicky Fifty days longer, but then he would carry him to Hell."(24)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 24

1689, September 3 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2272

Richard Dugdale allegedly vomits a piece of paper, which when dried revealed Greek letters. It reveals that Richard Dugdale's alleged fits which are thought to be the result of a possession by the Devil are to last 600 days. At the end of this time, the paper "threatned...the Lord would plunge him in the Lake of burning."(34)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 34

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2273

During a fit seizes that Richard Dugdale on October 22, 1689, Satan allegedly confesses that he will not drag Richard Dugdale to Hell, for Mr. Jolly delivered him. Satan advises Richard Dugdale to "thank my Tormentor as long as thou livest."(42)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 42

1689, October 22 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2274

A "stranger wholly unknown at the Surey," laid a hand on a lump which allegedly appeared on Richard Dugdale's body. The lump then spoke to this stranger (Anonymous 381), advising him that no "Doctor of Physick" can help Richard Dugdale, but only "Doctors of Divinity." The stranger is in fact a physician.(42)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 42

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2377

A young man (Anonymous 407) "in a Bravado, and Defiance of the Devil," walks at night in a churchyard, where alleged the Devil greeted him "in the shape of a Black Dog with terrible Eyes." This brings such terror to the young man, "that he was never quiet in his Mind till he got into good Society."(153)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 153

1691 Coln  Colne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2378

A young man (Anonymous 407) who in "Defiance of the Devil," walked at night in a graveyard, and had the Devil appear to him in the shape of a "Black Dog with terrible Eyes," goes to stay with Mr. Shepherd and Mr. Harlakenden in Colne. When the young man prays, "the Black Dog was seen by the Man as if he would have tone Mr. Harlakenden's Throat out." However, the young man feared not while praying. He "continued long in this condition," which "proved [him] a most ferious Christian," although the Devil changed his form "as a Fly or a Flea, and various shapes."(153)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 153

1691 Coln  Colne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2379

Upon the death of a young man (Anonymous 407) who "in Defiance of the Devil," walked a churchyard at night, and was plagued by apparitions of the Devil for the rest of his life in the shape of "a Black Dog with terrible Eyes," or "as a Fly or a Flea and various shapes," he has "Victory over the fear of Death." This is because "this Dog or Flea made no impression upon him," such was his desire "to be dissolved."(153)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 153

1691 Coln  Colne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2466

Elizabeth Southerns alleges in her confession that for five or six years, Tibb would appear to her regularly at dawn and ask what she wanted to have or have him do. Southerns claimed that at this time, she always replied that she wanted nothing yet.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2467

Elizabeth Southerns alleges in her confession that six years after Tibb first appeared to her, she was drowsing in the sun with a small child on her knee one Sunday morning. Tibb came in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to get blood from under her left arm. At this, she woke and said "Iesus saue my Child; but had no power, nor could not say, Iesus saue her selfe." This was enough to make Tibb disappear again. However, the banishment left Southerns mad for the next eight weeks.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2468

Elizabeth Southerns alleges that just before the previous Christmas, her daughter Elizabeth Device helped out Richard Baldwyn's family at their mill, and Device sent Southerns to call on Baldwyn to ask for some kind of repayment. As Southerns was blind in her advanced age, her granddaughter Alison led her to the mill; on the way, they met with Baldwyn. Baldwyn threw them off the property, saying "get out of my ground Whores and Witches, I will burne the one of you, and hang the other." Southerns met with her spirit Tibb on the way back home, and bid him "Reuenge thee eyther of him, or his."(B3-B3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B3-B3v

1611   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2469

Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, makes a confession during her examinaton before William Sandes, Mayor of Lancaster, Justice of the Peace for Lancaster James Anderton, and Coroner for the County of Lancaster Thomas Cowell. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

1612, May 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2470

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, fourteen years ago, Elizabeth Southerns seduced her to "condescent & agree to become subiect vnto that diuelish abhominable profession of Witchcraft." Whittle and Southerns were at Southern's home in the Forest of Pendle. Soon after she agreed, the Devil came to her in the shape of a man and moved her to become his subject and give him her soul. Whittle resisted at first, but Southerns persuaded her until she yielded. The spirit also demanded a part of her body to suck from and took "a place of her right side neere to her ribbes."(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2471

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that the night Elizabeth Southerns persuaded her to become a witch and make a compact with a spirit, a thing appeared in the shape of a spotted bitch and told Southerns that "she should haue Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will." This spirit, which was Southerns' familiar Tibb, brought a feast of "Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke" but no matter how much they ate, they never felt full or any benefit from eating. Tibb was accompanied by Whittle's new familiar, a spirit calling itself Fancie; the two of them cast light over the feast and cleared away the remnants. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2472

Alison Device is examined before Justice of the Peace Robert Nowell at Reade in the County of Lancaster to give evidence against her grandmother, Elizabeth Southerns.(C)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C

1612, March 13 Reade  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2473

Alison Device gives deposition accusing her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns of begging, persuading and advising her numerous times to allow a Devil or familiar to appear to her. Southerns also wanted her to allow this spirit to suck at some part of her, and claimed that if she did, the spirit would do whatever she wanted. This was two years prior to Device's examination.(C)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2474

Alison Device gives deposition against her grandmother, Elizabeth Southerns, alleging that John Nutter once came to Southerns for help with a sick cow. Southerns agreed to look at the animal, and had Alison lead her to it at about 10 o'clock at night; Southerns stayed there for about half an hour, and Alison's sister Jennet led her home again. The cow was dead the next morning, leading Alison to believe that Southerns bewitched it to death.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1612, March 13   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2475

Alison Device alleged in her deposition against Elizabeth Southerns that, about two years before, Alison had got a piggin, or wooden bucket, of blue milk and brought it to Southerns. She found, on arrival, that there was a quarter-pound of butter in the milk, and still the same amount of milk remaining. Alison added that, when she arrived, Southerns had no butter left in the house. (C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2476

Alison Device gives deposition against Elizabeth Southerns alleging that Southerns had a falling out with Richard Baldwyn two years before, and that Baldwyn would not allow her on his land. Device claims that Southerns had her lead her to Baldwyn's home around 10 o'clock at night four days later, and that Southerns stayed about an hour until Device's younger sister Jennet fetched her home. Device heard the next day that Baldwyn's daughter was sick; the child languished for a year or so and then died. Device accuses Southerns of bewitching the girl to death, as she had heard Southerns curse Baldwyn numerous times.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2477

Alison Device gives deposition against Elizabeth Southerns alleging that Southerns had a falling out with Richard Baldwyn two years before, and that Baldwyn would not allow her on his land. Device claims that Southerns had her lead her to Baldwyn's home around 10 o'clock at night four days later, and that Southerns stayed about an hour until Device's younger sister Jennet fetched her home. Device heard the next day that Baldwyn's daughter was sick; the child languished for a year or so and then died. Device accuses Southerns of bewitching the girl to death, as she had heard Southerns curse Baldwyn numerous times.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2478

James Device is examined on April 27, 1612 before Justices of the Peace for Lancashire Roger Nowell and Nicholas Bannister.(C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

1612, April 27 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2479

James Device alleges during his examination that, about a month ago, he was walking toward his mother's home at sunset and met a brown dog coming from his grandmother's house. About two or three nights later, he heard "a voyce of a great number of Children screiking and crying pittifully" coming from his grandmother's home when he reached the same place where he had met the dog. The next five nights, also at sunset, he would hear "a foule yelling like vnto a great number of Cattes: but what they were, this Examinate cannot tell." (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

1612, March   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2480

James Device alleges during his deposition that one night last month, a thing (Anonymous 178) came into his bedroom around midnight and lay heavily on him for about an hour. The spirit then left out the window. All he could see of it was that it was black and about the size of a hare or cat.(C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

1612, March   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2481

Elizabeth Device is indicted on three counts. The first is for bewitching John Robinson to death, the second is for bewitching James Robinson to death, and the third is for conspiring with Alice Nutter and Elizabeth Southerns to bewitch Henry Mytton to death.(F3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F3v

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2482

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that she bewitched James Robinson to death.(F4-F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4-F4v

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2483

Elizabeth Device makes a confession at the home of James Wisely in the Forest of Pendle on April 27, 1612. This confession is witnessed by Justices for the Peace for Lancaster Roger Nowell and Nicholas Bannister.(F4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2484

Jennet Device, a child of nine, gives evidence before the court against her mother, Elizabeth Device. Elizabeth curses and cries out against her daughter, until Jennet, shaken to the point of tears, tells the judge she will not speak in Elizabeth's presence. (F4v-G)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4v-G

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2485

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that her mother, Elizabeth Device, used her familiar Ball to kill John Robinson, and that her mother had been a witch for the last three or four years. Elizabeth also had Ball kill James Robinson, John's brother; James died three weeks later. (F4v-Gv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4v-Gv

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2486

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that she once saw her mother, Elizabeth Device, call for her spirit Ball, and ask him to kill Henry Mytton. Ball said he would do it and vanished away; three weeks later, Mytton died.(F4v-Gv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4v-Gv

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2487

James Device alleges during his examination that, about a year before, he heard his grandmother Elizabeth Southerns say that his mother Elizabeth Device had bewitched Henry Mytton to death with the help of some others. Mytton was killed because Southerns had asked him for a penny and he denied her. She arranged for his death in revenge.(G2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G2

1611   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2488

James Device alleges during his examination that, three years before, he was at his grandmother's house with his mother, Elizabeth Device, when Elizabeth was approached by a "thing in shape of a browne dogge, which his mother called Ball." The spirit spoke to Elizabeth and bid her make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it hard, and crumble it little by little so that Robinson's body would decay and wear away. Ball said that when the image was gone, Robinson would die; he then vanished. The next day, James saw his mother make an image. She crumbled it over about three weeks, and two days after it was gone, Robinson was dead.(G2-G2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G2-G2v

1609   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2489

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that, on Good Friday, she had a number of witches at her home of Malking Tower to dine. She confirmed the list her son James Device had given as being in attendance. (G3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2490

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that on Good Friday, the same day she held a feast of witches at her home of Malking Tower, her mother Elizabeth Southerns had two women of Burneley Paris at her house, the names of whom Richard Nutter's wife could tell, and that Anne Crouckshey of Marsden was also there.(G3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2491

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that she recalls discussing killing Master Lister at the feast at Malking Tower, but she denies that there was any talk of killing the gaoler, or of blowing up Lancaster Castle.(G3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2492

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that 20 people, only two of which were men, attended the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday. Her mother, Elizabeth Device, told her they were all witches, and that they were there to give a name to her sister Alison Device's familiar. They feasted on beef, bacon and mutton. Jennet gave the names of six of the attending witches: The wife of Hugh Hargraves, her uncle Christopher Howgate and his wife Elizabeth Howgate, Dick Miles' wife, and Christopher Jacks and his wife. She did not know the names of the rest, but confirmed that her mother and brother, James Device, were also there.(G3v-G4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v-G4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2493

James Device alleges during his examination that numerous people dined at his mother's home of Malking Tower at noon on Good Friday, three of which were men. They met to name his sister Alison Device's familiar, which they could not do because Alison was imprisoned at Lancaster Castle. The conversation turned to discussion of freeing Elizabeth Southerns, Alison Device, Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne from their imprisonment. They determined that they would need to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and blow up the castle before the next assizes in order to let them escape. (G4-G4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G4-G4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2494

James Device alleges during his examination that the following people were witches and had attended the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday: Hugh Hargreave's wife, Christopher Bulcock's wife, John Bulcock, Myle's Nutter's mother, Elizabeth Hargreaves, Christopher Howgate, Elizabeth Howgate, Alice Graye, and Kathryn Hewit (alias Mould-heel), Preston's wife, his mother Elizabeth Device, and himself. Device claimed that they all left on horseback after agreeing to meet the next Good Friday at Preston's wife's home. If they needed to meet in the mean time, that meeting would be held at Romley's Moor.(G4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2495

Jennet Device gives deposition alleging that about three years before, her brother James Device called his familiar Dandy to kill both John Hargraves and Blaze Hargraves. (Iv-I2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Iv-I2

1609   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2496

James Device alleges during his examination that he stole a wether (a castrated sheep) from John Robinson and brought it to Malking Tower for the Good Friday feast. He also restated that the meeting was to name Alison Device's familiar, but that she was not there, and that they had discussed killing the gaoler at Lancaster and blowing up the castle to free the prisoners.(I2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2497

James Device alleges during his examination that one of the women at the Malking Tower feast on Good Friday had come to ask assistance from the rest to bewitch Thomas Lister to death. She claimed that Lister had "orne malice vnto her, and had thought to haue put her away at the last Assises at Yorke." She also claimed not to have the power to do the deed herself.(I2v-I3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v-I3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2498

James Device alleges during his examination that Jennet Preston has a familiar spirit in the shape of a white foal with a black spot on its forehead. (I2v-I3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v-I3

1612, April 27 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2499

James Device makes a confession while imprisoned in the Castle at Lancaster before William Sandes, Mayor of Lancaster, James Anderton, Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancaster, and Thomas Cowell, Coroner for the County of Lancaster.(I4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I4v

1612, August Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2500

James Device alleges during his confession that his familiar Dandy was insistent that he give him his soul. He and Dandy argued about it: "he would giue him that part thereof that was his owne to giue: and thereupon the said Spirit said, hee was aboue CHRIST IESVS, and therefore hee must absolutely giue him his Soule[.]" The last time Dandy came to him was the Tuesday before his apprehension; the familiar had vanished with a fearful cry and yell when James yet again refused to give his soul absolutely.(I4v-K)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I4v-K

1612, August Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2501

Jennet Device alleges during her deposition that her mother, Elizabeth Device, taught her two prayers, one to get drink and one to cure the bewitched. Jennet recited both, and claimed that her brother, James Device, had successfully used the one to get drink. He told her that an hour after saying it, drink arrived at the house in a strange manner.(K-K2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K-K2

1612, August Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2502

Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, Elizabeth Device and James Device are declared guilty of murder by witchcraft.(K2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K2v

1612, August 18 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2503

John Singleton gives deposition in Salmesbury before Justice of the Peace Robert Holden on August 7, 1612. In his deposition, he claims that he had often heard his master, Sir John Southworth (now deceased) speak of his cousin John Southworth's wife, Jane Southworth, as an "euill woman, and a Witch." Sir John also said he was "sorry for her husband, that was his kinsman, for he thought she would kill him." Furthermore, Sir John avoided Jane, to the point that he would choose routes that allowed him to avoid passing her house.(L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

1612, August 7   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2504

William Alker gives deposition on April 15, 1612, before Justice of the Peace Robert Holden. Alker claims to have seen Sir John Southworth shun Joan Southworth whenever they came near one another. He also claimed to have heard Sir John say that "he liked her not, and that he doubted she would bewitch him."(M)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, M

1612, April 15   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2505

Grace Sowerbutts is examined a second time, this time on August 19, 1612 following the evidence against Joan Southworth, Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley. Justices of the Peace William Leich and Edward Chisnel preside over the examination at the direction of Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley.(M4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, M4v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2506

Grace Sowerbutts retracts her accusation that Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley killed, cooked, ate and rendered for fat Thomas Walshman's child, or that either of them ever changed shape. She also states that Jane Southworth had nothing to do with the child's death.(Mv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Mv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2507

Grace Sowerbutts, retracting her accusations against Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley and Joan Southworth, accuses the priest Master Thompson, alias Master Christopher Southworth, of encouraging her to make the accusations. According to Sowerbutts, she was sent to Thompson to learn her prayers, and while under his tutelage, he "did perswade, counsell, and aduise her, to deale as formerly hath beene said against her said Grand-mother, Aunt, and Southworths wife."(Mv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Mv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2508

Grace Sowerbutts retracts her claims of having seen devils or any other visions, and that she climbed up on the hay-mow herself rather than being cast there. When demanded to answer whether she attended church, she responded that she did not, but promised to start willingly.(Mv-M2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Mv-M2

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2509

Joan Southworth, Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley are examined a second time, this time on August 19, 1612 following Grace Sowerbutt's retraction. Justices of the Peace William Leich and Edward Chisnel preside over the examination at the direction of Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley.(Nv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Nv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2510

Jennet Bierley gives deposition a second time, following Grace Sowerbutts' retraction. Bierly alleges that Sowerbutts was brought to priest Master Thompson, alias Christopher Southworth, by her mother. She accused Thomson of counseling Sowerbutts to make the accusations because Bierley attended a different church.(Nv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Nv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2511

Jane Southworth gives deposition following Grace Sowerbutt's retraction, alleging that a month or six weeks before she was gaoled, she spoke with Master Thompson, alias Christopher Southworth. At that time, she "challenged him for slandering her to bee a Witch: wherunto he answered, that what he had heard thereof, he heard from her mother and her Aunt[.]" Nevertheless, she thought him the origin of the slander, and thought it was because she would not be persuaded to change churches.(Nv-N2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Nv-N2

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2512

Ellen Bierley gives deposition following Grace Sowerbutt's retraction. She alleges that she saw Master Thompson, alias Christopher Southworth, six or eight weeks before she was imprisoned. She accused Thompson of prompting Sowerbutts to accuse her of witchcraft, and could think of no reason why he would except that she attends a different church.(Nv-N2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Nv-N2

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2513

Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth are found innocent of witchcraft and murder at the conclusion of their trial. Instead, priest Master Thompson, alias Christopher Southworth, is declared to have conspired maliciously against them. (Nv-N2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Nv-N2v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2514

Margaret Crooke gives deposition against Anne Redferne before Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell, alleging that her brother Robert Nutter had a falling out with Redferne at Whitsontide 18 or 19 years before. He fell sick about a fortnight later, and died around Candlemas. Crooke claims to have heard him say often that "Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." (O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

1593, June 3   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2515

Margaret Crooke alleges in her deposition that her father, Christopher Nutter, became sick the Maudlintide after her brother Robert Nutter died claiming Anne Redferne had bewitched him. He languished until Michaelmas and then died. Crooke claimed that during his sickness, he " did sundry times say, That hee was bewitched; but named no bodie that should doe the same."(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

1594, July 22   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2516

John Nutter gives deposition alleging that, around Christmas eighteen or nineteen years before, he heard his brother Robert Nutter tell their father Christopher Nutter "Father, I am sure I am bewitched by the Chattox, Anne Chattox, and Anne Redferne her daughter, I pray you cause them to bee layed in Lancaster Castle[.]" Christopher called him foolish, and blamed Robert for his own misfortunes. Robert wept and continued to insist he was bewitched, saying that "I will procure them to bee laid where they shall be glad to bite Lice in two with their teeth."(Ov-O2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ov-O2

1593, December 25   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2517

Anne Whittle confesses to making clay images and begs on behalf of her daughter, Anne Redferne, following John Nutter's examination. Redferne is nevertheless declared more dangerous than Whittle for having made more clay images.(Ov-O2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ov-O2

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2518

James Device alleges during his examination that, two years before, he saw three clay images half a yard long at the end of the Redferne home. He claims that he saw Thomas Redferne holding one, his daughter Marie Redferne holding another, and his wife Anne Redferne holding the third. Anne Redferne was crumbling hers. Device could not tell whose images they were. Shortly after he walked away, a thing like a hare appeared and spit fire at him.(O2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O2v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2519

Alice Nutter is arraigned and tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley. She stands accused of bewitching Henry Mytton to death, and is suspected of attending the meeting of witches at Malking Tower. Nutter pleads not guilty.(O3-O4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O3-O4

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2520

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that Alice Nutter and Elizabeth Southerns "ioyned altogether, and bewitched the said Henry Mitton to death." Device also claimed that Nutter knew the two women from Burnley Parish who attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower.(O4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O4v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2521

James Device alleges during his examination that Alice Nutter attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower.(P)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2522

Jennet Device, while giving deposition about who attended the feast on Good Friday at Malking Tower, picks Alice Nutter out of the crowd in the courtroom. Device claims that she recognized Nutter as having been at the feast.(Pv-P2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Pv-P2

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2523

James Device alleges during his examination that Katherine Hewit attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. He also claimed to have overheard Hewit and Alice Grey confess to killing the child Anne Foulds and to having Michael Hartley's child in hand.(P4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2524

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that Katherine Hewit was among the witches who attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. Device claims to have heard Hewit and Alice Grey confess to having killed the child Anne Foulds, and to having got ahold of another child. (P4-P4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P4-P4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2525

Elisabeth Device alleges during her examination that, during the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower, she heard Katherine Hewit give her consent for the murder of Master Lister.(P4-P4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P4-P4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2526

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that Katherine Hewit attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. When asked to find her and point her out at the trial, Device took Hewit by the hand. Device accused Hewit of witchcraft, described where she sat at the feast, who sat next to her, and reported on the conversation.(Q)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2527

Jennet Bierley is found not guilty of witchcraft. She is cautioned to use the mercy and favour well, and ordered delivered.(Qv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Qv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2528

Margaret Pearson is arraigned and tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley. She stands accused of using witchcraft on the horse and goods of Dodgeson of Padiham.(S3v-S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S3v-S4v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2529

Anne Whittle gives deposition alleging that Margaret Pearson confessed to her that she is a witch and has a spirit (Anonymous 153) in the shape of a man with cloven feet. Pearson claimed to have "done very much harme to one Dodgesons goods" and sat with her spirit on the back of Dodgeson's mare until the horse died.(S2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S2v

1612, August 19   Paddiham  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2530

Anne Whittle alleges during her examination that Margaret Pearson confessed to bewitching Mrs. Childer and her daughter to death.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2531

Jennet Booth gives deposition on August 9, 1612 before Justice of the Peace Nicholas Bannister. In her deposition, she alleges that the Friday after Margaret Pearson was gaoled, Booth was carding wool in Pearson's home. She went to warmed up some milk to give to her child, and took it off the fire only to find a thing like a toad crawling out from under the pan. Her child carried the toad out of the house in tongs.(T)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T

1612, August 9   Paddiham  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2532

Isabel Robey is arraigned and tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley. She stands accused of practicing witchcraft. (T2-T2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T2-T2v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2533

Peter Chaddock gives deposition on July 12, 1612 before Justice of the Peace Sir Thomas Gerrard. In his deposition, he alleges that Isabel Robey was displeased with his choice of wife prior to his marriage, that he called her a witch, and that he told her did not care for her. Two days later, he was struck by a pain in his bones. He claims Thomas Lyon was also afflicted when he joined Chaddock on a trip, but both soon mended.(T3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3

1612, July 12 Windle    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2534

Peter Chaddock alleges in his deposition that, four years before, his wife argued with Isabel Robey; later the same day, he was working in the hay and became afflicted with a stiffness and pain in his neck. Over the next five days, he also developed a fever and thirst, but could not drink. He sent for his friend James to pray for him, which allowed him to drink again, and was soon mended thereafter.(T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

1608 Windle    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2535

Peter Chaddock alleged during his examination that on Lady Day in Lent the year before, he became "sore pained with great warch in his bones, and all his limmes, and so yet continueth." He claims that Isabel Robey is directly responsible for his pains.(T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

1611, March 25 Windle    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2536

Jane Wilkinson gives deposition before Justice of the Peace Sir Thomas Gerrard. In her deposition, she alleges that Isabel Robey once asked her for milk, and she refused. Wilkinson became afraid of Robey thereafter, and became sick and so pained she could not stand. (T4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4

1612, July 12 Windle    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2537

Jane Wilkison alleges in her deposition that the day after she refused to give Isabel Robey some milk, she left home to travel to Warrington, but was "suddenly pinched on her Thigh as shee thought, with foure fingers & a Thumbe twice together, and thereupon was sicke." She was forced to return home on horseback, and mended soon after.(T4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4

1612, July 12 Windle    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2538

Margaret Lyon gives deposition before Justice of the Peace Sir Thomas Gerrard. In her deposition, she alleges that Isabel Robey once told her that "Peter Chaddock should neuer mend vntill he had asked her forgiuenesse; and that shee knew hee would neuer doe." Mrs. Chaddock later told her the same thing: "I thinke that my Husband will neuer mend vntill hee haue asked her forgiuenesse."(T4-T4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4-T4v

1612, July 12 Windle    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2539

Margaret Parre gives deposition before Justice of the Peace Sir Thomas Gerard. In her deposition, she alleges that Isabel Robey once came to her home, and that she had asked Robey how Peter Chaddock did. Robey replied that she had not seen him. Parre then asked about Jane Wilkinson, for Wilkinson had been sick and was suspected to be bewitched; Robey replied "I haue bewitched her too." Parre said she trusted she could bless herself from all witches. Robey did not like this, saying "would you defie me?" and left angry.(V)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, V

1612, July 12 Windle    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2540

Isabel Robey is found guilty of felony by witchcraft. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging. (V-Vv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, V-Vv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2541

Ellen Bierley is found not guilty of witchcraft. She is cautioned to use the mercy and favour well, and ordered delivered. (Qv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Qv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2542

Jane Southworth is found not guilty of witchcraft. She is cautioned to use the mercy and favour well, and ordered delivered.(Qv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Qv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2543

Katherine Hewit is found guilty of felony and murder. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging. (Qv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Qv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2544

Alice Nutter is found guilty of felony and murder. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging. (Qv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Qv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2545

Anne Redferne is found guilty of felony and murder. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging. (Qv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Qv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2546

Elizabeth Astley, John Ramseden, Alice Grey, Isabel Sidegraves and Lawrence Hayes are found not guilty of witchcraft by Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley. They are cautioned to forsake the Devil and ordered to "enter Recognizances with good sufficient Suerties, to appeare at the next Assizes at Lancaster, and in the meane time to be of the good behauiour."(X-Xv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, X-Xv

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2547

Margaret Pearson is pronounced guilty of witchcraft. She is sentenced by Sir Edward Bromley to stand in the pillory for four market days, once each in Clitheroe, Paddiham, Whalley and Lancaster. While pilloried, she will have a paper on her head with large letters declaring her crimes, and must confess to them. Afterward, she will be imprisoned for one year without bail, and released on the surety of good behaviour thereafter.(V3, V4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, V3, V4v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2548

James Device is found guilty of felony and murder. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences him to execution by hanging. (V2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, V2v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2549

Elizabeth Device is found guilty of felony and murder. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging. (V2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, V2v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2550

Anne Whittle is found guilty of felony and murder. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging. (V2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, V2v

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2552

Anne Robinson gives deposition alleging that Master Thomas Lister was often heard to cry out "Iennet Preston was in the house, looke where shee is, take hold of her: for Gods sake shut the doores, and take her, shee cannot escape away. Looke about for her, and lay hold on her, for shee is in the house[.]" On his deathbed, she claims to have heard him say "Iennet Preston lyes heauie vpon me, Prestons wife lyes heauie vpon me; helpe me, helpe me."(Y2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Y2v

1612, July 27 Gisburne  Gisburne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2553

James Device alleges during his examination that a woman from Gisburne Parish in Yorke (identified as Jennet Preston) came to the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower to ask the assistance of the company gathered there. She desired to kill Master Lister of Westby because he "had borne malice vnto her, and had thought to haue put her away at the last Assizes at Yorke." He heard her say that her power was not strong enough anymore for her to do it herself.(Y3v-Y4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Y3v-Y4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2554

James Device alleges during his examination that some time after the feast at Malking Tower, he went to see Jennet Preston with Henry Hargreives to see if she was the same woman who had come seeking help to kill Thomas Lister. They proved to be one and the same. (Y3v-Y4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Y3v-Y4

1612, April Gisburne  Gisburne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2555

Henry Hargrieves gives deposition on May 5, 1612 before Justices of the Peace Roger Nowell, Nicholas Bannester and Robert Holden. In his deposition, he alleges that Anne Whittle confessed to him to knowing Jennet Preston. Whittle also told him that Preston was at the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower; she added that Preston "was an ill woman, and had done Master Lister of Westby great hurt."(Y4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Y4v

1612, May 5 Goldshey    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2558

Jennet Preston's husband becomes aware of the charges against his wife while attending the witch trails at Lancaster Assizes. Edward Bromley, Justice of the Assize, became suspicious of Device's accusations and commanded her to point out who among the prisoners were the witches named as present at the Malking Tower feast. Device did so, and then told Bromley that there was a woman from Craven who had attended but was not among the prisoners. Upon hearing this, Preston's husband "cried out and went away: being fully satisfied his wife had Iustice, and was worthie of death."(Z2v-Z3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Z2v-Z3

1612, July Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England