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231 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific county

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
136

Joan Peterson and her neighbuor (Anonymous 341) were allegedly sitting by her fireside when Peterson shrieked and cried out, asking the neighbour if he saw anything. The neighbour does not at first, then sees what appears to be a black dog go directly to Peterson and put its head under her armpit. He is so astonished and frightened that he runs from the house.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
145

Joan Buts pleads innocent, and is acquitted of the charges of bewitching Mary Farmer to death and using witchcraft to torment Elizabeth Burgiss. Despite hearing 19 or 20 witnesses, the Jury finds the evidence against her to be insufficient.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 2

1682, March 27 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
148

Alice Fowler is reputed to be a witch for muttering and grumbling to herself regularly.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 1

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
181

A black cat is seen to repeatedly come to the cradle of a sick child and rock it; when the child is being watched by two women, one drives off the cat with a poker and, when it later returns, the other woman kicks at it. The leg that kicked at the cat becomes sore and swollen, frightening the women, who leave the house and encounter a Baker, who saw Peterson go that way and was frightened by the cat himself. He alleges that Peterson has bewitched the child. The cat is thought to be Peterson herself.(1, 5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 1, 5-6

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
239

Anne Fowler is accused by Walter Fowler, her son, of bewitching him and others for many years.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
250

Justice Arthur Robinson, having held a long suspicion that Elizabeth Sawyer is a witch, has thatching taken from her roof. He alleges that wherever some of the thatching was burnt, Sawyer was soon seen to come, thereby proving she is a witch. (A4-B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, A4-B1

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
251

Elizabeth Sawyer's appearance and habits are used as further proof that she is a witch. She is allegedly bloodlessly pale and ghost-like in her face, with a tendency to stare at the ground; her body is crooked and deformed, and her tongue appears to be under the Devil's control at her apprehension and trial, due to her long cursing, swearing, blaspheming and imprecating. Her tongue in particular is identified as "the meanes of her owne destruction, which had destroyed many before."(B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B1

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
254

Mr. Radcliffe gives deposition alleging that Elizabeth Sawyer threatened his wife, Agnes Radcliffe. According to Mr. Radcliffe, the two women fought after Sawyer's sow ate some of Agnes' soap, and Agnes struck the animal. Sawyer told Agnes "for that Elizabeth Sawyer would be reuenged of her, and thus threatned Agnes Ratcleife, that it should be a deare blow vnto her."(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B2-B3

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
255

Mr. Radcliffe alleges in his deposition that the evening after Agnes Radcliffe and Elizabeth Sawyer fought, Agnes fell sick and "was extraordinarily vexed, and in a most strange manner in her sicknesse was tormented." She died about four days later, foaming at the mouth and distempered. Radcliffe claims that Agnes, on her deathbed, said to him, "if shee did die at that time shee would verily take it on her death, that Elizabeth Sawyer her neighbour, whose Sowe with a washing-Beetle she had stricken, and so for that cause her malice being great, was the occasion of her death."(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B2-B3

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
324

Joan Peterson allegedly heals a man of a chronic headache that several doctors could not; the man had been suffering for five weeks and was cured after she gave him a drink and instructed him to take it three times. This account is given as proof of her healing skill.(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4-5

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
432

Anne Kirk is executed for witchcraft at Tyburne on December 4, 1599.(99)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 99

1599 Tyburne    London, Greater  MIddlesex  England 
466

Sarah Bowers, a fourteen year old girl, described as "of a Temper pretty Brisk and Lively, somewhat given to Pride," starts having fits the day when she feels an invisible hand might hit her on the back while in a yard near her aunt's house. She is struck to the ground, where she lies some time as if dead. These fits continue for weeks.(3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
467

Sarah Bower has a fit during which she cannot speak for days and has visions during which she sees heaven and hell and speaks to something that "appear'd to her in the shape of an Angel with Wings, in a flaming Light, which she calls the Man of God." This Angel (Anonymous 27) councils her not to fall prey to Satan and predicts she will die soon. The Angel also passed on words for Sarah Bower to repeat to the people of England," That if the People of London, and England, did not speedily repent from their Sins, especially that of Pride in Apparrel and turn from the Evil of their Ways, God Almighty would give them up as a Prey to their Enemies." Sarah Bower then concludes that her speech would be taken away again, only to be restored on St. Thomas' Day at Christmas, when she "should declare many more Things." These events are witnessed by her neighbours (Anonymous 100).(4-5)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 4-5

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
468

Sarah Bowers, a fourteen year old girl suffering from fits, declares that "at Two a Clock in the Afternoon, she must go and meet the Black Man that had appeared to her in the Neighbours House afore-mentioned," a man (Anonymous 237) who allegedly offered the girl riches in return for blood from her arm. Sarah Bower's speech then leaves her, and "she began to throttle in her Mouth as formerly," and she takes to reading Chapter 17 of the Gospel of Matthew in the Bible, while making a buzzing noise and pointing to every Verse and Line with her finger, as her neighbours (Anonymous 100) witness.(5 - 6)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 5 - 6

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
477

Sarah Morduck is taken into custody on the charge of bewitching Richard Hathaway with Sir Thomas Lane as the Examiner; evidence is given against her, including several witnesses' allegations (Anonymous 238) that she has a long standing reputation as an "ill liver," while another person (Anonymous 239) deposed that Morduck said Hatheway scratching her would only make him worse.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
478

Sarah Morduck hires Richard Hathaway to make her a key to her home after quarreling with her husband, and while Hathaway is working on the lock, Morduck allegedly convinces him to accept a drink over his protests; soon after Hathaway becomes unable to eat or drink, or do any work.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
479

Richard Hathaway, now allegedly unable to see in addition to unable to eat and drink, scratches Sarah Morduck at the urging of his friends (Anonymous 368), who brought her to him; he succeeds in drawing Morduck's blood, which restores his sight and ability to eat and drink.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
497

Joan Peterson is apprehended by order of a warrant signed by Mr. Waterton at the urging of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates, and her house searched by the confederation for images of clay, hair, and nails; the searchers are unable to find any such items. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

1652, March 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
498

Joan Peterson is carried before Mr. Waterton, a Justice of the Peace, by the confederation of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 139 to have her examination taken; when examined by Waterton, Peterson denies the charges of having used witchcraft to take the life of Lady Powell. Furthermore, she denies ever having heard of Lady Powell prior to being approached by Anne Hook to testify against Anne Levingston.(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4-5

1652, March 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
499

Justice Waterton orders Joan Peterson illegally searched for witch's marks, but nothing supporting the suspicion that she is a witch can be found. Peterson is released on bail, on the condition that she return for the next sessions.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
500

Joan Peterson is apprehended and tried a second time on the matter of Lady Powel's demise; she is told by the confederation of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 139 that she need not fear to confess, that they sought not her life but testimony against Anne Levingston, who had inherited Lady Powel's estate. Peterson maintained that she had not known or heard of Lady Powel, and that while she knew Levingstone, had conducted no business with her for over a year.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5

1652, March 14 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
501

Joan Peterson is illegally searched a second time for witch's marks, this time in a "most unnaturall & Barbarous manner" by a jury of four women brought in specifically for the task. One of these women reports to Justice Waterton that Peterson has one teat more than most women in her secret parts; Justice Waterton uses this finding to have her committed to Newgate Prison.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6

1652, March 14 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
502

Joan Peterson is indicted, arraigned before Mr. Recorder and tried before a jury for witchcraft; the confederates (Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 339) produce many poor women of ill repute to give testimony against her. Peterson again denies knowing Lady Powel, and insists she had no part in her death. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6

1652, April 5 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
503

Joan Peterson is executed for bewitching Christopher Wilson on 12 April, 1652. To the end, she refused to confess anything against Anne Levingston. Peterson stated that she had already confessed all she could before the bench and that she had made her peace with God.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 9

1652, April 12 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
681

Anne Arthur is visited by an apparition (Anonymous 25) in the evening as she is walking home from work. He asks her where she was and where she is going to which she replies she had been in London selling her ware. Since she is poor, the apparition offers her silver and gold which she refuses.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent. London: 1685, 2

1685, March 3 Deptford    London, Greater  London  England 
682

A young girl (Anonymous 79) who is nursed by Alice Flower accuses her of being a witch.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
683

Alice Flower falls ill and gets a neighbour (Anonymous 80) to nurse her. When the neighbour returns from running errands, she finds Alice Flower stripped, dead and cold on the floor with her toes tied together with a blanket over her.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 3

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
684

Alice Fowler is found (by her neighbours) to have five teats on her body that are black as coal.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 3

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
785

William Harrison is allegedly knocked down and robbed by Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93). Widow Perry and her sons throw Harrison into a pit they had dug stones out of, but he does not remain there long.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 6

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
788

Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93) are apprehended on the suspicion of robbing and murdering William Harrison.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 6

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
789

Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93) are arraigned and found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 6

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
790

Widow Perry is executed by hanging at Broadway Hills in Cambden after being found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 6-7

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
791

Widow Perry's son (Anonymous 92) is executed by hanging at Broadway Hill in Cambden after being found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 6-7

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
792

Widow Perry's son (Anonymous 93), a former servant of William Harrison, is executed by being hanged in chains at Broadway Hill in Cambden after being found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison. Anonymous 93's remains are left hanging for others to see.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 6-7

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
796

Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93) deny accusations that claim they robbed and murdered William Harrison. Perry and her sons predict that Harrison will be seen again in seven years time.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 7

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
849

Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl, finds her side is numb after her fit. She bends at the waist from the weight of her limbs that hang as though dead, although before these fits she was "very straight and went very well." She is only somewhat recovered when "A Chyrurgeon (Anonymous 99) being sent for [...] blooded her." (3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
851

After six weeks of experiencing fits, Sarah Bower rises in the monring and "out of her wonted Fits, she was taken Speechless," and her tongue is placed at the back of her throat. Richard Dirby, with the permission of Sarah Bower's aunt, tries to move it, but it is fixed.(4)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 4

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
853

Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl suffering for a number of extraordinary fits, is approached by a "Gentleman all in Black" (Anonymous 237) who offers her riches in the form of money, suits of head-cloths, and very high top-knots in exchange for blood from her arm, which would make her his. The gentleman takes out a knife "she thought, to cut her Arm," causing her to cry out so her neighbours (Anonymous 100) come, upon which the "Devil immediately Vanished." When Sarah Bower tries to explain what happened, all assume that "some Rogue had attempted to Rob the House," and Sarah Bower remains speechless until the following Thursday, upon which occasion she told her neighbours of the gentleman in black, and how "he had sort of broad Feet like a Cow."(3-4)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3-4

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
985

Numerous Justices of the Peace at Hicks Hall and the Old Bailey declare that they are unsatisfied with the proceedings and proof against Jane Peterson; they indicate that there was a design to the whole affair related to a prejudice against Anne Levingston.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 11

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
986

The confederation of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 139, and their agents, repeatedly promise Jane Peterson a reprieve or pardon if she will confess that Anne Levingston had employed her to kill Lady Powel; Peterson refuses to make a false confession, going so far as to punch one member of the confederation in the nose and declare him a rogue.(8-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 8-9

1652, April 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
1133

Elizabeth is terrified when she a woman (Anonymous 139) allegedly asks her for a pin. She runs inside screaming and falls ill shortly thereafter, refusing to eat meat from that point on. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

1622, January 13 Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1135

Elizabeth Jennings grows increasingly ill, losing the ability to walk. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

1622, February 15 London Borough of Hounslow  Thistleworth (Syon House)  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1136

Lady Jennings, increasingly concerned with their daughter Elizabeth's languishing fits and "idle talk" send to word to London physician Dr. Fox. Dr. Fox brought Elizabeth back to London with him where she continued to suffer. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

1622, February 19 London Borough of Hounslow  Thistleworth (Syon House)  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1142

Margaret Russell visits Anne Goodcole's house to request assistance in healing Elizabeth Jennings. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

1622, April 24 Clerkenwell    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1180

James Barrow suffers from a violent fit that is like being burned. The fit lasts for a week, during which Barrow also walks up and down a room, throws his hat from his head, lays his hands under his belly, screeches lamentably, and makes a croaking sound. (5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

1661, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1184

James Barrow allegedly sees rats (Anonymous 207) and cats (Anonymous 206) during his violent fits. The apparitions sometimes have glasses of sack (white wine) and pasties that they offer to Barrow. When Barrow refuses the food and drink, the rats and cats demand his soul. James Barrow refuses to condescend to them. When these tell Barrow that they will dine with him when "his Father and Mother was gone forth," he refuses to eat or drink, unless he "did first go behind the door and sing, with his hat off."(5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1185

James Barrow suffers from thirty fits in one day, during which he strikes himself in the face and goes lame, dumb, and blind. It is believed this could only be accomplished "by the malice and power of the Devil." (5-6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5-6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1186

James Barrow, in an effort to control his fits, is confined to one particular stool in the house. If any other person sits on the stool, Barrow is thrown flat on the ground as if dead, until the same person arises from the stool. When going to the houses of others, Barrow brings the stool with him. He counsels that no one should sit upon his stool, or he will know, however, having left the stool at a neighbour's house while at dinner with his household, he "fell down flat on his back," saying upon rising that he know "that some body hath sat upon my stool."(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1187

James Barrow declares he will not sing before he eats his food, but then chokes on his food when he attempts to eat it; Barrow cannot swallow one bite until he sings.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1188

James Barrow returns to his neighbour's house, where he accuses them of having sat upon his stool. After, he walks up and down in a frantic manner while holding a hammer, which he sometimes throws behind the door. He calls out the names of four people: Sam Man, John Sames, Mol Williams, and Mary Prett. This continues for part of the day, but none knew who those people were.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1189

James Barrows father (John Barrow) sees him sitting at a table with a pen, ink, and a pin. When John asks James what he is doing with the pin, James avoids answering the question. John thinks his sons put offs are the work of the devil. (6-7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6-7

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1191

James Barrow suffers from a fit that causes his feet to become extremely cold. Barrow calls for his mother (Mother Barrow) to pull off his hose and shoes, and when she finds his feet to be cold she attempts to warm him with clothes; Barrows anguish continues until he becomes well again on his own.(7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1192

James Barrow roars and cries, making a hideous noise, whenever someone reads the bible in his presence; Barrow himself cannot utter the name of God or Christ. (8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1193

John Barrow employs the help of physician and astrologer John Hubbard to help cure his son, James Barrow. Hubbard states he is familiar with these sorts of conditions, and believes James Barrow has been bewitched. (8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1194

John Hubbard attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment by using "fopperies and charms," including hanging papers around Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver (liquid metal mercury) under the door. These attempts are unsuccessful. (8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1195

John Hubbard attempts a second time to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment. Barrows hair is cut off at the crown in a round circle, and his finger and toe nails trimmed; the trimmings are wrapped in paper. Barrow is also instructed to go to an oak tree, take some oak boughs home to sleep on, then return to the tree and ram the paper packet of hair and nail trimmings into a hole in the trunk; these attempts are also unsuccessful.(8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1197

After taking Physick from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for some time, working under a master as an Apprentice. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat suddenly appeared to him and then entered into his body. This invasion evidently causes Barrow to look and act like a Changeling (a fairy child) and be unable to eat any food unless in his own household, preventing him from being an apprentice.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1208

John Barrow takes his bewitched son (James Barrow) to an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144) in the hopes of curing him. Anonymous 144 puts a cross on James Barrows head, which causes James Barrow to roar loudly. (9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1209

John Barrow takes his bewitched son (James Barrow) to the home of Lord Abony. Once there, a servant (Anonymous 145) pulls out a cross, causing James Barrow to roar.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1219

John Barrow claims he stripped and whipped his son (James Barrow) in the hopes of curing the boy of his possession and bewitchment.(12)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 12

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1238

John Clayton, Richard Webb, and Richard Aylmore pray for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. The prayers cause Barrow to fall into extreme and violent fits.(13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

1663 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1240

James Barrow is cured of his possession and bewitchment by prayers and an exorcism. This takes place over three days, during which time James Barrow progressively heals. At first, James Barrow cannot even stand to hear the name of God and Christ, crying out "Legat, go to the Devil Legat," although his mouth did not move. As well, he shies away from the Bible. By the end of the first day, however, he seemed to rejoice at the sight of the Bible. A second day of exorcism consisted of prayers for the better part of the day, which James Barrow endures well until night, when "he fell into a very great Agony." The third day, James Barrow admits to "strong temptations of the Devil, namely to cut his throat, or drown himself, or knock out his brains against a post." Prayer is still performed for the boy, and he roars like a dog, and tears at his clothing. A departure of five spirits is noted from the boy, after which time he is restored.(12-17)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 12-17

1663, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1241

John Crump attempts to cure his daughter (Hannah Crump) of her strange fits by calling on whatever physicians and experts he could find (and pay for) in his area. However, these attempts are unsuccessful.(18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1251

John Crump attempts to cure his daughter (Hannah Crump) of her strange fits by bringing her to London, however, she refused at Thomas Hospital in Southward. This leads John Crump to a man (Anonymous 147) who is said to know astrology. Anonymous 147 declares that Hannah Crump has been bewitched and that he cannot provide a perfect cure, and is thus dismissed by John Crump. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1252

Hannah Crump allegedly has violent fits whenever the bible is read to her; during the recitation, she bites herself in rage and grief.(18-19)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18-19

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1487

Margaret Wellam is suspected of being a witch and feeding evil spirits. Andrew Cansfield of London testifies against her.(265)

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937, 265

1616, August 1 Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1492

Elizabeth Newman allegedly bewitches three children named John, Elizabeth and James Gale. The children languish and eventually become deaf and dumb.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

1653, August 1 Whitechapell  Whitechapell  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1493

Elizabeth Newman allegedly bewitches Joan Holland. From August to January, Holland "was wasted consumed and pyned in her body."()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

1653, August 1 Whitechapell  Whitechapell  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1494

Elizabeth Newman puts herself on trial for bewitching Joan Holland. She pleads guilty, but her punishment is unknown.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

1653, August 1 Whitechapell  Whitechapell  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1495

Agnes Berry of Enfield allegedly bewitches Grace Hasley of Enfield. Hasley becomes "lame, and languished from 25 August until 3 September then next following and wasted away in her whole body."()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

1615 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
1496

Agnes Berry of Enfield is sentenced to be hanged for allegedly bewitching Grace Hasley.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

1653 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
1500

Emma Branch allegedly bewitched the infant Edward Wheeler, Anne Howell, and Joan Aldridge. Wheeler eventually dies while the other two languish but live.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

1616, June 5 Tottenham    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1501

Emma Branch, suspected witch, is committed to the goal for allegedly bewitching Edward Wheeler, Anne Howell, and Joan Aldridge. The charges are brought against her by Mary Aldridge, Katherine Barbor, and Alice Smythe. She is released due to lack of evidence.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

1616, June 5 Tottenham    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1573

Richard Burt, servent to M. Edling, goes to his master's barn, accompanied by a "great massive dogge." Along the way there, a hare crosses their path and the dog "in stead of following began to faint, and runne rounde his maister, and to whine pitifully." (2-3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 2-3

1592, March London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1574

Richard Burts, a servant to the gentleman M. Edling, greets Mother Atkins as she passes by his master's barn. Mother Atkins, " like a peruerse woman, like a perilous waspe, like a pestiferous witch, incensed with hate at the sight of him held downe hir head, not baigning to speake."(3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 3

1592, March 7 (Tuesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1575

The servant Richard Burt follows a hare that crossed the path of him and his dog to Mother Atkin's house, "whome before that time he knew to be a notorious witche."(2-3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 2-3

1592, March London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1576

The servant Richard Burt, while taking his lunch at work in his master's barn around the hour of noon is visited by a "monstrous blacke Cat among the straw." The animal acts strangely and startles him.(3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 3

1592, March 8 (Wednesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1577

Richard Burt, after being startled by a monstrous black cat during the course of his lunch around noon, hears a strange voice that commands him to leave his master's workplace. Upon asking where he is expected the go, "the Spirit answering againe sayde: Come and leave thy vittles behind thee and thy knife also."(3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 3

1592, March 8 (Wednesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1578

After being commanded by a voice to leave his master's barn, the servant Richard Burt is "hoised up into the aire" and carried over many fields and a great pond where his hat fell, and over Harrow Church. Even though he cried out, none could hear him, and he ended up "into a place which was all fire, where was heard such lamentable howling and dollful crieng, as if all the damned fiends of hell had been tortured, and tormenten in that Limbo."(4)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 4

1592, March 8 (Wednesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1579

Richard Burt finds himself after he has been magically "hoised up into the aire," in a strange place, which is dark, "plentiful in filthy odors and stinches," full of noise, and full of fire. This causes an "unquenchable drouth in his stomach," although there is nowhere for him to find refreshment. (4)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 4

1592, March Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1580

Richard Burt, imprisoned for four days in a dark, unknown location in Middlesex that full of fire, filthy odors, and noises, is told that he is forbidden to speak of what has befallen him upon returning home. Richard Burt asserts that he must tell his mother, and was then made to suffer by his tongue doubling and being severely burned and scratched with thornes and briers, "that it is both lamentable and terrible to behold him."(4)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 4

1592, March 8 Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1581

The servant, Richard Burt, is returned from some unknown location full of darkness and fire in Middlesex to Pinner in Middlesex, where he drinks from a ditch. Although some four days had passed during which he was missing, he does not visit his home or his friends.(5)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 5

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1582

Maister Edling of Woodhall passes a man on the way to Church four days after his servant, Richard Burt disappeared. Maister Edling asks the man if he can find him a new servant, and the man is revealed to be the lost Richard Burt. Maister Edling beseeches Richard Burt to tell him where he has been, but the servant cannot talk and only gestures towards the witch Mother Atkin's house.(5)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 5

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1583

The servant of Maister Edling, Richard Burt who has been rendered mute, is treated by the parson of the town, M. Smith, and Master Burbridge of Pinner. (5)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 5

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1584

Upon being healed of the inability to speak by the parson M. Smith of Pinner, the servant Richard Burt cries, "Woe worth mother Atkins, woe worth mother Atkins, for she hath bewitched me: whereupon he would not be quiet, but ever requested that he might speak with hir," thereby accusing Mother Atkins.(5)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 5

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1585

Mother Atkins, after being accused of bewitching the servant Richard Burt, is sent for by Master Burbidge and the parson P. Smith. Richard Burt scratchs her until he draws blood, which makes him well and ends her bewitchment over him. (5-6)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 5-6

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1586

Mother Atkins, a notorious witch, goes to M. Burbidge's house to ask for milk, at which time the maids were busy at the dairy, and is denied.(6)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 6

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1587

After Mother Atkins is denied milk at Master Burbridge's house, "immediately upon hir departure out of the doores, the Creame beganne to swell and rise in the cherne," so that it ran about the kitchen and down the sink-hole. All chores were wrecked that day.(6)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 6

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1588

Mother Atkins visits the grounds of Gregorie Coulson to ask for charity, but she found him busy working with the lambs. This caused him some delay in bringing her charity, and "she flung forth in a fume."(6)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 6

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1589

After Mother Atkins is angered by the slow speed Gregory Coulson uses to bring her charity, two lambs of Gregory Coulson are let forth into a yard, and "suddenly they began so nimbly to skip and frilke to and fro, that they never ceased after til they died."(6)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 6

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1629

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that the priest Sir Robert Brian of Highgate is sometimes "a conjureth with a syve and a pair of sheeres, invocating saith Paule and Saint Peter. And that he also useth the psalter and the key with a psalme." (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

1597 Highgate     London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1831

Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark is ensnared by music for many years, so much so that he treasured music above his family and "fel to his musick" upon his wife's death bed against her wishes. Mr. Goodwin's obsession is allegedly the fault of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.(1 - 2, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 2, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1835

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones of London Borough of Southwark allegedly "cast a net of pretended piety and fained extraordinary holyness" over Mr. Goodwin, despite being wicked women in reality.(4, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1836

Upon her deathbed, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, the wife of Mr. Wessell Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, implores her children to take their husband away from music and "especially the frequentation of Mr. Edward Jones; and that not so much out of dislike to him as to his wife, whom shee saw to be a subtil undermining woman, that would be ready to make her own advantage of old Mr. Goodwins weakness." (2-3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2-3

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1840

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones allegedly bewitch Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, so that he tells his son-in-law and Daughter Vernon that the passion he claims for a future wife is placed upon a woman "so eminent in Piety and wisdome, that his former wife deserved not to be named the same day." Although he refuses to identify this woman, "yet his daily converse and familiarity with Mrs. Jones put them in strange thoughts."(3-4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 3-4

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1841

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "woried [her husband Mr. Starkey an Apothecarie] out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." Shortly after, she marries Mr. Pigeon a lieutenant in the regiment. Her "old imperious carriage" continues in this marriage.(4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1842

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly urged her husband, Mr. Pigeon to partake in meat and drinks "compounded" of provocative drugs to convince him to leave her everything in his estate. Mr. Pigeon refuses to consent.(5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 5

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1843

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly practices behaviour that causes her husband Mr. Pigeon to fly "into such a passion, and was so transported, that he became altogether senselesse, feeble, and irrationall."(6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1844

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark sends for Doctor Burges, a Physician, to attend to her husband after she causes him to fly into a rage. Mr. Pigeon is healed of his rage by being vomitted twice in one day, and thus restored to a feeble state by Doctor Burges. (6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1845

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly confesses to her husband, Mr. Pigeon that she behaved in such a wicked manner to her first husband, Mr. Starky, that he "committed a sin, for which he was tormented in his conscience, and fell into such an agony that as she then said, she thought he would have dyed." She promises Mr. Pigeon to never act so again.(6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1846

Despite promising to behave, Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "returnes to her old practises, and so wrought with Mr. Pigeon at the last, to part with his estate to her." (6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1847

Mrs. Jones, still a married woman, is allegedly observed by her husband Mr. Pigeon to be seducing Mr. Goodwin, by taking his hand "and putting it under her apron, holding it against the bottom of her belly, with many repeated mutual kisses."(6-7)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6-7

1646 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1848

Mrs. Jones leaves her husband for Mr. Goodwin, allegedly turning him into a "poore deluded old man" and Mr. Goodwin promises to provide for her.(8)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 8

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1849

Mr. Goodwin is quite sick for ten days after being attacked by Mr. Pigeon, but Mrs. Jones "made him forget his paine, and speeded the cure, which else might have been dangerous." Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin lie, a most un-Christian act, and say that Mr. Goodwin had been thrown from a horse, "to salve his reputation."(9)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 9

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1850

Mr. Goodwin, who has been allegedly seduced by Mrs. Jones, is made to believe his relationship with her is lawful as Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "work [him] to believe."(10, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 10, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1851

Mr. Goodwin's children attempt to draw their father out of his bewitchment daily, and try to "perswade him against these women." But is is all in vaine, for "he is so bewitched with her." (11 - 12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 11 - 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1852

The minister Mr. Cooper, at the urging of neighbours, justices, and ministers, allegedly attempts to break Mr. Goodwin's bewitchment, caused by Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon. Mr. Goodwin is thus suspended from the Sacrament, which he cares little about being restored to.(12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1853

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "possesse him [Mr. Goodwin] at their pleasure, and plye him daily to beware of his children" so that he will refuse his own children's advice. Further, Mr. Goodwin "can scarce speak for joy" upon seeing Mrs. Jones and Mrs Pigeon, and dotes them with goods and presents, at the ruin of his family's accounts. (12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1855

Roger Crey, Mr. Goodwin's eldest apprentice who allegedly spoke out against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon fell sick, and the two women "physick him, he growes worse." When Mr. Goodwin's son asks a doctor be sent for, but "the old man refuses to give his consent, boasting highly of the great skill of those two she."(13-14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 13-14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1856

Mr. Goodwin's son privately caries some of the ill Roger Crey's water to Doctor Burnet and Mr. Clarke, an apothecary, suspecting foul play on Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon's part. "At the first sight of the water he tells him, the party was a dead man, past all recovery; and that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well," confirming Mr. Goodwin's son's suspicions.(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1857

Roger Crey is allegedly continually "plye(d) with druggs" by both Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during his illness despite his pleadings for them to stop, so that "he lies raging in the violence of a burning feaver, in all probability caused by the contrary medicines they had administred to hime." He dies under these ministration. (14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1858

After Roger Crey's death, Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "tooke coach and departed, though in the dead of the night," allegedly "terrified with the guilt of what they've done."(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1859

The parents (Anonymous 308 and Anonymous 309) of a "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is also visited by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during her illness allegedly "watc'ht diligently that she should take nothing from them" after the death of Roger Crey.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1860

A "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is attended in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones "dyed of griefe, having her heart broke by the occasion of the practises of these women."(15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 15

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1861

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly attempts to get her husband Mr. Pigeon to "draw up a declaration" against the present Governors, but he refuses, "for which she vowes to be revenged of him."(16)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1862

Mr. Pigeon allegedly "got cold by his carefull tending of the childe," and tells his wife Mrs. Pigeon that he fears he has gout. She "presently with violence affirmes, that it was the Pox."(16)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1863

Mr. Pigeon sends for Mr. Knowles to come and examine him in his sickness, in order to persuade his wife, Mrs. Pigeon. (16 - 17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16 - 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1864

Upon examining Mr. Pigeon, Mr. Knowles is confronted by Mrs. Pigeon. The two argue over the nature of his sickness, which Mrs. Pigeon maintains is the pox despite having no grounds for knowing his sickness.(17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1865

Mr. Pigeon, in his sickness, recommends to Mr. Knowles and Mrs. Pigeon that he should send for "two able Physicians," and he "will submit to a search."(17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1866

Mr. Knowles pleads with Mr. Pigeon to leave his wife when she insists that Mr. Pigeon is afflicted with the Pox, "to avoyd evill." Mr. Pigeon refuses. (17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1867

Mr. Pigeon becomes violent with Mr. Knowles upon being told to leave his wife, causing him to be strangely "transported by this strange provocation, that he can scarce give account of what he did." Mrs. Pigeon may have allegedly been responsible for causing such a strange rage.(17 - 18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17 - 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1868

During the strange rage visited on Mr. Pigeon, Mrs. Pigeon "hath got a strange black face, which by her art she yet makes more visible."(18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1869

Mrs. Pigeon indulges in unnatural acts when she "so endeavoured with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army" as an appeal to the Lord General (Anonymous 310), causing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1870

The young son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin, is made "maillable" by the labours of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.(18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1871

The bewitched son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin is married to Mrs. Jones' daughter, making Mr. Goodwin and Mrs. Jones to "become brothers and sisters," rendering their own relationship unnatural in the eyes of God. This further allows Mrs. Jones to move into Mr. Goodwin's estate.(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1872

Mr. Goodwin becomes "so evill spoken of for his shamefull scandalous frequentation of these wicked women [Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon], unable to beare up under such a burden, he gave up himselfe to melancholly and carelesse stupidity, that he let his bookes run into some disorder."(20)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1873

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly fetch two bailiffs (Anonymous 311 and Anonymous 312) to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin in his own home, "in the dead of the night." This is a "Divelish action" that the women were afraid to do in the light of day for fear of their neighbour's reactions.(21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 21

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1874

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are directed by Mr. Colbourne, who is "the man midwife" that helps them bring about the "the monster" of a judgment seizing all of Mr. Goodwin's estates. (22)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1875

Mr. Goodwin's hildren, allegedly ruined by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, and seeing "that their father is now captivated more than ever to these women" presented a petition to the Justices of the County and Borough of South-wark, which brings Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones to St. Margarets Hill.(22-23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22-23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1876

Upon meeting with the Justices of Southwark, Mr. Goodwin is "seriously reproved and admonished to forsake the scandalous company of these women," Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. A witness, Mr. Gold of Clapham appears and testifies that Mrs. Pigeon in particular is "a most Angelical woman."(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1877

The Justices of Southwark request that Mr. Goodwin's children produce proof against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon for what they alleged in their petition, which they would not do "should they incurr trouble from these Litigious women." The justices dismiss the case with only an admonition to Mr. Goodwin.(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1878

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are cast out of their churches, "and all communion with them," because of their scandalous nature. They spend Sabbath "at the Dye house," instead.(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2052

Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates offer Joan Simpson money to swear that Anne Levington used witchcraft to take Lady Powel's life, as part of a plot to kill Levington. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3

1651, December Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2053

Anne Hook, in the employ of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates, approaches Joan Simpson and successfully persuades her to swear against Anne Levingston by offering Simpson half the six score pounds Hook is being paid to do so herself; Simpson discovers the murder plot against Levingston shortly thereafter and refuses to swear, finding the whole business abominable.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3

1652, January 10 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2054

Anne Hook, in the employ of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates, approaches Joan Peterson and offers her money to swear that Anne Levingston had procured powders and seeds from Peterson to help her in her lawsuits, and to provoke unlawful love; Peterson refuses.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

1652, January Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2057

Joan Peterson is alleged to have conspired with another Gentlewoman (presumed to be Anne Levingston) "to administer a potion, or posset, to the Lady Powel," who died shortly after drinking it. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Tryall and Examination of Mrs. Joan Peterson. London: 1652, 8

1591 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2058

Joan Peterson, at her trial, allegedly renounces all witchcraft and confesses that "she administer'd not any thing to the Lady, but what was comfortable and nourishing."(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Tryall and Examination of Mrs. Joan Peterson. London: 1652, 8

1652, April 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2069

Joan Peterson allegedly helped a cow-keeper's wife (Anonymous 342) with a bewitched cow; Peterson first boiled the woman's urine and divined the identity of the bewitcher in the liquid's surface, then advised her on what to do to reverse the bewitchment.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2071

Joan Peterson is alleged to have a familiar in the shape of a squirrel, which a maidservant saw and heard talking with Peterson through the night; the maidservant is so frightened by this she lay as if in a trance, and the next day recalls hearing every word but was bewitched by hearing it and rendered unable to remember a thing of what was said. Peterson's son also allegedly tells his schoolfellows that his mother can do such strange things because of the squirrel's teachings.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2160

Richard Hathaway is allegedly admitted to St. Thomas' Hospital under the care of several doctors and surgeons (Anonymous 369), but they are unable to cure him of his inability to eat or drink.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2161

Richard Hathaway, able to see, eat and drink again, allegedly has pins in his excrement.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2162

Richard Hathaway's friends (Anonymous 368) allegedly bring him to a cunning-woman (Anonymous 370) living in Goodmans-fields to consult with her about the pins in his excrement; the cunning-woman reportedly advises them to boil Hathaway's urine in a stone bottle, but the bottle bursts into pieces when heated. Hathaway is struck blind and unable to eat and drink once more, though none of the shards touch him, and continues to pass pins in his excrement.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2163

Richard Hathaway's neighbors allegedly assist him in scratching Sarah Morduck a second time, which permits him to eat, drink and see again for a time though he continues to pass pins in his excrement. His affliction soon resumes, however.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2164

Richard Hathaway's neighbors, Mr. Parrot and the child of Mr. Swan, become sick in "as bad a manner, tho' not altogether so strange," and their illnesses help convince the neighborhood that Sarah Morduck bewitched Hathaway.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2165

Richard Hathaway is put under observation in a house by Richard Oldner and other Officers of the Parish, and watchmen are set to taking turns night and day, in order to determine whether or not he is a cheat.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April 12 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2166

A witness (Anonymous 371) at the examination of Richard Hathaway and Mrs. Sarah Morduck alleges in her deposition that she had seen Hathaway void a large stool with pins in it, and that she had also seen him scratch Morduck, then consume food and drink after some time without.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2167

A watchman (Anonymous 372) employed by the Officers of the Parish gives deposition at the the examination of RIchard Hathaway and Mrs. Sarah Morduck that he was tasked with watching Hathaway from Saturday, April 12th to Thursday, April 17th and on Sunday, April 20th, and alleges that he never once saw Hathaway eat or drink, but that on both the 17th and the 20th he observed Hathaway void pins from his mouth.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2168

Richard Oldner, Church-warden of St. Mary Overy, visits Richard Hathaway while he is under observation; Oldner allegedly gave Hathaway a glass of water to drink, which flew out of his mouth with great force.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April 18 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2169

Richard Hathaway allegedly cannot be made to eat and drink in court though the doctor present tries several means to get him to; it is decided to have him scratch Sarah Morduck before the court, and when he does, Hathaway immediately calls for food. Sir Thomas Lane orders bread and cheese be provided to him, and Hathaway is said to consume more than an ordinary man would in three days. Lane then observes Hathaway urinate voluminously into his britches, and pass a small amount of excrement.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2170

Sarah Morduck is allegedly heard to say at the examination that "the same time that he would be well when had scratch'd her" and soon after Richard Hathaway desired food; this combined with the depositions against her results in Sir Thomas Lane committing her to gaol to await further examination and trial. As she is being taken away, she is said to have sworn to have her revenge against several of them.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2187

Rose Mersam is indicted for allegedly causing James Thompson to languish and his body to waste for the space of five days. He continued in this state at the time of the indictment. Mersam allegedly committed this act using witchcraft and at the instigation of the Devil. (20)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 20

1569, May 21 Whitecross Street  St. Luke's  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2188

Rose Mersam pleads not guilty to bewitching James Thompson. (20)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 20

1569, May 21 Whitecross Street  St. Luke's  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2208

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon a steer, a pig, a little pig and a mare belonging to William Durante. All the animals die. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1572, November 30 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2209

Agnes Godfrey allegedly uses witchcraft upon a steer, a pig, a little pig, and a mare belonging to William Durante. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1572, November Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2210

Rose Mersam, at the instigation of the Devil, allegedly practices witchcraft upon James Thompson so that he languished and wasted in his body for the space of five days and remained so at the time the text was written.(20)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 20

1569, May 21 Whitecross Street  St. Luke's  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2211

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Frances Baker causing her to become ill, weak and wasted in body. She remained in that state at the time of the indictment. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1572, December 5 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2212

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft upon Frances Baker, causing her to become sick, weak, and wasted in body. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1610, December 5 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2213

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft on Jasper Tappes causing him to die six days later.(57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1573, June Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2214

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft on an one year old infant named Thomas Phillippes, causing him to die four days later. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1571, January 1 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2215

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft on William Harvye, causing him to die within days.(57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1572, January Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2216

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Jasper Tappes, causing him to die within a week. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1569, January 4 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2217

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Thomas Phillips, causing him to die within a few days. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1571, January Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2218

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on William Harvye, causing him to die within three days. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1573, January Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2219

Agnes Godfrey pleads not guilty to practicing witchcraft on animals belonging to William Durante (causing them to die), Frances Baker, Thomas Phillippes, Jasper Tappes, and William Harvye. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1571 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2220

Agnes Godfrey is found guilty of killing William Durante's steere, pig, little pig and mare in accordance with the first indictment, and guilty of killing Thomas Phillippes by witchcrafts. She is, however, found not guilty as to the other indictments, which include: practicing witchcraft on Frances Baker, causing her to become sick, weak and wasted in body; practicing witchcraft on Jasper Tappes, causing him to die within a week; practicing witchcraft on William Harvye, casuing him to die within a few days. Her sentence is unknown. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

1571 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2221

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft on William Durante, causing him to languish and become "wasted" and his body to become greatly injured. William Durante allegedly suffers in this state for fourteen days.(79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1575, April 7 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2222

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on William Durante, causing him to languish, become "wasted," and his body to become greatly injured. (79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1575, April Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2223

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft on William Coxe, causing him to languish for exactly one year, at which point he died. (79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1575, April 7 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2224

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on William Coxe, causing him to die exactly one year later. (79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1576, April Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2225

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft on Robert Coxe, causing him to languish for a year and then die.(79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1575, July 2 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2226

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for having allegedly practiced witchcraft on Robert Coxe, causing him to die a year later.(79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1575, July 2 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2227

Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft on a man, causing him to suffer for a month and then die.(79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1575, March 7 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2228

Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on an unnamed man (Anonymous 378), causing him to die a month later.(79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

1575, April Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
2229

Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon Edward Boulton. Boulton languished for nineteen days and then died. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1575, April 9 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2230

Anne Beaver is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Edward Boulton, causing his death. Boulton languished for eleven days and then died. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1575, April London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2231

Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon John Bailye causing his death. Baylie languished got 2 days and then died.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1579, September 1 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2232

Anne Beaver is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon John Baylie. Baylie languished for two days and then died.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1579, September London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2233

Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft on Thomas Coleman, causing his death. Coleman languished for a month and then died. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1582, May 7 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2234

Anne Beaver is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Thomas Coleman. Coleman languished for a month and then died.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1582, June London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2235

Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon Josias Boswell, causing his death. Boswell languished for twenty days and then died.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1583, May 1 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2236

Anne Beaver is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Josias Boswell, causing him death. Boswell languished for two days and then died. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1583, September London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2237

Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft on Richard Frisby, causing his death. Frisby languished for over two weeks and then died. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1583, December 17 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2238

Anne Beaver is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Richard Frisby. Frisby languished for over two weeks and then died. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1584, January London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2239

Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon Susan Mason. Mason languishes for eleven days and then dies. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1584, July 10 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2240

Anne Beaver is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Susan Mason, causing her death. Mason languished for eleven days and then died. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1584 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2241

Anne Beaver pleads not guilty to practicing witchcraft upon and murdering Edward Boulton, John Baylie, Thomas Coleman, Josias Boswell, Richard Frisby, Susan Mason. She is acquitted of all charges. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

1575 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2242

Elizabeth Rutter allegedly practices witchcraft upon Priscella Fielde. Fielde languishes for two days and then dies. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577, January 17 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2243

Elizabeth Rutter is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Priscella Fielde. Fielde languished for two days and then died. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2244

Elizabeth Rutter pleads not guilty to practicing witchcraft on Priscella Fielde, causing her to die. Rutter is found guilty and is sentenced to hang. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2246

Elizabeth Rutter allegedly practices witchcraft upon William Lyon causing him to languish. He continued in that state at the time of the indictment. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2247

Elizabeth Rutter is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on William Lyon, causing him to become lame. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577, 1 November Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2248

Elizabeth Rutter allegedly practices witchcraft upon Frances Fielde. Fielde languishes for two days and then dies. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577, January 30 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2249

Elizabeth Rutter allegedly practices witchcraft upon Frances Fielde. Fielde languishes for two days and then dies. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577, January 30 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2251

Elizabeth Rutter allegedly practices witchcraft upon John Fielde, causing him to languish for nearly two weeks and then die. ()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887,

1577, February 18 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2252

Elizabeth Rutter is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon John Fielde, causing him to languish for nearly two weeks and then die. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1577 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2253

Elizabeth Rutter is found guilty of practicing witchcraft on William Lyon, causing him to become lame, as well as on Priscella, John, and Frances Fielde, causing all of them to die. She is sentenced to be hanged. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

1578, March 29 Barnet  Fynchley  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
2594

Anne Arthur claims that the apparition (anonymous 25) frightened her, so she began running to reach her home. The apparition caught up with her, however, and asked her where she was going. Explaining that she was poor and had to work for a living she told him she was going home to Deptford after selling her things in the city. The apparition then allegedly offered her a bag of silver. Still frightened the woman refused and so he offered her a bag of gold which made Arthur scream until people (anonymous 438) came to find her and bring her home. She has since been distracted and disorderly.(1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent. London: 1685, 1-2

1684, March Deptford    London, Greater  London  England 
2843

Dr. John Lambe stands trial at the King's Bench in London for the rape of Joan Seager, an 11 year old girl. He is found guilty and sentenced to death, but "by his Maiesties especiall Grace he was pardoned."(15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 15-16

1627 King's Bench    London, Greater  London  England 
2844

Mabel Swinnington is examined at the Court of King's Bench and gives deposition against Dr. John Lambe. She alleges that, on the Friday of Whitson week, Elizabeth Seager came to her "in a pitifull manner wringing her hands like a woman ouer-whelmed with extreame griefe, crying out and saying, I am vndone, I am vndone." Elizabeth tells her "that villaine Doctor Lambe had vndone her childe," Joan Seager.(16-18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 16-18

1627, May 29 St. Martins    London, Greater  London  England 
2845

Mabel Swinton questions Joan Seager and finds her "much abashed and ashamed." Joan finally tells her that, on Whitson Eve, Dr. John Lambe needed someone to bring him a basket of herbs, but his women were busy elsewhere, so she brought it to him at the King's Bench. When she arrived, Lambe sent away his serving-man and locked the door, then led her into his closet and locked that door as well. He put her on a joint stool and stuck his tongue in her mouth. Though she "striued with him as much as she could, but hee would not let her alone, but stroue with her."(16-18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 16-18

1627, May 22 King's Bench    London, Greater  London  England 
2846

Mabel Swinton takes Joan Seager into her home to dress her wounds. She reports that "when I opened her to dresse her: the place did smoake like a pot that had seething liquor in it that were newly vncouered, and I found her to bee very sore, and could not abide to bee touched." Mabel adds that someone tried to dress the girl's injuries, when she asked Joan about it, she said "Lambs maid Becke had brought her a thing in a dish, and had drest her." However, the dressing contained a venomous speck in the ointment that had stuck to Joan's inner thigh. When Mabel pulled it away, she found that it had festered the spot it was stuck to.(18-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 18-21

1627, May 29 St. Martins    London, Greater  London  England 
2847

Mabel Swinnington reports that she went to see Dr. John Lambe the next day at Elizabeth Seager's request. She confronted him, declaring that "you haue vndone an honest mans child, for well shee may recouer her health of body againe, but neuer her credit, for it will bee a staine to her reputation whil'st shee liues." He would not admit to the deed, but demanded to see Joan and examine her. Mabel replied "she hath bin too late with you already, she will come no more here" and told him she not only knew he had sent his maid to dress Joan, but that the dish holding the venomous substance had been left behind.(18-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 18-21

1627, May 30 King's Bench    London, Greater  London  England 
2848

Dr. John Lambe, reprieved from his death sentence for the rape of Joan Seager, rents a house in London for a year and a quarter. On Friday, June 13, 1628, he is attacked by an angry mob while leaving the Fortune Playhouse. Though he flees, they catch up with him and "had him downe, and with stones and cudgels, and other weapons had so beaten him, that his skull was broken, one of his eyes hung out of his head, and all partes of his body bruised and wounded so much, that no part was left to receiue a wound." He dies of his injuries the following morning.(20-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 20-21

1628, June 13 London  St. Giles-without-Cripplegate  London, Greater  London  England 
2865

John Darrell is tried on charges of teaching William Sommers and the others demoniacs he claimed to have dispossessed to counterfeit possession. The anonymous publisher of the text claims to be doing so in his defense, as he is imprisoned and thus unable to defend himself.(Title Page, 12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, Title Page, 12

1599, September 30 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2866

John Darrell faces allegations of believing himself to have a "singular...gift to cast out Divells for vaine glory sake" and of having taught Katherine Wright, Thomas Darling, Mary Couper and William Sommers to counterfeit the signs of possession and dispossession to support that claim. (13-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 13-17

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2867

Katherine Wright gives deposition against John Darrell, alleging that she counterfieted her possession, and that Darrell instructed her to speak in a strange voice during her fits. He also told her that when she was asked the name of the spirit possessing her, she was to answer "Middlecub." (17-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 17-21

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2868

John Darrell faces allegations of lying on Katherine Wright's belly while she is in a fit. He was allegedly found in this state by a minister named Beckingham, who "plucked him of by the heeles, & thrust him out of the Chamber." He claims that he was trying to restrain her in her fit, and lay by her side, not on her belly, and that Beckingham was not present, but many women were there to witness, including his wife. (19-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 19-20

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2869

Thomas Darling confesses to counterfeiting his possession at John Darrell's instruction, though Darrell's defense alleges that he did so under threats of whipping, torture with a hot iron and hanging, and that the boy has been kept from making these charges in person because it is feared that he will deny his confession.(21-24)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 21-24

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2870

Mary Cooper confesses to counterfeiting possession. She accuses John Darrell of telling her that she was not pregnant, as she believed, but possessed and that when she laughed and smiled, her laughter was actually the Devil's.(24-28)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 24-28

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2872

William Sommers gives deposition alleging that John Darrell taught him to counterfeit possession. Darrell's defense claims that this cannot be true, because there are witnesses who saw him be flung about, heard noises come from his belly, heard him speak with his mouth shut, saw him swell enough to break a new leather girdle, saw strange lumps moving under his skin, and more.(28-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 28-33

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2873

William Sommers offers to counterfeit swelling before the High Commissioners at Lambeth. He puts his tongue in his cheek in a convincing recreation of the swelling he is said to have experienced when possessed. John Darrell's defense claims that he cannot counterfeit any other signs of possession, however, as he had the Devil's help originally.(33-34)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 33-34

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2874

William Sommers' claim that he faked his possession is supported by depositions from witnesses who allege that when they tried to investigate the lumps moving under his sheets, "one at one tyme caught his hande or foote, another his privie partes." One witness alleges that when he tried to throw off the sheet entirely, Darrell would not allow him to.(34-36)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 34-36

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2875

John Darrell's defense counters the allegations that William Sommers sometimes displayed ordinary strength, that when he was cast toward a fire he was taken away too quickly to burn, and that Sommers had black lead put in his mouth to make him foam. They claim that Sommers only had supernatural strength when in a fit, that Sommers did lay in the fire long enough to burn but without suffering harm and that black lead cannot make one foam at the mouth.(36-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 36-38

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2876

In response to William Sommer's accusation that John Darrell taught him to fake his possession, Darrell's defense responds that "Sommers is an vnlawful witnes, beeing manifestlie guiltie of periurie (having by oath both denied and affirmed counterfeiting) as also of blasphemy" and that he was witnessed to be possessed for at least a full month before Darrell arrived in Nottingham. (38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 38

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2877

William Sommers alleges in his deposition that "long before Dorrell came to Nottingham, they mett at Ashby de la Zouche, where Dorrell then dwelled, and (vpo[n] agreement) they mett at Ashby parke 4. yeares together." He adds that he waited to fake his possession until John Darrell judged he had learned it well enough. When Darrell came to Nottingham, he instructed Sommers on how to act during the dispossession. Darrell claims that Sommers was only a child at the time when they allegedly first met, too young to be traveling for secret instruction. He adds that he was far from Sommers during his fits.(38-41)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 38-41

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2878

In support of William Sommer's accusations against John Darrell, Darrell allegedly bough Sommers out of his apprenticeship, and they often retired to Darrell's chamber to talk; this is perceived by the court as the opportunity for Darrel to have instructed Sommers to counterfeit possession. Furthermore, Sommers had also demonstrated how he had faked various of his fits.(41-49)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 41-49

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2879

John Darrell produces a letter written by his wife's sister as proof that Sommers was possessed before he came to Nottingham. He claims that, rather than coaching Sommers, he too was a victim of Sommers' counterfeit possession, and merely made an error in judgement in believing him genuinely possessed.(49-51)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 49-51

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2881

John Darrell alleges that William Sommers was originally thought to be bewitched, but that this was disproved, and thought to be a witch himself after he was dispossessed. He claims that Sommers accused Doll Freeman of witchcraft out of malice.(53)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 53

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2882

John Darrell admits to having bought out the remaining years of William Sommers' apprenticeship to a master fiddler after his dispossession, and claims that he did so to ensure that "Sommers should not any longer prophane the Sabbath, but serve the Lorde IESVS in whose name he was delivered." He spoke privately with Sommers on request of Sommers' father and in the role of a preacher only, not to commend him for the skill of his counterfeiting possession.(53-55)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 53-55

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2883

John Darrell is accused of sending William Sommers to witness Thomas Darling's fits in order to improve his own counterfeiting. Darrell counters that, while Sommers is said to have "avouched as much to Darlings face in the hearing of many," he could not answer Darling's questions about what his uncle's home looked like, or give details about the town.(55)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 55

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2884

John Darrell's defense alleges that if William Sommers counterfeited his fits, he should be able to demonstrate how, and Sommers had not divulged the method for all of his supposed tricks. His defense also ridicules the suggestion that the Lancashire Seven counterfeited by suggesting that they were tutored by tumblers and jugglers.(55-58)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 55-58

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2886

John Darrell alleges that his suspension from his Ministry following William Sommers' confession of counterfeiting impoverished him, and caused great hardship for his wife and five children. He also complains that, since his imprisonment for heresy, he has not been permitted to go to church as the other prisoners are.(58-62)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 58-62

1599, May 26 Lambeth    London, Greater  London Borough of Lambeth  England 
2959

Sarah Bower, a fourteen year girl, experiences "most strange and unaccountable Fits," in intervals over several weeks. These fits are thought to be caused by "Fright she might receive by the Stroke on the Back." Many doctors (Anonymous 481) visit Sarah Bower, including Richard Dirby, and gave her "Comfortable things to take." However, they all believe "they never were with any Patient that had such Fits before."(3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2960

Two a Clock, the day Sarah Bower predicted she must meet a Gentleman in Black (Anonymous 237) who visited her and offered her money for blood for her arm, "with great Strength and Violence she found her self or was forced out of the Room," and went to the yard, where "she was soon thrown to the Ground in a strange manner," and experienced fits more violent than she ever had before. However, all witnesses (Anonymous 100) could see "no Form or Shape visible to them," that would cause her to fall.(6)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 6

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2961

Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl from Wapping, continues to experience fits as witnessed by many of her neighbours (Anonymous 100). It is observed that sometimes her fits, believed to be caused by the Devil in the form of an "evil spirit" (Anonymous 238) are quiet before a divine visits her, but causes her nonetheless to "be troublesome, sometimes falling out a Laughing, other times making Faces at them." Sarah Bower sometimes barks like a dog during prayers, or spits in the faces of those praying. She also is allegedly thrown from "one end of the Bed to the other," and tears her clothes. She becomes so strong that "scarce six Men can hold her in." Other strange noises Sarah Bower reportedly makes are lowing like a bull, and roaring like a lion. The Devil (Anonymous 238) is thought to appear before her in the "hideous Shape of a Monstrous Fiery Dragon, other whiles a Lyon." She seems caught between the Angel pulling her towards God, and the Devil towards Hell.(6 - 7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 6 - 7

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2978

A rat (Anonymous 242) appears to James Barrow, to which the child says, "Satan, thou must be burned in hell fire, and all that do obey thee," often repeating those words. The rat tells the child he must go up stairs, "and play with his pretty Rat there," at which command James Barrow often would go up the stairs. There, a "little box with single money in it," would be forced out of his hand, and the child would try to "take it up often," repeating to himself, "I will not sing, I will not sing." However, usually he would sing.(7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2979

James Barrow is observed to engage in "very strange actions," such as running around the house with his hands over his ears, or hopping. Sometimes "he would sweat very much," as he "would labour and strive, as if he had been ready to be choaked." At other times, he would lie down on his back on a board, and beat himself on the face and head "as hard as he could." These actions would happen often in a day, causing him to seem like a changeling. At other times, "he would be taken with lameness, his limbs hanging down," so that he was forced to be carried. He would only come out of such fits when he was behind a door in a chair, and forced to sing.(7 - 8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7 - 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2980

John Barrow receives many conflicting opinions on how best to care for his bewitched son, James Barrow, but nothing seems to work. He wishes to engage in "Fasting and Prayer," as he believes some "evil Spirit or Spirits [his son] was possessed with, by the malice of some Witch." He decides to seek further advice, and happens upon a "learned Doctor." (Anonymous 487)(11)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 11

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2981

The Doctor (Anonymous 487) helping John Barrow and his bewitched son, James Barrow, proves unhelpful, as he never saw the child in person. John Barrow sees this incident as an attempt on the devil's part to delay or prevent the dispossession of his son, James Barrow, and so leaves the service of the Doctor (Anonymous 487).(11 - 12)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 11 - 12

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2982

The sister of Hannah Crump starts a day of fasting and prayer on behalf of her possessed sister, in order to begin dispossession. During this day, Hannah Crump rises from her bed "in a very great race," tearing at her clothes, and crying out "in a lamentable manner." Although there are times Hanna Crump quiets down, she still resists, kicking her father, and continuing to burn herself and her family members, breaking windows, and demanding her tabacco pipe. She reveals during prayers that her illness befell her after she consumed an apple a woman (Anonymous 488) brought her in sickness. Her family turns their prayers towards stopping the witch's powers, and she resists violently, spitting at her father. Prayer continues until evening, when Hannah Crump is "quiet on the bed, as one that was willing to rest her self after a weary dayes work."(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18 - 19

1662, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2983

Before their execution, Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93) predict that Master Harrison will return in seven years. After Master Harrison was left in a pit, having been robbed and thrown in by Widow Perry and her sons, he lay for awhile before coming to. Then, not knowing where he was, he "was conveyed to a rock standing in the Sea on the coast of Turkey," where he remained for four days. He was then sold as a slave to a surgeon, for whom he worked as a gardner. When his master died, Master Harrison was able to return to England, and his own dwelling in Cambden, both fulfilling Widow Perry's prophecy and causing "no little astonishment and wonderful amazement of all his Friends and Relations."(7 - 9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 7 - 9

1669 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England