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32 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific county

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
118

Cicely Balye criticized Mary Smith for doing an inadequate job sweeping. In retribution, Smith called Bayle "a great fattail'd sow," but promised that her "fatnesse should shortly be pulled." (57)

Appears in:
Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft. Cambridge: 1590, 57

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
414

A woman who appears like a gentlewoman (Anonymous 22) destroys stores of beer and kills three hogs through witchcraft after being denied bacon and beer by a maidservant. (2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 2-3

1644, July 30 Soffam; Swaffham  Soffam; Swaffham  Norfolk  Norfolke; Norfolk  England 
540

William Wicherely allegedly attempts to conjure a spirit named Ambrose Waterduke. An elderly priest who was present to witness the conjuration fled before the spirit could appear.()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

1540 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
550

A woman who appears like a gentlewoman mounts her horse and vanishes after the maid she frightens cries out "The Lord deliver me from all witches."(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 2-3

1644, July 30 Soffam; Swaffham  Soffam; Swaffham  Norfolk  Norfolke; Norfolk  England 
822

Dorothy Durent gives deposition that, troubled by her infant son William's fits, she consulted with a Dr. Jacob in Yarmouth, who has a reputation for helping bewitched children. He allegedly advised her to hang William's blanket in in the chimney corner all day, to wrap the child in that blanket when she put him to bed at night, and to not be afraid if she found anything in the blanket, but rather to throw that thing into the fire.(8-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 8-9

1662, March 10 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
857

Jane Walter is allegedly bewitched "for a long time" by a familiar (Anonymous 236) allegedly belonging to Teecle's wife. Her tongue was found "tied in her Head with a Hempenstring, and run full of Pins, and she had many strange Fits," allegedly as often as 20 times in a day. The toad would creep several times into Jane Walter's lap. Teecle's wife was suspected of being a witch for some time. When the toad was to be burned, "it vanished away, that none knew what became of it."(7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

1693     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
859

John Ballard's daughter from Norfolk is bewitched for two years. She voids stones, pins, glass, a buckle and other things from her mouth, and suffers from "many strange Fits in a day." These were all presented before the Mayor and Alderman of the city of Norwich (Anonymous 101) by the John Ballard himself.(7-8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7-8

1693     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
860

Ann Burgess is allegedly bewitched for several years. She suffers up to twenty fits a day and vomits pins, tobacco pipes, nails, quills, and a bent farthing. This witnessed by many, and evidence shown before the mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101).(8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

1693 Norwich    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
861

Grace Brown is allegedly bewitched for several years. She vomited many things, including pins. These were shown before the mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101).(8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

1693 Norwich    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
939

Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly created a wax image of John Moulton, thrust a nail in the images head, and buried the image, as a means of slow, languishing, bewitchment(53-54)

Appears in:
Sterne, John. A Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft Containing these Severall Particulars. London: 1648, 53-54

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
940

Matthew Hopkins looked for the wax image which Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly buried in a graveyard to bewitch John Moulton. The image is never found, but child soon recovered and 'grew lusty again' (53-54)

Appears in:
Sterne, John. A Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft Containing these Severall Particulars. London: 1648, 53-54

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
941

Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly confessed to John Sterne, that she has made and uses wax images; she remains anonymous in his text.(53-54)

Appears in:
Sterne, John. A Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft Containing these Severall Particulars. London: 1648, 53-54

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
942

Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly signs her name, in blood, in the devil's book. (46-47)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 46-47

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1421

The morning after an altercation where Mary Smith threatens Cecily Bayle, Bayle awakes to discover a great cat on her chest and Mary Smith in her room. Immediately "after [she] fell sicke, languished, and grew exceeding leane." Her suffering continued for six months and was only finally relieved when she quit her job and moved. (55-57)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 55-57

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1422

Mary Smith, angry with Edmund Newton for his success in the trade of Holland cheese, was threatening her business. She allegedly appeared to Newton in the dead of the night, and "whisked about his face (as he lay in bed) a wet cloath of very loathsome sauour," as a means of threatening him or contaminating him (with illness/ malefic magic, or both).(57- 60)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57- 60

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1423

Edmund Newton sees the vision of "one cloathed in russet with a little bush beard," who promised to heal the sore on his leg. Perceiving that this being came from Mary Smith and seeing that he "had clouen feet," Newton refused to be healed by the man, and it disappeared instantaneously. (57-60)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57-60

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1424

Allegedly tormented by a familiar Toad and familiar Crabs sent by Mary Smith, Newton had one of his servants put the toad "into the fire, where it made a groaning noyse for one quarter of an houre before it was consume." Elsewhere, Mary Smith allegedly endured simultaneous "torturing paines, testifying the felt griefe by her out-cryes." (57- 60)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57- 60

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1425

Edmund Newton suffers from a "madnesse or phrensie," the "ioynts and parts of his body were benummed, besides other pains and greifes." By the time of publication, Newton is "not yet freed, but continueth in great weakenesse, disabled to performe any labour, whereby hee may get sufficient and competent maintenance." (57- 60)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57- 60

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1426

Edmund Newton, on the counsel of others, attempts to scratch Mary Smith as a a means of undoing her witchcraft. He finds, however, that he could not hurt her; his nails turned "like feathers" at the attempt.(57-60)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57-60

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1427

Henry Smith stops Elizabeth Hancocke as she travels home and, seeming in jest, accuses her of stealing his wife Mary Smith's hen. Smith herself arrives and repeats the accusation adding, that she "wished that the bones thereof might sticke in her throat, when she should eate the same." Hancocke, seeing the hen she was accused of stealing roosting in the thatch of the shop door, in "some passion and angry manner," wished "the pox to light vpon" Mary Smith. (50-51)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 50-51

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1428

Elizabeth Hancocke begins to suffer from a strange, debilitating illness within four hours of cursing at Mary Smith. Although she could still eat, she felt "pinched at the heart, and felt a sodaine weaknesse in all the parts of her body," a sensation which lasted for three weeks. In the moments she felt well enough to stand, Smith would taunt and curse her again, asking "the poxe light vpon you, can you yet come to the doore?"(51-52)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 51-52

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1429

Elizabeth Hancocke, at the sight of Mary Smith, falls into a fit. Throughout the rest of the day and night she suffered extreme pains across her whole body, tore at her hair, became distraught and bereaved of her senses, and was mysteriously tossed about and lifted off bed, all the while she thought Mary Smith stood in the room glowering at her.(52)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 52

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1430

Edward Drake, Elizabeth Hancocke's father, visits a local wizard or cunningman, who diagnoses Elizabeth's illness as bewitchment and names Mary Smith as the culprit by showing Drake a black glass where he sees her image. He then instructs Drake on how to make a witch-cake, (by mixing Hancocke's urine with flour, baking the loaf, and covering it with an ointment and a powder). The cake was to be split, applied to her heart and back, and a paper (with a spell on it?) was also meant to be laid on her. (52-54)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 52-54

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1431

Elizabeth Hancocke recovers after six weeks of torments after her father administers a counter-magic remedy prescribed by a local wise-man.(53-54)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 53-54

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1432

A Great Cat (a pet cum familiar of Mary Smith's) appears at Hancocke's home. Despite being stabbed with a sword, beaten over the head with a staff, and thrown in a sack, the cat does not die. It is finally stashed under the stairs, where it disappears of its own accord. (54)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 54

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1433

After he hit her son (allegedly with cause) Mary Smith cursed John Orkton and "wished in a most earnest and bitter manner, that his fingers might rotte off." He lost his appetite, grew weak, and fell ill with a mysterious disease which lasted approximately eight months. His fingers and toes grew gangerous and were amputated.(48-50)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 48-50

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1434

John Orkton visits a surgeon (Anonymous 201) in Yarmouth hoping to find a cure for the purification of his flesh. Although the surgeon was believed to have considerable skill, no remedy he applied lasted more than a day. The surgeon's remedies were not taking care of Orkton's ailment. At the time of publication, Orkton was still "rotting."(48-50)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 48-50

1616 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1435

Henry Smith allegedly curses Thomas Younges, after he tries to call in an old debt owed to his new wife. Three days later Younges "fell sicke, and was tortured with exceeding and massacring griefes."(58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 58-59

1616 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1436

Thomas Young visits a number of "sundry learned and experienced Physitians in Norwich." Despite following their advice, he does not recover from his (supernatural) suffering. (58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 58-59

1616 Norwich    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1437

Mary Smith is executed as a witch on January 12, 1616 (?), having confessed "her confederacy with the Diuell, cursing, banning, and enuy towards her neighbours, and hurts done to them, expressing euery one by name," including John Orkton, Cecily Bayles, Elizabeth Hancocke, and Edmund Newton. ()

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616,

1616, January 12     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1624

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, confesses to attempting to conjure a circle with a consecrated sword and ring, but was unsuccessful because "an old priest being there was so sore afraide that he ran away before the spirit called Ambrose Waterduke could appeare."(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

1597 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1628

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "Thomas Owldring, of Yarmouth, is a conjurer, and hath very good bookes of conjuring, and that a great nomber."(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

1597 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England