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48 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific county

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
80

John Lambe stands trial at the Worcester Assizes on two charges, firstly for "vnchristian and damnable practises against the person of an Honourble Peere of this Realme" and secondly for "damnable inuocation and worship of euill Spirits." He is found guilty of both, but judgement is suspended in both cases.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 3-6

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
81

Mr. Wayneman gives deposition against Dr. John Lambe, alleging they had met by chance and that at this meeting Dr. Lambe claimed he could tell what "secret markes" Wayneman had on his body and tell him acts he had done, then described both to him. Lambe added that "he vpon sight of any man or woman could doe the like to them."(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 6-7

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
82

Mr. Wayneman gave deposition alleging that Dr. John Lambe "did practise to drawe the said Mr. Wayneman into the Deuillish Art of Coniuration, and told him that he had the command of spirits." Lambe promised to show him an angel, and Wayneman agreed out of curiosity. Lambe took a crystal ball out of his pocket, rested his hat upon the table, and put the crystal on the hat's crown. He then knelt down before it and pronounced his adoration. When Wayneman asked why he did so, Lambe said he had to or the angel wouldn't appear. Lambe then added, "although I said to you, it was an Angell, I would shew you, I did deceiue you for it is a Spirit I vse to call vpon."(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 6-7

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
234

Margaret Landis of Worcester is accused of allowing her imps to do harm, and allowing them to suck the two teats located near her privy parts.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 4

1690, March 5 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
242

Rebbecca West of Worcester confesses to having sexual intercourse with the devil who appeared to her in the likeness of a young man.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 2

1690, March 5 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
244

Rebbecca West, Margaret Landis, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread are all allegedly burned to death at the stake on March 5th, 1645.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 7-8

1690, March 5 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
943

A old woman in Droitwich in the Country of Worcester (Anonymous 107) startled a boy (Anonymous 108) who was tending his mother's cows, by yelling "boo" from behind some bushes. Bewitchment was suspected as the boy could no longer speak. (50-51)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50-51

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
944

A bewitched boy (Anonymous 108), inarticulate and vengeful, ran after the woman he suspected of bewitching him, and raging, threw hot pottage in her face. The woman was identified as a witch.(50)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
945

A woman (Anonymous 107), is immediately apprehended and jailed after being identified as a witch. The identification is based solely on the inarticulate rage of a little boy she had spooked, and who had thrown hot pottage into her face.(50)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
946

A goaler (Anonymous 109), suspecting a local boy (Anonynous 108) had been bewitched into muteness made the woman he was holding in jail (Anonymous 106) sat the Lord's prayer and bless the lad, as a form of counter magic. It allegedly worked; the boy's speech was restored.(50-51)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50-51

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
947

The apparition of a witch (Anonymous 107) allegedly appears to a bewitched boy (Anonymous 108) at night. He rises to strike her; marks are later found on her body. (50-51)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50-51

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
948

Anonymous 107 of Lancashire is tried for witchcraft.(51)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51

1649   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
981

Mr. Wayneman gives deposition alleging that Dr. John Lambe claimed to be able to "doe strange things, as intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children." Lambe also claimed to have four spirits bound to his crystal ball, of which Benias was chief.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 6-7

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
988

Anthony Birch, attending a party at a gentleman's house where Dr. John Lambe performs juggling tricks, allegedly picks up Lambe's crystal ball when it is left on a table. He sees the shape of a hand in its depths, and then "a shepheard with a sheepehooke and tarbox on his backe." He is so amazed that he asks aloud what it is that he is seeing, and Dr. Lambe discontentedly snatches the ball back. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 5-6

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
989

Anthony Birch claims "it manifestly appeareth that the said Doctor Lambe was an absolute Witch, a Sorcerer and Iugling person absolutely giuen ouer to lewd wicked and diabolicall courses, an invocator and adorer of impious and wicked Spirits."(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 5-6

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
990

Dr. John Lambe can allegedly, through the spirits trapped in his crystal ball, "vndertake any difficult thing, and did very often discouer and bring to light goods and chattels although they had for a long time beene lost." Through the same means, he can also tell whether a person accused of witchcraft is truly a witch and diagnose disease without seeing the patient.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 6-7

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
991

While Dr. John Lambe is imprisoned, a gentlewoman (Anonymous 117) approaches him repeatedly to ask who her husband would be. When he finally agrees to the request, he allegedly bids her look into his crystal ball, which he sets on the ground. She reports seeing numerous people she know in its depths, and the image finally resolves to a gentleman she does not recognize, dressed all in green. Dr. Lambe tells her to take note of him, and said that though they would meet without him intending to make himself a suitor, he would feel compelled to be by the time they parted company. She describes this encounter and Dr. Lambe's prediction to numerous of her acquaintances, and a few days later the man in green come to her father's house as a client of her father's legal practice. However, the man's horse spooks and kicks him. He is taken into the gentlewoman's home to recover, and the two fall in love while he is under her care. They marry not long thereafter.(7-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 7-9

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
992

Dr. John Lambe is visited while imprisoned at Worcester Castle by three gentlemen, who allegedly decide to send for wine. The keeper tells them it is too late in the evening and the Castle gates have been locked for the night. The gentlemen give up the idea, but Lambe asks them what it was they had wanted to drink. He calls for a wine glass, and a pot appeared on the table with the sign of the Globe Tavern on the pot. When the gentlemen left, they stopped at the Globe Tavern and asked if anyone had fetched a bottle of wine from him lately. The inkeeper replied that "a little boy in greene had since eight of the clocke fetched so much for Doctor Lambe."(9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 9-10

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
995

John Hart allegedly dies from witchcraft administered by Rebecca West. Charges for this are presented Thomas Hart, his father, John Edes, a clerk, and an unnamed doctor (Anonymous 119). Rebbecca West allegedly pleads guilty to this murder, saying this had all been occasioned by her extreme poverty.(15-16)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15-16

1645, March Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
996

Margaret Landis is identified as a witch by a passing child (Anonymous 120) who calls her "Pegg the witch." (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3-4

1645 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
997

A child (Anonymous 120) falls sick and dies less three weeks after calling Margaret Landis "Pegg the witch." Margaret Landis had allegedly pointed at him threateningly. While the child was sick, he would have violent fits and call out saying Pegg the witch was by his bed.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3-4

1645 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
998

Abraham Chad and Elin Shearcraft testify that Susan Cock and Rose Hallybread made a large fire and used wax dolls resembling the Peak children to torment them. They stuck pins in the dolls and turned them on a spit over the fire. The children, allegedly unaware of what was happening, simultaneously felt pain.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 5

1645, March Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1373

A midwife and a Matron claim to have searched Rebecca West, Margaret Landis, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread for witch's marks and found "several large Teates in the secret Parts of their Bodies." They claim they questioned the women as to "how the marks' came there, they both made Answer, that the Devils Imps had done it."(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 6-7

1645 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1652

After the hearing of a Sermon, Joyce Dovey begins to feel "much wrought upon and dejected," a depression which leads her to fall "into some passions, and (as was conceived by her friends) Convulsion fits," which in time grew stronger and stronger, especially during prayer. (1-2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 1-2

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1653

Joyce Dovey's ecstatic despair is so violent that a Chaplain of Religion and a Captain, by some discourse, and other informations, strongly imagined, that she was possessed.(1-2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 1-2

1637 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1685

Joyce Dovey's Keeper (Anonymous 265), wanting a divine consultation on the possibility of her possession, silently prayed that if she were possessed, that a sign would manifest. The Devil, in a voice described as "bigger and grosser tone then her ordinary speech," began with "swearing, Wounds, Blood, &c.," behavior he would resume any time there was talk of divine matters around her. (2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 2

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1686

Religious symbols, in the form of "crucifixes, and crosses," allegedly appeared on Joce Dovey's "breast or throat" after three soldiers near her speak of Catholicism around her. The Devil cries out "haw, haw, haw, sayes," as they react in fear.(3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1688

Joyce Dovey, returning from the "House of an honest religious man," where she was a spectacle or a kind of oracle, "she began to be so distempered," that she could barely return home. Upon returning, she attempted to throw herself out of the window, and made it more than half way through, before her Keeper caught "by the coats, and took her in again."(3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1690

Joyce Dovey is "oft thrown against the walls, and into the fire, but all without any hurt." One one occasion, she was "cast into a great fire, some would have taken her out, but her Keeper said, let her alone, and observe the providence of God. She was magically "snatched out without humane help, not having any hurt, or so much as the smell of fire on her clothes." She did the same to a bible, throwing it into the fire, and it too would not burn.(3, 4)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3, 4

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1692

Joyce Dovey attempts to slice her own jugular to kill herself. She evidently "snatched a paire of Cizzers from a womans girdle, and applyed them to her throat; and another time a knife from another, in an admirable quick way, and strook her breast, yet both without so much as a scarre in either place."(3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1698

Joyce Dovey, finding that her Keeper (who had evidently been keeping a written record of her torments), had some kind of written record about her, "fell upon him very violently, and would have taken the paper from him, but he contended with her very toughly." (3-4)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3-4

1622 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2329

Mary Ellins, a nine or ten year old girl, goes to "the fields," in April, 1652 with some other children "to gather cowslips." However, along the way, they encounter "one Catherine Huxley, a single Woman," around forty years of age. The "Children called her Witch," and took to throwing stones at her. Mary Ellins partook in calling Catherine Huxley a witch, but was "so affrighted," she could not throw stones at her.(44)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 44

1652, April   Evesham  Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
2340

The young girl, Mary Ellins, falls ill, after having been "hindmost" of a group of children running from the alleged witch Catherine Huxley, having called her a "Witch" and thrown stones at her. Huxley allegedly says to Mary, "Ellins, you shall have stones enough in your ..." Mary Ellins is "so weak and Languishing that her Friends feared she would not. recover." This initial stage of the illness lasts one month.(44)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 44

1652, April   Evesham  Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
2341

Having been ill the space of a month after being "hindmost" in a group of children who were tormenting Catherine Huxley, an alleged witch, the young girl Mary Ellins begins to "void stones by the urinary passages," which "drop into the Pot or Bason." While voiding these stones, Mary Ellins also experiences the "most grievous pains in her Back and Reins," which are "like the pricking of Pins." Mary Ellins voids some eighty stones, "some plain pebbles, some plain flints, some very small, and some about an ounce weight," and she continues to exhibit these symptoms for a month or two. (44-45)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 44-45

1652, May   Evesham  Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
2342

The young girl, Mary Ellins, voids "stones by the urinary passages," for the space of "a month or two." This leads to "strong suspitions of Witchcraft" upon Catherine Huxley, who allegedly said to Mary Ellins the day the girl and her friends threw rocks at Huxley, calling her a witch, "Ellins, you shall have stones enough in your ---" Huxley is therefore "Apprehended, Examined and Searched." It is found that there are several stones at her bedhead, "such as the said Mary voided."(45)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 45

1652, July   Evesham  Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
2343

Catherine Huxley, a woman who is allegedly believed to be a witch responsible for the young girl Mary Ellin's sickness and voiding of "stones through urinary passages," is sent to Worcester, after having been examined and searched. At the "Summer Assizes in the said year 1652," she was condemned and executed, "upon the Prosecution of the Friends of the said Mary."(45)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 45

1652 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2344

Upon the "Apprehension and Commitment" of the alleged witch, Catherine Huxley, who is believed to have caused the illness and the voiding of "stones through urinary passages," in the young girl Mary Ellins, "Mary ceased to void any more stones." For a while, she voided "much blackish and muddy Sand," but then was "perfectly recovered," and grew up to marry have seven children in good health, having "never voided any stones since, nor been troubled with the pain forementioned."(45)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 45

1652   Evesham  Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
2363

Mr. Hopkins, the chief magistrate of Bewdley and a member of parliament, complains that he is "oft pained as he thought with the Spleen," but he was "not at all Melancholy." Mr. Hopkins confesses to being "possest (meaning, I think Bewitcht," which is dismissed as Mr. Hopkins being "Fanciful and Melancholy." However, Mr. Hopkins maintains his claims to be true, and he never "shew any Melancholy."(59-60)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 59-60

1662 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2364

Mr. Hopkins suffers for a long time from pain "as he thought with the Spleen," which he also believed to caused by "possession" or by being "bewitcht" as he "shewed no Melancholy." Eventually, Mr. Hopkins dies, but before doing so, "a piece of Wood came down into the rectum intestinum," which had to be "pull[ed] out with their Fingers." His wife thought it to be "the length of ones finger," and that both Mr. Hopkins and his wife "were sure he never swallowed any such thing." It is believed he was afflicted by Satan.(60)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 60

1662 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2392

A "Sanguine strong Maid" from Bewdley "fell into strange Histerical Fits," which began "by Stoppage of the Menstrua." She is treated by Richard Baxter, who provides her with "Castory and Rad. Ostrutii, and Sem. Dauci on Forestus Commendation." After she begins taking this, "she began to be better." However, when Richard Baxter is "driven out of the Country by War," and Mr. Robert Morton, the Pastor and physician left for Coventry, "she was left without help, and grew worse than ever." Richard Baxter concludes that "at last [...] by a suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis, she seemed possest by a Devil." (193)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2393

A "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409) from Bewdley experiences a number of fits from between 1642 until 1646 or 1647. These fits are characterized by: the fact that "many could not hold her," and "she would be cast off her Bed and upon it again, by a force far above her strength"; she asked for "needles and pins, and cords brought to her," to kill herself; her ability to predict events, such as the coming of a Papist to cure her "their way,"; laughing at Holy Water; and that she "would Swear, Curse, nd Rage against any that were Religious, and Hugg those that were Vicious, and be merry with them."(194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2394

When Richard Baxter returns to Bewdley, after having left "a Sanguine strong maid," who was experiencing violent fits, he "went to see her, and Prayed once by her." After, praying neighbours were encouraged by this, and "resolved to joyn with some of Bewdley, to Fast and Pray by her, till she was recovered." During prayers, "she was usually in violent Rage, and after thankt them." This culminates on a day, when Mr. Thomas Ware was praying, and "she fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone; The Black Dog is gone." After, she never experienced her fits again.(194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

1647 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2395

Many "good People in Charity" looked after a "Sanguine strong Maid"(Anonymous 409) during her violent fits, believed to be caused by a devil (Anonymous 165). However, "one young Man" (Anonymous 411) in particular "was more with her than the rest." During her fits, the maid often "toss[ed] her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." Upon seeing this, the young man's "Lust was provoked, which he exercised on her." After "praeterjiciendo semen," the maid seemed eased for a time, "enticing him the more to do it oft," in what he felt was "an Act of (Wicked) Compassion." This did only, however, "Enrage her Disease."(195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

1647 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2396

A young man (Anonymous 411) who took advantage of a "Sanguine strong maid" (Anonymous 409) during her fits, where she "tossed her naked Body about," in order to satisfy his lust, confesses to his sins "after her Deliverance" for these fits. Many were sad for the maid, and "prayed for her." Richard Baxter believes that the maid's illness must have begun with "the furor uterinus," but because a "Real possession," after the young man took advantage of her, "in punishment of their Sin." The young man and the maid marry, and "professed deep Repentance."(195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

1647 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2839

Dr. John Lambe, "beeing merry at the Castle with diuers of his acquaintance" while imprisoned at Worcester Castle, allegedly sees a woman walking toward them, and tells his companions he would make her lift her skirts. As they watch, she "began to take vp her cloathes, and by degrees lifted them vp aboue her middle." When chided by onlookers for her shameless behavior, she replies that she had been wading through a pool in her path and had lifted her clothes to save them from the water.(10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 10

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2840

A gentlewoman; having heard of the fame of Dr. John Lambe, comes to Worcester Castle with her friends, and as they approach his room, whispers to one of her companions "which was the Witch?" When they reachs the room, Lambe tells her he knows she called him a witch and says aloud, before the assembled company, that she has two bastards and gives both their names and where they were brought up. The gentlewoman retreated in embarrassment.(10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 10-11

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2841

A man named Wheeler is named to the Jury for Dr. John Lambe's trial at the Worcester Assizes. Before the trial, he joins the crowd around Lambe's chamber at Worcester Castle. Lambe comes to him, falls on his knees and asks for his blessing, declaring that Wheeler "should shortly be one of his twelue Godfathers." Wheeler tells him this is so, and says he has come to see whether Lambe could do the strange things ascribed to him. Lambe asks him to take off his garter and tie it securely around his middle. Wheeler does, tying twenty knots. Lambe then takes hold of the garter and removes it with such ease "it seemed to all the company, and to Wheeler himselfe, that the Garter came out of his very body." Wheeler is frightened by this and departs unsure whether he has been injured by the removal.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 11-12

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2842

In the two weeks following Dr. John Lambe's trial at the Worcester Assizes, "the High Sheriffe, the Foreman of the Iury, and diuers others of the Iustices, Gentlemen there present, and of the same Iury, to the number of forty dyed." The County of Worcester petitions the crown to have Lambe removed from their custody, and he is transferred to the King's Bench at London, where he lives "in great plenty of money, and much resorted vnto by people of seuerall conditions."(12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 12

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England