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23 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
47

A group of nine people (eight men and one woman) rob and murder Anthony James, a wealthy Yeoman, and his wife (Anonymous 66). The robbers take gold, silver, plates, and rings. They then stab Anthony James and his wife (Anonymous 66) with daggers to kill them. The children, Anthony James (Jr.) and Elizabeth James are kidnapped. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 4-5

1602     Essex  Essex  England 
2617

After the dispossession of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London who allegedly suffered from fits caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson; the student of divinity John Swan inquires "whether she did see any thinge departe from her." Mary Glover denies seeing anything, but admits that she did "feel somewhat depart," and as soon as this unknown being departed, she "felt such a freedome of all the powers and faculties of soule and body." This release brings her intense joy. (56-57)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 56-57

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2623

Elizabeth Jackson, a woman from London, is "arraigned and condemned at Newgate," for the bewitchment of Mary Glover, the fourteen-year old daughter of a merchant from Thames Street in London. Mary Glover allegedly suffers from fits when she is in the same room as Elizabeth Jackson, which eventually progress to fits every second day.(12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

1602 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
2626

The Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, tests Mary Glover during a fit allegedly brought on by being in the presence of the woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Mary Glover is in a fit, when to test the authenticity of her fit, the Recorder "called for a candle and a sheete of paper," and lit the piece of paper on fire. Sir John Crook then applied the paper to her hand, following up with a second, third, fourth, and fifth piece. Mary Glover's hand blistered, until the blisters broke, and "water came out." However, Mary Glover still lay "sencelesse" with the voice coming out her nostrils saying, "hang her, hang her." This seems to be evidence that Mary Glover is not counterfeiting her fits.(12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2628

The minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, informs the Recorder of London, sir John Crook, during the examination of Mary Glover, that he had often prayed with Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of causing Mary Glover's fits. However, whenever he concluded his prayers with the Lords Prayer, Elizabeth Jackson was unable to utter the line "but deliver us from evill," and if she ever managed to say it, Mary Glover "was tost up, and shaken, as if a mastive dogge should take a little curre into his mouth." Upon hearing this, Sir John Crook bids Elizabeth Jackson to say the Lords Prayer, which she did, skipping over the line "but deliver us from evil." Upon reciting the Apostle's Creed, Elizabeth Jackson further refuses to say "Jesus Christ is our Lord." This seems proof that Elizabeth Jackson may be affiliated with the devil, and a witch. (12 - 13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12 - 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2629

The minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, informs the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, during the examination of the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, who allegedly suffers from fits caused by the woman Elizabeth Jackson, that during a fit, Mary Glover had been known to be "tost and throwne" towards Elizabeth Jackson if she layd a hand on the girl. Sir John Crook bids Mary Glover to be laid down on a bed, and cloths to be laid on top of her, most notably her head so that she should neither hear nor see her surroundings. He asked the female witnesses (Anonymous 439) present to stand around the bed, and Elizabeth Jackson to stand among them, and for each of them to lay a hand on Mary Glover softly one by one. Mary Glover at first "did not stirre," until Elizabeth Jackson lays her hand on Mary Glover, causing "all the cloathes to be throwne off, and the maid tost towards here." This seems to confirm that Elizabeth Jackson is a witch, and Mary Glover's fits are authentic.(13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2630

The Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, having examined the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, accused of counterfeiting fits allegedly caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson, believes that Elizabeth Jackson is a witch. He tells Elizabeth Jackson, "Lord have mercy on thee woman," and sends her to Newgate prison. As soon as the witch is taken from the room where the examination of Mary Glover is taking place, Mary Glover comes out of a fit, and the voice that came from her nostrils crying "hang her, hang her" ceased. Mary Glover and her mother depart after this verdict.(13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2631

A month after the trial and condemnation of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, with a number of violent fits, Mary Glover continues to have fits every second day of the week. These fits are "most strange and fearefull." Upon hearing this, Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, calls for an exorcism, as he "did blame me (Mr. Lewis Hughes) and all the Ministers of London [...] that we might all be of us be ashamed, to see a child of God in the clawes of Sathan." The dispossession of Mary Glover is to be achieved through "fasting and prayer."(13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2632

After the dispossession of the fourteen year girl from London, Mary Glover, it is decided that she should live with a minister "for one yeare, least Sathan should assault her againe." The minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, present at her dispossession, agrees to take her in, along with her mother and sister. They are lodged at his house for the duration of a year, at Saint Helen's Bishopsgate in London. However, Mary Glover is no longer "afflicted in this kind."(14)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 14

1602 London    London, City of  London (Saint Helin)  England 
2712

The mother of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London suffering fits brought on after being threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, hears rumours of Elizabeth Jackson's continued threats against her daughter. She goes to confront Elizabeth Jackson, who denied everything, "yet could not forbeare but speake these wordes to her face; You have not crosses ynow, but I hope you shall have as many crosses, as ever fell upon woman and Children."(Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2821

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, visits a church in the next parish on a Sunday after she began to experience fits upon being threatened by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson is present at this sermon, and stares openly at Mary Glover. Because of this, Mary Glover "feeling her selfe amisse," is brought home, where she falls into a fit, "which was through repeticons of the witches view, increased both in strength and in strangenes dayly."(Fol. 6v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 6v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2822

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, experiences severe fits after being stared at by the old woman, Elizabeth Jenkins in church. During these fits, "she was turned rounde as a whoope, with her head backward to her hippes," and she tossed around in this position. Further, Mary Glover was "all over colde and stiffe as a frozen thing." At times, he head is between her legs as she tumbles around. Between fits, Mary Glover's mouth is open exceedingly wide at times, "during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon her mother, her sister, and Mistress Lumas, these women's faces are swollen and blistered for many days, as well as her mother's arm when she breathes upon it. Mary Glover attempts to hold her breath because of this, which gives her parents some hope that she will be delivered. There seems to be only "som extradordinary and unlawfull meanes which a Phisition in those times used," in order to cure her, but nothing natural. (Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2823

The fourteen year girl from London, Mary Glover, suffers from a number of unnatural fits after being threatened by Elizabeth Jackson. Her parents seek to keep her affliction secret, telling none but some neighbours of their daughter's sickness. In spirit of this, one day, Mary Glover's mother takes her into the city, where they accidentally meet Elizabeth Jackson. Mary Glover is so troubled after seeing Elizabeth Jackson, that she much "retorne speedelie home," and so finish their journey early. At home, Mary Glover suffers from a fit, worse than her usual by double.(Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 8r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2824

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from a new set of fits "with many uncouth novelties, and strange Caracters, of a newe stamp," after running into Elizabeth Jackson in the city of London. During these fits, which occur on every second day, Mary Glover would suddenly become ill around three in the afternoon. Upon lying down, "there apeared in her brest a notable hearing or rising," and her body would suddenly thrash about the room. Her neck appeared to be stretched longer than usual, and her eyes were turned "upward in her head." At times, it appeared she played an invisible instrument with her fingers, while her mouth made "strange antique forms," and strange noises such as "tesh" would come out of her. If prayers were said for her during her fits, when reaching the line, "Deliver us from evill," her body would be thrown across the bed she was lying on. Often, her body would fit into strange contortions as well. Her fits would last until six in the evening.(Fol. 8r - Fol. 10r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 8r - Fol. 10r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2826

A fourteen year old girl allegedly suffering from fits caused by an old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, goes to her uncle's house, Sheriff Glover, where is brought face to face with Elizabeth Jackson on a day she is not expecting a fit. "Before she could speak six works," Mary Glover enters a fit far more severe than her previous ones. After this incident, Mary Glover suffers from two kinds of fits: an ordinary fit which came every other day (which is a "strengthened and lengthened" fit compared to what she had experienced before); and extraordinary fits, which occur when Mary Glover encounters Elizabeth Jackson.(Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2828

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from a series of "ordinary" fits, in that they either regularly occur every second day in a fixed pattern, once in the afternoon and once when she goes to sleep; or whenever she tries to eat. These "ordinary" fits began around noon, and consisted of Mary Glover's eyes rolling up to the top of her head, the clenching of her jaw, and the loss of sense in her left leg. Her body also is prone to thrashing around without order. Mary Glover claims that while she cannot speak during these fits, "her understanding, togeather with her hearing, remained." Her belly would also swell "great as a football," and it would seem that an unknown presence moved about her body from her belly through her breast and unto her throat, causing her great pain. Mary Glover would also often gain large strength, so that several men were required to hold her down. At times, Mary Glover would also cry out. During her ordinary fits, Mary Glover also experiences several "intermissions of scarce halfe an hower," when her fits died down. These ordinary fits rejuvenate when Mary Glover begins to cry, and her body would contort. When these new, violent fits seized her, Mary Glover claimed to have no memory of them. Often, Mary Glover would also utter prayers, including at the end of her fitts, when she would say, "O Lord I geve thee thankes, that thow hast delivered me, this tyme, and many moe; I beseech thee (good Lord) deliver me for ever." After prayers, Mary Glover was often seized by a new set of fits, with similar symptoms to the former. Mary Glover's ordinary fits lasted until "twelve of the Clocke at midnight," including fits she experienced upon going to sleep, or whenever she "receaved nourishment, night or day." (Fol. 13r - Fol. 15r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 13r - Fol. 15r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2860

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from a number of "extraordinary" fits whenever in the presence of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. These fits are outside of her "ordinary" fits, which occur every second day for twelve hours, and whenever she tries to take sustenance. Mary Glover "extraordinary" fits began with her "seene dying away, by degrees, untill she became deprived, both of inward and outward senses." Her eyes would shut, her jaw clenched, and her body rigid. Until Elizabeth Jackson leaves, Mary Glover is fixed in this position. However, should Elizabeth Jackson approach or touch the girl, Mary Glover's body would "rise up in the middle, rebounding wise turne over," and violently thrust itself towards the old woman. At this time, a voice could be heard coming through Mary Glover's nostrils, saying "Hang her." This would repeat, until Elizabeth Jackson departed. Should Elizabeth Jackson approach Mary Glover during one of her ordinary fits, Mary Glover's fit would alter and become "extraordinary," as "all motions in the belly and breast cease, all returnes of her pangs geve over, her understanding depart, and all outward feeling be abolished." The return of the voice from Mary Glover's nostrils, saying, "Hang her," would also occur. As soon as Elizabeth Jackson removes herself from the presence of Mary Glover, the young girl recovers. (Fol. 24v - Fol. 26v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 24v - Fol. 26v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2861

Mary Glover experiences a fit of the "extraordinary" kind, at her uncle the Sheriff Glover's house. The fourteen year old girl is brought with Elizabeth Jackson, who is suspected of bewitching the young girl, to the sheriff's house on one of Mary Glover's fit days. Before Mary Glover "had spoken six wordes," she fell into a fit. Mary Glover exhibits no fear of Elizabeth Jackson, desiring to be brought face to face with the old woman, and claims after that "Goodwife Jackson had hurt her." During her fit, a voice is heard to come from Mary Glover, saying, "hang her, or hong her," which persisted "all the whyle Elizabeth Jackeson remayned in the house with her."(Fol. 26v - Fol. 27r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 26v - Fol. 27r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2862

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, experiences an "extraordinary" fit, at the house of Sir John Harte. Mary Glover allegedly suffers from fits which began after being threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Sir John Harte has Elizabeth Jackson brought into his house while Mary Glover visits him, and the girl was "imediatly taken with one of these fitts." While the girl is lying senseless, Elizabeth Jackson touches her, and Mary Glover is "cast (very strangely) upon her," and this repeats itself from any side of the bed Elizabeth Jackson touches her from. (Fol. 27r - Fol. 27v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27r - Fol. 27v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2863

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London who allegedly suffers from fits after the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, suffers from an "extraordinary" fit at the house of Lady Brunckard, at a time when a fit was not expected. This fit was witnessed by "many Divines and Phisitions." (Anonymous 463) During her fit, Mary Glover was cast "with great violence, towardes Elizabeth Jackson, when she touched her, and towards her only." Elizabeth Jackson is taken by fear and suffers from "gastely lookes, panting breathing, choaking speech, and fearfull tremblinge." However, the witnesses present believe this simply to be "impudent lyinge," and "nothing els but notes of a ruyned conscience." This was one of several "shows" that occurred surrounding the witnessing of the fits of Mary Glover. (Fol. 27v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2916

Although adverse parties encouraged the parents of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl allegedly suffering from mysterious fits thought to be caused by the witch, Elizabeth Jackson, to decide to have more physicians examine their daughter after the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the parents of Mary Glover decide to take her to ministers for an exorcism. They believe if their daughter is delivered, it is an example of "what a loathsom bondage, to be in the hands of Sathan, and what an arme of unmatcheable power, is on the other side."(Fol. 40v - Fol. 41v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 40v - Fol. 41v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2926

Dr. Bradwell, a physician from the College in London looks into the Mary Glover case, where a young girl is allegedly afflicted by fits caused the old woman Elizabeth Jackson, after she curses and threatens the girl. He describes two "natural" causes that might be responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms, one that is "originally inbred, or in her life time acquired." However, he dismisses the idea that whatever afflicts Mary Glover is inbred, for she was a healthy youth. Instead, it is more likely that she was affected by "a disease cometh through Contagion." Elizabeth Jackson, however, does not have "hurtfull breathes, or aires flowing from their bodie, or Cloathes, smite some other with the like," as one with a disease contagion usually does. Further, the symptoms of Mary Glover were more towards the "suffocation of the Mother," which "cometh not by Contagion." Finally, Mary Glover or Elizabeth Jackson did not infect others. Dr. Bradwell concludes that Mary Glover could not be affected by a natural cause, such as contagion.(Fol. 154r - Fol. 155v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 154r - Fol. 155v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2927

The physician Dr. Bradwell rebukes the writings of Dr. Edward Jorden, also a physician. Dr. Jorden examined the young girl, Mary Glover, who allegedly suffered from fits caused by the bewitchment of an old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. However, Dr. Jorden believed Mary Glover to be suffering from natural causes, and published his work in the suffocation of the mother, the disease he believes to be responsible for Mary Glover's affliction. Dr. Bradwell chastises Dr. Jorden for writing in direct response to the Mary Glover case, although he "would not touch (at all) the cause of Marie Glover in it." Dr. Bradwell further suggests that Dr. Jorden, when exposed to the supernatural, is unable to identify it, and that he is responsible for "drawing manie of the Colledge, to speake and stirre in it against us." Dr. Bradwell claims that Dr. Jorden released his book of "misconceipts" to the detriment of the minds of men, and that "he restraine the description aforesaid of a learned phisition to himself, and those only that concurred with him in this cause." Further, Dr. Jorden demonstrates himself to be contradictory, acknowledging witchcraft as well as natural disease as caused by the Devil, meaning Mary Glover's case "would constrayne him to eat his words, touching possession of Divells and witchcrafte." Dr. Jorden, "a fearfull scholler," found when trying to explain all of Mary Glover's symptoms that "neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." For example, Dr. Jorden suggests that Mary Glover was healed by fasting as in general this is helpful to cure the disease, however, Mary Glover was unable to take sustenance for many days before purposefully engaging in fasting. Dr. Bradwell concludes that Dr. Jorden cannot be right in his claims.(Fol. 42r - Fol. 42v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 42r - Fol. 42v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England