Go back
15 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
104

Henry Lord Rosse allegedly sickens strangely and dies. Joan, Margaret, and Phillip Flowers are suspected of bewitching him to death.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
530

Alexander Nyndge is allegedly afflicted with a wide variety of fits during his possession. The spirit causes him to use strange and idle gestures while laughing or dancing until he is thought to be mad, to refuse meat for extended periods until he begins to waste away, to shake as if with ague, and for a strange flapping noise to be heard from within his body. In the bed, the spirit's influence would cause him to curl up in a heap under the covers, bounce up from the bed, and beat himself against the bedstead or floor; at these times, he would need to be restrained to prevent him from hurting himself. The swelling fits also continued, joined by the appearance of a strange lump moving just under his skin.(A4)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A4

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
531

Edward Nyndge begins to have Alexander Nyndge prayed over, and requests their father William Nyndge to gather the neighbors to assist. Alexander would be set in a chair and, while being prayed over, and allegedly have fits in which he would be cast to the ground, or fall. He would draw back his lips, gnash his teeth, wallow and foam, while the spirit caused his body to be monstrously transformed. During these fits, Edward Nyndge and Thomas Wakefield would lay hands on Alexander, set him back in the chair, and together hold him in place while others continued praying.(A4 - A5)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A4 - A5

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
533

Edward Nyndge allegedly conjures the spirit within Alexander Nyndge, invoking the name of Jesus Christ and charging the spirit to speak with him. The spirit responds by causing a swelling in Alexander's chest and throat, and drawing his belly in toward his spine, but finally speaks after more prayer. Its voice is deep and hollow, and when pressed as to why it is tormenting Alexander, replies "I come for his Soule." It also acknowledges itself as fallen, referring to Christ as he who was its redeemer.(A4)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A4

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
534

The spirit possessing Alexander Nyndge allegedly struggles within him, declaring that it will "have his Soule and body too" and torments and disfigures Alexander more terribly than before. Alexander is forced to shriek, and the spirit causes him to fight back with such strength that it takes four or five men to hold him despite being bound to the chair; these exertions do not cause him to pant. He cries copiously, laughs, and shrills with his mouth closed. The spirit also flings him to the ground.(A4)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A4

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
536

William Nyndge Jr., brother to Edward Nyndge and Alexander Nyndge, allegedly provokes the spirit by declaring that "Wee will keepe him from th[ee] tho[u] foule Spirit, in spite of thy Nose." This causes the spirit to give both William and Edward terrible looks, which Edward responds to by leading the company present, about 40 people, in the Lord's Prayer and others. The spirit, speaking in a voice similar to Alexander's, replies "There bee other good Prayers." Edward denounces its claim, and the spirit roars fearfully, stretching Alexander's neck toward the fire.(A4 - A5)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A4 - A5

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
624

Francis Lord Rosse is allegedly afflicted by strange sickness, which causes him to be "most barbarously and inhumanely tortured," following the death of his brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected to have bewitched him.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
625

Lady Katherine begins to suffer "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" leaving her "many times in great danger of life" following the death of her brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected of bewitching her.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
656

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that she has a spirit named Pretty, given to her three years prior while in the service of William Berry in Langholme. She claims that Berry asked her to open her mouth and blew into her "Fairy which should doe her good." The spirit emerged from her mouth in the form of a woman and asked for her soul, which she gave readily at Berry's urging.(E3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E3v

1615   Langholme  Rutland  Rutlandshire  England 
1495

Agnes Berry of Enfield allegedly bewitches Grace Hasley of Enfield. Hasley becomes "lame, and languished from 25 August until 3 September then next following and wasted away in her whole body."()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

1615 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
1760

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses that she and her sister-in-law, Anne, the wife of Robert Pearce of Stoke in Suffolk, exchanged a white imp, a gray imp, and a black imp between themselves, so that "these Jmpes went commingly from one two another, and did mischiefe where ever they went."(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

1615     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1918

Mary Greenliefe allegedly allows her familiar spirits to feed from Susan Sparrow's fourteen year old daughter and her own teenage daughter. Greenliefe's daughter had awoken one night and was heard "to cry out in a fearefull manner; Oh Mother, now it comes, it comes, oh helpe mother, it hurts me, it hurts me." Having been told to quiet her daughter, Greenliefe allegedly suggested to Sparrow, "I will fee with them (meaning her said Impes,) that they shall suck my daughter one night, and thine another." The next night Sparrow's daughter awoke "much affrighted, sweating, and shrieking in a terrible manner, complaining that shee was nipped and pinched on her thigh. Sparrow's child had a large bruse on her thigh and complained of pain in her leg for a month after. (19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19

1615 Alresford    Essex  Essex  England 
2293

Edward Nyndge allegedly has Peter Bencham, Curate of the Town, conjure the spirit possessing Alexander Nyndge so he might force it to declare its name and origins. The spirit tells Edward that its name is Aubon, and it is from Ireland, and, when the fourth chapter of St. Matthew is read, claims that God is its master, and Aubon is His Disciple. (A5)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A5

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
2447

Ellen Greene alleged during her examination that, three years before, she sent her familiars Pusse and Hisse Hisse to kill John Patchett's wife and child at Joan Willimott's behest. The child died the day after Greene touched it, while Mrs. Patchett languished for over a month before dying.(Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

1615 Stathorne    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2456

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that two or three years before, she found one of Francis Lord Rosse's gloves on a dung-hill and delivered it to her mother, Joan Flower. Joan put the glove in hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bade Rutterkin to go upwards. Joan then buried the glove in the yard, and said "a mischiefe light on him, but he will mend againe."(F3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England