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10 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
77

Sir Francis Manners succeeds his brother as the Earl of Rutland and takes up residence at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Joan Flower, and her daughters Margaret and Phillip, are hired as charwomen to assist with the household's upkeep. Margaret earns a residency as both a poultry-keeper and a laundress. This lasts until the Countess hears accusations that the Flower women have been engaged in various misdemeanors during their employment.(C2-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
78

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Joan Flowers, the mother, is said to be "a monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious, and for any thing they saw by her, a plaine Atheist; besides of late dayes her very countenance was estranged, her eyes were fiery and hollow, her speech fell and enuious, her de[m]eanour strange and exoticke, and her conuersation sequestred; so that the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse."(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
79

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Phillip Flower, one of the daughters, is said to rob the Lady and maintain debauched and base company. Phillip is also accused of being "lewdly transported with the loue of one Th: Simpson" and to have bewitched Thomas so that "hee had no power to lea[v]e her, and was as hee supposed maruellously altred both in m[in]de and body."(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
102

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Margaret Flower, one of the daughters, is said to have "often resorted from the Castle to her Mother, bringing such prouision as they thought was vnbefitting for a seruant to purloyne, and comming at such vnseasonable houres, that they could not but coniecture some mischiefe between them." She is also accused of robbing the Lady and maintaining debauched and base company.(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
103

Sir Francis Manners, the Earl of Rutland, develops a dislike of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower and ceases to hear their complaints. The Countess, the Earl's wife, eventually discharges Margaret for "[i]ndecencies both in her life and neglect of her businesse." Margaret is turned out of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle with a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. In the aftermath, Joan Flower is "exprobrated by her neighbours for her Daughters casting out of dores, and other conceiued displeasures" and "many times cursed them all that were the cause of this discontentment, and made her so loathsome to her former familiar friends, and beneficiall acquaintance."(C4-C4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C4-C4v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
621

The Devil allegedly "perceiued the inficious disposition of this wretch, and that she and her Daughters might easily bee made instruments to enlarge his Kingdome, and bee as it were the executioners of his vengeance" and offered his services to Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower. The Flower women are said to have agreed to give their souls in exchange for the service of spirits and the knowledge of incantations, spells and charms. The conditions of the agreement are sealed through "abhominable kisses, and an odious sacrifice of blood, not leauing out certaine charmes and coniurations with which the Diuell deceiued them, as though nothing could bee done without ceremony, and a solemnity of orderly ratification."(C4v-Dv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C4v-Dv

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
628

Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners are allegedly afflicted such that they are unable to have any more children, resulting in a miscarriage before Christmas. However, they do not connect this misfortune to the actions of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower until later.(Dv-D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
629

Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are apprehended around Christmas and imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol on suspicion of bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death, causing the illnesses of Francis Lord Rosse and Lady Katherine, and Countess Manners' miscarriage. (D2-D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2-D2v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
630

Joan Flower, en route to Lincoln Gaol, dies before she can be convicted. She had allegedly called for bread and butter, and her last words were that she "wished it might neuer goe through her if she were guilty of that wherevpon shee was examined." Her body is buried at Ancaster.(D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2v

1618 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
631

Sir Francis Manners, upon hearing that Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower had been apprehended, hurried to Lincoln Gaol with his brother Sir George Manners. Both participate in the examinations.(D2v-D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2v-D3

1618 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England