Go back
6 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
250

Justice Arthur Robinson, having held a long suspicion that Elizabeth Sawyer is a witch, has thatching taken from her roof. He alleges that wherever some of the thatching was burnt, Sawyer was soon seen to come, thereby proving she is a witch. (A4-B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, A4-B1

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
251

Elizabeth Sawyer's appearance and habits are used as further proof that she is a witch. She is allegedly bloodlessly pale and ghost-like in her face, with a tendency to stare at the ground; her body is crooked and deformed, and her tongue appears to be under the Devil's control at her apprehension and trial, due to her long cursing, swearing, blaspheming and imprecating. Her tongue in particular is identified as "the meanes of her owne destruction, which had destroyed many before."(B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B1

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
254

Mr. Radcliffe gives deposition alleging that Elizabeth Sawyer threatened his wife, Agnes Radcliffe. According to Mr. Radcliffe, the two women fought after Sawyer's sow ate some of Agnes' soap, and Agnes struck the animal. Sawyer told Agnes "for that Elizabeth Sawyer would be reuenged of her, and thus threatned Agnes Ratcleife, that it should be a deare blow vnto her."(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B2-B3

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
255

Mr. Radcliffe alleges in his deposition that the evening after Agnes Radcliffe and Elizabeth Sawyer fought, Agnes fell sick and "was extraordinarily vexed, and in a most strange manner in her sicknesse was tormented." She died about four days later, foaming at the mouth and distempered. Radcliffe claims that Agnes, on her deathbed, said to him, "if shee did die at that time shee would verily take it on her death, that Elizabeth Sawyer her neighbour, whose Sowe with a washing-Beetle she had stricken, and so for that cause her malice being great, was the occasion of her death."(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B2-B3

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1004

"The Wisemen" from Knaresborough Forest (the home of many of the accused witch's in Edward Fairfax's account), allegedly teach the locals to burn calves as an act of counter magic when their cows will not give milk(34-34)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34-34

1621   Forest of Knaresborough   North Yorkshire  York  England 
1005

"The Wisemen" of Knaresborough forest claim that supernatural sufferings experienced by Helen Fairfax, Elizabeth Fairfax, and Maud Jeffery, were the result play and counterfeit.(36)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 36

1621 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England