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8 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
742

Frances Moore, in her confession, recalled that 16 years before William Foster had threatened to hang her children for stealing bread. Six years ago, two after receiving Tiffy from Elizabeth Weed, she allegedly decided to curse Foster for it. Tiffy went to Foster and caused him become sick; he lay in pain for seven or eight days before dying. Moore claimed, however, not to remember what exactly she had instructed Tiffy to do to him..(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

1640 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
1988

A mysterious snake appears on a shelf Mrs. Stock's house, after her husband, Francis Stock, tells an enraged William Hatting that his wife was a "scolder." When Mrs. Stock "endeavoured to kill [it] with a Spade; and striking at it, the Snake suddenly vanished away, and could no where be found."(31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1989

Mrs. Stock is is suddenly "taken sick with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body," after she attempts to kills a mysterious snake in her home. Within a week, in death-throws, she cries out that "Sarah [Hatting] was the cause of her death," and dies. The illness and death happened shortly after Francis Stock fights with William Hatting and insults his wife Sara Hatting and before the death of her two children, who perish in a similar manner shortly after Mrs. Stock.(31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1990

Francis Stock's daughter dies "within two or three dayes after the death" of his wife. Stock suspects Sara Hatting is culpable for the child's suffering and death. The illness and death happened shortly after Francis Stock fights with William Hatting and insults his wife Sara Hatting and after Mrs. Francis attempts to kill a snakes which unexpectedly appeared in her home, but found upon administering a death blow, that the serpent has disappeared. This Stock daughter is the second to perish in her family; her mother's death precedes hers and a sibling dies shortly after her. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2002

Francis Stock's child falls sick, appearing to catch the same disease which appears to have claimed its sister and mother, this child also dies. The illness and death happened shortly after Francis Stock fights with William Hatting and insults his wife Sara Hatting and after Mrs. Francis attempts to kill a snakes which unexpectedly appeared in her home, but found upon administering a death blow, that the serpent has disappeared. This Stock child is the third person to perish in its family; its mother and sister's death precedes this person's demise.(31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2003

A verbal altercation between Francis Stock's servant, Anonymous 336, and John Hatting, son of William and Sara Hatting, turns into a physical altercation. The "very next day hee was taken sick, and so continued in a pining and languishing condition, crying out often of the said Sarah, that she had bewitched him, and was the cause of his death, which soon after ensued."(31, 32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31, 32

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2386

Dr. Lamb, allegedly a conjurer who was eventually "killed by the Mob," invites Sir Miles Sands and Mr. Barbor to a "Mornings Draught at his House." There, he told them "if they would hold their Tongues and their Hands from medling with any thing," he would demonstrate "some sport." Drawing on his "Practice," Dr. Lamb makes a tree spring up "in the middle of the Room," and "soon after appeared three little Fellows, with Axes on their Shoulders, and Baskets in their Hands, who presently fell to work, cut down the Tree, and carried all away."(155-156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 155-156

1640 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2387

Having visited Dr. Lamb, a conjurer, in the morning, and witnessed a tree spring up in a room inddors as well as "three little Fellows, with Axes on their Shoulders, and Baskets in their Hands, who presently fell to work, cut down the Tree, and carried all away," Mr. Barbor observes a wood chip from the tree fall onto his velvet coat, and "he flips it into his Pocket," despite promising he would not be "medling with any thing." Returning to his house that night, "when he and his Family were in Bed, and asleep, all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered," waking the entire household so they were "affright." Mr. Barbor's wife told Mr. Barbor, "you told me you was at Dr. Lamb's this Day, and I fear you medled with something." Mr. Barbor tells her about the wood chip in his pocket, upon which Mrs. Barbor exclaimed, "I pray you [...] fling it out, or we shall have no Quiet." Mr. Barbor throws the chip away, and "all the VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," allowing the household to go back to sleep.(156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

1640 London   London  London, City of  London  England