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10 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
391

Alice Huson of Burton Agnes, Yorkshire is accused of bewitching Faith Corbet, causing her to scream, bite, and scratch.(53)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 53

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
952

Alice Huson asks to be paid for the services she provides Mrs. Corbet, with a piece of cloth which Corbet's children had worn next to their skin. Corbet gives her a neck cloth made of an old sheet, Huson refuses the gift; still she often frequents the Corbet's home and is given 'meat and drink'(52-53)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 52-53

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
953

Faith Corbet begins to have fits not long after her gloves went missing. Faith had been scolded by her mother ealier for suggesting Huson was a witch, and does not immediately accuse her of the theft. However, Faith but comes to blame Alice Huson, who had been sitting alone in her mother's kitchen, for the loss of her gloves and her subsequent fits. (53)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 53

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
954

Faith Corbet's fits are diagnosed by 'numerous people' as natural. They are categorized as hysteria, melancholy, and convulsions.(53-54)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 53-54

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
955

Faith Corbet is seen by a battery of physicians from all over York over a four year period. Corbet responds to their treatments only sometimes; her fits come in intervals.(53-54, 56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 53-54, 56

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
956

Faith Corbet makes the first of many claims that medical intervention will not cure her so long as her tormentors walked free. This is also the first time Doll Bilby is implicated in Corbet's fits, and by implication, identified as a witch.(54)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54

1660 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
974

A woman (Anonymous 113) allegedly 'got upon a Bed-staff, said certain words' and flew into the bedroom where her sister and her sister's husband slept. This assertion came from Anonymous 113's seven year old daughter (Anonymous 115) who was allegedly left there on one of the 'hundreds' of times she made the trip.(48-49)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 48-49

1660 Oxford  Oxford  Oxford  Oxfordshire  England 
975

Following the testimony given against her by her daughter (Anonymous 115), Anonymous 113 confesses, and is condemned and executed as a witch.(49)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 49

1660 Oxford  Oxford  Oxford  Oxfordshire  England 
1067

Thomas Spatchet's fits allegedly escalate. They are said to occur every fifteen minutes to half an hour, four to twenty times a day, for weeks and months on end. The more there are in a day, the shorter each individual fit is said to be, and he hardly has one day in a month or five weeks without a fit.(6-7, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 6-7, 18

1660   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1068

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from skipping or jumping fits, where his feet come close together, move up and down, and side to side; these fits are said to continue until he has no strength left in his legs and has to rest.(7, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 7, 18

1660   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England