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List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
139

Rose Cullender and Amy Denny are jointly indicted at the assizes held at Bury St. Edmonds in Suffolk. The trial is presided over by Sir Matthew Hale, Lord Chief Baron of His Majesties Court of Exchequer, and lasts four days. They are charged with bewitching Elizabeth Durent, Ann Durent, Jane Bocking, Susan Chandler, William Durent, Elizabeth Pacy, and Deborah Pacy.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 1

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
802

Anne Durent, Susan Chandler and Elizabeth Pacy allegedly arrive at Bury St. Edwards for the trial of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny in good health, but the morning of the trial fall into violent fits accompanied by shrieking and are thus rendered unable to give deposition before the court. When they finally recover, all three are said to be struck dumb for the duration of the trial.(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 4-5

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
821

Dorothy Durent gives deposition alleging that Amy Denny bewitched her infant son William, causing him to be afflicted with strange fits. She says that she had argued with Denny after leaving William in Denny's care with explicit instructions not to give him suck, only to return home and find out that Denny had done so. Denny threatened Durent, and told her "she had as good to have done otherwise than to have found fault with her." That same night, William had his first fit.(5-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-8

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
822

Dorothy Durent gives deposition that, troubled by her infant son William's fits, she consulted with a Dr. Jacob in Yarmouth, who has a reputation for helping bewitched children. He allegedly advised her to hang William's blanket in in the chimney corner all day, to wrap the child in that blanket when she put him to bed at night, and to not be afraid if she found anything in the blanket, but rather to throw that thing into the fire.(8-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 8-9

1662, March 10 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
823

Dorothy Durent gives deposition stating that she followed Dr. Jacob's advice to hang William's blanket in the chimney corner. She alleges that when she went to wrap William in the blanket that night, a great toad fell out and ran up and down the hearth. She had a youth of her household catch the toad and hold it in the fire with tongs. As soon as the toad was in the fire, it made a "made a great and horrible Noise, and after a space there was a flashing in the Fire like Gun-powder, making a noise like the discharge of a Pistol, and thereupon the Toad was no more seen nor heard." When the Court asked whether there was any residue of the toad left in the fire, Dorothy said that after the flash and noise, not a thing remained of the creature.(8-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 8-10

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
824

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that the day after the toad fell out of William's blanket and she had it burnt, Amy Denny's niece (Anonymous 389), a neighbor of Durent's, told her that Denny was "in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire." Durent says that she called on Denny herself, and found her exactly as Denny's niece had said - "her Face, her Leggs, and Thighs, which this Deponent saw, seemed very much scorched and burnt with Fire." When asked how she came by the burns, Denny replied that she must thank Durent for her condition, and that Durent would live to see some of her children dead.(10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 10-11

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
825

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that, after her son William recovered from his fits, her ten-year-old daughter Elizabeth became afflicted with similar fits. Dorothy reports that Elizabeth complained she had seen apparitions of Amy Denny during her fits, and that Denny was the cause of her afflictions.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-12

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
826

Dorothy Durent reports in her deposition that her daughter Elizabeth died following her illness, and claims it came to pass two days after Denny predicted Elizabeth's demise. Durent accuses Denny of having bewitched Elizabeth to death, alleging that Denny "hath been long reputed to be a Witch, and a person of very evil behaviour, whose Kindred and Relations have been many of them accused for Witchcraft, and some of them have been Condemned."(11-13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-13

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
827

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that she became strangely lame soon after her daughter Elizabeth died. When questioned about it in court, she claimed that she had not needed crutches prior to that time save for when she was pregnant.(13-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 13-14

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
829

Elizabeth Pacy is brought to court to give indictment against Amy Denny for Denny's alleged bewitchment of Elizabeth and her younger sister Deborah, but Pacy is unable to speak and lays senseless and motionless on a cushion at court. Although she is said to have come to herself after a while, she can neither see nor speak.(15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 15-16

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
830

Sir Matthew Hale, the judge presiding over the court, instructs that Amy Denny to be privately brought before Elizabeth Pacy. Though Pacy is in an insensible state and her eyes are shut, she reacts immediately when Denny touches her hand, leaping up and scratching Denny until she draws blood. Pacy must be removed from Denny, and thereafter continues to make angry motions in Denny's direction.(16-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 16-17

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
852

Dr. Thomas Browne of Norwich gives deposition in court as an expert witness. In his opinion, Elizabeth Pacy, Deborah Pacy, Elizabeth Durent, Ann Durent, Jane Bocking and Susan Chandler are indeed bewitched, citing a recent Danish example of witchment. He claims that bewitchment is menstrual hysteria that has been heightened by the Devil in cooperation with witches.(44-45)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 44-45

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
856

Edmund Durent gives deposition in court alleging that, after his wife refused to sell Rose Cullender herrings, his daughter Ann Durent became afflicted with pain like the pricking of pins in her stomach, and had swooning fits. In between fits, Ann claimed to have seen Cullender's apparition threaten to torment her. Ann is also said to have vomited pins, which Edward presented in court as evidence. Ann's fits continued until the trial.(33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-35

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
863

Susan Chandler is allegedly called into the court to give deposition against Rose Cullender, but falls into a fit and must be carried out. Struck dumb, the only words she can get out are "burn her." (41-42)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 41-42

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
864

Mary Chandler gives deposition stating that she, along with five other women, were hired to search Rose Cullender after Sir Edmund Bacon, Justice of the Peace for Suffolk, granted a warrant at the request of Samuel Pacy. Mary says that Cullender cooperated with the search, and alleges that once Cullender had been stripped naked she was found to have four teats: A large one about an inch long on her lower belly, and three smaller ones on her privy parts. Mary reports that the larger teat looked recently sucked, had a hole in its tip, and exuded a milky substance when handled. (38-40)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 38-40

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
865

Sargent Earl, Sargent Banard, and Sargent Keeling attend Amy Denny and Rose Cullender's trial; Sargent Keeling is said to be dissatisfied with with evidence presented. While convinced the children were indeed possessed, he is not convinced that Denny and Cullender were responsible, and argued that prosecuting based on the imaginings of the afflicted puts everyone in danger for then anyone could imagine a crime and accuse an innocent party. Keeling particularly objected to Elizabeth Pacy's reaction to Denny's touch while blindfolded being taken as proof of bewitchment.(43)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 43

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
866

John Soam gives deposition in court that one day during the harvest, he drove three carts past Rose Cullender's home and one hit her window. He says that Cullender was irate at the damage, and alleges that she threatened him. He claims that the offending cart overturned two or three times that day and stuck in the town gate despite having more than enough clearance, forcing Soam to have a gatepost cut down to free it. Once he managed to get the cart into the yard, he could not get it near the place where he needed to unload his corn. When he and others tried to unload it well away from the place, it proved to be a great and tiring labour. They were forced to stop when people who came to help all developed sudden nosebleeds. The next morning, Soam returned to the cart and was able to unload it without any trouble at all.(51-54)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 51-54

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
868

Robert Sherringham gives deposition alleging that Rose Cullender is responsible for the death of all his all his piglets, a persistent lameness in his limbs, and for plaguing him with "a great Number of Lice of an extraordinary bigness." He says that he was forced to burn all his clothes to be rid of the lice.(54-55)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 54-55

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
879

Richard Spencer gives deposition in court claiming that he overheard Amy Denny say that "the Devil would not let her rest until she were Revenged" on Ann Sandeswell.(55)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
2325

Dorothy Durent gives deposition alleging that, despite Amy Denny's dire prediction that she would live to see some of her children dead, baby William recovered immediately after the toad was burnt, and was still living at the time of the assizes.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
2326

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that she went to the apothecary one day to get something to help her daughter Elizabeth with her fits and returned to find Amy Denny in her house. When she asked Denny what she was doing there, Denny claimed to be checking on Elizabeth to give her water. Durent, angry to have Denny in her house, thrust her out, at which time Denny said to her "You need not be so angry, for your Child will not live long."(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-12

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England