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13 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
881

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition that shortly after Amy Denny destroys some geese Sandeswell had bought from her, Denny became a tenant of Sandeswell's husband Cornelius. Sandeswell alleges that Denny told Cornelius that the chimney on the house would fall if it wasn't looked after, to which he replied that the chimney was new and payed her no heed. Not long after, the chimney fell as predicted.(55-56)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-56

1665 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
1613

Anonymous 254 is allegedly visited by a thing "like a Mouse" which "came to him, which none could hinder." Shortly thereafter he begins to have "strange fits" which are read as supernatural in origin.(20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

1665 Isle of Ely    Cambridgeshire  Isle of Ely  England 
1614

A possessed man from the Isle of Ely (Anonymous 254) visits a wizard / cunning-man in search of a cure for his "strange fits." This "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician," who gave him an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off." (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

1665 Isle of Ely    Cambridgeshire  Isle of Ely  England 
1622

A woman (Anonymous 256) allegedly claims (the story come to William Drage via a Lawyer who heard this assertion) that regardless of what happened to her in court, she was "sure not to die yet: for all the mischief she had done, was in transforming her self into the shape of a Bumble Boe; and biting the Maids thread often in pieces as she spun," proclaiming a certain immortality and the ability to go on doing maleficium.(18-19)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 18-19

1665   Hatford  Hertfordshire  Oxford  England 
1636

Margaret Bell is allegedly scratched to persuade her to lift a bewitchment off a local child. (21)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 21

1665 Lutterworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1651

Dr. Woodhouse allegedly treats those in Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire with a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," he also treats Mary Hall with. He evidently administered it to a bewitched boy in Berkhamstead (Anonymous 262) after the remedies for "convulsion fits" were unsuccessful. Woodhouse, after questioning the Querents on the details of the fits, went to see the boy for himself and found the boy began his fit by "pulling off its headcloaths; then it fell a pulling off its Hair, and then scratching the skin off its face." Woodhouse presumably concluded, at this point, that the boy was possessed and provided the appropriate medical treatment.(38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38-39

1665 Berkhamsted   Berkhamsted  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1891

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly afflicted with Roaring Howling Fits, accompanied by all manner of bodily contortions if he lay back upon his bed, and fears he will bring harm to others. These roaring fits come after ten hours of shaking, and last for two hours, in which he roared, howled or barked like a dog and would be left hoarse. On the days he is so afflicted, he is unable to eat until they are done, and fears that he will become raging mad and attack others.(14-16, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 14-16, 18

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1892

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from kneading fits, attributed to Aubrey Grinset. During these fits, he would be cast into heaviness and benumbment, as if asleep, but be aware of others in the room and hear them if they spoke. While benumbed, he would feel a blow on his breast, side or shoulder, and then a kneading like his flesh were bread until he became sore. There would be an intermission, and the kneading would repeat, until he seemed to be near death, but would revive. At times, he seemed to catch a hand, and was sometimes able to bring it to his mouth and bite it. Once he thought he had bitten a thumb, and at the same time Aubrey Grinset was observed to wear an unusually large shoe on one foot. When she was searched, Aubrey's toe was found to have an impression on it as if sawn at. After biting the hand, the kneading fits ceased for a year.()

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693,

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1893

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from fits in which he feels like he is being is grasped in arms while someone gropes his crotch, attributed to Aubrey Grinset. These fits are infrequent, but he finds them particularly troubling and frightening.(17, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 17, 18

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1899

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from fits that prevent him from traveling, attributed to Aubrey Grinset, in which his feet would be as if nailed to the ground or his legs buckle under him, he would lose all strength, or find himself violently moved in a direction he did not wish to go. These fits are said to have stopped on Aubrey Grinset's death.(21-23, 28, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 21-23, 28, 18

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1900

Thomas Spatchet is observed in his fits by a Professing Physick (Anonymous 320) and is prescribed physick for them. This physick seems to increase the frequency and violence of his fits, such that he stops taking it for two years, though his violent fits continue until eight weeks before Aubrey Grinset's death. The Professing Physick concludes that his violent fits are no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion that sometimes ends with him stretched out like a dead man. The Professing Physick also observes that at the times when Spatchet's fits prevent him from eating, he becomes weak but is spared from losing much weight or muscle.(26, 27)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 26, 27

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
2380

In the house of Mr. Beecham, the rector of Branston, "it was frequently observed, that a Tobacco-pipe would move it self from off a Shelf at one end of the Room, to another Shelf at the other end of the Room." This was done without any visible help or source. (155)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 155

1665 Branston  Braunston-in-Rutland  Rutland  Rutland  England 
2381

Upon hearing of a "pipe of tobacco" which mysteriously "would move it self off a Shelf at one end of the Room, to another Shelf at the other end of the Room," without any visible help in the home of Mr. Beecham, the rector of Braunston-in-Rutland, Mr. Mun, the rector of Stockerson in Leicestershire, came to visit. He "took a Pipe of Tobacco in that Room," but instead of the pipe moving, "a great Bible [...] moved it self off from a Desk at the lower end of the Room, and cast it self into his Lap." The Bible opens to Genesis 3.15, where it says, "Satan; I'll shew thee they Doom: The See of the Woman shall break the Serpent's Head. Avoid Satan."(155)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 155

1665 Branston  Braunston-in-Rutland  Rutland  Rutland  England