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25 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
370

Elizabeth Brooker of Hointon, Devon is treated by a midwife for a severe pain in her leg after she turns a woman, who had been begging for pins, away. The midwife applies plasters, and many other cures, but none relieve the pain. (66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
1374

A woman, allegedly a witch, approaches Elizabeth Brooker, a servant of Mistress Heiron (who worked in her mercer's shop), and asks her for a pin. The woman is unsatisfied with Brooker's gift of a pin from her sleeve, wanting a specific one, leaves in a "great Fume and Rage, and told the Maid, she should hear farther from her, she would e'er long wish she had given her the Pin she desired; with many threatning Speeches."(66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
1375

Anthony Smith, a surgeon from Kingston Devon, does surgery on Elizabeth Brooker, finding under her skin, despite its invisibility, a pin which was magically inserted into her muscle.(66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1376

Mr. Salter, a "skilful Apothecary" in Honiton, Devon, is called in to provide treatment for Elizabeth Brooker's severe leg pain. He evidently "advised them well, whose Counsel they followed, but all in vain."(66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
1378

Anthony Smith, a surgeon from Kingston, designed a Suppurative Cataplasm (a plaster designed to draw out infection) to Elizabeth Brooker's mysteriously aching leg. Brooker was dissatisfied with the treatment.(66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
2284

Dr. Skinner advises Margaret Gurr to pray "when [...] tempted." When she yields to temptations, Margaret Gurr goes "flying in the Air;" for a second time. However, when she prays, Margaret Gurr is "in good ease."(4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2285

A witch (Anonymous 382) speaks for a second time through possession of Margaret Gurr, saying, "Go you not to that Devil Doctor Skinner for help."(4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2286

While Margaret Gurr is "in the Chamber with the [...] Devil," down the stairs by her master and his family, strange voices speak, and there was a "great lumberings and clatter [...] as if the Chairs and Stools had been thrown about the Chamber." Margaret Gurr concludes that if she had not been cured quickly, her master and his family would have been forced to leave the house.(4-5)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4-5

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2287

The master and mistress of Margaret Gurr, Christopher Elderidge and his wife, pray for Margaret Gurr while she is possessed by "the Devils and the Witch, that there was continual Noises and Voice speaking in me, and I was always moveable." The Elderidges admit to being terrified of Margaret Gurr during her possession.(5)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 5

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2288

Dr. Skinner cast out the Devils and witch from Margaret Gurr, "and also Cured me of the Scurby and Gout," in a period of twelve days. After being restored to her health, Margaret Gurr is no longer troubled by the Devils.(5-6)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 5-6

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2289

After being restored by Dr. Skinner and cured of her possession by two devils and a witch, Margaret Gurr is able to "read the Divine word of God," having before her affliction, no knowledge of "any Letters in the Bible or Testament." Blessed with the power to read, Margaret Gurr allegedly spends her time in reading and in prayers after her affliction.(6)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2290

During her possession and torture caused by two devils and a witch, Margaret Gurr's brother and friends avoided her, and continue to so after Margaret Gurr is cured, "being still afraid."(6-7)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6-7

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2291

A young seventeen-year old male servant of Henry Chowning allegedly had "appear unto him a Spirit in the form of a Grey-hound," which told him he must go into Virginia, before vanishing.(8)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2292

Upon being visited by a devil in the shape of a greyhound, a young servant returns to his master, Henry Chowning, and told what had happened to him. Shortly afterward, the servant becomes strangely ill, and "grew worse and worse," so that his neighbours suppose him to be bewitched. Henry Chowning and his neighbours decide to seek out help for him.(8)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2297

Henry Chowning sends for Dr. John Skinner to come and treat his servant, who had taken ill after seeing an apparition of a greyhound. Dr. Skinner concludes that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," through the boy's pain; admonitions that "he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea;" and the boy's speaking in a voice that was not his own. (9-13)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 9-13

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2298

Dr. Skinner finds that a young servant boy "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound" is much less ill around the doctor, and gives the boy an "order for the putting up of Medicines, for the means must be speedy, or else it cannot be performed." The boy takes the medicine, and within a week, the boy's mother reported that "he was much ammended," and that the evil spirit had been cast out of him.(9-13)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 9-13

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2299

After being treated by Dr. Skinner, a young servant boy who had been "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound" complains of "a pain in his belly." Dr. Skinner accordingly sends more medicine, and within eighteen days, the boy is restored, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since."(13)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 13

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2300

Susan Woldredge is strangely afflicted by "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." This may have been caused by unnatural means.(14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14

1681 West Chiltington  West Chiltington  West Sussex  Sussex  England 
2301

The father of Susan Woldredge seeks out the help of many doctors for his daughter's mysterious illness, and none seem to be able to cure her.(14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14

1681 West Chiltington  West Chiltington  West Sussex  Sussex  England 
2302

Mr. Woldredge seeks the advice of Dr. Skinner for his daughter's mysterious illness, to which Dr. Skinner says, "she would be well and bid him go home."(14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14

1681 West Chiltington  West Chiltington  West Sussex  Sussex  England 
2303

Upon Dr. Skinner's advice on treating Susan Woldredge for her mysterious illness, Susan Woldredge is at first "in extream misery and swelling and raging pain in her Eyes, insomuch that she thought certainly she would have lost her Eye," but then was suddenly cured, and "she was in a short time made perfectly well."(14-12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14-12

1681 West Chiltington  West Chiltington  West Sussex  Sussex  England 
2304

A woman calls upon Dr. Skinner to help treat "the Evil in her Throat," while at Ashington-Fair. At that time, however, Dr. Skinner "had nought to give her."(12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

1681 West Grinstead  West Grinstead  West Grinstead  West Grinstead  England 
2305

When a woman who sought out Dr. Skinner for his help to cure "the Evil in her throat," fails to come visit him, he inquired after why. The woman replied that "she had no need, for she found her self begin to mend from that same time, and was not perfectly well." (12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

1681 West Grinstead  West Grinstead  West Grinstead  West Grinstead  England 
2306

Goody Halle experiences a mysterious, "most lamentable pain in her head, neer her Eye," during both night and day, preventing her from resting. Many doctors examined her, but "ere no good."(12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

1681 Seavenock    Kent  Kent  England 
2307

Goody Hall visits Dr. Skinner during her mysterious illness, and "was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," and remains in good health afterward.(12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

1681 Seavenock    Kent  Kent  England