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29 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
155

Margaret Lang torments a child.(19)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 19

1690   West Central Lowlands  Renfrewshire  Renfrewshire  Scotland 
158

John Lindsay is accused of playing a pipe as a group of witches danced. The group also allegedly created an image of Mr. John and stabbed it with pins.(18)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 18

1690   West Central Lowlands  Renfrewshire  Renfrewshire  Scotland 
161

Margaret Fulton lights a black candle while entering a house to practice witchcraft.(21)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 21

1690   West Central Lowlands  Renfrewshire  Renfrewshire  Scotland 
1979

Richard Dugdale, a young man from Lancashire, begs leave of his master to go to a rushbearing, or a rural festival at the dedication of a church, in Whalley. The following morning, returning to work, Richard Dugdale "being troubled in Mind, he thought that he saw several Apparitions, but could not tell the resemblance thereof."(62)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62

1690 Whalley  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1980

Richard Dugdale of Lancashire becomes ill while making hay, and upon the advice of a well reputed neighbour and serving woman, goes to take a drink and lie down in the Hall he works at. After "some time being laid down upon the Bed, the Chamber-Door opened of it self," and several apparitions appear to him. First, smoke or mist, then a "Hard-favoured man" he mistakes for a fellow servant or a Black man, which turns into a naked child. "All this was done when he was awake." The apparitions disappear after dancing in front of him, in a burst of flame.(62-63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63

1690 Gisburne  Gisburne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1981

Upon a violent fit, where Richard Dugdale of Lancashire could scarce be held down, his uncle and family take him to see the neighbouring doctor, Dr. Chew. After "taking the physick from Dr. Chrew, " he had "to the best of his knowledg, [...] little advantage by the first Physick."(59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1982

Richard Dugdale of Lancaster consults Dr. Crabtree after his first Physick from Dr. Chew fails to cure his fits, but was amazed at Richard Dugdale's "precise fore-telling various sorts of Weather." Even though he was "blooded several times, the first of which was as black as Ink," Richard Dugdale's fits continually worsen. His father, Thomas Dugdale, stops the treatments. Dr. Chew concludes that " if the Spirit in Richard Dugdale was a Water-Spirit, there was no cure for it," and that the disease is not natural, leading to his recommendation to seek out ministers.(49)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 49

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1986

Richard Dugdale returns to see Dr. Chew concerning his fits, which have yet to resolve themselves after having seeing Dr. Crabtree and the minister, Mr. Jolly. He takes "Physick from Dr. Chew, and says, that the Physick worked well with him, and since that time, he says, he never had any Fit," allowing him to marry and continue with his gardening profession, although it is agreed his "disease was not ordinary."(63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 63

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2000

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits characterized by his ability to speak in "another Voice, besides his own," and further, his voice can be heard at great distances. Sometimes, noises arise from Richard Dugdale that are not human, but animal or strange. These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, John Walmsly, William Loond, John Fielding, Thomas Core, Grace Whalley, Nathaniel Waddington, John Fletcher, and Edmund Haworth.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2001

Richard Dugdale is allegedly seized by fits possibly caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by extreme weight change, being at "one while as heavy as a Lump of Lead of that bigness, and other while as light as a Bag of Feathers of 14 or 16 pound weight." These fits are also characterized by his lifeless appearance for a considerable amount of time. Witnesses to Richard Dugdales fits of this nature include: the minister Mr. Jolly, his father Thomas Dugdale, John Walmsly, John Livesay, William Livesay, John Smalley, John Hindle, Joseph Hargreaves, Thomas Booth, John Grimshaw, and William Sellars.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2004

Richard Dugdale, allegedly suffers from many fits thought to be caused by Satan characterized by "his diabolical rage and blasphemy against God, and Christ," and at other times, "Satan sometimes in his Fits, transform himself into an Angel of Light," and recited sermons and scriptures that he had never heard. These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, John Livesay, and Nathaniel Waddington.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2005

Richard Dugdale is allegedly seized by a number of fits possibly caused by the Devil, characterized by his ability to "his speaking several languages, which he never learned." These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, William Fort, and Robert Waddington.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2006

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from lumps on his chest and stomach, which sometimes become mice, or rats, and at other times sounds like "a little dog." This is witnessed by Mr. Jolly and John Fletcher.(46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2007

Richad Dugdale allegedly vomits a number objects during his fits which are believed to be caused by the Devil, including gold, silver, and brass rings; a hair button; stones; and a curtain-ring. These fits were witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly; Richard Dugdale's father, Thomas Dugdale; Edmund Hayworth; Grace Whalley; and John Hindle.(49)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 49

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2008

Richard Dugdale suffers from a number of alleged fits, during which objects such as goose-dung and stones appear in his hands, although there are none near. Further, these stones are often warm to the touch. Both Thomas Dugdale, Richard Dugdale's father, and John Whalley are witness to these fits.(49)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 49

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2009

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, possibly caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by strange contortions of his body, "begun in the Calf of his Leg, and wrought upwards into the Chest of his Body, and then he was thrown down." As well, he engaged in strange movements during the length of these fits, as witnessed by John Walmsly, William Loond, John Fletcher, William Fort, and Joshua Thomason. After these strange contortions of the body, Richard Dugdale apparently looks "in far better liking, when out of his Fits, then ever he was before," however, Richard Dugdale allegedlly cannot recall what transpires during his fits.(51)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 51

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2010

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, possibly caused by The Devil, characterized by "dancing and roreing hidiously." These fits are witnessed by Ann Whittaker, John Walmsly, William Livesay, John Fletcher, and Henry Page.(54-55)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 54-55

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2011

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, during which time John Hindle "prickt a large pin in his Feet, and he neither stirred nor complained at all." John Fletcher was witness.(57)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 57

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2012

Dr. Whittaker refuses to treat Richard Dugdale for his fits, "for that he concluded it to be more than a Natural Distemper."(65)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 65

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2347

A servant girl (Anonymous 397) of Joseph Cruttenden is told by an old woman (Anonymous 398) "about Noon," that "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them; but tells this Girl withal, That if she spake of what she had told her, the Devil would tear her to pieces." However, if the servant girl does not speak of these warnings, "she need not fear, for no hurt should come to her."(54)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 54

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2348

One night, as Joseph Cruttenden and his wife "lay in Bed," in their home in Brightling, "Dirt, and Dust, &c." was thrown at them, but there was no visible source from where it came. The couple "rise and Pray" which seems to stop "that Disturbance." However, once the couple go to bed again, they find "the same trouble," forcing them to rise again. This happens after an "old Woman" predicts it will happen to a servant girl of Joseph Cruttenden.(54-55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 54-55

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2349

After Joseph Cruttenden and his wife experience a number of "disturbances" in the form of dust and dirt being thrown at them from sources which they "could not tell whence it came," in the night, "a part of one end of their House Fired." Although the household tries to "rake it down," the fire "flashes somewhat like Gunpowder," and as soon as the fire is stopped in one place, "it began in another place," until eventually the whole House was burnt down. Even though the house burned, "it flamed not." The household spends the night "in carrying Goods," from one place to another, and some believed "some thing like a Black Bull was seen tumbling about" in relation to the fire. (55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2350

Joseph Cruttenden and his wife are offered one of Colonel Busbridge's houses after their house burns down under mysterious circumstances. However, "when the Goods were brought, such like Disturbances were there also," and "the House Fireth." Although many tried to "quench it," the fire would not go out, until "the Goods are thrown out, when it ceased with little or no help."(55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2351

After Colonel Busbridge's house burns down upon inviting Joseph Cruttenden and his wife to stay their after their own house burnt done, "none durst let them into their Doors." Joseph Cruttenden and his wife must "abide under a Hut." In this hut, their goods are "thrown upside down, Peuter-dishes, Knives, Brickbrats strike them, but hurt them not."(55-56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55-56

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2352

After a number of strange events occurs surrounding Joseph Cruttenden and his wife, including the throwing of dirt and dust without them knowing "from whence it came," the burning down of their house, and one of the houses of Colonel Busbridge who took them in afterward, and of their goods being "thrown upside down" in the hut they currently reside in, Mr. Bennet and Mr. Bradsaw, both ministers, "came to Pray with them." During this visit, "a Knife glanced by the Breast of Mr. Bennet," and "a Bowl or Dish thrown at his Back." However, during prayers, the goods are "quiet."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2353

A man (Anonymous 399) passing by the hut where Joseph Cruttenden and his wife keep their bewitched goods is hit by "a Wooden Tut" which "came flying out of the Air," from the hut which had no doors. After, "a Horse-shoe, which was by some laid away," was seen to rise of its own accord, and "fly to the Man," striking him in front of numerous witnesses (Anonymous 400). The man confesses to being a thief, accomplishing his deeds "under the colour of Religion."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2354

One of Joseph Cruttenden's servant girls (Anonymous 397) tells Joseph Cruttenden's wife "the former story of the Womans Discourse," wherein an old woman told the servant girl that "sad Calamities were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them," and made the girl swear not to speak of what she had been told, or "the Devil would tear her to pieces." The old woman (Anonymous 398) is sent for, "Examined before Captain Collins, and Mr. Busbridge," as well as "searched and watched for 24 hours." The servant girl, however, cannot verify that the old woman apprehended is the same old woman she spoke to. The apprehended woman "was formerly suspected to be a Witch," and lived in Burwast.(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2355

Four ministers, Mr. Bennett, Mr. Weller, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Gold, "kept a Fast" for Joseph Cruttenden and his wife, who are the victims of strange happenings, including dust and dirt being thrown at them so that they "could not tell from when it came," the burning of any house they stay in with their goods, and the bewitching of their goods so that they "fly through the air" and are "upside down." After the fasting, it seems that Joseph Cruttenden and his wife have "not any trouble."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England 
2356

An old woman, (Anonymous 398), who was also responsible for telling a young servant girl of Joseph Cruttenden that "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them," gave some of her neighbours (Anonymous 401) "some Meal" to make bread. However, they could not make it into Loaves, "but it was Butter." After trying to bake it in the oven, it "would not bake, but came out as it went in."(56-57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56-57

1690 Brightling  Brightling  East Sussex  Sussex  England