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List of all Event assertions around a specific nation

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
3

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that, after Andrew Byles was dead, she discovered she was pregnant with his child. She appealed to Sathan, her familiar, for advice on how to abort it, and he instructed her to "take a certayne herbe and drinke it." She did, and it "destroyed the childe forthwyth."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1545 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
4

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession, that her marriage to Christopher Francis was filled with "much vnquietnes and [was] moued to swearing and cursinge." Desiring to remedy their relationship, Elizabeth asks Sathan to kill their daughter, now a year and a half old. This, however, did not bring Francis "the quietnes that she desyred."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1548 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
5

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession, that she instructed Sathan to lame her husband, Christopher Francis, when their relationship remained unsatisfactory following the death of their daughter. Sathan did so by lying in Christopher's shoe in the shape of a toad for him to discover with his toes. Christopher, amazed by the toad, asked Elizabeth what it was, and she told him to kill it. When he did, he was struck with "a lamenes wherof he can not healed."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1548 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
6

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that she kept Sathan for 15 or 16 years before tiring of him. At that time, she gave Sathan to Mother Agnes Waterhouse in exchange for a cake. Francis also passed on the instructions her grandmother, Eve of Hatfield Peverel, had given her, to give Sathan blood and feed him with milk and bread.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
9

Mother Agnes Waterhouse is executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. On the day of her execution, she "bewayled, repented, and asked mercy of God, and all the worlde forgyuenes, and thus she yelded vp her sowle, trusting to be in ioye with Christe her sauiour, whiche dearely had bought her with his most precious bloudde."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 29   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
10

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that she attempted to borrow yeast from her neighbor, Alice Poole, but when she was refused, she left the house cursing. After this refusal, a white-colored spirit in the shape of a little rugged dog appeared to Francis. She bid the spirit to go to Poole and plague her, which the spirit agreed to do in exchange for a crust of white bread. Thereafter, Poole was said to be grievously pained in her head.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
11

Elizabeth Francis is executed in April, 1579 having confessed to bewitching Alice Poole.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579, April   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
12

Ellen Smith's daughter allegedly has a falling out with the daughter of Widow Webbe of Maldon. The day after the falling out, Ellen Smith strikes Widow Webbe's daughter, Susan Webbe, on the face, causing the girl to sicken and die two days later. Susan Webbe is said to have cried "away with the witch, away with the witch" as she languished on her sickbed.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Maldon  Maldon All Saints  Essex  Essex  England 
13

Ellen Smith of Maldon is allegedly executed for witchcraft in April, 1579.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579, April   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
14

Mother Staunton allegedly came to Richard Saunder's home, and was turned away when she tried to borrow yeast from Mrs. Saunder. Mother Staunton is said to have left the home murmuring, and shortly after her departure the Saunders' baby became violently sick. When Mrs. Saunder picked up the infant to comfort it, the cradle continued rocking of its own accord, and would not stop until a visiting gentleman stabbed it repeatedly with his dagger.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Wimbish  Wimbish  Essex  Essex  England 
15

Mother Staunton allegedly came to William Corner's home and demanded various things, including a piece of leather, from Mrs. Corner, which Mrs. Corner denied her. Staunton then demanded to know how many children she had, to which Mrs. Corner replied that she had one. The child soon suffered from sweating and chills, and started shrieking and staring and wringing and writhing until it was thought the child must surely die of it.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Wimbish  Wimbish  Essex  Essex  England 
16

Mother Staunton allegedly came to Robert Cornell's home twice to ask milk from Mrs. Cornell, but Mrs. Cornell turned her away and barred the door both times due to the suspicion that Staunton was a witch. The second time she came to the house, Staunton drew a circle in the dirt with a knife outside the front door, marking it with the compass points. When asked, she claimed to be digging a "shyting house" for herself. The next day, Mrs. Cornell left the house through that door, and is said to have taken sick with an illness that caused her to swell up as with child until she feared she would burst.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Wimbish  Wimbish  Essex  Essex  England 
17

Mother Staunton is tried for murder in April of 1579, and found to be not guilty.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579, April   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
18

Mother Nokes allegedly bewitches the limbs of two servants in the service of Thomas Spycer, Anonymous 58 and Anonymous 366. Anonymous 58 had snatched a pair of gloves from Mother Nokes' daughter, to which Nokes said "I will bounce him well enough," causing his limbs to give out. Anonymous 366 was afflicted when Anonymous 58 sent him to return the gloves on his behalf . Mother Nokes afflicted the boy's limbs are so badly afflicted that Thomas Spycer had to have him brought home in a wheelbarrow, and he was unable to move from his bed for eight days.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579   Lambert, Lambert End, Lambourne  Essex  Essex  England 
19

Mother Nokes allegedly catches her husband, Mr. Nokes, having an affair with the wife (Anonymous 365) of a Lamberd Ende tailor. In revenge, Mother Nokes is said to have told the the tailor's wife that she will not keep her nursing child. Shortly thereafter, the child dies.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579   Lambert, Lambert End, Lambourne  Essex  Essex  England 
20

Mother Nokes is allegedly executed in April, 1579 for practicing witchcraft at Chelmsford.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579, April   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
22

Ursley Kempe allegedly sends her familiar Jacke to kill her brother's wife, Mrs. Kempe, because she "had called her whore and witche."

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
24

Ursley Kempe confesses to sending her familiar Tyttey to plague Thorlowe's wife [Grace Thurlowe] by hurting her knee.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
25

Ursley Kempe is condemned in April, 1582 for being a witch and using magic to harm others.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
26

Joan Pechey is accused by Ales Hunt of being skilfull and cunning in witchery.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 25   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
27

Elizabeth Bennet is accused of bewitching William and Joan Byet and three of his livestock, all of which died. She also confesses to bewitching William Willes' wife and William Willinga[...]e.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
28

Annis Glascocke is allegedly identified by one of her old roommates as "a naughtie woman, and a dealer in witchcrafte," according to Michael Stevens. Glascocke "denyeth that she knewe anye such woman, or that any such speaches were vsed vnto her."

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
29

Alice Manfielde is accused of sending her imp Robin to plague Cheston's bull, make it pine, and die. This was seen as an act of retribution; Cheston's wife allegedly chides Manfielde and speaks many evil words to her.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1575   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
30

Alice Manfielde is accused of bewitching Joan Cheston's cattle.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
31

Alice Manfielde is condemned of witchcraft, and swiftly executed in April, 1582.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, April   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
32

Margaret Grevell is accused by John Carter of bewitching a brew and halting beer production in her town.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
33

Margaret Grevell is sent to prison for her mischievous actions.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
34

Elizabeth Ewstace is accused of hurting Felice Okey's geese. Felice Okey testifies against Elizabeth Ewstace during her trial.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
35

Elizabeth Ewstace allegedly threatens Felice Okey's husband, leaving him bewitched for a short while with scratches on his face, and no ability to see, hear, or speak.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
36

Elizabeth Ewstace is interrogated in prison by Brian Darcey; she denies participating in a malefic conspiracy with Alice Manfield, noting that their only business has been when she buys ointment from Manfield to treat her lameness.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
37

Annis Herd is accused by several Little Okeley residents of bewitching, and is sent to prison.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 17   Little Oakey  Essex  Essex  England 
38

Joan Robinson is accused of bewitching animals and men.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
39

Joan Cunny confesses sending her familiars to hurt John Sparrow's wife, and to knock over a stack of logs in John Glascock's yard.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
40

Joan Cunny confesses to sending her familiars to hurt William Unglee of Stisted, a Miller, but they are unsuccessful. Instead, the familiars hurt Barnaby Griffen, one of Unglee's workers.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
41

Joan Cunny confesses to sending her familiars to hurt Master Kitchin, the town Minister, but they were not able to because of his strong religious faith.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
42

Joan Cunny confesses sending her familiars to hurt George Coe, the town shoe maker, but they are not able to because of his strong religious faith.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
43

Joan Upney confesses to sending her familiar toad to pinch and suck at John Harrolde's wife until she died.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1584 East London  Dagenham  Essex  Essex  England 
45

Joan Cunny is executed in Chelmsford on 5 July, 1589.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, July 5   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
46

Joan Prentice is executed in Chelmsford on 5 July, 1589.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, July 5   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
47

A group of nine people (eight men and one woman) rob and murder Anthony James, a wealthy Yeoman, and his wife (Anonymous 66). The robbers take gold, silver, plates, and rings. They then stab Anthony James and his wife (Anonymous 66) with daggers to kill them. The children, Anthony James (Jr.) and Elizabeth James are kidnapped.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1602     Essex  Essex  England 
48

Annis Dell is executed at the Hartford Assizes in Hertfordshire on August 4,1606 after being found guilty of murdering Anthony James Jr. and for mutilating Elizabeth James by cutting out her tongue.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
49

Johane Harrison is tried for witchcraft in Hertfordshire in August, 1606.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
50

Johane Harrison is executed in Hertfordshire on August 4, 1606 after being found guilty of witchcraft.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
69

Joan Vaughan allegedly "committed something either in spech, or gesture, so [u]nfitting, and [u]nseming the nature of woman-hood, that it displeased the most that were there present," deeply offending Mistress Belcher. Belcher struck Vaugan for the transgression, and forced her out of her company. Vaughan, enraged, replied "shee would remember this iniury, and re[v]enge it." Belcher was unimpressed, and ended the encounter by saying that Vaughan "neither seared her nor her mother: but bad her doe her worst." Vaughan is said to have reported this altercation to her mother, Agnes Brown, and they decided to take revenge on Belcher, after a wait of three or four days to avoid suspicion.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
71

MIstress Belcher is allegedly suddenly struck with an intolerable pain in her body, which has the side effect of horribly disfiguring her face. While in pain, Belcher is heard crying out, "Heere comes Ioane Uaughan, away with Ioane Uaughan."

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
72

Arthur Bill is accused of bewitching Martha Aspine to death, based on strong suspicions that he was also guilty of having previously bewitched numerous kinds of cattle, and the evil reputation he and his parents have earned.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Raunds  Raundes  Northamptonshire  County of Northampton; Northants  England 
73

Arthur Bill, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father) are apprehended. The Justices and officers responsible for their capture allegedly decide to swim them to determine whether they are indeed witches. All three are bound thumb-to-toe and thrown into water; they are said to float. This is taken as confirmation of their guilt.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Raunds  Raundes  Northamptonshire  County of Northampton; Northants  England 
74

Arthur Bill and his parents, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father) are imprisoned at Northampton Gaol for witchcraft after they are tested through swimming. Arthur is determined to be the principal witch. They are delivered to the gaol by Sir Gilbert Pickering.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
75

Hellen Jenkenson is found guilty of bewitching a child to death and hanged at Northampton Gaol on July 22, 1611. She denies the accusations against her to the last, insisting "she was to die an Innocent, I thinke as Innocent as the rest."

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611, July 22 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
76

Mary Barber is found guilty of bewitching a man to death, and is hanged at Northampton Gaol on July 22, 1611.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611, July 22 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
77

Sir Francis Manners succeeds his brother as the Earl of Rutland and takes up residence at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Joan Flower, and her daughters Margaret and Phillip, are hired as charwomen to assist with the household's upkeep. Margaret earns a residency as both a poultry-keeper and a laundress. This lasts until the Countess hears accusations that the Flower women have been engaged in various misdemeanors during their employment.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
78

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Joan Flowers, the mother, is said to be "a monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious, and for any thing they saw by her, a plaine Atheist; besides of late dayes her very countenance was estranged, her eyes were fiery and hollow, her speech fell and enuious, her de[m]eanour strange and exoticke, and her conuersation sequestred; so that the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
79

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Phillip Flower, one of the daughters, is said to rob the Lady and maintain debauched and base company. Phillip is also accused of being "lewdly transported with the loue of one Th: Simpson" and to have bewitched Thomas so that "hee had no power to lea[v]e her, and was as hee supposed maruellously altred both in m[in]de and body."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
80

John Lambe stands trial at the Worcester Assizes on two charges, firstly for "vnchristian and damnable practises against the person of an Honourble Peere of this Realme" and secondly for "damnable inuocation and worship of euill Spirits." He is found guilty of both, but judgement is suspended in both cases.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
81

Mr. Wayneman gives deposition against Dr. John Lambe, alleging they had met by chance and that at this meeting Dr. Lambe claimed he could tell what "secret markes" Wayneman had on his body and tell him acts he had done, then described both to him. Lambe added that "he vpon sight of any man or woman could doe the like to them."

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
82

Mr. Wayneman gave deposition alleging that Dr. John Lambe "did practise to drawe the said Mr. Wayneman into the Deuillish Art of Coniuration, and told him that he had the command of spirits." Lambe promised to show him an angel, and Wayneman agreed out of curiosity. Lambe took a crystal ball out of his pocket, rested his hat upon the table, and put the crystal on the hat's crown. He then knelt down before it and pronounced his adoration. When Wayneman asked why he did so, Lambe said he had to or the angel wouldn't appear. Lambe then added, "although I said to you, it was an Angell, I would shew you, I did deceiue you for it is a Spirit I vse to call vpon."

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
83

Hannah Crump is cured of her affliction with witchcraft, after her family fast and pray for a day on her behalf. Hannah Crump finds herself able to take a Bible, and read it for an hour or two. Hannah and her father John Crump rejoice, and her affliction never troubled her again.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661, July Warwick  Warwick  Warwickshire  Warwickshire  England 
84

Joane Williford, Joan Caridan and Jane Hott are executed for witchcraft in Feversham on September 29, 1645.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 29 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
85

Mother Lakeland is burned to death on September 9, 1645. She is condemned for murdering her husband and for several others by witchcraft.

The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration

1645, September 9 Ipswich  Ipswich; Gippeswick  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
88

Elizabeth Stile is apprehended in Windsor in the county of Berkshire.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January 28 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
90

Mother Devell is apprehended in Windsor in the county of Berkshire.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, February 26 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
91

Mother Margaret is apprehended in Windsor in the County of Berkshire.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, February 26 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
96

Joan Prentice confesses that the Devil appeared to her in the form of a ferret with firey eyes, and demanded her soul and blood in order to create an allegiance to him. The ferret sucked blood from Prentice's finger and told her its name was Bidd.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1585   Henningham Sibble  North Essex  Essex  England 
99

Alice Newman allegedly plagues a nobleman with a spirit.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
100

Margery Sammon confesses to taking two spirits from her mother.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 25   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
101

John Walsh confesses to keeping a familiar that belonged to his Master, Robert Draitons. The familiar would appear to Walsh in the forms of a culver (pigeon), a dog, and a man with cloven feet. Evidently the familiar does not appear to Walsh anymore.

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
102

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Margaret Flower, one of the daughters, is said to have "often resorted from the Castle to her Mother, bringing such prouision as they thought was vnbefitting for a seruant to purloyne, and comming at such vnseasonable houres, that they could not but coniecture some mischiefe between them." She is also accused of robbing the Lady and maintaining debauched and base company.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
103

Sir Francis Manners, the Earl of Rutland, develops a dislike of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower and ceases to hear their complaints. The Countess, the Earl's wife, eventually discharges Margaret for "[i]ndecencies both in her life and neglect of her businesse." Margaret is turned out of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle with a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. In the aftermath, Joan Flower is "exprobrated by her neighbours for her Daughters casting out of dores, and other conceiued displeasures" and "many times cursed them all that were the cause of this discontentment, and made her so loathsome to her former familiar friends, and beneficiall acquaintance."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
104

Henry Lord Rosse allegedly sickens strangely and dies. Joan, Margaret, and Phillip Flowers are suspected of bewitching him to death.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
105

Joan Williford makes a confession before Mayor Robert Greenstreet of Feversham and the assembled jury, on September 24, 1645.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 24 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
106

Anne Ashby confesses to accepting a piece of sinewy and scorched flesh from the Devil which, when touched, affects people's desires. This piece of flesh is observed by E. G. Gent and put on display.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652 Cranbrook  Cranbrooke  Kent  Kent  England 
107

Anne Martyn, just after judgment had been passed on her, confesses that she is pregnant by the devil.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652 Cranbrook  Cranbrooke  Kent  Kent  England 
108

Mary Brown is hanged for being a witch, in Maidstone on July 30, 1652.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
109

Mildred Wright is hanged for being a witch, in Maidstone on July 30, 1652.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
110

Anne Wilson is hanged for being a witch, in Maidstone on July 30, 1652.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
111

Mary Read is hanged for being a witch, in Maidstone on July 30, 1652.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
112

Jane Stretton of Ware, Hartford suffers from "strange and extraordinary fits." When medicine is applied to her "as it is usual for the Tooth-Ach," it does not help, but rather causes her to be "more violently tortured still then before." It is believed that Jane Stretton suffers from "Witchcraft and such Diabolical means." This is further confirmed by the sightings of devils and imps (Anonymous 24), "sometimes in the shape of a Toad, at other times it resembled a Frog," while at yet other times it is in the form of a mouse. These imps and devils torment Jane Stretton for nine months. She is also incapable of taking any sustenance, safe "surrups and such like liquid ingredients." She is never dispossessed.

The Hartford-shire Wonder

1669 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
113

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that Elizabeth Lord bewitched John Fraunces, servant to Goodman Some, by giving him a drink that caused him to sicken and die.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1572 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
114

Cysley Sellis allegedly bewitches Thomas Death's child (Anonymous 207) to death.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   Little Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
118

Cicely Balye criticized Mary Smith for doing an inadequate job sweeping. In retribution, Smith called Bayle "a great fattail'd sow," but promised that her "fatnesse should shortly be pulled."

A Treatise Against Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
120

Elizabeth Gooding is accused of causing the death of a horse.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, April Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
121

Anne Leech confesses sending an imp to kill Mr. Edward's cows.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
122

Hellen Clark confesses to having the devil appear to her in the form of a white dog, which she names Elimanzer and feeds with milk-pottage.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
124

Mary Johnson allegedly bewitches Elizabeth Otley's child to death. She apparently shoved her familiar, a rat-like imp she carried with her in her pocket, through a hole in Otley's door, suggesting it should "rock the Cradle," and "do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." The business it was sent to do was murder.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
126

Anne Cooper allegedly sends one of her Imps to kill a young girl named Mary.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
128

Elizabeth Harvey claims that if she was a witch, that she was made so by Marian Hocket.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
129

Marian Hockett denies any involvement with witchcraft.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
130

Rose Hallybread explains that she fed her familar with oatmeal, and allowed it to suckle upon her body as payment for services rendered.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
131

Joyce Boanes allegedly went to John Spall's home, and used imps to kill ten or twelve of his sheep.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
132

Rebbecca Jones confesses that a very handsome young man appeared to her, who may have been the devil.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
134

Anne Cate (Maidenhead) claims to have received three familiar spirits in the shape of moles, named James, Prickeare, and Robyn. She also received a familiar in the shape of a Sparrow, named Sparrow, from her mother (Anonymous 345) circa 1623. These familiars allegedly spoke to Cate, and instructed her to "deny God and Christ, which this Examinant did then assent unto."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1623 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
135

Elizabeth Hare is accused of giving Imps to Mary Smith.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645     Essex  Essex  England 
136

Joan Peterson and her neighbuor (Anonymous 341) were allegedly sitting by her fireside when Peterson shrieked and cried out, asking the neighbour if he saw anything. The neighbour does not at first, then sees what appears to be a black dog go directly to Peterson and put its head under her armpit. He is so astonished and frightened that he runs from the house.

The Witch of Wapping

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
137

Anne Bodenham of Salisbury is executed in Fisherton Anger on March 19, 1653 for being a witch. During her execution, she claimed that "God nothing had to doe with her," and she "did nought but curse and sware."

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
139

Rose Cullender and Amy Denny are jointly indicted at the assizes held at Bury St. Edmonds in Suffolk. The trial is presided over by Sir Matthew Hale, Lord Chief Baron of His Majesties Court of Exchequer, and lasts four days. They are charged with bewitching Elizabeth Durent, Ann Durent, Jane Bocking, Susan Chandler, William Durent, Elizabeth Pacy, and Deborah Pacy.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
140

Mary/Ann Foster is examined before a Justice of the Peace and confesses to setting Joseph Weedon's barns on fire. She claims that "she lighted Touchwood, and the Devil carryed her up by the Arms to the top of the Roof, and there with her Touchwood she set fire in the Thatch." Foster also confesses to destroying Weedon's sheep.

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, August 22 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
141

Mr. Farmer and Mrs. Farmer both give deposition alleging that, on the advice of their neighbours, they went to a Dr. Bourn to cure their bewitched daughter, Mary Farmer. Dr. Bourn told them that their daughter was "under an ill tongue." Dr. Bourn gave them instructions on how to determine who had bewitched Mary. First, they must save some of her urine, then stop it up in a bottle, bury it, and burn the her clothes. This would evidently draw the witch who was hurting Mary to the house.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
142

Temperance Lloyd is apprehended and put in prison.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, August 14 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
143

Mary Trembles allegedly confesses to pricking and tormenting Grace Barnes of Bideford.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
144

Susanna Edwards confesses that devil had carnal knowledge of her body and sucked on her breasts and secret parts.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 17 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
145

Joan Buts pleads innocent, and is acquitted of the charges of bewitching Mary Farmer to death and using witchcraft to torment Elizabeth Burgiss. Despite hearing 19 or 20 witnesses, the Jury finds the evidence against her to be insufficient.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
146

Jane Kent is indicted at the Old Bailey for witchcraft and other diabolical arts, in which she is accused by Mr. Chamblet of allegedly bewitching his swine, wife Mrs. Chamblet, and daughter Elizabeth Chamblet. Mr. Chamblet blames Kent for Elizabeth Chamblet's death.

A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer

1682, June 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
147

Mary Floyd is executed for witchcraft on August 18, 1682.

The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches

1682, August 18 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
148

Alice Fowler is reputed to be a witch for muttering and grumbling to herself regularly.

Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
153

Alice Huson confesses to having seen the devil in the shape of a black man on a horse.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 22 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
165

Temperance Floyd of Bideford is accused of being a witch, and of also teaching Mary Floyd and Susannah Edwards the art of witchcraft.

The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches

1682, August 18 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
166

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) batch of bread moves overnight, seemingly of its own accord, from a table to another room, where they were "hid in Tubs and covered with linnen Cloathes." The tenant had the keys to all the doors at all times, and found the doors to all her rooms locked as she had left them overnight. A similar incident occurs with her cheeses and meat.

The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
167

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) cattle are killed in a strange manner. Among these, are a sow that "leap'd and danc'd in several unusual postures and at last fell down dead."

The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
168

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) stack of hay, and the building it was kept in, were set on fire. This fire is believed to be linked to other mysterious fires that start within the house.

The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
169

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) cheese and meat allegedly move to another room of their own accord.

The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
170

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) cabbage plants are moved by an unknown force. At night the plants are pulled up and laid down in "several formes, as Crosses, Flower-de-luces, and the like." Even upon raking the ground, no footsteps were found the following morning, but the plants had been pulled up again. Upon being replanted a third time, they were left alone.

The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
171

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) roasted pig is allegedly defleshed by an unknown force. Its bones are left in perfect order.

The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
172

Elizabeth Stile confesses to practicing witchcraft and "hainous, and vilanous practises," with Father Rosimond, his daughter, Mother Dutten, Mother Deuell, Mother Margaret, and Elizabeth Rockingham around the back of Master Dodges' house.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
175

Mother Dutton allegedly created four wax figures, representing Lanckforde, his 'Maide," Maister Galis, and Switcher. Dutton impaled these images with a 'Hauthorne pricke', in the area where the heart would be. The four people the images represented died.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
176

Elizabeth Stile, in her confession, alleges to have given Saddock a clap on the shoulder as punishment for reneging on his promise to give her an old cloak. Saddock went home and died.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
177

Mother Dutton and Mother Devell, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, kill William Foster's cow by witchcraft.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
178

Elizabeth Stile, in her confession, claims to have a familiar named Phillip who appears in the form of a rat. Stile fed Phillip breadcrumbs, and blood from her right wrist. She alleges that Philip provided her with milk and cream when she was unable to get any through begging.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
179

Elizabeth Stile allegedly bewitches Ostler of Windsor, causing him to suffer pain in his limbs such that he is unable to do his work or rest. Stile had come to Ostler of WIndsor's Master's (Anonymous 190) house to beg alms, but came too late and became angry with Ostler when there was little left to offer her.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
181

A black cat is seen to repeatedly come to the cradle of a sick child and rock it; when the child is being watched by two women, one drives off the cat with a poker and, when it later returns, the other woman kicks at it. The leg that kicked at the cat becomes sore and swollen, frightening the women, who leave the house and encounter a Baker, who saw Peterson go that way and was frightened by the cat himself. He alleges that Peterson has bewitched the child. The cat is thought to be Peterson herself.

The Witch of Wapping

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
186

Mary/Ann Foster is imprisoned in Northampton Gaol for arson and witchcraft by a Justice of the Peace. She is to remain there until the next Assizes.

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, August 18 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
187

Mary/Ann Foster allegedly mutters "You had been better let me have it, for you shall have more Mutton shortly lye upon your hands then you know what to do with" after Joseph Weedon refuses to sell her mutton for the price she offered.

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
188

For the next several days after Joseph Weedon refused to sell Mary/Ann Foster mutton, he allegedly finds over 30 of his sheep "in a miserable condition, with all their Leggs broken to pieces in several places" and "their Bones all shattered in their Skins." Foster is suspected in their demise.

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
189

Joseph Weedon attempts to scratch Mary/Ann Foster with his fingernails, and when they prove too dull, slices her hand open with a knife. He is encouraged in this endeavour by the "general opinion, that fetching blood of the witch takes a way her power of doing any harm."

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
190

Joseph Weedon's hay barn catches on fire and burns to the ground on the 22nd of May following a threat from Mary/Ann Foster. The fire is almost impossible to put out. Weedon moves his family out of their home, fearing for their safety, and indeed they, and the barn, remain safe for the whole two weeks of his absence. Days later, his corn barn also catches on fire, as do his wheat crops. The fire jumps to his house, which also burns to the ground. The damages total over 300 pound, and he blames Mary/Ann Foster for his loss.

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, May 22   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
191

Mary/Ann Foster is apprehended in connection to the damages to Joseph Weedon's livestock and property, and a Justice of the Peace orders her examined by a Jury of Women. They find her to have "five several strange and unusual excrescencies which appeared exactly like a Sows Teats, and seemed to be usually suckt by something."

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, August 18 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
192

Mary/Ann Foster confesses to setting Joseph Weedon's barn on fire with the help of the Devil, as well as causing his sheep to die "in that strange and miserable manner." She further boasts that she would make many more die as well as herself.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674, August 18   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
193

At her trial, Mary/Ann Foster denies being a witch while confessing to causing the destruction of Joseph Weedon's sheep and property. She is condemned to be hanged on the strength of her previous confession.

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, August 18 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
194

Mary Foster is hanged for witchcraft at the Northampton Assises on August 22, 1674. She refuses to speak a word beyond requesting her hands be untied.

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1674, August Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
195

A woman (Anonymous 4) is captured in Newbury by the army and determined to be a witch.

A Most Certain, Strange, and True Discovery of a Witch

1634 Newbury  Newbury  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
196

A woman (Anonymous 4) is allegedly shot at by army soldiers in Newbury, but she catches the bullets they fire and eats them.

A Most Certain, Strange, and True Discovery of a Witch

1634 Newbury  Newbury  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
197

A woman (Anonymous 4) is captured by the Army in Newbury and shot in the head, in 1634.

A Most Certain, Strange, and True Discovery of a Witch

1634 Newbury  Newbury  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
198

Elizabeth Clarke of Manningtree, according to the second hand report given by Matthew Hopkins, allegedly enjoyed six or seven years of tri-weekly "carnall copulation with the Devil six or seven yeares, who, "in shape of a proper Gentleman, with a laced band, having the whole proportion of a man, and would say to her, Besse I must lye with you, and shee did never deny him."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
199

Elizabeth Clarke of Manningtree confesses to having killed Mr. Edwards' hogs.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
200

Anne Bodenham of Salisbury uses green glass to inform Anne Styles about who has stolen Master Goddard's silver spoon.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
201

Anne Bodenham of Salisbury appears in the shape of a great black cat.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
202

Anne Bodenham of Salisbury draws a circle and calls upon the devil, to which two spirits appear.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
203

Anne Bodenham of Salisbury allegedly calls upon a devil to torment a maid from Salisbury (Anonymous 5).

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
204

Anne Bodenham of Salisbury is hanged for allegedly being a witch in Salisbury, 1653.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
205

Mr. Farmer, Mrs. Farmer and various other witnesses (Anonymous 375) give deposition alleging that the Farmers followed Dr. Bourn's advice to bury a bottle of Mary Farmer's urine and burn her clothes, and that this act brought Joan Buts to the Farmers' home. Buts came in looking ghastly, sat down on a stool, and when questioned by a woman present (Anonymous 374) regarding why she looked so terrible and what brought her to the house, answered that she was ill, had not been out of her house in seven weeks, and that she "could not forbear coming." Buts then threw down her hat, fell to the floor and began wallowing while making a fearful noise; when she got up, she started cursing horribly. The witnesses presented this as proof that Buts was the person who bewitched Mary Farmer.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
206

Dorcas Colesman accuses Susanna Edwards of causing her tormenting pains that have lasted for many weeks.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1680, August Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
207

Temperance Lloyd is accused of bewitching Grace Thomas, by causing her to feel as though she had been pricked with 'pins and awls.'

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1680, September 30 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
208

Temperance Lloyd of Bideford is searched for and is allegedly found to have witch's marks.

A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland

1682, July 2 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
210

Temperance Lloyd allegedly met with the devil, who appeared in the likeness of a black man and convinced her to torment Grace Thomas.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, September 30 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
211

Temperance Lloyd pinches Grace Thomas' shoulders, arms, thighs and legs to torment her.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, September 30 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
212

Temperance Lloyd confesses to being involved with the devil for twelve years, and participating in William Herbert's death.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
213

Temperance Lloyd confesses to causing the death of Anne Fellow.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
214

Temperance Lloyd allegedly 'secretly' pricked Jane Dallyn, the wife of Symon Dallyn of Biddiford, Marriner, in one of her eyes, causing her death. Lloyd recounts she did this act in secret, and that "she was never discovered or punished for the same."

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
215

Temperance Lloyd confesses to bewitching Lydia Burman to death by appearing to her in the form of a red pig.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
217

Mary Trembles allegedly arrives at Agnes Whitefield's door. It is at that moment that Whitefield comes to understand that "Mary Trembles, together with the said Susanna Edwards, were the very persons that had tormented her, by using some Magical Art or Witchcraft upon her said Body as aforesaid."

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 16 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
218

Mary Trembles and Susanna Edwards are accused of pricking a Bideford woman named Grace Barns.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
219

Susanna Edwards confesses that the devil did carry her spirit around.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
220

Susanna Edwards confesses to pricking and tormenting Dorcas Coleman.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
221

Mary Trembles confesses that Susanna Edwards taught her the practice of witchcraft.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
222

Mary Trembles confesses that the devil appeared to her in the shape of a lion.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
223

Temperance Floyd of Bideford confesses to being in league with the Devil for twenty years, a period in which she claimed to be "guilty of many Cruelties, and [to have had] Hellish power afflicted both Man and Beast."

The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches

1682, August 18 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
224

Temperance Floyd, Mary Floyd, and Susanna Edwards of Bideford cause a cow to give blood instead of milk.

The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
225

Temperance Floyd of Bideford confesses to causing ships to be cast away at sea and men dying as a result.

The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
226

Temperance Floyd of Bideford confesses to having sexual relations with the devil for nine nights.

The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
227

Temperance Floyd of Bideford confesses to killing Hannah Thomas, by squeezing the girl's arm till blood came out of her mouth.

The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches

1682, August 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
230

William Spicer allegedly makes a habit of taunting an old woman, Anonymous 8, whenever he passes the Alms-House where she lives. He would "call her Witch, and tell her of her Buns; which did so enrage the Old Woman, that she threatened him with a Warrant." Anonymous 8 appealed to a Justice of the Peace, which frightened Spicer into humbling himself before her and promising to cease. Spicer nevertheless begins to experience fits a few days later.

Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire

1689 Mendip  Beckenton  Somerset  Somerset  England 
231

William Spicer allegedly suffers from strange and violent fits over the course of a fortnight. During these fits, he claimed to see Anonymous 8 "against the Wall in the same Room of the House where he was, and that sometimes she did knock her Fist at him; sometimes grin her Teeth, and sometimes laugh at him." He displays such strength while afflicted that three or four men are needed to hold him. After he drinks small beer, he frequently vomits pins; over thirty pins are counted by the time his fits cease.

Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire

1689 Mendip  Beckenton  Somerset  Somerset  England 
234

Margaret Landis of Worcester is accused of allowing her imps to do harm, and allowing them to suck the two teats located near her privy parts.

The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches

1690, March 5 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
236

Joan Buts is indicted at the Assizes of Southwark, Lord Chief Justice Sir Francis Pemberton presiding, on two counts: she is alleged to have bewitched Mary Farmer to death, and to have used witchcraft to torment Elizabeth Burgiss.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1690, March 27 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
237

Jane Throckmorton falls "uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body," which causes her to sneeze continually for half an hour, fall into a trance in which her belly swells and heaves, or shakes her leg or arm as if palsied.

The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys

1589, November 10 Warboys  Warboys  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
238

Temperance Lloyd is accused of pricking and tormenting her accuser, Grace Thomas, causing intense bodily harm.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 1 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
239

Anne Fowler is accused by Walter Fowler, her son, of bewitching him and others for many years.

Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
240

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that, after she received the familiar Sathan from Elizabeth Francis, she decided to try him out by asking him to kill one of her hogs. When he did, she gave him a chicken and a drop of her blood as payment.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
242

Rebbecca West of Worcester confesses to having sexual intercourse with the devil who appeared to her in the likeness of a young man.

The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches

1690, March 5 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
244

Rebbecca West, Margaret Landis, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread are all allegedly burned to death at the stake on March 5th, 1645.

The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches

1690, March 5 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
245

Mother Lakeland confesses to murdering her husband, Anonymous 45. After making a pact with the Devil, Lakeland bewitches her husband, causing him to suffer in misery for a while and then die.

The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration

1645, September 9 Ipswich  Ipswich; Gippeswick  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
246

Mother Lakeland confesses to sending one of her familiars that appears in the shape of a dog to torment Mr. Lawrence and his child. The familiar torments Mr. Lawrence first and kills him, and then torments and kills the child.

The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration

1645 Ipswich  Ipswich; Gippeswick  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
247

Mother Lakeland confesses to sending a mole familiar to torment and kill Mrs. Jenings, after she refused to lend Lakeland a pin. Lakeland was also trying to avoid paying off a debt of one shilling.

The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration

1645 Ipswich  Ipswich; Gippeswick  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
248

Mother Lakeland allegedly sent one of her imps to kill Mr. Beale. The imp only succeeded in tormenting him, forcing him to live as his body rots.

The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration

1645 Ipswich  Ipswich; Gippeswick  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
250

Justice Arthur Robinson, having held a long suspicion that Elizabeth Sawyer is a witch, has thatching taken from her roof. He alleges that wherever some of the thatching was burnt, Sawyer was soon seen to come, thereby proving she is a witch.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
251

Elizabeth Sawyer's appearance and habits are used as further proof that she is a witch. She is allegedly bloodlessly pale and ghost-like in her face, with a tendency to stare at the ground; her body is crooked and deformed, and her tongue appears to be under the Devil's control at her apprehension and trial, due to her long cursing, swearing, blaspheming and imprecating. Her tongue in particular is identified as "the meanes of her owne destruction, which had destroyed many before."

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
253

Elizabeth Sawyer is arraigned and indicted for witchcraft at the Old Bailey. She is charged with bewitching her neighbours infants and cattle, and Agnes Radcliffe, to death.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 14 London (Old Bailey)    London, City of  London  England 
254

Mr. Radcliffe gives deposition alleging that Elizabeth Sawyer threatened his wife, Agnes Radcliffe. According to Mr. Radcliffe, the two women fought after Sawyer's sow ate some of Agnes' soap, and Agnes struck the animal. Sawyer told Agnes "for that Elizabeth Sawyer would be reuenged of her, and thus threatned Agnes Ratcleife, that it should be a deare blow vnto her."

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
255

Mr. Radcliffe alleges in his deposition that the evening after Agnes Radcliffe and Elizabeth Sawyer fought, Agnes fell sick and "was extraordinarily vexed, and in a most strange manner in her sicknesse was tormented." She died about four days later, foaming at the mouth and distempered. Radcliffe claims that Agnes, on her deathbed, said to him, "if shee did die at that time shee would verily take it on her death, that Elizabeth Sawyer her neighbour, whose Sowe with a washing-Beetle she had stricken, and so for that cause her malice being great, was the occasion of her death."

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621 London  Edmonton  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
256

Two alleged witches, Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44, are tried for witchcraft at the York Assizes on charges of bewitching two women, Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, so that they suffered tormenting fits and vomited strange objects.

The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire

1657 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
257

Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10 are brought before the Judges to give evidence against Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44. During their deposition, both allegedly fell into convulsive fits before the court, crying out and swooning as they "vomit wooll, an[d] crooked pins. and haf[t]s of knives, one whereof being of Marble made a great noyse by reason of yt weight of it, as it fell upon the floore."

The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire

1657 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
258

The jury declares Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 guilty of bewitching Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, but the Judges are unsatisfied by the evidence. They put the trial on hold for further deliberation, "uncertain whether this wonderfull Vomite proc[ee]ded from the Divel, or whether i[t] were some artificiall combinat[i]on of the two women to impose upon the Iu[d]ges, and [t]he Court."

The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire

1657 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
266

Ursley Kempe allegedly bewitches Grace Thurlowe's infant, causing the child to fall out of her cradle and break its neck. Kempe later confessed to this crime, claiming that she had sent her familiar Tyffin to hide in the cradle and rock it, jostling the infant, causing it to fall out and break its neck.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1581   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
267

Ursley Kempe appears without having been called for and offers to cure Grace Thurlowe's lameness for the cost of twelve pence. Thurlowe accepts the offer and agrees to the price and "she was wel & in good case as shee was before." However, when Kempe appears to collect the money, "saide Grace made answere, that shee was a poore and a needie woman, and had no money: & then the said Ursley requested of her cheese for it: but she said she had none." Kempe left, vexed and annoyed and claimed that she would be even with Thurlowe, and indeed she was. It wasn't simply that Thurlowe's illness returned, it was that she could, from that point in time, never return to health without it appearing that it was costing her son his health to do so: "she saith, that when she is any thing well or beginneth to amend, then her childe is tormented, and so continueth for a time in a very strange case, and when he beginneth to amend: Then shee the saide Grace becommeth so lame, as without helpe shee is not able to arise, or to turne her in her bed."

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1580   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
268

Annis Letherdall accuses Ursley Kempe of bewitching her daughter, Elizabeth Letherdall. Kempe had sent her own son, Thomas Rabbet to Letherdall's home to request some scouring sand, and offered to dye some hose in return. Letherdall refused and sent Kempe's son away empty handed. Upon witnessing Letherdall's daughter Elizabeth carry some sand to another neighbor, Kempe cursed the girl in revenge, causing her belly and private parts to swell.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1581   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
269

Alice Newman, at Ursula Kempe's behest, conspires to sends her spirit Jacke to bewitch Edna Stratton to death. Kempe had been insulted by Edna' husband, and refused spices by Edna herself. This was considered an act of just retribution.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1581, December   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
270

Ursley Kempe accuses Ales Newman of sending the spirit Pigin to plague a child.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 9   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
281

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger teaches Anne Styles a spell that can be used to break Mistress Sarah Pocket's neck.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
282

Joan Cunny of Stisted confesses that she learned the art of witchcraft from Mother Humfrey. Humfrey allegedly showed Cunny how to pray to the Devil by kneeling and making a circle on the ground.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March 30   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
293

George Dell is executed in Hertfordshire on 4 August,1606 after being found guilty of murdering Anthony James Jr. and participating in the mutilation of Elizabeth James.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
294

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger gives a charm made out of yellow powder in the shape of a cross to Anne Styles to help protect Thomas Mason.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
295

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger uses a staff, a book, and a piece of green glass as magical instruments to call upon the Devil. At her invocation, five spirits appear in the form of ragged boys; Bodenham scatters bread crumbs for them.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
296

Johane Harrison is apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft. Her house is searched for incriminating evidence; such evidence is found in the form of chest full of magical instruments and human remains.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Royston  Royston  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
297

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger casts a circle and calls upon the Devil, who appears in the form of a little boy, then a snake, and finally a shaggy dog.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
298

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger allegedly gives Anne Styles (for her Mistress to use) powder made of leaves, some dried leaves, and fingernail parings; this is a three prong magical approach designed to poison Sarah and Anne Goodard. The powder was to be administer in a "drink or broth, to rot their Guts in their Bellies; the leaves to rub about the brims of the Pot, to make their Teeth fall out of their Heads; and the paring of the Nayls to make them drunk and mad."

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
299

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger casts a circle and calls upon the Devil, who appears as two spirits in the the forms of long-haired boys; the boys sign a contract in blood with Anne Styles.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
300

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger allegedly bewitches Anne Styles into having fits.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
301

Anne Styles is questioned by a jury as to the state of her spirituality, and whether she would like to be saved by God.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
302

Anne Styles confesses that Anne Bodenham persuaded her to become involved in witchcraft, but that she freely consented to participating in it.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
307

Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger confesses to being able to cure diseases by charms and spells and through the use of glass and books.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
308

Anne Bodeham of Fisherton Anger has her body searched by a group of women that find a teat on her shoulder.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
309

Arthur Bill and his mother allegedly conspire to bewitch a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from relenting and making a confession. The ball remains lodged in Bill (Father)'s throat for some time, during which he was unable to speak a word. However, it eventually worked its way out, and Bill (Father) became the principal witness against Arthur.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
310

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her examination before Justices Robert Bernard and Nicholas Pedley that the Devil had appeared to her in the form of a young man 21 years before, along with two spirits in the form of puppies. The Devil asked her to renounce God and Christ, which she did, and told her she must sign a covenant giving him her soul at the end of 21 years. In exchange, he would give her his services to do mischief as she required him.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
311

Elizabeth Weed alleged in her confession that the spirit in the form of a young man returned to her a week later at about 10 o'clock at night with a paper and asked if she was willing to seal their covenant. When she said she was, he pricked her under her left arm to draw blood, and had her sign with the blood. The spot pricked became a large lump. After she signed, the spirit bedded her for the first time, and the two puppy spirits joined them in bed to suckle from her.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
312

Joan Williford alleges during her confession that she had promised her soul to the Devil twenty years before. She gave some of her blood to him, and he used it to write the covenant between them. In exchange, he agreed to be her servant for 20 years; this contract was nearly expired at the time of Willford's trial.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1625 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
313

Joan Williford alleges during her confession that, seven years before her trial, the Devil came to her in the shape of a small dog and demanded that she forsake God and rely on him instead. She replied that "she was loath to forsake him." Nevertheless, he promised that she would not lack and sometimes brought her money. Williford named this familiar Bunne.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1638 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
314

Joan Willimot confesses that she desired to be "revenged upon Thomas Letherland and Mary Woodr[a]fe now his wife." She also alleges that her familiar Bunne "carried Thomas Gardler out of a window, who fell into a backside."

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 24 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
315

Joan Williford accuses Jane Hott, Elizabeth Harris and Joan Cariden, alias Argoll, of being her fellow witches during her confession. She alleges that Harris cursed John Woodcott's boat six or seven years before, and that Cariden had cursed both Robert Greenstreet, Mayor of Faversham, and John Mannington. Mannington's curse was that he should not thrive, which Willimot claims came to pass.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 24 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
317

Mr. Freeland's fourteen year old maidservant (Anonymous 1) is searched for witch's marks under her armpits; fleshy red protuberances are found.

The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland

1666, July 20 London (Petticoat Lane)    London, City of  London  England 
318

Anne Martyn is hanged for being a witch in Maidstone on 30 July, 1652.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
319

Anne Ashby is hanged in for being a witch in Maidstone on 30 July,1652.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
321

A tenant (Anonymous 2) leaves a bottle of vinegar in the dairy house along with the milk of six cows; in the morning she returns to find the bottle empty and the milk turned into a "perfect possett."

The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
322

Father Rosimond, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, has been known to transform into an ape or a horse; Stile claims that she has conversed with him at length while he is in the shape of an ape.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
323

Father Rosimond, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, can bewitch people, or cure people who have been bewitched.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
324

Joan Peterson allegedly heals a man of a chronic headache that several doctors could not; the man had been suffering for five weeks and was cured after she gave him a drink and instructed him to take it three times. This account is given as proof of her healing skill.

The Witch of Wapping

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
325

John Winnick is examined before Justice Robert Bernard, and alleges in his confession that he was visited by a bear-like spirit about the size of a rabbit (Anonymous 130) around Midsummer 29 years before. He had lost a purse containing 7 shillings, and was cursing the loss while working in the barn when Anonymous 130 appeared to him. Anonymous 130 offered to see that the purse was returned to him if he would renounce God and Christ, and worship it instead; Winnick agreed, and was instructed to return to the same place the next day.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1615, June 21   Molesworth  Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
326

John Winnick alleged in his confession that the day after the bear-like spirit (Anonymous 130) first appeared to him, he returned to the barn and found his purse on the floor. When he picked it up, Anonymous 130 appeared again, and Winnick "fell downe upon his knees and said, my Lord and God I thanke you." Anonymous 130 said that it had brought two other spirits with it, one like a white cat (Anonymous 131) and one like a grey coney (Anonymous 132), and that Winnick was to worship them as well. Anonymous 130 promised that Winnick would never lack for food, that Anonymous 131 would hurt anyone he desired, and that Anonymous 132 would hurt any animal he desired. Anonymous 130 also said it must have Winnick's soul when he died, and some blood to seal the covenant. When Winnick agreed, Anonymous 130 pricked him on the head; thereafter all three would come to him daily to suck from his body.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1615, June 22   Molesworth  Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
328

Aubrey Grinset confesses she made league with the Devil, and has been a witch for over twenty years.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
329

John Tonken alleges that the Old Witch (Anonymous 6) appears to him repeatedly before his vomiting fits, sometimes in the form of a cat and once in the form of a mouse; she often predicts what he will vomit. He is often heard to beg her to make him well, or demand her name and where she lives, but she will not tell him. For lack of another name, he calls her Old Witch.

A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall

1686, May 4 Pensans  Pensans  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
330

Elizabeth Chandler, during her examination before Justices Robert Bernard and Nicholas Pedley, alleges that she is a victim, not a witch. She claims that she has been visited numerous times by a spirit in the night, which makes a roaring and a puffing, and leaves her sore at the bottom of her belly. Chandler adds that "she did never willingly invoke or imploy the same, but hath prayed to God to deliver her therfrom."

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
331

Joan Wallis alleges in her confession that Blackeman never lay with her, but Edward Wingfield claimed in his deposition that she had confessed differently to him. According to Wingfield, Blackeman had the use of her body as often as three times a week.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 14   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
333

Jane Wallis is examined before Justice Robert Osborne, and confesses to having been visited six weeks before by a spirit in the shape of a man wearing black clothes. He greeted her, introduced himself as Blackeman and asked if she was poor. When she replied to the affirmative, he said he would send Grissell and Greedigut to her, to do anything she asked of them. Wallis noticed then that he had ugly feet. To her terror, he seemed to grow, then shrink, and vanished away. In his deposition, Edward Wingfield added that Blackeman appeared ancient; Wingfield claimed Wallis had confessed to him.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, February   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
341

Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike, confesses before Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell. In her confession, she alleges that twenty years before, she was coming home from begging and, near the Stonepit in Gouldshey in the Forest of Pendle, a devil or spirit appeared to her in the shape of a boy wearing a coat half-brown, half-black. This spirit told her that if she gave him her soul, she could have anything she requested. Southerns demanded his name; he said he was called Tibb. Tempted by his promises, she agreed to give him her soul.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1592   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
342

Anne Bodenham places glass on an image and rubs it to see for a client what others are doing in her absence.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
343

Anne Bodenham of Salisbury allegedly transforms and appears in the form of a black cat to Anne Styles.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
344

Elizabeth Southerns alleges in her confession that the best way to kill someone through witchcraft is to make a clay image of the person and dry it thoroughly. She says that if you want them to be afflicted in one place more than another, to take a thorn or pin and prick that part of the image. If you want a part of their body to be consumed away, take that part of the image and burn it. To consume their whole body, take the remainder of the image and burn it; this will cause them to die.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
345

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that she, Elizabeth Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitched Robert Nutter to death. She claims that Southerns also showed her that she had bewitched Richard Ashton to death.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, May 19   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
346

James Device alleges during his examination that, around the last Saint Peter's Day, Henry Bullocke came to Elizabeth Southerns and accused her granddaughter, James' sister, Alison Device, of bewitching his child, and demanded that Alison come with him to his house. Alison did, and when they got there, James claims he saw her fall on her knees, beg forgiveness, and confess to bewitching the child.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1611, June 29   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
347

Anne Whittle's confession and examination is heard by Justice of the Peace for Lancashire Roger Nowell on April 2, 1612 at the fence in the Forest of Pendle.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
348

James Device alleges during his examination that the teeth Henry Hargreaves and he found buried at the west end of Elizabeth Southerns' house are the same teeth Anne Whittle gave Southerns twelve years before. He says they also found a clay image near the teeth, almost withered away, of Anne Nutter, Anthony Nutter's daughter.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
349

Alison Device is examined at Reade on March 30, 1612 before Justice of the Peace for Lancashire Roger Nowell.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612 Reade  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
350

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, after Mrs. Moore chided her for using a charm to amend some drink, Whittle called for her familiar, Fancie, and instructed him to bite the Moores' cow on the head and make it go mad. Fancie turned into a brown dog and bit the cow, which died within six weeks.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
351

James Device alleges during his examination that, twelve years before, Anne Whittle took three scalps and and eight teeth from people buried in the graveyard of the new church in Pendle. Whittle is said to have kept four teeth for herself, and to have given the other four to Elizabeth Southerns, who showed them to Device.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1600   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
354

Alison Device alleges during her examination that, about eleven years before, the family's firehouse was broken into and all or most of their linen, half a peck of cut oatmeal and a quantity of meal was stolen, all worth about twenty shillings. The following Sunday, Alison says she went to Anne Redferne and took a parcel of the same from her, claiming they were the goods stolen from her family.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1601   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
355

Alison Device alleges during her examination that her father, John Device, was afraid of Anne Whittle, and made a deal to pay her a measure of meal every year if she would not harm his family. This lasted until he died, eleven years before; Alison claims that he said on his deathbed that "Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, did bewitch him to death, because the said meale was not paid the last yeare. "

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1601   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
356

James Device is arraigned and tried before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley at Lancaster Assizes on August 18, 1612. He stands accused of bewitching Anne Townley and John Duckworth to death.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 18 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
357

James Device alleges during his examination that, the previous Lent, John Duckworth promised him an old shirt, but when he went to collect it two weeks later, Duckworth denied it to him. As he left Duckworth's house, his familiar Dandy appeared to him and said "Thou didst touch the said Duckworth." Device denied it, but Dandy insisted that "thou didst touch him, and therfore I haue power of him[.]" Device finally agreed, and bid Dandy to kill Duckworth. A week later, the man was dead.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1611, April   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
358

Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley, and Jane Southworth are tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize for Lancaster Edward Bromley. They stand accused of bewitching Grace Sowerbuts so that she wasted and consumed.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
359

Grace Sowerbutts is examined under oath. She claims that, for the last several years, she has been haunted and vexed by some women. She names them as her grandmother Jennet Bierley, her aunt Ellen Bierley, Jane Southworth and Old Doewife.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
360

Grace Sowerbutts accuses Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley, Jane Southworth and Old Doewife of dragging her violently by her hair and laying her on top of Henry Bierley's hay-mow.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
361

Grace Sowerbutts accuses Jennet Bierley of turning into a dog to torment her. Sowerbutts alleges the Bierley knocked her over while in the shape of a dog, but did not hurt her. She claims that after this incident, she told her father about how Bierley had been tormenting her. When asked why she hadn't said anything sooner, Sowerbutts claimed that she had wanted to, but could not.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
362

Anne Redferne is arraigned and tried at Lancaster Assizes for witchcraft on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
363

Anne Redferne is acquitted of bewitching Robert Nutter to death, but tried a second time on charges of bewitching Christopher Nutter to death. She pleads not guilty.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
364

Katherine Hewit is arraigned and tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assize Sir Edward Bromley. She stands charged of bewitching Anne Foulds to death.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
365

John Bulcock and his mother, Jane Bulcock, are arraigned and tried on August 19, 1612 before Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley. They stand accused of bewitching Jennet Deane until she wasted and consumed, and became mad.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
366

James Device gives deposition alleging that both Jane Bulcock and John Bulcock attended the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
367

James Device gives deposition that, at the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower, he heard John Bulcock and Jane Bulcock confess to bewitching Jennet Deane, and give their consent to bewitching Master Thomas Lister and Leonard Lister to death.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
370

Elizabeth Brooker of Hointon, Devon is treated by a midwife for a severe pain in her leg after she turns a woman, who had been begging for pins, away. The midwife applies plasters, and many other cures, but none relieve the pain.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
371

Mary Hill, a young eighteen year old of Beckington, Somerset allegedly throws up 200 crooked pins, after taking very ill "some time before Michaelmas last past was Twelve-Month." She is also seized by violent fits when she vomits. She spent much of her life "very much in the Neglect of her Duty to God." Her vomiting of crooked pins results in "a numerous Concourse of People to see her," whom she admits to being aware of in her fits.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1691, April 4 Mendip  Beckenton  Somerset  Somerset  England 
377

Aubrey Grinset confesses to afflicting Thomas Spatchet and several others.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, October or November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
378

Aubrey Grinset confesses to bewitching John Collet of Cookly and Henry Winson of Walpoole to death. She lured John Collet and his household out of their home, by calling out that there was the biggest snake anyone had ever seen, and used the opportunity to get close to him; he died two days later. She provides no details on Henry Winson's demise.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
379

Aubrey Grinset confesses that the Devil appeared to her repeatedly, first in the form of a handsome young man and later in the form of a greyish-black cat or kitten, and that she allowed him to suck blood from a teat on her body.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
380

Aubrey Grinset is searched by an anonymous jury of women (Anonymous 166) after her confession. They find a teat exactly where she said it would be, but her body is otherwise whole.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
381

Mr. Mompesson of Tidworth is allegedly haunted by an unknown source that moves boards in his house.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1662, November 5 Tedworth    Wiltshire  Wilts  England 
382

Mr. Mompesson of Tidworth is allegedly visited by apparition that is blue and glimmering and causes the eyes to hurt when looking upon it.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1662, January Tedworth    Wiltshire  Wilts  England 
383

Jane Brooks of Shepton Mallet allegedly bewitches a young boy named Richard.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1657, November 15 Shepton Mallet  Shepton Mallet  Somerset  Somerset  England 
384

Elizabeth Stile is accused of bewitching a young girl into having fits where she is unable to speak.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1664, January 30 Bayforde  Stoke Trister  Somerset  Somerset  England 
385

Elizabeth Stile of Bayford is searched for witch's marks by Elizabeth Torwood, Catharine White, Mary Day, Mary Bolster, and Bridget Prankard. They find a mark that looks like a "kernel of beef" and decide, as a result, to prick it with a pin. They leave the pin in her mark to show others.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1664, February 7 Bayforde  Stoke Trister  Somerset  Somerset  England 
386

Catherine Green of Brewham allegedly convinces Christian Green to give up her soul to the devil.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1664   Brewham  Somerset  Somerset  England 
389

Julian Cox of Taunton, Somerset is tried on the accusation of practicing witchcraft on a young maid that causes her health to deteriorate.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1663 Taunton    Somerset  Somersetshire  England 
390

Doctor Pordage of Bradfield, Berkshire is allegedly haunted by three spirits that appear one night in the forms of a Everard, giant, and dragon. The Everard was "wearing Apparel, Band, Cuffs, Hat" and "seemed to walk once through the Chamber very easily, and so Disappeared." The giant, with sword in hand, "seemed to flourish against [Pordage]" and had a figure of a green tree beside him. The dragon took up "most part of a large Room" with "great Teeth and open Jaws" and "ejected fire." Dr. Pordage found protection from these spirits with the help of the Ministration of the Holy Angels.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649 Bradfield  Bradfield  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
391

Alice Huson of Burton Agnes, Yorkshire is accused of bewitching Faith Corbet, causing her to scream, bite, and scratch.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
392

Alice Huson of Burton Agnes, Yorkshire confesses to having the devil appear to her in the form of a black man; He promised her financial security if she would bind herself to him and forsake the Lord. He kept this promise in as much as that he gave her small sums of money six or seven times.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 28 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
393

Elizabeth Wright is searched for witch's marks by Anonymous 165 and allegedly has two teats like warts behind her arm, and a large collection of marks towards the top of her shoulder which is described as "udder of an ewe." Sir Humphrey and Master Graysley examine the marks.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
395

Alice Gooderigde is searched for witch's marks by Anonymous 165 and is found to have a bloody hole as big as two pence on her stomach; the searchers believe the bloody hole is a result of a wart or teat being cut off; Gooderidge claims the hole is a result of holding a knife while falling off a ladder, which caused the knife to be thrust into her stomach; the hole is not festering, and therefore the searchers do not believe her story. The marks are examined by Sir Humphrey and Master Graysley.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
396

Alice Gooderidge is sent to the Derby prison for allegedly bewitching Thomas Darling.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Darbie    Derbyshire  Derbyshire  England 
401

Mary Hall, begins to grow ill in the autumn of 1663. Her illness begins 'first in one foot with a trembling shaking and Convulsive motion, afterwards it possessed both; she would sit stamping very much; she had sometimes like Epileptick, sometimes like Convulsive fits, and strange ejaculations."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1663, (Fall) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
404

James Graham of Chester is allegedly visited by an apparition of Anne Walker who tells him of how she was murdered by Mark Sharp.

Satan's Invisible World Discovered

1632     Cheshire  Chester  England 
405

Goodwife Watts of Sandwich gives a young pregnant woman (Anonymous 94) lodging in her home. The young woman suffers from strange and tormenting labour pains and Goodwife Hatch is thus called for. The baby (Monster 1) born resembles a lump of flesh with deformed facial features, arms growing out of its shoulder with no joints, and fourteen toes on its feet; it dies and is buried in a church yard.

Strange News out of Kent of a Monstrous and Misshapen Child

1609, July 30 Old Sandwich  Old Sandwich  Kent  Kent  England 
406

Margaret Mere of Maidstone, Kent on 23 October, 1568 gives birth to a monstrous and deformed child that lives for twenty-three hours and then dies.

The Forme and Shape of a Monstrous Child, Borne at Maydstone in Kent

1568, October 23 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
407

Anthony Smith's wife of Horkesley, Essex gives birth on 21 April, 1532 to a monstrous male child that has no limbs or tongue

The True Reporte of the Forme and Shape of a Monstrous Childe, borne at Muche Horkesleye

1532, April 21   Muche Horkesleye  Essex  Essex  England 
408

Captain Brown of Shropshire is brutally murdered by his servant, after which he appears as an apparition to two Gentlewomen.

An Account of a Most Horrid and Barbarous Murder and Robbery Committed on the Body of Captain Brown

1684, March     Shropshire  Shropshire  England 
410

Anonymous 20 of Kirkham gives birth to a stillborn monster baby

A Declaration of a Strange and Wonderful Monster: Born in Kirkham parish in Lancashire

1646   Kirkeham  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
411

A pond in Garraton turns from water to blood and is a supposed sign from God as to how the people are all of one blood.

The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire

1645   Garraton  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
412

Anonymous 21 of London gives birth on 16 September, 1645 to a monstrous baby that has nails coming out of its thighs, no head, and stumps for legs.

The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire

1645, September 16 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
413

Thomas West captures a monster on 15 July, 1642 that is the likeness of both a toad and man, has a broad mouth and sharp teeth, and is very large in size

A Relation of a Terrible Monster Taken by a Fisherman near Wollage, 15 July, 1642

1642, July 15 Woolage Village  Womenswold   Kent  Kent  England 
414

A woman who appears like a gentlewoman (Anonymous 22) destroys stores of beer and kills three hogs through witchcraft after being denied bacon and beer by a maidservant.

Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway

1644, July 30 Soffam; Swaffham  Soffam; Swaffham  Norfolk  Norfolke; Norfolk  England 
415

A woman from Suffolk (Anonymous 23) allegedly bewitches a pregnant woman after being offered only half a piece of bread. Soon after that, woman gives birth to two pieces of deformed flesh.

Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway

1644, July 30     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
416

Anonymous 24 gives birth on 28 July, 1644 to a monstrous baby that is a hermaphrodite, has no nose, hands, or legs, and dies shortly after birth.

Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway

1644, July 28 Manchester  Ratcliffe  Greater Manchester  Manchester  England 
420

The appearance of thunder and lightening in the sky causes the residents of Hertford to become fearful and confused as to the meaning of it.

Look Up and see Wonders a Miraculous Apparition in the Air

1628, April 9   Hatford  Hertfordshire  Oxford  England 
422

A woman from Old Gravel Lane (Anonymous 19) allegedly has a fit after a meeting of Anabaptists. Upon returning home from the meeting, and with the intention of repeating the notes she had taken at the sermon to her husband (Anonymous 482), she suddenly speaks "Noises of another nature, seeming to be the pulling Mewes or Shreamings of three young Kitlings." Immediately after, Anonymous 19 is also struck with blindness. It becomes obvious that the woman is possessed, as she is taken with "strange and unusual Gestures, and involuntary Motions both of her Tongue and other Members."

News from Old-Gravel Lane

1675, March 21       Unknown  England 
423

A woman from Old-Gravel lane (Anonymous 19) allegedly has a fit during which she cannot eat because her throat closes up. She thus refuses to eat with her husband (Anonymous 482) and friends, and the spirit (Anonymous 240) possessing her admits that he would choke her should she try to eat. After, whenever she attempted to eat, she could not swallow, because "the Vessels of her throat were stopped."

News from Old-Gravel Lane

1675, March 22       Unknown  England 
424

A woman from Old-Gravel lane (Anonymous 19) is allegedly possessed, drawing ministers (Anonymous 483) and others to visit her out of both curiosity and charity. The spirit (Anonymous 240) possessing Anonymous 19 speaks with these witnesses. When asked who sent the spirit to possess the woman, it replied that it was sent by "a Woman below." (Anonymous 239). When asked why he was sent, the spirit answered it was to prevent the woman from "perswading her Husband (Anonymous 482) to be Baptized." The spirit expressed his desire to possess the woman for as long as he could. It is believed that the spirit is the Devil himself.

News from Old-Gravel Lane

1675, March 22       Unknown  England 
425

Margaret Hooper is thought to be bewitched by a spirit (Anonymous 248) because of her incessant rambling. Her husband, Stephen Hooper, tries to convince her to "cal upon, God & that being the Creature of God, she should not forget to call upon her Creator ini the day of trouble," encouraging her also to pray with him. The Devil, however, causes her mind unrest, and her husband continues to pray for her.

Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres

1641, November 15 Edenbyres    Durham  Durham  England 
426

Margaret Hooper has a fit in the middle of the night in which she allegedly sees the Devil. She calls out to her husband, Stephen Hooper, saying that "shee did see a strange thing (Anonymous 247) like unto a snale, carrying fire in a most wonderfull sort." Her husband and others try to comfort her, and a candle is lighted. Margaret Hooper, however, continues to be fearful, crying out, "doe not you see the Devill?" When her husband urges her to focus on God, she cautions that "if you see nothing now, you shall see something by and by."

Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres

1641, November Edenbyres    Durham  Durham  England 
427

Mary Hill allegedly has three encounters with an old woman (Anonymous 8) in the days leading up to her first fits. First, Hill demands a ring from Anonymous 8, and threatens her when she refuses. Second, Hill refuses to escort Anonymous 8 to the neighbouring town of Froom to find spinning work. Third, Hill refuses to give Anonymous 8 an apple. Hill's first fit occurs within three days of refusing Anonymous 8 the apple.

Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire

1689, July Mendip  Beckenton  Somerset  Somerset  England 
428

Mary Hill allegedly suffers a pricking in her stomach the Sunday after refusing Anonymous 8 an apple. Monday at dinner, "something arose in her Throat, which was like to have Choaked her; and at the same time fell into Violent Fits, which held her till Nine or Ten a Clock at Night." The fits are so severe that four or five people are needed to restrain her. Hill claims to see Anonymous 8 standing against the wall grinning, and is seen to step around as if avoiding blows.

Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire

1689, July Mendip  Beckenton  Somerset  Somerset  England 
429

Doll Bartham allegedly sends toads to torment Joan Jorden in her bed and prevent her from from sleeping. Jorden throws the first toad into the middle of the room, but it comes back and sits croaking by her bed. She then throws it out the window.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599 Stradbrook  Stradebroke  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
430

Doll Bartham is arraigned before the Lord Chief Justice of England at S. Edmondsbury in Suffolk and condemned for the bewitchment of Joan Jorden. She is executed on July 12, 1599.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599, July 12 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
431

Anne Kirk is arraigned in London on November 30, 1599 on charges of witchcraft before Lord Anderson and Justices. She is found guilty, and condemned to death.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599, November 30 London (Old Bailey)    London, City of  London  England 
432

Anne Kirk is executed for witchcraft at Tyburne on December 4, 1599.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599 Tyburne    London, Greater  MIddlesex  England 
433

Anne Kirk allegedly has a falling out with a woman in the street; that night, the woman's child gives a shriek as they sit by the fire. It then pines away until it dies.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599 London (Castle Alley)    London, City of  MIddlesex  England 
434

Anne Kirk allegedly meets with Anonymous 458, the other daughter of Anonymous 457, in the street and causes her to be "stricken downe in a very strange maner; her mouth beeing drawne aside like a purse, her teeth gnashing togeather, her mouth foming, and her eyes staring the rest of her body being strangely disfigured." The girl recovers when Kirk leaves, but has similar fits often thereafter. Anonymous 458 gave deposition against Kirk, but claimed that she could not show how she was tormented until she had a fit.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599 London (Bredstreet Hill)    London, City of  London  England 
435

Anne Kirk allegedly becomes offended when not invited to a child's christening, and causes the child to become strangely tormented.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599 London (Castle Alley)    London, City of  MIddlesex  England 
436

The parents of a child, believed to be bewitched by Anne Kirk, consult with Mother Gillam, who tells them their child is forespoken. She advises them to "cut of a piece of the witches coate with a payre of sheeres, & burne it togeather with the childs vnder cloth." They do, and the child heals.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599 London (Castle Alley)    London, City of  MIddlesex  England 
437

Anne Kirk allegedly has a falling out with an innkeeper, Anonymous 459, and causes his child to become strangely tormented in revenge. Anonymous 459 cannot cure his child with physick, so he goes to a cunning-man, Anonymous 461 for help. Anonymous 461 makes him swear not to reveal who told him, then identifies Kirk as the person responsible for his child's illness and shows him Kirk's image in a glass. However, he is unable to help the child, who dies of his fits.

The Trial of Maist. Dorrell

1599 London (Castle Alley)    London, City of  MIddlesex  England 
438

Joseph Wright is arrested and fasts for the thirty-five days of his confinement.

The Miraculous Fasting of the Naked Man

1700 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
440

John Walsh confesses that he uses the fairies, (found in fairy mounds and invoked at noon or midnight) to aid him in his work. He warns that there are "iii. kindes of Feries, white, greene, & black," but that "the blacke Feries be the woorst."

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
441

John Walsh describes how to make wax pictures, pictures of clay, and a toad in order to cause harm to people. The wax pictures would make a person sick for two years, while the clay pictures would kill a person within nine days. The clay pictures were made with the earth of a new grave, the rib bone of a burned man or woman, a black spider, and the pith of an elder tree, with everything being tempered in water.

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
443

A baby is born in Allington, Lancashire with two four legs and arms, two bellies, one back, two faces and one head.

Stranges News of a Prodigious Monster Born in the Township of Allington

1613 Adlington  Standish  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
444

William Laud's life and death are allegedly foretold in chapters thirteen and fifteen of the Revelation of John.

A Prophecie of the Life, Reigne, and Death of William Laud

1644 Canterbury    Kent  Kent  England 
446

Margaret Hooper allegedly has a fit in which she violently thrashes in her bed, causing her husband, Stephen Hooper, to send for her sister. They try to hold down Margaret Hooper, but no one can hold her down, and she foams at the mouth. Her body shakes "with such force, that the bed and the chamber did shake and move" as well. Her husband continues to pray for her, and within half an hour, her fit is ended, although she claims afterward that a beast follows her around with no head or tail, though all tell her it is her imagination.

Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres

1641, November Edenbyres    Durham  Durham  England 
447

Anonymous 26 appears to his sweetheart a month after he was thought dead, and carries her over forty miles to her father's house in two hours.

The Suffolk Miracle

1693     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
448

An Alderman of Nottingham, offended that William Sommers has accused his kinswoman Doll Freeman of being a witch, makes a counter-accusation against Sommers and has Sommers imprisoned for witchcraft himself.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
449

Williams Sommers is allegedly visited by the Devil while imprisoned. The Devil threatens to let him hang if he does not permit the Devil to re-possess him and say that he faked everything during his previous possession. Sommers agrees to this new compact, and the Devil possesses him once more.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
450

William Sommers is called before the Commissioners to be examined as part of the proceedings to determine whether his second possession has been faked. The High Sheriff demands in the name of God that Sommers tell the truth, triggering a violent fit. The Commission takes this opportunity to test how real the fit is, and have pins stuck deep into Sommers' hand and leg, but he remains senseless and the wounds do not bleed. When Sommers comes back to his senses, the Commission questions him on what they had done to him during the fit. He claims he recalls being stuck by pins, but little else, and shows the wrong hand when asked where he was pricked, and claims the hole in his other hand had been there before. When asked why he fell during his fit, Sommers replies that he had felt sick to his stomach.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
455

William Hynde gives deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers with swelling on his neck the size of a walnut that moved to his cheekbone and then to his eye, causing the eye and skin to turn black. The swelling trembled when touched.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
458

John Darrell alleges that when Alice Gooderidge sent her familiar Minny against Thomas Darling, she "streyned all hir body, & vomited," and that Darling was inflicted with the exact same torments. He adds that she "named the tyme, place, occasion, and the vvordes shee vsed, when shee sent the Deuil to vexe and torment him in his body."

A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers

1599 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
459

According to John Darrell, Alice Goodridge confessed to sending her familiar, Minnie, to torment and cause the possession of Thomas Darling of Burton upon Trent, whom Darrell allegedly dispossessed. Darrell uses this to counter the charges that he is himself a fraud, for "if Darling did counterfeit, then hee was not bewitched: and if he was not bewitched, then was the iudgement and execution against Alice Goodridge erroniously and wrongfullie awarded."

A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers

1599 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
460

Anne Starchie allegedly suffers her first fit at the age of nine, in which she is taken with a heavy and dumpish countenance, and suffers a fearful starting and pulling of her body. These fits become extreme, lasting 9-10 weeks.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1594, February Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
461

Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Eleanor Holland, and Elizabeth Hardman allegedly have a fit during which they crawl on their knees until the afternoon, fleeing from family and neighbors into other rooms while calling them "devils with horns" that creep under the bed. Once they regain the use of their feet, they can no longer speak.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March 19 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
462

Eleanor Holland and Elizabeth Hardman have a fit lasting three days and three nights during which they cannot eat nor can they talk to anyone but each other, "to ther lads. saue that their lads gaue them leaue (as the said) the one to eate a toast & drink, the other a sower milk posset." Despite the permission, they say that Hartley is angry they ate, and made them vomit it up again. On the last night, Eleanor Holland is made to take up a distaff and spin faster and a finer thread than she ever has before, which she did for an hour and a half straight.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March 21 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
463

Margaret Byrom is allegedly thrown into the kitchen fire, under a table, and numerous other places, but suffers no injuries.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, January 10 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
464

Edmund Hartley is condemned and hanged at the assizes of Lancaster for allegedly causing the possession of Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Byrom and Jane Ashton.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1634 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
465

John Darrell has Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Byrom and Jane Ashton brought together for observation, noting that of all of them Jane Ashton and the Starchie children are most grievously tormented. Satan is said to have exceeded for cruelty with John Starchie in particular. During the observation, three or four of them scoffed and blasphemed. At one point, they allegedly all join hands to cause a strange and supernatural loud whupping noise in the house and grounds, driving Darrell and his companion George More from the room.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
466

Sarah Bowers, a fourteen year old girl, described as "of a Temper pretty Brisk and Lively, somewhat given to Pride," starts having fits the day when she feels an invisible hand might hit her on the back while in a yard near her aunt's house. She is struck to the ground, where she lies some time as if dead. These fits continue for weeks.

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
467

Sarah Bower has a fit during which she cannot speak for days and has visions during which she sees heaven and hell and speaks to something that "appear'd to her in the shape of an Angel with Wings, in a flaming Light, which she calls the Man of God." This Angel (Anonymous 27) councils her not to fall prey to Satan and predicts she will die soon. The Angel also passed on words for Sarah Bower to repeat to the people of England," That if the People of London, and England, did not speedily repent from their Sins, especially that of Pride in Apparrel and turn from the Evil of their Ways, God Almighty would give them up as a Prey to their Enemies." Sarah Bower then concludes that her speech would be taken away again, only to be restored on St. Thomas' Day at Christmas, when she "should declare many more Things." These events are witnessed by her neighbours (Anonymous 100).

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
468

Sarah Bowers, a fourteen year old girl suffering from fits, declares that "at Two a Clock in the Afternoon, she must go and meet the Black Man that had appeared to her in the Neighbours House afore-mentioned," a man (Anonymous 237) who allegedly offered the girl riches in return for blood from her arm. Sarah Bower's speech then leaves her, and "she began to throttle in her Mouth as formerly," and she takes to reading Chapter 17 of the Gospel of Matthew in the Bible, while making a buzzing noise and pointing to every Verse and Line with her finger, as her neighbours (Anonymous 100) witness.

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
469

Anonymous 28, a young girl, allegedly becomes possessed by evil spirits after her father, Anonymous 429, has a falling out with "a certain woman who had an evil name" (Anonymous 430). The possession caused her to be "taken with strange Fits, and something would rise up in her throat like two great bunches about the bigness of an Egg; and a strange voice was frequently heard within her, speaking Blasphemous words, not fit here to be repeated." The voice is said to be rough and gutteral, coming from her abdomen.

Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire

1664   Dacorum Hundred  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
470

The spirits allegedly possessing Anonymous 28, enticed to converse with the observers, explain how she came to be possessed by them. They explain that there are two of them (Anonymous 189 and Anonymous 190), and that they were sent by two women (Anonymous 130 and Anonymous 131). They were originally intended to possess the girl's father, Anonymous 429, but they found him at prayer and were thus forbidden from entering. The two women sent them instead to Anonymous 28.

Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire

1664   Dacorum Hundred  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
471

The author (Anonymous 432) allegedly hears reports of Anonymous 28's possession and comes to see it for himself. There are forty or fifty others present when he arrives. He observes her for two or three hours, during which time he becomes satisfied that the girl is indeed possessed.

Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire

1664   Dacorum Hundred  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
472

Anonymous 429, the father of Anonymous 28, sends for five ministers to fast and pray for his daughter, in the hope that she can be dispossessed. The spirits possessing her (Anonymous 189 and Anonymous 190) allegedly tell him "He expected five men to come, but there should only four come." This comes to pass; one of the five ministers suffers an unexpected accident and is prevented from coming.

Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire

1664   Dacorum Hundred  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
473

Anne Mylner starts having fits after she returns home one day from the fields claiming that "she saw a whyte thing compassing her round about, and so amased." She becomes very ill, will not eat (a little quantity of bread and cheese), and falls into trances.

The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester

1563, October Tarporley  Tarporley  Chester  Chester  England 
474

Anne Mylner has a fit during which she lies on her bed stiff and as though in a trance, but looking aghast. Then, her stomach starts swelling repeatedly very quickly. Finally, she contorts her body.

The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester

1564, February Tarporley  Tarporley  Chester  Chester  England 
475

Master (John) Lane spits vinegar up Anne Mylner's nose while praying that she would call upon the blood of Christ in an attempt to cure her possession. He applies this cure relentlessly until she finally cries out "No, no, no more for Gods sake." He then makes her repeat the Lord's prayer after him. This treatment is allegedly successful.

The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester

1564 Tarporley  Tarporley  Chester  Chester  England 
476

William Perry starts having extreme fits after an encounter with an old woman when he was on his way home from school. His fits are so violent that two or three people cannot hold him down.

The Boy of Bilson

1622 Bilson  Bilston  West Midlands  Staffordshire  England 
477

Sarah Morduck is taken into custody on the charge of bewitching Richard Hathaway with Sir Thomas Lane as the Examiner; evidence is given against her, including several witnesses' allegations (Anonymous 238) that she has a long standing reputation as an "ill liver," while another person (Anonymous 239) deposed that Morduck said Hatheway scratching her would only make him worse.

A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
478

Sarah Morduck hires Richard Hathaway to make her a key to her home after quarreling with her husband, and while Hathaway is working on the lock, Morduck allegedly convinces him to accept a drink over his protests; soon after Hathaway becomes unable to eat or drink, or do any work.

A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
479

Richard Hathaway, now allegedly unable to see in addition to unable to eat and drink, scratches Sarah Morduck at the urging of his friends (Anonymous 368), who brought her to him; he succeeds in drawing Morduck's blood, which restores his sight and ability to eat and drink.

A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
480

William Perry has a fit lasting three days. After drinking holy water, he vomits pins, wool, knotted thread, rosemary, walnuts, feather, and then regains his speech.

The Boy of Bilson

1622 Bilson  Bilston  West Midlands  Staffordshire  England 
481

William Perry has a fit during which he vomits eleven pins and a knitting needle.

The Boy of Bilson

1701 Bilson  Bilston  West Midlands  Staffordshire  England 
482

William Perry is determined to have faked his possession for attention and gifts.

The Boy of Bilson

1622 Bilson  Bilston  West Midlands  Staffordshire  England 
483

Margaret Gurr is allegedly visited by a grey devil, who urges her to hang herself "with Clock-Lines that was in the Room," and should she fail to do that, he urges her to "put or thrust Knitting-Needles in my Ears," in order to kill herself.

A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent

1681, July 19     Kent  Cantia  England 
484

Margaret Gurr is allegedly visited by two Devils who appear to her on July 19, 1681. One of the devils was "of stout thick squat Stature" dressed in grey; the other was "of little Stature and short," and dressed in black.

A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent

1681, July 19     Kent  Cantia  England 
485

Margaret Hooper allegedly acts as though bewitched. She comes home one day in a bad mood, speaking "much ildle talk," and grows increasingly irate when no one, especially her husband, will listen to her.

A True and Most Dreadfull Discourse of a Woman Possessed with the Deuill who in the Likenesse of a Headlesse Beare Fetched her out of her Bedd

1584 Durham    Durham  Dvrham  England 
486

Margaret Hooper has a fit during which she calls out to those around her, emphatically asking if they too could see the devil.

A True and Most Dreadfull Discourse of a Woman Possessed with the Deuill who in the Likenesse of a Headlesse Beare Fetched her out of her Bedd

1584 Durham    Durham  Dvrham  England 
487

A devil in the shape headless and tail-less bear appears to Stephen and Margaret Hooper and 'strokes' them.

A True and Most Dreadfull Discourse of a Woman Possessed with the Deuill who in the Likenesse of a Headlesse Beare Fetched her out of her Bedd

1584 Durham    Durham  Dvrham  England 
490

Thomas Sawdie allegedly begins to have fits whenever the Roberts family reads scripture or prays, in which he yells, roars, whistles and otherwise causes a disturbance until he is too exhausted to continue. After these fits, he would fall into a dead sleep around midnight in which it was difficult to tell whether he was alive or dead, his arms would spread apart, and his body be stricken with a stiffness such that they would break before they would bend; he would not come out of this state until 7 or 8 the following morning. In the mornings, he would be lifted out of his bed by an unknown force and thrown violently under it without disturbing the bedsheets.

A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie

1663, July Lawrack  Landrake with St Erney  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
491

Dorothy Sawdie confronts her son Thomas Sawdie the morning after his third fit triggered by prayer and the reading of scripture, and presses him to tell her whether he had seen any evil thing, made any promise to it, or any other thing. Thomas is unwilling, but is said to have eventually confessed to making a compact with the Devil and to his agreement to meet in the field.

A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie

1663, July Lawrack  Landrake with St Erney  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
492

Thomas Sawdie allegedly begins to have furious frantic fits, in which he attempts to run away while removing his clothes. Eventually, they are forced to bind him with a narrow towel tied into three knots at his wrist, but he soon demonstrates that he can remove his hands when he pleases from this confinement, and once leaps a high gate with his hands still bound behind his back. These fits include fitting himself through small spaces in attempts to make his escape; Sawdie claims that he could "put his body out at a Mouse-hole" and indeed manages to get himself stuck to the waist in a hole in a wall that should not have fit him.

A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie

1663, July Lawrack  Landrake with St Erney  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
493

The Devil allegedly appears to Thomas Sawdie in the form of a little man with long fingers and large eyes dressed in black velvet after Sawdie confesses to his mother; the Devil threatens Sawdie with his fist and tells him that thereafter he will fall down dead whenever God is named. As promised, Sawdie continues to howl, whistle and be disruptive when Scripture is read or other religious activities, then fall into a death-like state.

A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie

1663, July Lawrack  Landrake with St Erney  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
494

Thomas Sawdie allegedly has a fit of roaring and whistling when Mr. Teag reads scripture, occasionally falling down as if dead, then starting to roar and whistle once more; this continued until Mr. Teag took the boy's hand. When the minister was holding Sawdie's hand, the boy would lie silently as if dead, but break into outrage again if Mr. Teag withdrew. Mr. Teag holds Sawdie's hand as long as he is able, occasionally seeming to feel a sudden vibration and quivering from the spirits within the boy.

A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie

1663, August Lawrack  Landrake with St Erney  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
495

Toward the end of the day of prayer, The Devil allegedly tells Thomas Sawdie that if he turns his head away from Mr. Teag so that he can't see Mr. Teag's face, he would be able to open his eyes and roar again despite Mr. Teag's hand holding his. Sawdie does so and starts struggling with his head buried in the chest of the man holding him on the other side. Mr. Teag soon realizes that his looking Sawdie in the face ends the fit, and ensures that he is able to do so until the end of the day.

A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie

1663, August Lawrack  Landrake with St Erney  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
496

Thomas Sawdie is allegedly found to be able to speak of God again while bound hand and foot in the field. He is pressed to repeat the Lord's Prayer, and when he does so, makes a noise and falls backward, crying "He is gone, He is gone." John Roberts, his master, asked what Sawdie meant by that, and the boy replies that the Devil has left him. Sawdie also asks for Mr. Teag. It is observed that this happens at the same hour that the prayers started the day before.

A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie

1663, August Lawrack  Landrake with St Erney  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
497

Joan Peterson is apprehended by order of a warrant signed by Mr. Waterton at the urging of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates, and her house searched by the confederation for images of clay, hair, and nails; the searchers are unable to find any such items.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, March 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
498

Joan Peterson is carried before Mr. Waterton, a Justice of the Peace, by the confederation of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 139 to have her examination taken; when examined by Waterton, Peterson denies the charges of having used witchcraft to take the life of Lady Powell. Furthermore, she denies ever having heard of Lady Powell prior to being approached by Anne Hook to testify against Anne Levingston.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, March 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
499

Justice Waterton orders Joan Peterson illegally searched for witch's marks, but nothing supporting the suspicion that she is a witch can be found. Peterson is released on bail, on the condition that she return for the next sessions.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
500

Joan Peterson is apprehended and tried a second time on the matter of Lady Powel's demise; she is told by the confederation of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 139 that she need not fear to confess, that they sought not her life but testimony against Anne Levingston, who had inherited Lady Powel's estate. Peterson maintained that she had not known or heard of Lady Powel, and that while she knew Levingstone, had conducted no business with her for over a year.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, March 14 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
501

Joan Peterson is illegally searched a second time for witch's marks, this time in a "most unnaturall & Barbarous manner" by a jury of four women brought in specifically for the task. One of these women reports to Justice Waterton that Peterson has one teat more than most women in her secret parts; Justice Waterton uses this finding to have her committed to Newgate Prison.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, March 14 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
502

Joan Peterson is indicted, arraigned before Mr. Recorder and tried before a jury for witchcraft; the confederates (Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 339) produce many poor women of ill repute to give testimony against her. Peterson again denies knowing Lady Powel, and insists she had no part in her death.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, April 5 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
503

Joan Peterson is executed for bewitching Christopher Wilson on 12 April, 1652. To the end, she refused to confess anything against Anne Levingston. Peterson stated that she had already confessed all she could before the bench and that she had made her peace with God.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, April 12 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
514

Elizabeth Saunders and Thomas Saunders describe their daughter's feigned possession.

Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes

1620, December     Essex  Essex  England 
516

Katheren Malpas suffers from a long brutal possession. She accuses Goodwife White of bewitching her, but retracts the accusation against White when visited by her. Malpas claims later that her bewitchment was feigned.

Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes

1620, December     Essex  Essex  England 
518

Anne Godfrey accuses Anne Heldyn of causing her fits. She is found guilty of slander. She is sentenced to the stocks for two hours and held in the house of correction for eight months.

Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes

1620, April 7     Essex  Essex  England 
522

A young maid from Arpington (Anonymous 32) has a fit during which her face is contorted so that it is nearly unrecognizable. This fit is believed to be caused by "envious Spirits within her," (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88), which "contracted her Nerves, Joynts and Sinews," so that her face is no longer "of human Shape," although she was generally known as "comely and well favour'd before." It is said that her nearest relatives would not have recognized her. Further, her teeth are set, and her eyes strained. During this fit, Doctor Boreman prays earnestly for the young maid, as witnessed by a number of people (Anonymous 449).

Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits

1679, May 5 Arpington    Kent  Kent  England 
524

A young maid from Arpington (Anonymous 32) is allegedly possessed by a spirit (Anonymous 88) that makes her bark twice like a dog. This is witnessed by a number of people (Anonymous 449), including Mrs. Hopper, and Doctor Boreman, the latter who prays over the maid while she is in her fits.

Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits

1679, May 5 Arpington    Kent  Kent  England 
525

A young maid from Arpington (Anonymous 32) allegedly has two devils inside her (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88), and experiences fits. During these fits, Doctor Boreman prays over her. While praying, in front of a number of witnesses (Anonymous 449), including the woman Mrs. Hopper, "a live and seeming substance forc'd its way out of her mouth in the likeness of a large Serpent (Anonymous 18)." This is one of the spirits that possesses the girl. It flies towards Doctor Boreman, "winding itself, in the presence of the whole auditory about his neck." It remains there until some of the witnesses pull it off, "at which it immediately Vanished, and was never seen since."

Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits

1679 Arpington    Kent  Kent  England 
527

The alleged dispossession of the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover begins with fasting and prayer as prompted by Mary Glover herself, on Tuesday, December 14, 1602, at her father's house on Thames Street in London. Mary Glover suffers from an affliction she believes is caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson. The fasting and prayer begin at eight in the morning, and continue through until seven at night. The preacher Mr. Skelton led the prayers, "which consisteth of a commaundement cast downe, and of a promise, to exalte." These events are witnessed and embellished by Mr. Glover and Mrs. Glover (the parents of the child), John Swan who is a student of divinity, and several other preachers leading to a total of six: Mr. Barber, Mr. Evans, Mr. Lewis Hughes, and Mr. Bridger.

A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance

1605, December 14 London    London, City of  London  England 
528

Mary Glover begins having vehement and terrible fits during the second day of her dispossession, which is "her fitt day, being every second day." These fits differ somewhat from her regular symptoms in many ways. They begin later than usual, at two in the afternoon rather than at noon. Further, these fits are characterized by blindness "accompanied with a pale dead colour of face and eyes closed (yet so, as you might perceiue the whyte of them to be turned up)," and dumbness, but unlike previous fits, "shee never came to haue freedome of speech till the whole fitt was ended." Further symptoms of her fit include "an heaving or swellinge in the bellie, breast, and throat," the "wagging of her chappe," and the "deadnes of the left side, with inflexible sifnes, of legg, arme, hand, and fingers." These symptoms all hit her in no particular sequence and last several hours, so that there was no coherence with previous fits Mary Glover experienced. These changes in her usual fits allowed her to be more communicative while being more terrifying.

A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance

1602, December 16 London    London, City of  London (Shoreditch)  England 
529

Alexander Nyndge allegedly has a fit witnessed by his entire family in which his chest and body swell, his eyes bulge and his back curls toward his belly; his brother Edward Nyndge, a Master of Arts, decides this must be the work of an evil spirit. Edward reads from Scripture over Alexander, and charges the Spirit by the death and Passion of Christ to declare itself; the spirit responds by strangely affecting Alexander's face. Once the fit has passed, Alexander reports that the spirit is afraid of Edward.

A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill

1615, January 20 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
530

Alexander Nyndge is allegedly afflicted with a wide variety of fits during his possession. The spirit causes him to use strange and idle gestures while laughing or dancing until he is thought to be mad, to refuse meat for extended periods until he begins to waste away, to shake as if with ague, and for a strange flapping noise to be heard from within his body. In the bed, the spirit's influence would cause him to curl up in a heap under the covers, bounce up from the bed, and beat himself against the bedstead or floor; at these times, he would need to be restrained to prevent him from hurting himself. The swelling fits also continued, joined by the appearance of a strange lump moving just under his skin.

A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
531

Edward Nyndge begins to have Alexander Nyndge prayed over, and requests their father William Nyndge to gather the neighbors to assist. Alexander would be set in a chair and, while being prayed over, and allegedly have fits in which he would be cast to the ground, or fall. He would draw back his lips, gnash his teeth, wallow and foam, while the spirit caused his body to be monstrously transformed. During these fits, Edward Nyndge and Thomas Wakefield would lay hands on Alexander, set him back in the chair, and together hold him in place while others continued praying.

A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
532

Mary Glover prays performatively during her dispossession. During this, her first prayer, she is pious, forgives Elizabeth Jackson, the woman believed to be responsible for bewitching her, and implores God to forgive Jackson, too. She begins praying once she obtains the ability to speak during a fit. The preacher, Mr. Evans, continues to pray for her while she prays, some hour and a half. During her prayer, Mary Glover is described as "her face ruddie coloured, and directed vpward, her eye liddes a little opened, her handes both at once, (but not ioyned together) continually lifted vp and presently falling downe at the end of every period or perfect petition," causing many of the women in the company of twenty four people presently around her to cry openly, as Mary Glover does herself. However, at the end of her prayer, Mary Glover is so exhausted, she lapses yet again into a fit.

A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance

1602, December 16 London    London, City of  London (Shoreditch)  England 
533

Edward Nyndge allegedly conjures the spirit within Alexander Nyndge, invoking the name of Jesus Christ and charging the spirit to speak with him. The spirit responds by causing a swelling in Alexander's chest and throat, and drawing his belly in toward his spine, but finally speaks after more prayer. Its voice is deep and hollow, and when pressed as to why it is tormenting Alexander, replies "I come for his Soule." It also acknowledges itself as fallen, referring to Christ as he who was its redeemer.

A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
534

The spirit possessing Alexander Nyndge allegedly struggles within him, declaring that it will "have his Soule and body too" and torments and disfigures Alexander more terribly than before. Alexander is forced to shriek, and the spirit causes him to fight back with such strength that it takes four or five men to hold him despite being bound to the chair; these exertions do not cause him to pant. He cries copiously, laughs, and shrills with his mouth closed. The spirit also flings him to the ground.

A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
535

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London experiences several fits on the second day of her dispossession. These fits grow worse while she is being prayed for the preachers Mr. Swan, and Mr. Barber. However, she begins to revive when an "ancient" preacher, M. Evans, begins to pray for her, in front of a company of twenty four witnesses, including the student of divinity, John Swan. During her fits, Mary Glover's body twists and distorts, grows stiff as iron as testified by the witness Mr. Badger, and her mouth opens and shuts "very often without uttering any worde, (and theruppon a preacher called it a dumb spirit)," her eyes shut, her belly "greatly swoalne," her breast "bulking up," and her throat swells. However, when she begins to revive, she "began againe to speake," a sign that the fight with the Devil is in her favour. She utters the words, "Once more, once more" with deliberation. This leads into her third prayer of the dispossession.

A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance

1602, December 16 London    London, City of  London (Shoreditch)  England 
536

William Nyndge Jr., brother to Edward Nyndge and Alexander Nyndge, allegedly provokes the spirit by declaring that "Wee will keepe him from th[ee] tho[u] foule Spirit, in spite of thy Nose." This causes the spirit to give both William and Edward terrible looks, which Edward responds to by leading the company present, about 40 people, in the Lord's Prayer and others. The spirit, speaking in a voice similar to Alexander's, replies "There bee other good Prayers." Edward denounces its claim, and the spirit roars fearfully, stretching Alexander's neck toward the fire.

A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill

1615 Lyeringswell    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
537

Mary Glover experiences her worst fit before dispossession. She appears demonic and monstrous; she spits, rages, looks as though she will devour her witnesses. While the preacher Mr. Evans prays over Mary Glover, asking God "to rebuke this foule malitious Devill," she barks froth at him. At other times, her body contorts and twists, and her voice "at this time was lowd, tearfull and very strange, proceedinge from the throat." Often, she made noises that were inhuman, such as "cheh cheh" or "keck keck," and "she did very often, & vehemently straine to vomitt." During this fit, the preacher, Mr. Bridger, prays on one side of her bed, "mentioninge the seed of the woman that should breake the Serpents head." As Mary Glover's fit progressed, she tossed her head, and turned her body side to side, and many of the company present (Anonymous 437) were "fearfull, as, her hucklebone standing vp in her bellie at the place of her navell." Mr. Glover, her father wept outright at his daughter's torment, however, John Swan reassures him that if Mary Glover's fits were not so violent, "I should not looke for deliuerance." As Mr. Lewis Hughes, another preacher, prays louder and louder, Mary Glover raged all the more, contorting her body and with foam and "her breath enteringe into his throat," while her eyes were shut and her eyebrows raised, making "her to looke the more ghastly." She becomes so strong in her fit, that she manages to lift Mr. Lewes who held her in his arms as well. Several witnesses cry out "Jesus helpe!" The preachers believe the increased violence of her fits are "but a token of Satan's ruine not farr of."

A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance

1602, December 16 London    London, City of  London (Shoreditch)  England 
538

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London afflicted by fits thought to be caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson, is allegedly dispossessed. The preacher Mr. Skelton begins to pray, and having continued awhile, Mary Glover "did fall downe suddenlye into the chaire," where she no longer moved, and with "her head hanging downward," seemed to be dead. This is accentuated by the pale colour of her face, and that her eyes were shut, and her body stiff. The student of divinity, John Swan, believes during this time that he did see "a thing creeping vnder one of her eye liddes, of the bignes of a peason." Suddenly, she is revived from this state, as if "life came into her whole body." Her eyes open, her tongue came into its right place, and her hands raise up; all signs of dispossession. Mary Glover, with "chearfull countenance" cries out at this moment, "he is come, he is come! The comforter is come, O Lord thou hast delivered me!" The company witness to her dispossession (Anonymous 437) rejoices, and Mary Glover proceeds to tell many of them "he is come, he is come!" All believe she is dispossessed.

A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance

1602, December 16 London    London, City of  London (Shoreditch)  England 
539

William Wicherely inventories his use of crystal, swords, and holy water as magical instruments.

An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549

1549 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
540

William Wicherely allegedly attempts to conjure a spirit named Ambrose Waterduke. An elderly priest who was present to witness the conjuration fled before the spirit could appear.

An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549

1540 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
542

William Wicherely, during his examination, identifies a group of magicians and conjurers from the five hundred he claims are practicing magic in England.

An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549

1549 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
543

The Throckmorton family is visited by numerous neighbours during Jane Throckmorton's illness, including Mother Alice Samuel. When Jane sees Mother Samuel, she cries out "looke where the old witch sitteth (pointing to the said mother Samuell) did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is: Take off her blacke-thrumbed cappe, for I cannot abide to looke on her." Mistress Throckmorton rebukes her daughter and, thinking she is overtired, sends her to bed. However, Mother Samuel is observed to look rueful at Jane's words.

The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys

1589, November 13 Warboys  Warboys  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
544

John Mowlin is visited by several visions and apparitions (Anonymous 22), which he believes are sent to him by God to do God's work. These continue for some five weeks, and appear to John Mowlin as a man in a coloured coat with "holes in [his] hands and feet," as well as through Voices. These same apparitions visit Thomas Lipeat, who suspects that they are not from God, but from the Devil.

The Divell in Kent

1674, May 13 Old Sandwich  Old Sandwich  Kent  Kent  England 
545

Thomas Lipeat speaks with an apparition (Anonymous 22) which appears in the shape of the Moon. The apparition asks him, along with John Mowlin, to preach the Gospel of all men to repent. Lipeat suspects the apparition is not God, as it asks Lipeat to omit that he heard the Voice of God, but rather just that he had a Vision.

The Divell in Kent

1647, May Old Sandwich  Old Sandwich  Kent  Kent  England 
546

Thomas Lipeat sees the apparition (Anonymous 22) in the form of a man who offers him money, but Thomas Lipeat refuses saying the grace of God is sufficient. The apparition mentions that John Mowlin believes his sayings. The apparition leaves after Thomas Lipeat's refusal.

The Divell in Kent

1647, May Old Sandwich  Old Sandwich  Kent  Kent  England 
547

Richard Dugdale is determined to be possessed by the Devil when he visits Mr. Jolly in Pendle Hill. He is seized with violent fits and rages when Mr. Jolly prays and reads the Bible.

The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings

1689, August Pendle Hill    Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
548

Richard Dugdale returns drunk from a party. After being at home for a while, his side starts hurting and he sees an apparition that tells him to eat and take from the table in front of him. The table is suddenly filled with food and precious jewelery.

The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings

1688, July     Surrey  Surrey  England 
549

After a night of drinking and dancing, Richard Dugdale begins to utter shocking profanities. He sees the apparition of a man's head and the Devil appears to him.

The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings

1688, August     Surrey  Surrey  England 
550

A woman who appears like a gentlewoman mounts her horse and vanishes after the maid she frightens cries out "The Lord deliver me from all witches."

Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway

1644, July 30 Soffam; Swaffham  Soffam; Swaffham  Norfolk  Norfolke; Norfolk  England 
552

Janet Preston of Gisburne is alleged to be the first of several noted cases of witchcraft in the North in 1612.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1612 Gisburne  Gisburne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
553

Anne Styles confesses to Mr. Chandler that she made a contract with the Devil and that he gave her silver. Anne Bodenham had pricked her finger with a pin and had her sign her name in blood.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
554

Anne Styles falls into a trance crying that she should be thrown into the fire shortly after she tells Mr. Chandler about making a contract with the Devil.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
555

Mr. Farmer, Mrs. Farmer and numerous others (Anonymous 375) give deposition in court alleging that Joan Buts caused the child Mary Farmer to become violently ill, caused her to be repeatedly stuck full of pins, and ultimately killed her through witchcraft.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
556

Mother Lakeland is approached by the Devil. He tells her that if she will serve him, she shall never want again. After approaching her with this offer on several occasions, Mother Lakeland consents, at which point receives three imps, two little dogs, and a mole from the Devil.

The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration

1645, September 9 Ipswich  Ipswich; Gippeswick  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
561

Thomas Rabbet accused Ales Newman allegedly sends two familiars, one to kill Johnson and one to plague his wife.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 25   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
562

Joan Pechey is allegedly accused by Ales Hunt's mother of being skilled at witchcraft.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
564

Febey Hunt says that her mother-in-law, Ales Hunt, has two familiars she describes as "little thinges like horses, the one white, the other blacke, the which shee kept in a litle lowe earthen pot with woll, colour white and blacke: and that they stoode in her chamber by her bed side, and saith, that shee hath seene her mother to feede them with milke out of a blacke trening dishe, things that are like horses which she keeps in an earthen pot."

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 25   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
565

Ursley Kempe claims to have learned how to unwitch herself from 'one Cockes wife of Weley.'

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1570   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
566

William Hook accuses Ales Newman of having bewitched her husband.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 23   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
567

Elizabeth Bennet informs (in front of Brian Darcey) on the case of Ales Newman. She states that Ales Newman never sent her familiars to plague Johnson and his wife.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
568

Annis Glascocke is searched by Annis Letherdall and Margaret Sympson. Glascocke is found to have witch's marks on her left shoulder and thigh that look like they had been sucked, just like Ursley Kempe.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
569

Margery Sammon is accused of having inherited her deceased mother, Mother Barnes' familiars. Sammon first confesses to returned home to care for her mother for the six months before her death, but she both denies that she had "any spirites of her sayd Mother, or that her mother had any to her knowledge." Having been pulled aside by her sister Ales Hunt, Sammon later confesses to have received two familiars, Tom and Robbyn, from her mother on the day she died.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 25   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
570

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she had "yued somwhat vnquietly" with her husband and for this reason caused Sathan to kill him. This was about nine years prior to her trial, and she had lived as a widow since.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
571

Ellen Smith's son is allegedly turned away by John Eastwood when begging for alms and went home to tell his mother; shortly thereafter Eastwood is taken with a great pain in his body. That night, Eastwood and a visiting neighbor see a rat run up the chimney and a toad fall back out. They seize the toad in tongs and thrust it into the fire, which causes the fire to burn bright blue and almost go out. This act is said to have caused Smith great pain, to the point where she came to the house to investigate, pretending to merely be inquiring after the well-being of the inhabitants. Eastwood sends her away with the insistence that all is well.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Maldon  Maldon All Saints  Essex  Essex  England 
572

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that Mother Osborne is a witch and has a mark on the end of her fingers like a pit, and another mark on the outside of her right leg that Francis believes to have been plucked out by Osborne's familiar spirit. Francis saw the marks when Mother Osborne asked her for help with her sore legs; the marks are said to be similar to ones Francis' sister, Mother Waterhouse, has.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
573

Mother Staunton allegedly made demands of John Cornell the younger and took offense when she was denied; immediately after, his cattle are said to have given gory stinking blood instead of milk, and one of his cows became so stricken that it never recovered.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Wimbish  Wimbish  Essex  Essex  England 
574

William Bonner accuses Elizabeth Bennet of causing his wife's lip to swell and her eyes to sink in by kissing her.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
575

Ursley Kempe informs against Elizabeth Bennet which leads to her being apprehended. After this, Elizabeth Bennet is pressured to confess. She admits sending her familiars to plague her neighbour's cattle.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 22   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
576

Arnold's wife of Sudbury is identified as a witch by Annis Glascocke during her trial.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
577

Annis Glasgocke calls Ursley Kempe a whore and accuses her bewitching her because she cannot weep.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
578

Ales Hunt is tried for witchcraft (in front of Brian Darcey). She confesses that two spirits appeared to her and said that Ursley Kempe would betray her.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1528, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
579

Alice Hunt confesses that her sister, Margery Sammon, has two familiars that she inherited from their mother.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February 24   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
580

Joan Pechey is accused during her trial of lying in bed naked with her own son. She denies this, but her son confesses that this is true.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, February   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
581

Robert Sanneuet accuses Elizabeth Ewstace of bewitching him circa 1567 and Margaret Ewstace of bewitching his brother Crosse circa 1570.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 9   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
582

Henry Sellis is accused by Richard Ross of bewitching his horses to death in 1574.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 1   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
583

Henry Sellis describes (to Brian Darcey) how his mother, Cysely Sellis, kept her goose-eyed black male imp, Hercules (or Jacke) and her white female imp, Mercurie hidden by "foure Brome fagots" in the roots of a crabtree, where they "stand and lye vpo~ a sleese of wooll."

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 3   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
584

Joan Cunny of Stisted allegedly cast a circle in John Wiseman's field called Cowfenn, in which two black frogs appear. Cunny makes a deal with the fogs, named Jack and Jill, where she will give them her soul in return for their powerful services.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
585

Mother Dutton, Mother Devell, and Elizabeth Stile, as alleged by Stile in her confession, made an image of William Foster for George Whittyng; Whittyng magically attacks Foster through this image aided by Mother Devell's familiar Gille.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
586

Elizabeth Stile, in her confession, alleges that the child of a man of Windsor threw a stone at home when sent to fetch water at a nearby well; his hand was rotated backwards on his wrist in punishment.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
587

Elizabeth Stile is allegedly bewitched by Mother Devell after her confession, which resulted in the arrest of the other witches; Devell's bewitchment robbed her of her senses and the use of her limbs, and caused her toes to rot off her feet. Prior to the confession, Stile had been in notably good health, able to walk the twelve miles from Windsor to Reading Gaol. By the time of her arraignment, the bewitchment had rendered her a "moste vglie creature to beholde."

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 Readyng    Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
588

George Dell murders Anthony James (Jr.) by first stuffing his mouth with cow dung so he would not make any noise, then slitting his throat from ear to ear. After the deed is done, George Dell ties the boy to a stake and throws him in a bottomless pond instead of giving him a proper Christian burial.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
589

Elizabeth James (the sister of Anthony James (Jr.) and daughter of Anthony James and Anonymous 66) is miraculously able to tell others of her family's murder, after being mute for four years because her tongue had been cut out by George and Annis Dell. She is questioned by many authority figures - one dresses up as a devil to try and scare her - but Elizabeth James' story always stays the same and she is therefore considered to be telling the truth.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
590

An unknown force throws rocks through Mr. Freeland's windows. His maidservant is suspected, but the rocks flew inward when she was in the house, and outward when she was in the yard.

The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland

1666, July 20 London (Petticoat Lane)    London, City of  London  England 
591

Mr. Freeland's stores of beer are tampered with by an unknown force. Corks fly into the air and the cellar overflows, ankle deep, with beer.

The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland

1666, July 20 London (Petticoat Lane)    London, City of  London  England 
592

A looking-glass flies off of Mr. Freeland's kitchen shelf, seemingly of its own accord, out of the window, and into the yard. Mrs. Freeland retrieves it, puts it on the dresser, with a dish on it to hold it down. The dish trembled and the mirror again took flight.

The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland

1666, July 20 London (Petticoat Lane)    London, City of  London  England 
593

Dishes and pewter fly and dance in Mr. Freeland's house. Rowland Bennet is struck in the nose by a flying pitcher; Freeland is struck by a breadbox (or a flower pot) and a pewter dish rolls through his legs.

The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland

1666, July 20 London (Petticoat Lane)    London, City of  London  England 
594

Joan Prentice confesses that she sent her familiar Bidd to nip Sara Glacock as retribution for being denied alms at Maister Glascock's door. Prentice claims that Bidd, against her orders, killed the child. When she confronted and scolded Bidd, it disappeared.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, February 28   Henningham Sibble  North Essex  Essex  England 
595

Joan Prentice confesses to sending her familiar Bidd to destroy the brew William Adam's wife was making, as retribution because of their falling out.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1588, March 31   Henningham Sibble  North Essex  Essex  England 
596

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that Elizabeth Lord bewitched Jone Roberts, servant to old Highham, by giving her a piece of apple cake that caused her to sicken and die.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
597

Widow Webbe allegedly sees a spirit in the shape of a black dog leave her house immediately after the death of her daughter; the child died after two days of illness following a blow to the face from Ellen Smith.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Maldon  Maldon All Saints  Essex  Essex  England 
598

Alice Chaundeler, the mother of Ellen Smith, is alleged to have been a witch, and to have been executed for witchcraft.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579. Maldon  Maldon All Saints  Essex  Essex  England 
599

Ellen Smith, as alleged in her son's confession, kept three familiar spirits: Greate Dicke, contained in a wicker bottle; Little Dicke, contained in a leather bottle; and Willet, contained in a wool pack. When Smith's house was searched, the containers were found, but the spirits were gone.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Maldon  Maldon All Saints  Essex  Essex  England 
600

Mother Staunton allegedly demanded a leather thong from John Hopwood, and when denied left offended; the same night, Hopwood's gelding died suddenly in its stable.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579   Waltham on the Wolds  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
601

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that she first learned witchcraft from her grandmother, Eve of Hatfield Peverel, at the age of 12. Grandmother Eve instructed her to renounce God and his Word.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1542 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
602

John Sellis, the youngest son of Cysley and Henry Sellis, testifies (in front of Brian Darcey) against his parents. He describes an encounter with his parents' white familiar "Impe" and black familiar "John" claiming that "one night there was a blacke thing like his sister, that tooke him by the legge and that hee cried out, saying, father, father, come helpe me and defende mee, for there is a blacke thing that hath me by the legge: at which he saith, his father said to his mother, ye stinking whore what meane yee? can yee not keepe your imps from my children." He also claimed that he had seen "his father to feede them out of a blacke dish with a woodden spone," and "his mother to feed them twise, and that out of a dish with a spone with thinne milke."

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 3   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
603

John and Cysley Sellis are accused by Joan Smith of bewitching a child to death.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1581 (one holy day in the after noone sithence Michaelmas before the trial)   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
604

Henry and Cysley Sellis are tried for witchcraft (by Brian Darcey). Henry Sellis denies having had any part in the death of Richard Ross's horses. Cysley denies any harsh conversation with Ross's wife.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 1   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
605

Cysley Sellis is searched by Ales Gilney, Joan Smith, and Margaret Simpson for witch's marks. The marks they find are identified as witch's marks on the basis that they are like Ursley Kempe's marks (who was identified as a witch).

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 1   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
606

Ales Baxster is unable to speak or stand after a 'thinge all white like a Cat' paws at her chest.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1581 ? (circa Hallymas pre-trial)   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
607

Mildred Norrington begins to have fits; she roars, cries, gnashes her teeth, makes terrible gestures and expression, and is so strong she can not be held down by four men. She can not, or will not speak.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1574 Westwall  Westwell  Kent  Kent  England 
608

Two men (Anonymous 59 and Anonymous 60) working in Mr. Freeland's yard are hit on their backs with pieces of tile and brick. At first the men blame each other for the flying objects, but they then witness stones being thrown by an unknown force in and out of the windows of Mr. Freeland's house.

The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland

1666, July 20 London (Petticoat Lane)    London, City of  London  England 
609

Mr. Freeland dismisses his maidservant (Anonymous 1) from his household, after which no more strange and unexplainable acts, such as flying objects, occur.

The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland

1666, July 20 London (Petticoat Lane)    London, City of  London  England 
610

Partner, the familiar spirit possessing Mildred Norrington, confesses that its owner, Old Alice had sent it, and her other familiar Little Devil, to kill Richard Anger, his son, Edward Anger, and Wolston's wife

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1574     Kent  Cantia  England 
611

Mildred Norrington is successfully dispossessed. Roger Newman and John Brainford were able to, through prayer, compel Partner to depart. Norrington confirms this by crying 'he is gone'.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1574 Westwall  Westwell  Kent  Kent  England 
612

Partner confesses stealing of meat, drink, and corn from "Petmans, at Farmes, at Millens, at Fullers, and in every house, at the behest of Old Alice.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1574 Westwall  Westwell  Kent  Kent  England 
613

Under examination, by George Darel and Thomas Wooton, Mildred Norrington retracts her possession.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1574   Bocton Malherbe  Kent  Kent  England 
614

After her examination, Mildred Norrington is made to illustrate her 'feats, illusions, and trances,' as a means of proving her possession was feigned.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1574   Bocton Malherbe  Kent  Kent  England 
615

Ales Hunt and her mother, the Widow Barnes are accused by Ursely Kempe of bewitching Rebecca Durrant, a crime for which Hunt is indicted and tried, but found not guilty.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 29   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
616

Cysley Sellis is accused by Thomas Death of bewitching his son, John to death. A crime for which she is indicted, found guilty, and remanded.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582, March 29   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
617

Thomas Death accuses Cysley Sellis of murdering his calve.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1558, March 1   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
618

John Carter testifies (to Brian Darcey) that he denied Margaret Grevell alms. During the next days, he and his family were unable to brew beer.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1558, March 13   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
619

Nicholas Stricklande testifies (to Brian Darcey) that Margaret Grevell sent her son to buy a rack of mutton from him; he asked him to return in the afternoon. A few days after turning Grevell away, Stricklande's wife is unable to produce butter.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1558, March   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
620

Joan Cunny confesses to sending her familiars Jack and Jill to hurt many people over the span of sixteen to twenty years, but she cannot remember an exact number of people.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
621

The Devil allegedly "perceiued the inficious disposition of this wretch, and that she and her Daughters might easily bee made instruments to enlarge his Kingdome, and bee as it were the executioners of his vengeance" and offered his services to Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower. The Flower women are said to have agreed to give their souls in exchange for the service of spirits and the knowledge of incantations, spells and charms. The conditions of the agreement are sealed through "abhominable kisses, and an odious sacrifice of blood, not leauing out certaine charmes and coniurations with which the Diuell deceiued them, as though nothing could bee done without ceremony, and a solemnity of orderly ratification."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
624

Francis Lord Rosse is allegedly afflicted by strange sickness, which causes him to be "most barbarously and inhumanely tortured," following the death of his brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected to have bewitched him.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
625

Lady Katherine begins to suffer "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" leaving her "many times in great danger of life" following the death of her brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected of bewitching her.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
628

Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners are allegedly afflicted such that they are unable to have any more children, resulting in a miscarriage before Christmas. However, they do not connect this misfortune to the actions of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower until later.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
629

Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are apprehended around Christmas and imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol on suspicion of bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death, causing the illnesses of Francis Lord Rosse and Lady Katherine, and Countess Manners' miscarriage.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
630

Joan Flower, en route to Lincoln Gaol, dies before she can be convicted. She had allegedly called for bread and butter, and her last words were that she "wished it might neuer goe through her if she were guilty of that wherevpon shee was examined." Her body is buried at Ancaster.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
631

Sir Francis Manners, upon hearing that Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower had been apprehended, hurried to Lincoln Gaol with his brother Sir George Manners. Both participate in the examinations.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
632

Margaret and Phillip Flower are convicted of murder and sentenced to death. Their executions are carried out at Lincoln on March 11, 1618.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 11 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
633

Anne Baker is examined before Sir Francis Manners, Sir George Manners, both Justices of the Peace for the County of Lincoln, and Samuel Fleming, Doctor of Divinity and Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
634

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that she has visions of planets, and that she had one such vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, the eldest son of William Fairebarne, causing him to experience an unspecified affliction. William, thinking she was the cause, beat her and broke her head, after which Thomas mended. When asked who sent the planet, if not her, Baker merely insisted it was not her.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
635

Anne Baker alleges in her examination that she had a vision of a hand appear to her, and heard a voice say from the air "Anne Baker, saue thy selfe, for to morrow thou and thy maister must be slaine." The next day, she and her master were riding a cart, and she saw a flash of fire; the fire went away when she said her prayers. A short time later, a crow came and picked at her clothes, and was also driven off by prayers. The crow went next to her master and beat him to death, but she was able to bring him back with more prayers, though he lay sick for a fortnight. Baker claims that, if she had not had the foreknowledge, she, her master and all the cattle would have been slain.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
636

Margaret Cunny, daughter of Joan Cunny, has a falling out with Father Hurrill and curses him. Because of this, Joan Cunny believes that she may have sent her familiars to her daughter.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
637

Joan Cunny denies sending her familiars to hurt Finche's wife, Deuenishe's wife, or Renold Ferror.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
638

Joan Cunny denies that her familiars have the power to hurt people, yet she admits they have the ability to hurt cattle.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
639

Anne Baker is accused during her examination of bewitching Anne Stannidge's daughter to death. Baker alleges that Stannidge brought the child to her, and that she took the girl into her skirt, but did her no harm. Stannidge claimed that she had to burn some hair and nail-parings taken from her daughter in order to get Baker to give the child back; Stannidge said that when she did so, "the said Anne Baker came in and set her downe, and for one houres space could speake nothing." Baker said that she came to Stannidge's home in great pain, but knew nothing of burning hair and nail-parings, and had been so sick at the time that she could not recall why she had gone there in the first place.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
640

Anne Baker is accused during her examination of bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death. Baker admits to having been angry with Hough, for Hough "angred her in giuing her almes of her second bread" and felt that Hough "might haue giuen her of her better bread, for she had gone too often on her errands." She neither confirms nor denies any involvement in Hough's demise, however.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
641

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that Joan Gylles had asked her to look at her sick child, for Gylles suspected the child was bewitched. Baker confirmed that the child had been forespoken, but could do nothing for it, and the child died.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
642

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that she spoke to a man named Nortley in his home, where he was carrying his child, and asked him "who gaue the said Child that loafe, he told her Anthony Gill, to whom this Examinate said, he might haue had a Child of his owne if hee would haue sought in time for it."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
643

Henry Milles accuses Anne Baker of causing him "two or three ill nights" during her examination. She replies "you should haue let me alone then," implying that he had been harassing her in some capacity.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
644

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that, three years before, she traveled to Northhamptonshire, and that on her return she met up with Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis, who informed her that Henry Lord Rosse had died. She claims that they told her "there was a gloue of the said Lord buried in the ground; and as that gloue did rot and wast, so did the liuer of the said Lord rot and wast."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 2 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
645

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that she has a familiar spirit in the shape of a white dog. She calls it her "good Spirit."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 3 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
646

Joan Willimott is examined on February 28, 1618 by Alexander Amcotts, Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, February 28     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
647

Joan Cunny confesses that she sent her familiars to seek revenge upon Harry Finch's wife (Anonymous 62) who denied Cunny drink because she was too busy to get any for her. Finch's wife had great pain for a week in her head and in the side of her body, after which she died. These claims against Cunny are also supported with evidence given by her children and grandchildren.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
648

Joan Cunny's grandson (Anonymous 63) confesses that, when the wood he gathered was stolen, his grandmother sent one of her familiars to prick the foot of the boy (Anonymous 64) who stole the wood.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
649

Joan Cunny's grandson (Anonymous 63) confesses that his grandmother sent him, with her familiar Jack, to Sir Edward Huddlestone's house. When they arrived at the house Jack went round about a tree, after which it fell, seemingly to others of its own accord.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Stistead  Essex  Essex  England 
650

Joan Upney confesses that Fustian Kirtle (alias Mother Arnold), a witch of Barking, gave her a familiar like a mole and told her that if she wanted to do ill to anyone to send the familiar and it would clap them. After the death of this familiar, Mother Arnold provided Upney two more familiars, "another Moule and a Toad, which she kept a great while."

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, May 3 East London  Dagenham  Essex  Essex  England 
651

Joan Upney confessed that she ran away after hearing that John Harrolde and Richard Foster accused her of being a witch.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, May 3 East London  Dagenham  Essex  Essex  England 
652

Joan Prentice confesses that Elizabeth Whale, the wife of Michael Whale, and Elizabeth Mott, the wife of John Mott, are "well acquainted" with her familiar Bidd, Although she states she "knoweth not what hurt they or any of the~ haue doone to any of their neighbour," her statement clearly implicates Whale and Mott as witches.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, March   Henningham Sibble  North Essex  Essex  England 
653

Joan Willimot alleges during her examination that Joan Flower told her that "my Lord of Rutland had dealt badly with her and that they had put away her Daughter, and that although she could not haue her will of my Lord himselfe, yet she had spied my Lords Sonne and had stricken him to the heart." Willimott claimed that Henry Lord Rosse's death was due to being "striken with a white Spirit." She added that she could cure people afflicted in this manner.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, February 28     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
654

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that, the week before, her spirit came to her and told her that "there was a bad woman at Deeping who had giuen her soule to the Diuell." Her spirit appeared in a form uglier than usual, and urged Willimott to give it something, even just a piece of her girdle, in payment for its services. She told it she would give it nothing, for she had not sent it there - she had only once sent it on an errand, to check on Francis Lord Rosse. Willimott added that the spirit had reported that Francis Lord Rosse would recover.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, February 28     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
655

Joan Willimott is examined a second time before Alexander Amcots, on March 2, 1618.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 2     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
656

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that she has a spirit named Pretty, given to her three years prior while in the service of William Berry in Langholme. She claims that Berry asked her to open her mouth and blew into her "Fairy which should doe her good." The spirit emerged from her mouth in the form of a woman and asked for her soul, which she gave readily at Berry's urging.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1615   Langholme  Rutland  Rutlandshire  England 
657

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that "shee neuer hurt any body, but did helpe diuers that sent for her, which were stricken or fore-spoken." Pretty would assist her in this, by coming to her weekly and reporting who was afflicted so she could go to them and undo it through "certaine prayers which she vsed." Willimott insisted that she did not use Pretty to do anything, only to bring word of people needing to be cured.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 2     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
658

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that Pretty came to her the night before in the shape of a woman, and mumbled something she could not understand. When asked whether she had dreamed it, she insisted that she was awake at the time.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 1     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
659

Joan Willimott is examined a third time on March 17, 1618, this time before Sir Henry Hastings and Samuel Fleming, Justices of the Peace for the County of Leicester.

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
660

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that she had spoken to Mrs. Cooke of Stathorne about John Patchett, and that she had told Mrs. Cooke that Patchett's child might have lived had he sought help for it in time. She also claimed to have told Mrs. Cooke that Mrs. Patchett had "an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle."

The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
661

The robbers (eight men and one woman) stop at an inn and show the hostess (Annis Dell) the loot they have stolen from the James family. The ask the hostess what they should do with the children, Elizabeth James and Anthony James (Jr.), whom they have kidnapped. She suggests that the boy be murdered and the girl have her tongue cut out.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
662

George and Annis Dell cut out Elizabeth James' tongue after tricking her into a false sense of security by kindly mentioning her mother and father (who they murdered). Elizabeth James begins to cry and make noise after her tongue is gone, at which time Annis Dell threatens to kill her if she is not quiet.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
663

Henry Whilpley and Nicholas Deacon give witness that the body of a murdered young boy found in a pond is in fact Anthony James (Jr.). When Annis Dell is questioned about the dead boy she denies having any knowledge or involvement with him.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
664

Johane Harrison confesses that she has two spirits (Spirit 1 and Spirit 2) that help her with witchcraft, one for men and the other for cattle.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford  Gadsden  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
665

Johane Harrison allegedly bewitches a Yeoman (Anonymous 122) after he calls her an old hag. The Yeoman suffers from hot sweats and cold chills, and his body twitches as if he were possessed.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford  Gadsden  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
666

Johane Harrison allegedly murders the baby of a woman (Anonymous 72) who accidentally sprinkled dirty laundry water on her while she was walking by.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford  Gadsden  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
667

Johane Harrison allegedly bewitches to death all of a Yeoman's (Anonymous 73) cattle after he had tries to help his bewitched sister by riding to Cambridge to see a scholar.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford  Gadsden  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
668

Margaret Simons is accused by John Ferrall, a vicar in Kent, of bewitching his son (Anonymous 74). Allegedly, Simons cursed Ferrall's son (Anonymous 74) after he attacked her dog with a knife. Five days after the incident the boy (Anonymous 74) became very ill, but was able to recover with the help of another witch.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1581     Kent  Cantia  England 
669

Mother Bungy confesses, on her death bed, that her skills in witchcraft and prognostication were feigned. She admits to learning how to cozen from Dr. Herone

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1580 s Rochester  St Margaret's, St Nicholas' and the Cathedral  Kent  Kent  England 
670

Jane Stretton, a twenty year old woman from Ware, is unaware of a fight her father, Thomas Stretton, has had with a cunning man (Anonymous 487). She is visited by the cunning man's wife (Anonymous 322), who offers the young woman "a pot of drink." Innocently, Jane Stretton drinks from this, and is soon after "taken with violent rageing fits, which torment her greviously." However, she does not suspect her fits are caused by Anonymous 322 yet.

The Hartford-shire Wonder

1669 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
671

An archer (Anonymous 75), of the town Malling in Kent, is accused of playing with a fly devil or familiar that enhances his skill in archery. The archer (Anonymous 75) won two or three shillings as a result of his advanced abilities, and was then severely punished by authority figures to appease the other angered archers and to overthrow witchcraft.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1651, Printed Malling  Tonbridge and Malling   Kent  Kent  England 
672

Jane Stretton has a strange and violent fit shortly after giving her neighbour's wife (Anonymous 322) a pin. Anonymous 322 is the wife of a cunning man (Anonymous 487), who was in an argument with Jane Stretton's father Thomas Stretton. This fit is worse than any she experienced before. Her "body swells like a bladder puft up with wind ready to burst," and her limbs are completely distorted. She goes to her Neighbour's house, where "her head being intoxicated by the violency of her fits, she falls down against the door and beats it open," and lies on the floor.

The Hartford-shire Wonder

1669 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
673

Jane Stretton continues having fits for a space of six months, which "increased violently." She cannot eat and does not pass stool. People from all over come to see her and this "wonder." This great influx of people causes Thomas Stretton to move his daughter to the house of John Wood, a neighbour, in order "to purchase some quietness." However, during this time, friends and relations of Jane Stretton begin to suspect that her illness "proceeded from more then an ordinary cause."

The Hartford-shire Wonder

1668 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
674

Jane Stretton continues to suffer from fits that prevent her from eating. Flax and Hair seems to "fall down upon a white sheet that was laid over her bed." Her tongue is found to often "hang or loll out of her Mouth," which upon being seen seems to have flax, hair, and thread points to be placed on it. When these are removed, "two flames in resemblance of fire, the one of a red colour, the other blew," and eleven pins, all crooked and distorted, come out of Jane Stretton's mouth. These events cause even more people to come and visit with Jane Stretton.

The Hartford-shire Wonder

1668 Hartford    Huntingdonshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
675

A Yeoman (Anonymous 76) is swindled by an Alchemist (Anonymous 77) who appears trustworthy. Convinced that the Alchemist can multiply angels, the Yeoman gives the Alchemist all his money to put in a ball of wax for doubling, but the money is turned into lead (likely switched for another ball of wax as the angels were) leaving the Yeoman with no money and the Alchemist gone to London.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1651, Printed     Kent  Cantia  England 
676

Stretton's neighbour (Anonymous 487) and his wife (Anonymous 322) are believed to have caused the demonic being to torment Jane Stretton, when it is discovered that the cunning man (Anonymous 487) and Jane Stetton's father, Thomas Stretton, had been in an argument. The cunning man and his wife are brought before her while she is having a fit, where fire burns her mouth. Anonymous 322 admits that "she could not have stayed any longer from her."

The Hartford-shire Wonder

1669 Ware  Ware  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
677

T. E. confesses in writing to Reginald Scot that he learned the illusion and invention of art and science from an Anglo-Saxon book written by Sir John Malborne, a divine of Oxenford, written three hundred years earlier. T. E. has left the book with the parson of Slangham (Anonymous 78) in Sussex, and should Scot want to look at the book, he may write the parson in T. E's name and request it. T. E. appears to be writing from prison because he has been condemned to die.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1582, March 8     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
678

Arthur Robinson, a Justice of Peace, gives deposition alleging that numerous of Elizabeth Sawyer's neighbours came to him and said Sawyer had "a priuate and strange marke on her body." He thus requested that the Bench assemble a Jury of Women to search Sawyer, which the Bench granted.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 14 London (Old Bailey)    London, City of  London  England 
679

A Jury of Women, composed of Margaret Weaver and two matrons, Anonymous 40 and Anonymous 41, is assembled and charged with searching Elizabeth Sawyer for witch's marks. According to their deposition in court after the search, Sawyer "fearing and perceiuing shee should by that search of theirs be then discouered, behaued her selfe most sluttishly and loathsomely towards them, intending thereby to preuent their search of her." They complete their search nevertheless: "they all three said, that they a little aboue the Fundiment of Elizabeth Sawyer the prisoner, there indited before the Bench for a Witch, found a thing like a Teate the bignesse of the little finger, and the length of halfe a finger, which was branched at the top like a teate, and seemed as though one had suckt it, and that the bottome thereof was blew, and the top of it was redde."

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April London (Old Bailey)    London, City of  London  England 
680

Elizabeth Sawyer gives a full confession after her conviction to Minister Henry Goodcole while imprisoned at Newgate Gaol. Goodcole records their conversation and presents it in full in a question-and-answer dialogue format.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
681

Anne Arthur is visited by an apparition (Anonymous 25) in the evening as she is walking home from work. He asks her where she was and where she is going to which she replies she had been in London selling her ware. Since she is poor, the apparition offers her silver and gold which she refuses.

Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent

1685, March 3 Deptford    London, Greater  London  England 
682

A young girl (Anonymous 79) who is nursed by Alice Flower accuses her of being a witch.

Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
683

Alice Flower falls ill and gets a neighbour (Anonymous 80) to nurse her. When the neighbour returns from running errands, she finds Alice Flower stripped, dead and cold on the floor with her toes tied together with a blanket over her.

Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
684

Alice Fowler is found (by her neighbours) to have five teats on her body that are black as coal.

Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler

1684 Shadwell (London Borough of Tower Hamlets)    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
685

Elizabeth Sawyer alleges in her confession to Henry Goodcole that the Devil first came to her when she was cursing, swearing and blaspheming. The first words he said to her were "Oh! haue I now found you cursing, swearing, and blaspheming? now you are mine." He bid her not to fear him, and told her he would not harm her but rather do whatever mischief she asked of him. If she asked him to do harm to man or beast, he would vex them to death for her.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
686

Elizabeth Sawyer alleges in her confession to Henry Goodcole that the Devil would bring her word of the harm he did on her behalf within a week. He would scratch and pinch people and cattle for her, or cause their death. She claims that she "was the cause of those two nurse-childrens death, for the which I was now indited and acquited, by the Iury." However, she denied any involvement in the death of Agnes Radcliffe.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
687

Elizabeth Sawyer alleges in her confession to Henry Goodcole that she had been acquainted with the Devil for eight years, and that he would come to her three times a week. He would often take the form of a white or black dog. They would talk on his arrival; he would ask after her well-being, what he should do for her, and threaten to tear her to pieces if she did not give him her soul and body.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
688

Elizabeth Sawyer alleges in her confession to Henry Goodcole that she granted the Devil her soul and body, and to seal the promise, gave him permission to suck blood from her. She told Goodcole that "The place where the Diuell suckt my bloud was a little aboue my fundiment, and that place chosen by himselfe; and in that place by continuall drawing, there is a thing in the forme of a Teate, at which the diuell would sucke mee. And I asked the Diuell why hee would sucke my bloud, and hee sayd it was to nourish him." He would put his head under her petticoat to do so, would suck for a quarter-hour at a time, and it caused her no pain.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
689

Elizabeth Sawyer alleges in her confession to Henry Goodcole that she named the Devil Tom, and that he would bark at her when he had done the mischief she'd asked of him. When she named him, "he promised to doe for me whatsoeuer I should require of him."

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
690

Elizabeth Sawyer alleges in her confession to Henry Goodcole that, despite what numerous children had claimed, she did not have two white ferrets she fed on white bread and milk, and the white thing that had been seen running through the thatch of her house was an ordinary ferret. She knew of no spirits or devils that took the form of ferrets.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
691

Elizabeth Sawyer alleges in her confession to Henry Goodcole that, when the Devil found her praying to Jesus Christ, he forbade her to continue. Instead, he told her to pray to him using a Latin prayer he taught her: "Santibicetur nomen tuum. Amen." She said she had never heard those words from anyone else, that she knew no other Latin, and that she did not know the meaning of it.

The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton

1621, April 17 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
693

Elizabeth Burgiss gives deposition in court that Joan Buts caused stones, some as large as a man's fist, to fly about her master's yard such that everyone was forced inside the house. The stones are said to have hit only her, and once everyone was inside, to have flung themselves at the windows without breaking the glass.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
694

Elizabeth Burgiss sees Joan Buts in her Master's house when others cannot, and also witnesses an object flying of its own accord. Afterward she is in great anguish and has clay pulled from her back that has thorns sticking out of it.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27     Surrey  Surrey  England 
695

Doctor Burcot allegedly purchased a familiar from Thomas Hilles, aka Feats "whereby he thought to have wrought miracles, or rather to have gained good store of money."

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1651       Unknown  England 
696

Elizabeth Francis alleged in her confession that her first request of her familiar, Sathan, was that "she might be ryche and to haue goodes," in the form of sheep. Sathan brings her 18 black and white sheep for her pasture, which "continued wyth her for a tyme, but in the ende dyd all weare awaye she knewe not howe."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1542 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
697

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that after Sathan brought her sheep, she desired to have Andrew Byles, a wealthy man, as a husband. Sathan advises her to have sex with him first, which she does, but Byles refuses to marry her. Furious, Francis has Sathan "waste his goodes" and then kill him with a touch.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1545 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
698

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that every time Sathan did something for her, he demanded a drop of blood in payment. She would prick herself for the blood on various parts of her body, leaving red marks that were still visible at the time of her trial.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 26 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
699

Elizabeth Francis alleges in her confession that some time after Andrew Byle's demise, she again desired a husband. This time, she set her sights on Christopher Francis, and Sathan again advised her to fornicate with him first. She agrees, and is soon pregnant again. Christopher agrees to marry her, and their daughter is born within three months after the wedding.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1546 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
702

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that, every time Sathan did something for her, she would pay him by pricking her hand or face and allowing him to suck her blood. After, he would lie down in his pot. The places where she pricked herself remain visible to the time of the trial.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 26 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
703

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she once became offended by Father Kersye, and instructed Sathan to kill three of Father Kersye's hogs. After Sathan carried out the request, Mother Waterhouse rewarded him with a chicken and a drop of blood. Sathan ate the chicken in its entirety, leaving no bones or feathers behind.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
704

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she had a falling out with Widow Gooday and instructed Sathan to drown Gooday's cow. When Sathan did so, she rewarded him with a drop of blood and another chicken.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
705

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she had a falling out with one of her neighbours (Anonymous 67) and instructed Sathan to kill three of that neighbour's geese.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
706

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she was once refused yeast and in revenge instructed Sathan to "destroye the brewing at that tyme."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
707

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges that her neighbour, Anonymous 68, refused to give her butter, and in revenge she caused this neighbour's curds to spoil two or three days later.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
708

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she had a falling out with her neighbours, Anonymous 85 and Anonymous 86, and sent Sathan to kill the husband, Anonymous 85, with a bloody flux. Once Anonymous 85 had died, she rewarded Sathan with a drop of blood and a chicken.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1557 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
709

Mr. Chamblet alleges in his deposition that, shortly after he found his swine to be bewitched, his daughter Elizabeth Chamblet was also bewitched by Jane Kent; he claims she swelled all over her body and her skin became discoloured, resulting in her death.

A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer

1682, June 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
710

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that whenever she wanted Sathan to do something for her, she would say her Pater Noster (the Lord's Prayer) in Latin.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 26 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
711

Mother Agnes Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she caused Sathan to take the shape of a toad when her poverty forced her to remove the wool from the familiar's pot. To change his shape, she prayed in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 26 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
712

Mother Waterhouse alleges in her confession that, while travelling to Brackstede shortly before her apprehension, Sathan told her to return home. He warned her that she would "haue great trouble, and that shee shoulde be eyther hanged or burned shortly."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 26 Brack stede    Essex  Essex  England 
713

Mother Staunton allegedly came to Robert Lathburie's home to make demands and was sent away; shortly after her departure, twenty of his hogs are said to have fallen sick and died, and one of his cows was afflicted such that it became three times more likely to become lost. Lathburie burned one of the dead hogs in an attempt to save the rest.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Wimbish  Wimbish  Essex  Essex  England 
714

Thomas Prat writes a document accusing Mother Staunton of witchcraft, detailing numerous events in support, and witnessed by Thou Farrour and Thomas Swallowe; he delivers the document to Master George Nichols.

A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex

1579 Wimbish  Wimbish  Essex  Essex  England 
715

Joan Waterhouse alleges in her confession that, the previous winter, her mother Agnes Waterhouse attempted to teach her witchcraft and the name of her familiar, but she refused.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1565 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
716

Joan Waterhouse alleges in her confession that once, when her mother Agnes Waterhouse was gone to Breakstede, she went to the neighbours to ask for bread and cheese from their child, Agnes Browne. Browne refused to give her any, or "at the least not so muche as wolde satisfye her."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
717

Joan Waterhouse, after Agnes Browne refuses to give her bread and cheese, decides to do as she had seen her mother, Agnes Waterhouse, do and call on the familiar Sathan for help. Sathan emerges from under Mother Waterhouse's bed in the form of a large dog with horns and asks what she would have of him.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
718

Joan Waterhouse alleges in her confession that she offered Sathan a red rooster in exchange for him frightening Agnes Browne, but Sathan demands her body and soul instead. Joan is so frightened of him herself that she agrees to get him to leave. He departs to haunt Browne.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
719

Mother Agnes Waterhouse makes a second confession in which she admits to having killed a man. She also admits to having a familiar in the shape of a white cat which she used to kill many of her neighbours' cattle and the man, and to turning the cat into a toad.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 27   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
720

Agnes Brown alleges in her deposition that she was churning butter when she was visited by a "thynge lyke a blacke dogge with [a] face like an ape a short ta[l]e a [cheine] and a syluer whystle (to her thinking) about his neck, and a peyre of hornes on his heade, & [held] in his mouth she keye of the milkehouse doore." She claims she was afraid and that this thing skipped and leaped and sat on a nettle.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
721

Agnes Browne claims in her deposition that she asked the thing like a black dog what it wanted, and it answered that it had come for some butter. When she told it she had none to give, it put the key in the lock of the milkhouse door and insisted that it would have some butter. It opened the door, set the key on a cheese on the shelf, and stayed in there a while. When it finally emerged, it locked the door behind itself, told Brown that it had made some butter for her, and left.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
722

Agnes Browne alleges in her confession that, immediately after the thing like a black dog left, she went to her aunt and told her what had happened. Her aunt sent for a priest, who had Browne pray to God and call on the name of Jesus.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
723

Agnes Browne alleges during her deposition that the thing like a black dog returned the next day with the milkhouse key in its mouth, and she said to it "in the name of Iesus what haste thou there." The thing laid down the key, told her she spoke evil words by using that name and departed. When Browne reported this, her aunt (Anonymous 87) confiscated the key for two days and made Agnes show her the buttery print left on the cheese the previous day.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
724

Agnes Browne alleges during her deposition that the thing like a black dog returned a third time a few days after the second, this time with a bean pod in its mouth. When the Queen's Attorney Master Gerard asked her how she knew that, she replied that she bid it show her in the name of Jesus. It again told her she spoke evil words and departed, only to return a short time later with bread in its mouth. This time, she asked it what it wanted, and it replied butter. She told it once more she had none to give, it insisted it would have some anyway, and left again.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
725

Agnes Browne alleges in her deposition that she last saw the thing like a black dog the previous Wednesday, which was July 24, 1566. This time, it came with a dagger in its mouth and asked her if she was dead. She replied that she was not and thanked God, to which it said it would fix that by thrusting its dagger into her heart. Agnes claims she commanded it to lay down its knife in the name of Jesus, but it refused to part with its "[sw]eete dames knyfe." She then asked who its dame was, and it "nodded & wagged his head to your house mother water house."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 24 Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
726

Mother Agnes Waterhouse accuses Agnes Browne of lying, on the basis that she owns nothing like the dagger Browne claimed the thing like a black dog threatened her with. Joan Waterhouse takes the opportunity to insist that when she conjured Sathan, he appeared as a dog, not a dog-thing with an ape's face. Queen's Attorney Master Gerard asks Mother Waterhouse to summon Sathan to settle the matter, but she insists that she no longer has any power over him.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 27   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
727

Queen's Attorney Master Gerard demands Mother Agnes Waterhouse tell the court of the times when she had allowed Sathan to suck her blood. Mother Waterhouse insists that she never did, until Master Gerard has her kerchief pulled back to reveal the red spots on her face and nose; she then admits to letting Sathan suck but instead insists that she had not let him do so in a fortnight.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 27   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
728

Mother Agnes Waterhouse makes her final confession on the day of her execution, July 29, 1566. She admits to having been a witch for the last 15 years, to have committed many abominable deeds, and to desire God's forgiveness for her abuse of His name and her devilish practices.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 29   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
729

Mother Waterhouse confesses on the day of her execution to having sent her familiar Sathan to hurt and destroy the goods of a tailor named Wardol, whom she was offended by. Sathan was unable to do anything to him, despite numerous attempts, because Wardol "was so strong in fayth that he hadde no power to hurt hym."

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 29   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
730

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that the spirit in the form of a young man and the two puppy spirits became her familiars. She named the white puppy Lilly and the black puppy Priscill; Lilly's purpose was to hurt men, women and children, while Priscill's purpose was to hurt cattle. The purpose of the man-spirit was to "lye with her carnally, when and as often as she desired, and that hee did lye with her in that manner very often."

The Witches of Huntingdon

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
731

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that she once became angry with Henry Bedell and sent her familiar Lilly to kill him, but that Lilly returned claiming it lacked the power to do so; she sent Lilly out again three days later to kill Bedell's child instead and this time the familiar succeeded.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
732

Elizabeth Weed alleged in her confession that she once sent her familiar Lilly to Edward Musgrave, but that Lilly returned claiming not to have the power. Instead, Weed sent out Priscill to kill two of Musgrave's horses, and one belonging to John Musgrave, plus a cow of William Musgrave's and another cow of Thomas Thorp's; Priscill succeeded where Lilly had failed.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
733

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that her 21 years was almost up: Her contract was set to expire on the next Low-Sunday.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
734

Elizabeth Weed alleges in her confession that she "had a desire to be rid of that unhappy burthen which was upon her," and that to that end she had been attending Church regularly. She said that she was pleased with the minister, Mr. Poole, and his preachings, to the extent that she had been going to his house for repetitions.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, March 31 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
735

Peter Slater alleges, in his statement, that he visited Francis Moore after he heard she had been taken into custody for witchcraft, and questioned her on the death of his wife. He claims that Moore confessed to cursing his wife, causing her to die.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
736

Mary Darnell gives a statement before Justice Robert Bernard alleging that, a year ago, Elizabeth Chandler bewitched her daughter Katherine Darnell to death. Darnell claims that Katherine and a child of Chandler's had a falling out while eating furmity at a neighbor's home one day, and that Katherine came home complaining that Chandler had boxed her ear. Katherine was sick for the next three weeks, complaining the whole time of pain in her ear and that Chandler was appearing to her; she would cry out that Chandler wanted to kill her. She died of the illness, at the age of nine.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1645 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
737

John Winnick alleges in his confession that only sent out his familiars to cause mischief once. That one time, he sent the bear-spirit (Anonymous 130) to harass a maidservant (Anonymous 88) of Mr. Say's into stealing food from her master for him.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 11   Molesworth  Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
738

Mary Darnell alleges in her statement that, not long after her daughter's death, she made a pot of furmity and invited the neighbors over, but the pot kept boiling for an hour after she pulled it off the fire. She was unable to prevent it from boiling over, despite transferring it to numerous other bowls, tubs and vessels. Darnell heard from Lewis Carmell that Elizabeth Chandler had confessed to sending a familiar named Beelzebub to spoil the furmity.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1645   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
739

Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh allege in their depositions that they heard Anne Desborough confess to naming the brown mouse Tib, and the mouse with the white belly Jone. Tib's purpose was to hurt men, and Jone's purpose to hurt cattle. They would appear to her daily to suck blood from the places where marks had been found.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
740

Francis Moore, at her examination before Justice Nicholas Pedley, alleges that she had received her first familiar eight years before from Margaret Simpson. The familiar was in the form of a little black puppy Simpson had named Pretty, and Simpson instructed her to keep Pretty with her all her life. If she did, and she ever cursed any cattle, she could set Pretty on them, and the cattle would soon die.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1638 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
741

Frances Moore alleges in her confession that, eight years before, she received a second familiar from Elizabeth Weed, in the form of a white cat Weed had named Tiffy. Weed told Moore that, in order to receive Tiffy's services, she must renounce God and affirm it with blood. If she did so, she could set Tiffy on anyone she cursed, and they would soon die. Moore renounced God, pricked her finger with a thorn, and allowed Tiffy to lick the blood.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1638 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
742

Frances Moore, in her confession, recalled that 16 years before William Foster had threatened to hang her children for stealing bread. Six years ago, two after receiving Tiffy from Elizabeth Weed, she allegedly decided to curse Foster for it. Tiffy went to Foster and caused him become sick; he lay in pain for seven or eight days before dying. Moore claimed, however, not to remember what exactly she had instructed Tiffy to do to him..

The Witches of Huntingdon

1640 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
743

Frances Moore alleged in her confession that, five years before, Edward Hull's cow got into her grain. She cursed it and set Pretty on it, causing the cow to swell and die.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1641 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
744

France Moore alleged in her confession that, five years before, one of Peter Brown's cows went into her corn; she cursed the cow and set Pretty on it, causing the animal to die two or three days later.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1641 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
745

Frances Moore alleged in her confession that she had killed her familiars Tiffy and Pretty the year before, but that they had been haunting her since. She claimed that, when she was apprehended, they had crawled under her clothes and had been tormenting her so that she couldn't speak freely to confess.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 9 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
746

John Browne gave deposition before Justice John Castell alleging that he had met John Clarke Jr. on the road, and that Clarke told him he was heading to Keyson because he and his parents had been accused of witchcraft. Browne told Clarke that he, too, had been accused, and that the searchers said they had found marks on him. According to Browne, Clarke claimed to have cut off his marks three days before his own searching. Clarke then became suspicious, telling Browne that he didn't believe him to be a witch as he had not seen him at any meetings. Browne said his meetings were in different places, and they parted.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, May 2   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
748

Peter Slater gives a statement before Justice Robert Bernard, alleging that his wife had a falling out with Francis Moore 21 years before. Not long after, his wife gave birth to their child, and a week after the birth his wife suddenly got sick and died. He says that ever since that day, he has suspected Moore of witchcraft.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1625 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
749

William Searle gives a statement before Justice Robert Bernard alleging that, three or four years before, Francis Moore had requested to bake a loaf of bread at his home, and he refused her. In retribution, she set her familiar Pretty on his chickens, causing them to flutter, refuse to eat and die.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1642 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
750

William Searle gives a statement alleging that, three or four years before, Francis Moore had caused one of his hogs to die in retribution for some of his servants setting a dog on one of her hogs.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1642 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
751

Thomas Becke alleges in his deposition that Anne Desborough confessed to a second visitation by the brown mouse-spirit, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit with a white belly, slightly smaller than the first. The brown mouse-spirit told her that the spirits were to stay with her, and must suck her blood. Desborough agreed to allow them her blood. This visitation is not included in Joseph Coysh's account of her confession.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
752

Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh give deposition before Justice Nicholas Pedley alleging that they heard Anne Desborogh confess to having been visited by a mouse-spirit 30 years before, while living in Tichmarch. The mouse-spirit, which was brown and slightly larger than a real mouse, came to her while she was asleep, and nipped her on her breast to wake her. It then demanded she give it part of her soul. Desborough was terrified by this and prayed to God, which caused the mouse-spirit to leave.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
753

Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh give deposition alleging that Anne Desborough agreed to allow two mouse-spirits, one brown, and one with a white belly, to suck her blood and have her soul upon her death. She also agreed to forsake God and Christ.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
754

Mother Sutton allegedly causes Master Enger's horses to die in their stables overnight. Some appear to have been strangled, others to have beaten out their own brains, and others dead without an obvious cause.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1610   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
755

Mary Sutton allegedly seeks revenge upon Master Enger's servant (Anonymous 89) for having struck her bastard son, Henry Sutton, on the ears. Henry had been throwing rocks and filth at other children and would not stop after repeated warnings; he went crying home to his mother after the chastisement. The next day, Mary causes a black sow to follow and spook the horses pulling a cart of corn Anonymous 89 is taking to market; the horses go wild and run away with their load. On the way back, Anonymous 89 observes the same sow heading into Mother Sutton's home.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
756

Anonymous 89 talks of Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton's misdeeds with another servant while ploughing, including what happened with the sow on the way to market. While he is talking, a beetle (Anonymous 155) strokes him on the chest, causing him to fall into a trance from which he cannot be roused. He stands "like a liuelesse trunke deuided from his vitall spirits" for some time. He eventually recovers on his own and returns home to report the incident to Master Enger.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
757

Master Enger attempts to cure his servant, Anonymous 89, who has remained afflicted after the incident with the beetle (Anonymous 155). He tries everything he can think of, sparing no cost, but without result. Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton are suspected of causing the man's affliction through bewitchment.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
758

Anonymous 89 alleges that he was visited by Mary Sutton in his chamber at night, where she alternately sat knitting by moonlight and staring at him. He claims that after a while, she came to his bedside and told him "if hee would consent she should come to bedde to him, hee should be restored to his former health and prosperitie." He is repulsed by her advances and instead chastises her for the way she lives, her behaviour and her three bastards. Realizing her efforts are futile, she leaves the same way she came. Anonymous 89 reports this visitation to Master Enger.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
759

Master Enger goes to the field where Mary Sutton is tending hogs. He accuses her of having come to his home the night before, to visit Anonymous 89 by moonlight, but she denies it. Master Enger attempts to persuade her to come back to his home, where he claims Anonymous 89 is waiting to accept her proposition. She refuses, stating that "neyther had they authoritie to compell her to goe without a Constable." At this, Master Enger has her snatched and set unwilling on horseback. Though she fights back, she is eventually held down and made to stay on the horse.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
760

Master Enger drags Mary Sutton by force to the bedside of Anonymous 89, Enger's afflicted servant. Anonymous 89 draws blood from her and immediately began to be well again. However, Mary takes the opportunity to touch Anonymous 89 on the neck with her finger. He falls into "as great or farre worse vexation then he had before."

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
761

Master Enger's son hears the rumours about Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton, and the child throws stones at Mother Sutton while calling her a witch when she comes to grind her corn at the mill. Mother Sutton "conceited a rancour, and deadly hatred to this young childe, and purposed not to suffer opportunitie passe to be reuenged."

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
762

Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton allegedly call upon their spirits Dicke and Jude. They allow the spirits to suck on the teats on their thighs, and order them to strike Master Enger's son with torments. Not long after, the child "was put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged."

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
763

Master Enger, the morning after discussing his plights with Anonymous 90, seeks out Mary Sutton in the fields in the company of several of his men. They question her and attempt to bind her to a horse, but the men are allegedly stricken lame.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612, March   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
764

Master Enger beats Mary Sutton senseless with a cudgel; she allegedly rendered his men lame when they came to apprehend her. The beating restores the mobility of his men. They bind her to Enger's horse and carry her off to Enger's home, shutting the mill gates behind them.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612, March   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
765

Master Enger has Mary Sutton thrown into the mill pond. She is allegedly observed to sink about two feet into the water, then rise and float on the surface like a plank of wood.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612, March   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
766

Master Enger accuses Mary Sutton of bewitching his cattle, causing his servant Anonymous 79 to languish, and bewitching his son to death. Mary Sutton proclaims her innocence, but is forced to confess when Enger tells her "it was bootlesse to stand so obstinately vpon deniall of those matters, for her owne sonne Henry had reuealed all, both as touching her selfe and her mother, and of the time and manner of their plotting to torment his little boy."

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612, March   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
767

Frances Moore allegedly pricked her finger with a thorn, drawing blood, which she used to seal the contract with her cat familiar Tissy.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1638 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
768

Mother Sutton allegedly causes Master Enger's swine to fall mad. Some eviscerate one other and feed on them, and others run to the mill pond and drown themselves in groups of ten and twenty as if one mind.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1610   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
769

Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton's alleged campaign to destroy Master Enger's livestock causes 200 pounds worth of damage in less than two years.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1610   Milton Milles  Bedfordshire  Beford  England 
770

Elizabeth Chandler, during her examination, denies ever striking Mary Darnell's daughter Katherine or ever sending a spirit to harm the child. She also says that Darnell's spoiled pot of furmity was not her doing.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
771

Elizabeth Chandler alleges during her examination that she had a falling out with Mary Darnell, during which Darnell turned her into a duck. She claims that her visitations from the roaring apparition began about six months later.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
772

Elizabeth Chandler, during her examination, is questioned about whether she has two imp familiars named Beelzebub and Trullibub. Chandler denies having any familiars; she claims that Beelzebub is what she calls a log of wood, and Trullibub her name for a stick.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
773

Davie Thurlowe, who is "strangely taken and greatly tormented," and whose had in twisted fully backwards, allegedly recovers from his torments after Ursley Kempe visits him. Kempe had employed a combination of countermagic and reassurance to do this work. She took Davie's hand and said "A good childe howe art thou loden and so went thrise out of the doores, and euery time when shee came in shee tooke the childe by the hands, and saide A good childe howe art thou loden." Kempe reassured Thurlow, firmly stating "I warrant thee I, thy Childe shall doe well enough." Grace Thurlowe, under examination by Brain Darcey, tells this story to Brian Darcy, shortly before she recounts how her and Kempe had fallen out.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1581   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
774

Ellen Shepheard is examined before Justice Robert Bernard and Nicholas Pedley, in which she alleges that she was first visited by a spirit five years ago. She claims that she was swearing and cursing about the way her children had been fighting, and that a spirit appeared to her in the shape of a small, iron-grey rat. This rat-spirit demanded she come with it, but she sent it away saying "I will not, avoid Satan."

The Witches of Huntingdon

1641   Molesworth  Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
775

Ellen Shepherd alleges in her confession that, shortly after her first encounter with the rat-spirit, she went into the field and there was cursing, fretting and blaspheming, which attracted the spirit to come back. This time, it had three other rat-spirits with it, and demanded she forsake God and Christ to take it and its companions as her gods instead, promising happiness if she complied. Shepherd consented to this, and to allowing the spirits to take her soul when she died. She also granted them her blood, and thereafter they had often sucked from her on and about her hips.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1641   Molesworth  Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
776

Ellen Shepherd alleges in her confession that she never used the rat-spirits to torment anything, and that they had not brought her happiness.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 8   Molesworth  Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
777

Ellen Shepherd alleges in her confession that the rat-spirits had been tormenting her that afternoon, since she had been brought in for the examination. She intended to end her habit of cursing and swearing.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 8   Molesworth  Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
778

Jane Wallis alleges in her confession that, about four days after Blackeman's initial visit, Grissell and Greedigut came to her for the first time. They had the shape of hounds wearing hog's-hair bridles, and told her that Blackeman had sent them to do whatever she bid them. She replied that she lacked nothing, but when they asked her to feed them she said she was poor and had nothing to give, at which they left.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, March 16   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
779

Edward Wingfield claims in his deposition that Jane Wallis confessed to him that Grissell and Greedigut came in several shapes, but mostly that of hounds with bristles on their backs. He said that they would suck on her body, and she told him that while she never sent them to do mischief, Blackeman would.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
780

Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton are executed on March 31, 1612 at Bedford after being found guilty of killing Master Enger's livestock, bewitching his servant (Anonymous 89) and bewitching his son to death.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612, March 31 Bedford    Bedfordshire  Bedfordshire  England 
781

Jane Wallis alleges in her confession that Grissel and Greedigut would visit her often, and bring two or three shillings for her when they did. Edward Wingfield's deposition of her confession agreed on this detail, but added that Blackeman would be with them.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 16   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
782

Edward Wingfield alleges in his deposition that during Jane Wallis' confession to him, she said that Grissell and Greedigut once robbed a man, pulling him from his horse to steal his money for her. He added that she often forgot their names.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, April 14   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
783

John Clarke Jr. alleges during his examination by Justice John Castell that he overtook a man and three women on the road to Keyston the previous Sunday, but denied saying anything to them about cutting off witch's marks, meeting any witches or making a compact with the Devil.

The Witches of Huntingdon

1646, May 2   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
785

William Harrison is allegedly knocked down and robbed by Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93). Widow Perry and her sons throw Harrison into a pit they had dug stones out of, but he does not remain there long.

The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
787

Annis Glascocke is accused of having bewitched Martha Stevens, Charity Page, and the Page's child (or ward) to death.

A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex

1582   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
788

Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93) are apprehended on the suspicion of robbing and murdering William Harrison.

The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
789

Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93) are arraigned and found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison.

The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
790

Widow Perry is executed by hanging at Broadway Hills in Cambden after being found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison.

The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
791

Widow Perry's son (Anonymous 92) is executed by hanging at Broadway Hill in Cambden after being found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison.

The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
792

Widow Perry's son (Anonymous 93), a former servant of William Harrison, is executed by being hanged in chains at Broadway Hill in Cambden after being found guilty of robbing and murdering William Harrison. Anonymous 93's remains are left hanging for others to see.

The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
793

John Gaule describes the witch testing techniques he learned from local witch-finders. Women are made to sit in the middle of a room. If they will not cooperate, they are bound to a chair, kept awake, and denied food for twenty four hours, while witnesses watch for imps to appear.

Select Cases of Conscience Touching Witches and Witchcrafts

1646   Great Staughton  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
794

John Gaule suggests that imps might approach witches (who are bound and watched) and that witch-finders are trained to spot them, and to sweep the room looking for flies or spiders to kill, lest they be the witch's imps.

Select Cases of Conscience Touching Witches and Witchcrafts

1646   Great Staughton  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
795

John Gaule claims normal animals can become possessed and become familiars. He may have based this claim on the testimony of Frances Moore. Moore was examined as a witch in Huntington in 1646 and claimed to have killed her familiars Tissy and Pretty.

Select Cases of Conscience Touching Witches and Witchcrafts

1646   Great Staughton  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
796

Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93) deny accusations that claim they robbed and murdered William Harrison. Perry and her sons predict that Harrison will be seen again in seven years time.

The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison

1662 London  Cambden  London, Greater  London  England 
802

Anne Durent, Susan Chandler and Elizabeth Pacy allegedly arrive at Bury St. Edwards for the trial of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny in good health, but the morning of the trial fall into violent fits accompanied by shrieking and are thus rendered unable to give deposition before the court. When they finally recover, all three are said to be struck dumb for the duration of the trial.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
803

Amy Ratcliffe, Alice Smith, Richard Rawson, M. Smith, M. Dickson, and M. Bills witness the birth of monstrous child. It's mother suggested that before it was born she felt as though she had been possessed by an evil spirit which caused her extreme torments.

Strange News out of Kent of a Monstrous and Misshapen Child

1609, July 30 Old Sandwich  Old Sandwich  Kent  Kent  England 
821

Dorothy Durent gives deposition alleging that Amy Denny bewitched her infant son William, causing him to be afflicted with strange fits. She says that she had argued with Denny after leaving William in Denny's care with explicit instructions not to give him suck, only to return home and find out that Denny had done so. Denny threatened Durent, and told her "she had as good to have done otherwise than to have found fault with her." That same night, William had his first fit.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
822

Dorothy Durent gives deposition that, troubled by her infant son William's fits, she consulted with a Dr. Jacob in Yarmouth, who has a reputation for helping bewitched children. He allegedly advised her to hang William's blanket in in the chimney corner all day, to wrap the child in that blanket when she put him to bed at night, and to not be afraid if she found anything in the blanket, but rather to throw that thing into the fire.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
823

Dorothy Durent gives deposition stating that she followed Dr. Jacob's advice to hang William's blanket in the chimney corner. She alleges that when she went to wrap William in the blanket that night, a great toad fell out and ran up and down the hearth. She had a youth of her household catch the toad and hold it in the fire with tongs. As soon as the toad was in the fire, it made a "made a great and horrible Noise, and after a space there was a flashing in the Fire like Gun-powder, making a noise like the discharge of a Pistol, and thereupon the Toad was no more seen nor heard." When the Court asked whether there was any residue of the toad left in the fire, Dorothy said that after the flash and noise, not a thing remained of the creature.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
824

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that the day after the toad fell out of William's blanket and she had it burnt, Amy Denny's niece (Anonymous 389), a neighbor of Durent's, told her that Denny was "in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire." Durent says that she called on Denny herself, and found her exactly as Denny's niece had said - "her Face, her Leggs, and Thighs, which this Deponent saw, seemed very much scorched and burnt with Fire." When asked how she came by the burns, Denny replied that she must thank Durent for her condition, and that Durent would live to see some of her children dead.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
825

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that, after her son William recovered from his fits, her ten-year-old daughter Elizabeth became afflicted with similar fits. Dorothy reports that Elizabeth complained she had seen apparitions of Amy Denny during her fits, and that Denny was the cause of her afflictions.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
826

Dorothy Durent reports in her deposition that her daughter Elizabeth died following her illness, and claims it came to pass two days after Denny predicted Elizabeth's demise. Durent accuses Denny of having bewitched Elizabeth to death, alleging that Denny "hath been long reputed to be a Witch, and a person of very evil behaviour, whose Kindred and Relations have been many of them accused for Witchcraft, and some of them have been Condemned."

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
827

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that she became strangely lame soon after her daughter Elizabeth died. When questioned about it in court, she claimed that she had not needed crutches prior to that time save for when she was pregnant.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
828

Dorothy Durent is allegedly cured of her lameness at the moment Amy Denny is pronounced guilty of witchcraft. She is seen to return home without the use of her crutches.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 13 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
829

Elizabeth Pacy is brought to court to give indictment against Amy Denny for Denny's alleged bewitchment of Elizabeth and her younger sister Deborah, but Pacy is unable to speak and lays senseless and motionless on a cushion at court. Although she is said to have come to herself after a while, she can neither see nor speak.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
830

Sir Matthew Hale, the judge presiding over the court, instructs that Amy Denny to be privately brought before Elizabeth Pacy. Though Pacy is in an insensible state and her eyes are shut, she reacts immediately when Denny touches her hand, leaping up and scratching Denny until she draws blood. Pacy must be removed from Denny, and thereafter continues to make angry motions in Denny's direction.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
831

Samuel Pacy gives deposition in court alleging that, the previous October, his younger daughter Deborah suddenly became lame, and remained so for seven days. On the seventh day, Amy Denny came to the Pacy home and attempted to buy herrings. She was sent away three times; the third time she left grumbling discontentedly. At the same moment, Pacy claims Deborah was taken with violent fits of extreme pain in her stomach, as if pricked by pins, and shrieked dreadfully.

A Tryal of Witches

1661, October 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
832

Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that he consulted with a local physician, Dr. Feavor, on the matter of Deborah's fits. He reports that Dr. Feavor observed Deborah in her fits but could not diagnose her affliction. Dr. Feavor corroborates Pacy's report in his own deposition.

A Tryal of Witches

1661, October 30 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
833

Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that Deborah cried out during her fits that Amy Denny appeared to her as an apparition, and that Denny was responsible for her affliction; Pacy used this to have Denny thrown in the stocks.

A Tryal of Witches

1661, October 28 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
834

Samuel Pacy gives deposition that his older daughter, Elizabeth Pacy, began to have fits two days after Amy Denny was thrown in the stocks. Elizabeth's mouth could not be opened to let her breathe, and Pacy is forced to have one of her teeth broken out so she can get air. Not long after, Deborah Pacy is similarly afflicted, and must also have a tooth tapped out. Both girls claim to have seen apparitions of Amy Denny, accompanied by an unknown woman whose appearance and clothes they describe, during their fits.

A Tryal of Witches

1661, November 2 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
846

Samuel Pacy gives deposition alleging that his daughters Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy have numerous violent fits over a two month period. During these fits, their bodies become so sore they cannot be touched, go lame on one side, or lose sight or hearing. At the end of each fit, they each were said to cough up phlegm intermixed with pins and nails.

A Tryal of Witches

1661, November 2 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
847

Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that he would have his daughters Elizabeth and Deborah read from the New Testament in between fits and observed that "they would read till they came to the Name of Lord, or Jesus, or Christ; and then before they could pronounce either of the said Words they would suddenly fall into their fits. But when they came to the Name of Satan, or Devil, they would clap their Fingers upon the Book, crying out, This bites, but makes me speak right well." The girls claim that Amy Denny has told them they must not name the Lord or Jesus, and claim that Denny appeared to them along with Rose Cullender during their fits, threatening them with torments ten times worse if they told what they had seen or heard.

A Tryal of Witches

1661, Fall Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
849

Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl, finds her side is numb after her fit. She bends at the waist from the weight of her limbs that hang as though dead, although before these fits she was "very straight and went very well." She is only somewhat recovered when "A Chyrurgeon (Anonymous 99) being sent for [...] blooded her."

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
851

After six weeks of experiencing fits, Sarah Bower rises in the monring and "out of her wonted Fits, she was taken Speechless," and her tongue is placed at the back of her throat. Richard Dirby, with the permission of Sarah Bower's aunt, tries to move it, but it is fixed.

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
852

Dr. Thomas Browne of Norwich gives deposition in court as an expert witness. In his opinion, Elizabeth Pacy, Deborah Pacy, Elizabeth Durent, Ann Durent, Jane Bocking and Susan Chandler are indeed bewitched, citing a recent Danish example of witchment. He claims that bewitchment is menstrual hysteria that has been heightened by the Devil in cooperation with witches.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
853

Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl suffering for a number of extraordinary fits, is approached by a "Gentleman all in Black" (Anonymous 237) who offers her riches in the form of money, suits of head-cloths, and very high top-knots in exchange for blood from her arm, which would make her his. The gentleman takes out a knife "she thought, to cut her Arm," causing her to cry out so her neighbours (Anonymous 100) come, upon which the "Devil immediately Vanished." When Sarah Bower tries to explain what happened, all assume that "some Rogue had attempted to Rob the House," and Sarah Bower remains speechless until the following Thursday, upon which occasion she told her neighbours of the gentleman in black, and how "he had sort of broad Feet like a Cow."

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
854

Margaret Arnold, Samual Pacy's sister, gives deposition stating that she had the care of Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy for a time during their bewitchment. She alleges that she thought they had been faking the vomiting of pins and nails, and had all pins removed from their clothing upon their arrival at her home, but that they had nevertheless vomited pins several times in her presence. She said the girls had claimed to have the pins forced on them by bees and flies.

A Tryal of Witches

1661, November 30 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
855

Margaret Arnold gives deposition alleging that, while her nieces Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy were in her care, they would claim to see mice, and once a duck, catch them and throw them into the fire. Though Arnold could not see the creatures herself, she heard one screech like a rat when it hit the fire, and saw another make a flash like gunpowder.

A Tryal of Witches

1651, Fall Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
856

Edmund Durent gives deposition in court alleging that, after his wife refused to sell Rose Cullender herrings, his daughter Ann Durent became afflicted with pain like the pricking of pins in her stomach, and had swooning fits. In between fits, Ann claimed to have seen Cullender's apparition threaten to torment her. Ann is also said to have vomited pins, which Edward presented in court as evidence. Ann's fits continued until the trial.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
857

Jane Walter is allegedly bewitched "for a long time" by a familiar (Anonymous 236) allegedly belonging to Teecle's wife. Her tongue was found "tied in her Head with a Hempenstring, and run full of Pins, and she had many strange Fits," allegedly as often as 20 times in a day. The toad would creep several times into Jane Walter's lap. Teecle's wife was suspected of being a witch for some time. When the toad was to be burned, "it vanished away, that none knew what became of it."

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
858

Diana Bocking gives deposition alleging that her daughter Jane Bocking has suffered fits since February, in which she has stomach pains like the pricking of pins, swoons, can eat little or no food, and daily vomits crooked pins. Diana claims that she has found more pins and a lath-nail clenched in Jane's fists after Jane is seen to catch at the air with her hands. Jane is also said to talk to unseen persons, complain that Rose Cullender and Amy Denny appeared to her, and be stricken dumb. Diana produced the pins and lath-nail as evidence in court.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, February 1 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
859

John Ballard's daughter from Norfolk is bewitched for two years. She voids stones, pins, glass, a buckle and other things from her mouth, and suffers from "many strange Fits in a day." These were all presented before the Mayor and Alderman of the city of Norwich (Anonymous 101) by the John Ballard himself.

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
860

Ann Burgess is allegedly bewitched for several years. She suffers up to twenty fits a day and vomits pins, tobacco pipes, nails, quills, and a bent farthing. This witnessed by many, and evidence shown before the mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101).

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Norwich    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
861

Grace Brown is allegedly bewitched for several years. She vomited many things, including pins. These were shown before the mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101).

Dreadful News from Wapping

1693 Norwich    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
862

Mary Chandler alleges in her deposition that the morning after she had searched Rose Cullender, her daughter Susan Chandler saw an apparition of Cullender take her hand. Susan is said to have fallen sick to her stomach shortly thereafter, having fits in which she saw apparitions of Rose Cullender with a large dog, vomited pins and was stricken with blindness or dumbness.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, February 2 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
863

Susan Chandler is allegedly called into the court to give deposition against Rose Cullender, but falls into a fit and must be carried out. Struck dumb, the only words she can get out are "burn her."

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
864

Mary Chandler gives deposition stating that she, along with five other women, were hired to search Rose Cullender after Sir Edmund Bacon, Justice of the Peace for Suffolk, granted a warrant at the request of Samuel Pacy. Mary says that Cullender cooperated with the search, and alleges that once Cullender had been stripped naked she was found to have four teats: A large one about an inch long on her lower belly, and three smaller ones on her privy parts. Mary reports that the larger teat looked recently sucked, had a hole in its tip, and exuded a milky substance when handled.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
865

Sargent Earl, Sargent Banard, and Sargent Keeling attend Amy Denny and Rose Cullender's trial; Sargent Keeling is said to be dissatisfied with with evidence presented. While convinced the children were indeed possessed, he is not convinced that Denny and Cullender were responsible, and argued that prosecuting based on the imaginings of the afflicted puts everyone in danger for then anyone could imagine a crime and accuse an innocent party. Keeling particularly objected to Elizabeth Pacy's reaction to Denny's touch while blindfolded being taken as proof of bewitchment.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
866

John Soam gives deposition in court that one day during the harvest, he drove three carts past Rose Cullender's home and one hit her window. He says that Cullender was irate at the damage, and alleges that she threatened him. He claims that the offending cart overturned two or three times that day and stuck in the town gate despite having more than enough clearance, forcing Soam to have a gatepost cut down to free it. Once he managed to get the cart into the yard, he could not get it near the place where he needed to unload his corn. When he and others tried to unload it well away from the place, it proved to be a great and tiring labour. They were forced to stop when people who came to help all developed sudden nosebleeds. The next morning, Soam returned to the cart and was able to unload it without any trouble at all.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
867

Robert Sherringham gives deposition in court that his cart had smashed into Rose Cullender's home, breaking part of the house; he claims that that she threatened him when she saw the damage and told him his horses would suffer for it. Sure enough, all four died a short time later.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 12 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
868

Robert Sherringham gives deposition alleging that Rose Cullender is responsible for the death of all his all his piglets, a persistent lameness in his limbs, and for plaguing him with "a great Number of Lice of an extraordinary bigness." He says that he was forced to burn all his clothes to be rid of the lice.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
872

John Darrell, a minister living in Ashbie de la Zouche, is summoned to Nottingham by the Mayor and Aldermen of Nottingham so that he may cure William Sommers of his possession, due to his reputation for restoring persons thusly afflicted.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 5 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
873

A high Commission is gathered in order to determine whether William Sommers' second possession is counterfeit or not. John Darrell takes the names of threescore persons willing to give depositions on the matter. 17 of the threescore are sworn, examined and their depositions given for the Commission.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
877

Elizabeth Stile, in her confession, alleges that the father of the boy whose hand was turned around in punishment for throwing a stone at her house is unable to restore the boy's hand to its proper place; he goes to Mother Dutton, Mother Devell or Father Rosimond for help for his son, and the boy is cured.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
878

Mother Dutton, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, cures William Foster after she, along with Mother Dutton, Mother Devell, and Elizabeth Stile, had made an image of Foster for George Whittyng.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
879

Richard Spencer gives deposition in court claiming that he overheard Amy Denny say that "the Devil would not let her rest until she were Revenged" on Ann Sandeswell.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 10 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
880

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition in court alleging that, seven or eight years ago, she had bought a number of geese from Amy Denny but had not yet brought them home, and that Denny threatened to destroy them if she didn't come pick them up. A few days later, all the geese were dead.

A Tryal of Witches

1655 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
881

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition that shortly after Amy Denny destroys some geese Sandeswell had bought from her, Denny became a tenant of Sandeswell's husband Cornelius. Sandeswell alleges that Denny told Cornelius that the chimney on the house would fall if it wasn't looked after, to which he replied that the chimney was new and payed her no heed. Not long after, the chimney fell as predicted.

A Tryal of Witches

1665 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
882

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition alleging that a quarter-barrel of fish she had ordered from her brother was discovered to have fallen into the ocean when Sandeswell went to collect it. She had requested Amy Denny's company, and Denny rebuffed her. Her brother told her that he had been unable to keep the fish in the boat, that he had never before seen the like, and that no-one else's goods had been lost.

A Tryal of Witches

1655 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
883

The Jury finds Amy Denny and Rose Cullender guilty on thirteen counts of witchcraft and Justice Matthew Hale sentences them to hang. The date of execution is set for March 17, 1662. Though they are urged to confess prior to their execution, both refuse. Hale was later revealed to be hesitant to acquit or pardon, lest he countenance a disbelief in witchcraft, and thus in Christianity.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 14 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
884

The morning after Rose Cullender and Amy Denny are sentenced, Samuel Pacy, Elizabeth Pacy, Deborah Pacey, Mary Chandler and Susan Chandler visit the home of Lord Chief Baron Matthew Hale. All three children are allegedly in good health, though Susan is said to still be thin and wan. Samuel Pacy reports that his daughters were restored to their speech and health within half an hour of the convictions. Susan Chandler allegedly had pains in her stomach that night, however.

A Tryal of Witches

1662, March 15 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
885

A Justice of the Peace who presides over the examination, trial, and condemnation of Anne Ashby, Anne Martyn, Mary Browne, Mildred Wright, Anne Wilson, and Dr. Gresham on Friday 30 July, 1652.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
886

Ann Ashby allegedly 'swell'd into a monstrous and vast bigness' (like false pregnancy) in court, claiming that she was possessed by her spirit Rug. This was witness by E. G. Gent.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Cranbrook  Cranbrooke  Kent  Kent  England 
887

A groom who witnessed Ann Ashby's preternatural possession allegedly cried out 'come Rug into my mouth.' This groom died close to London under suspicious circumstances.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
888

Mary Browne, Anne Wilson, or Mildred Wright (the author is uncertain) is tested with a pin; she neither felt the prick nor did she bleed.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
889

Mary Read of Lenham allegedly has a witch's mark under her tongue which she shows to many, including E. G. Gent.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Lenham  Lenham  Kent  Kent  England 
890

"Some people" claim that burning witches prevents witchcraft from becoming hereditary.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 30 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
891

Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson allegedly bewitch a child through image magic by creating a wax representation of the child and burying it under the threshold, causing it to languish for an extended period.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
892

Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are tied to the bewitchment of nine children and two adults, (allegedly done through witchcraft).

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
893

Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are tied to the loss of cattle, valued at 500 pounds, (allegedly done through witchcraft).

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
894

Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are tied to the loss of corn at sea (allegedly done through witchcraft).

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
895

Anne Styles comes to ask Anne Bodenham if she has been poisoned. When Anne Styles arrives at Anne Bodenham's house, Anne Bodenham is allegedly already expecting her and knows that it is about poison.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
896

Anne Bodenham gives Anne Styles powder, dill, and her own nails with instructions on bewitching Anne and Sarah Goddard.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
897

Anne Styles accuses the Devil, two ragged boy spirits, and Anne Bodenham, of being the source of her torments.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
898

Thomas Hays gives deposition alleging that he witnessed William Sommers having a violent fit. During this fit, Thomas Hays saw one of Sommers' legs bent crooked, and something run out if it and into the other leg. After, Sommers' belly swelled, and the swelling moved to his throat, tongue and base of his ear, now the size of an egg. Not knowing what to think of this, Hays went to Mr. Arkinson, and then Mr. Ebings and Mr. Aldridge. From conversing with all three, Hays determined that no illness but the Devil could be the cause of Sommers' affliction.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
899

Robert Aldridge gives deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers naked with something the size of a mouse running up his right leg, then into his left leg, and then entering his belly. Sommers' belly swelled massively, then the swelling reduced to the size of a fist and moved to his breast, and moved from there to his neck and under his ear, where it remained at the size of a French walnut for a quarter hour. Aldridge heard a strange hollow voice insisting he belong to it, which he called a liar and replied that he was God's. Aldridge also said that Sommers acted strangely the rest of the day, and, when restrained, proved to have the strength of five men. Sommers' bed was also seen to shake and move, and a shape like five kittens moved under the coverlet.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 3 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
901

Anne Styles has many fits where she has trances and foams at the mouth and is tossed from one bed to another, but is cured of her fits, and cries out thanking the lord for her deliverance upon hearing that Anne Bodenham has been executed.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653   Stockbridge  Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
902

Anne Bodenham is allegedly able to perform spells and charms and throw a man into the air for forty miles.

Doctor Lambs Darling

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
903

Anne Bodenham is searched for witch's marks. Two are discovered, one her shoulder and one in "her secret place."

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Salisbury    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
904

Anne Styles pays Anne Bodenham twelve pence and a jug of beer to find out who took Master Goddard's spoon. Bodenham then tells her a little boy will bring it back shortly.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
905

William Aldred gives deposition on his participation in the exorcism of William Sommers performed by John Darrell. He alleges that he was among the 150 people who witnessed or became directly involved. Aldred says that he was invited to give a prayer, during which Sommers was tormented by fits. John Darrell gave the next prayer, during which Sommers' fits doubled in intensity, and Sommers menaced Darrell and had to be restrained. At the end of the exorcism, Aldred saw Sommers thrown grovelling onto a bed, and lay there as if dead. Darrell praised God and willed the watchers to be thankful, at which time Sommers was seen to thank God for his delivery from possession.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
907

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that the third time her familiar Ball appeared to her, he was in the shape of a brown dog; this was four years before. Ball urged her to make a clay image of John Robinson, which Device did in her mother's house, drying it with the fire. She crumbled the image over the course of a week, and about a week after it was gone, Robinson died. Device claimed she did it because Robinson had "chidden and becalled" her for having a bastard child.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1608   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
908

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, was cast out of his chair by an unknown force and thrown towards the fire at noon on All Hallow's Eve. His head hit the iron grate and one hand landed in the fire. He was found to be so heavy that it took three or four people to pull him away from the fire. Afterwards, neither his hair nor his hand was found to be burnt.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, October 31 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
909

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that "she doth verily thinke, that the said Bulcockes wife doth know of some Witches to bee about Padyham and Burnley."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
910

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that she heard Katherine Hewit and John Bulcock give their consent to assist Jennet Preston in murdering Master Lister at the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
911

Jennet Device points out Jane Bulcock and John Bulcock in court and alleges that they attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. She details where Jane sat and who sat next to her. Device claims that John turned the spit for the feast. She also reports on their conversations.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
912

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, tried to reach a cloth on a line hung above his bed on All Hallow's Eve; when he could not, he seemed to suddenly grew taller than any man in town and got his chin over the line. His hands plucked at the line, but could not free it from his neck; the onlookers had to step in to save him from hanging.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, October 31 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
913

Jennet Device alleges during her deposition that her brother, James Device, has been a witch for three years, ever since a familiar in the shape of a black dog appeared to him at their mother, Elizabeth Device's, house. The familiar's name is Dandy.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1609   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
914

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, had a fit the night before John Darrell arrived in Nottingham, in which he was heard to say that Darrell was coming. Pie claims that no-one, including herself, knew Darrell was on his way, for Darrell had said in his most recent message that he wouldn't be in Nottingham until the next week.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 4 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
915

From all the depositions given in court, a partial guest list for the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday is drafted. This list includes Elizabeth Device, Alice Nutter, Katherine Hewit, John Bulcock, Jane Bulcock, Alice Grey, Jennet Hargraves, Elizabeth Hargraves, Christopher Howgate, Christopher Hargraves, Grace Hay, Anne Crunckshey, Elizabeth Howgate and Jennet Preston.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
916

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, had many fits the day of John Darrell's arrival, leading up to his appearance in Nottingham. These fits were more extreme than those Sommers had previously experienced. He lay many times with his mouth open, and at one point was heard to say I will use William Sommers' tongue and members for three days," without moving his tongue or lips, but in his ordinary voice. An hour and a half before Darrell came into town, Sommers fell into a senseless fit such that Pie and the other onlookers thought he was surely dead, with his face black and his eyes bulging, and his limbs cold. This lasted a full hour, in which they tried to make him more comfortable and revive him with aquavitae.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 5 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
917

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Mrs. Moore, wife to John Moore, once sent for her to amend some drink that had been forspoken. Whittle recited the charm she used, which successfully unwitched the drink. Mrs. Moore was offended by the charm and chided Whittle.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
918

Joan Pie gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that she visited Sommers many times to see the events that people said showed him to be possessed, and came away from it all satisfied that he was indeed possessed.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
919

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, was heard to say "I have but a small time now to stay, but I will shortly return" on John Darrell's arrival in Nottingham, and foretold of Darrell's arrival in the house though Darrell came in through the back.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 5 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
920

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, would often be accompanied by the smell of brimstone during his fits.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, October Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
921

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, had a fit the week before John Dorrell came to town. During this fit, he laughed uncontrollably and then was thrown to the foot of the bed, his body folded in two. He was pulled into a heap and rolled into the bed, then cast up from the bed in a ball to a height of a half yard, and the coverlet wound tightly around his body. The bedclothes were so firmly wrapped that it took great effort to free him from them.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, October Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
922

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, named witches after his deposition, including Millicent Horselie of Bridgeford. While Horselie was being examined, Sommers was heard to describe what was happening to her, though he was not present and those with him had no knowledge of the examination.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
925

Temperance Lloyd allegedly causes nine thorn pricks to appear on Grace Thomas' knees by pricking a piece of leather nine times.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
926

Anne Styles returns several times to Anne Bodenham to find out things for other people. On one occasion, she wishes to know who has stolen Thomas Mason's pieces of gold. She pays Anne Bodenham seven shillings and Anne Bodenham then places a green glass on a book to show her what is going on at the Goddard residence.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
927

Anne Styles goes again to see Anne Bodenham because Elizabeth Rosewell wants to know if Anne and Sarah Goodard want to poison her. Upon Anne Style's arrival, Anne Bodenham says that she had been expecting her and knew it was about poison.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
928

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, suffered a fit on Allhallowtide in which he had to be restrained; it took four or five women to hold him, and they could not keep him lying flat upon the ground. If he hadn't been held, he would have beaten his head and limbs upon the ground until he had caused himself great injury.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 1 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
929

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, would often have a swelling on his body during his fits, which would move on his feet from toe to toe, up his leg and body to his throat, ears and eyes, where his eyes would swell black.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, October Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
930

Richard Newton gives deposition against William Sommers alleging he saw Sommers have a fit, during which he spoke in Latin with his mouth open but without moving his lips or his tongue.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
931

Henry Nussie gives deposition against William Sommers in which he claims to have seen Sommers speak words in Latin to John Wigan without moving his mouth or tongue.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
932

William Sommers, as alleged by William Langford in his deposition, showed extraordinary strength when resisting restraint, but showed no signs of exertion and his limbs were found to be as cold and senseless as a dead man's; at this time, Sommers also made rhyme of Scripture, singing in a tiny voice unlike the normal singing voice Langford had heard from him many times before.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, February 17 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
933

William Sommers, as alleged by William Langford in his deposition, had numerous fits the day of his dispossession, in which he gnashed his mouth, foamed abundantly, spoke in voices like those of a bull, a bear, and a small inhuman voice; at other points he became too heavy for five or six men to carry, and had a swelling move about his body until the time of his dispossession.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 7 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
934

Thomas Gray gives deposition against William Sommers alleging he saw Sommers held down on the bed by his head and feet while a round lump moved and panted under the bed covers. Gray lay his hands on the lump and felt it move; when he clasped his hands together, the lump deflated as if pricked and reappeared on the other side of Sommers.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, December 3 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
935

John Wood gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that he visited Sommers out of curiosity at the home of his friend Robert Cooper, clerk of St. Maries in Nottingham, where Sommers was being held. Wood witnessed Sommers having a fit, in which it took three or four lusty men to hold him down. Wood tried himself to restrain Sommers' arms, and could not. He noted that the fit lasted at least two full hours. Throughout, Sommers panted without seeming to breathe, and was hot to the touch but did not sweat or become red-faced.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, February 17 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
936

John Wood gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that when he heard that Sommers had retracted his claim of possession, he questioned Sommers about whether he remembered Wood visiting him and what Wood had done at that time. Sommers said he did remember, and that Wood had nipped his finger with his thumbnail. Wood called him on the lie, and Sommers revised his story: Wood did not nip his finger, he bent the finger to see if Sommers had any feeling in the hand. Wood called this a lie as well, and Sommers replied that he could not in fact remember what Wood had done.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, February Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
937

John Strelley gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that he visited Sommers out of curiosity and found him to be having a fit in the presence of John Darrell and W. Aldred. During this fit, Sommers displayed such strength that Strelley and three other men together could hardly hold him. The four of them were breathing hard and sweating from the exertion, but Sommers did not.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, February 18 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
938

Richard Mee claims he saw William Sommers having a violent fit, during which an unknown voice said that he would have his [Sommers'] right eye and then he would have his left eye." After this Sommers' left eye went black.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 6 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
939

Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly created a wax image of John Moulton, thrust a nail in the images head, and buried the image, as a means of slow, languishing, bewitchment

A Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft Containing these Severall Particulars

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
940

Matthew Hopkins looked for the wax image which Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly buried in a graveyard to bewitch John Moulton. The image is never found, but child soon recovered and 'grew lusty again'

A Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft Containing these Severall Particulars

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
941

Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly confessed to John Sterne, that she has made and uses wax images; she remains anonymous in his text.

A Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft Containing these Severall Particulars

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
942

Elizabeth Bradwell allegedly signs her name, in blood, in the devil's book.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1644 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
943

A old woman in Droitwich in the Country of Worcester (Anonymous 107) startled a boy (Anonymous 108) who was tending his mother's cows, by yelling "boo" from behind some bushes. Bewitchment was suspected as the boy could no longer speak.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
944

A bewitched boy (Anonymous 108), inarticulate and vengeful, ran after the woman he suspected of bewitching him, and raging, threw hot pottage in her face. The woman was identified as a witch.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
945

A woman (Anonymous 107), is immediately apprehended and jailed after being identified as a witch. The identification is based solely on the inarticulate rage of a little boy she had spooked, and who had thrown hot pottage into her face.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
946

A goaler (Anonymous 109), suspecting a local boy (Anonynous 108) had been bewitched into muteness made the woman he was holding in jail (Anonymous 106) sat the Lord's prayer and bless the lad, as a form of counter magic. It allegedly worked; the boy's speech was restored.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
947

The apparition of a witch (Anonymous 107) allegedly appears to a bewitched boy (Anonymous 108) at night. He rises to strike her; marks are later found on her body.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649, May   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
948

Anonymous 107 of Lancashire is tried for witchcraft.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649   Droitwich   Worcestershire  Worcester  England 
949

A woman (Anonymous 111) allegedly transforms into a black pole-cat like creature.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649 ? Tewkesbury  Teuksbury  Gloucestershire  Gloucester  England 
950

A man (Anonymous 112), suspecting something was stealing milk from his sow, as it made milk as its piglets starved, allegedly stabbed a black pole-cat like creature in the thigh. A bleeding woman (Anonymous 111) was identified as a witch and the thief, as she had the same stab wounds.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649 ? Tewkesbury  Teuksbury  Gloucestershire  Gloucester  England 
951

A woman (Anonymous 111) is tried in Gloucester as a witch.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1649 ? Glocester    Gloucestershire  Glocester  England 
952

Alice Huson asks to be paid for the services she provides Mrs. Corbet, with a piece of cloth which Corbet's children had worn next to their skin. Corbet gives her a neck cloth made of an old sheet, Huson refuses the gift; still she often frequents the Corbet's home and is given 'meat and drink'

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
953

Faith Corbet begins to have fits not long after her gloves went missing. Faith had been scolded by her mother ealier for suggesting Huson was a witch, and does not immediately accuse her of the theft. However, Faith but comes to blame Alice Huson, who had been sitting alone in her mother's kitchen, for the loss of her gloves and her subsequent fits.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
954

Faith Corbet's fits are diagnosed by 'numerous people' as natural. They are categorized as hysteria, melancholy, and convulsions.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
955

Faith Corbet is seen by a battery of physicians from all over York over a four year period. Corbet responds to their treatments only sometimes; her fits come in intervals.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
956

Faith Corbet makes the first of many claims that medical intervention will not cure her so long as her tormentors walked free. This is also the first time Doll Bilby is implicated in Corbet's fits, and by implication, identified as a witch.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
957

Faith asserts that the day her sister goes into labour (which happens on March 22, 1663, the beginning of the year Faith lives with her), a black cat lurches at her and frightens her. The implication is that this is Huson. After three days of examination, Huson admits to transmogrifying into a cat, but get's the details wrong. She says she was under a window and Faith said the cat was at the door.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1663, March 4 Pickering  Pickering  North Yorkshire  York  England 
958

Faith Corbet suffers from the worst of her fits: it last twenty two hours. Sometimes her tongue hangs out, sometimes her teeth grit. Her legs and arms twist, her stomach carves in. She lays still with her eyes open, as though dead, but can hear, understand, and at times accuse Alice Huson and Doll Bilby.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 22 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
959

Faith Corbet, after a short recovery, facilitated by the presence and attention of three doctors, again falls into fits after seeing Doll Bilby. Henry Corbet decide to take action against Alice Huson and Doll Bilby

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1644, April 24 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
960

Alice Huson and Doll Bilby are apprehended as witches, at the behest of Henry Corbet. His daughter, Faith Corbet, had accused both women of bewitching her for over four years.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1644, April 25 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
961

Alice Huson and Doll Bilby are examined as witches, at the behest of Henry Corbet. His daughter, Faith Corbet, had accused both women of bewitching her for over four years.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1644, April 26 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
962

Alice Huson and Doll Bilby are searched as witches, at the behest of Henry Corbet. His daughter, Faith Corbet, had accused both women of bewitching her for over four years.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1644, April 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
963

Doll Bilbly, during her re-examination as a witch (done at the behest of Henry Corbet) confesses to bewitching Faith Corbet.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1644, April 29 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
964

Alice Huson, during her re-examination as a witch (done at the behest of Henry Corbet) confesses to bewitching Faith Corbet.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 28 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
965

Alice Huson and Doll Bilby are jailed as witches, at the behest of Henry Corbet. After 3 days of interrogation and searching (beginning on the 26th and ending on the 29th of April 1644), both women confessed to bewitching his daughter Faith.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1644, April 29 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
966

The devil in the shape of a black man with cloven feet and upon a horse appears to Alice Huson. He promises her that if she would give herself to him, she should never want. She agrees and her gives her money (5 or 7 shillings, altogether about 7 times). She falls to her knees and worships him, because she 'said [she] would.'

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1661 ? Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
967

Alice Huson confesses 'in her own words' to the crimes which Faith Corbet accused her of, in the order they appear in Henrt Corbet's account.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 28 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
968

Alice Huson allegedly transforms herself into a black cat in order to frighten Faith Corbet. She confesses to this at trial.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1663, March 22 Pickering  Pickering  North Yorkshire  York  England 
969

Alice Huson confesses 'in her own words' to killing Dick Warren. She committed this crime through use of the evil eye and ill intent.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 28 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
970

Alice Huson confesses 'in her own words' to having a largely financial relationship with the devil. The devil gave her money, and she gave/lent this money to Thomas Ratle (20 s), Lancelot Harrison (20 s), and Will Parkely (2 s) implicating them in her maleficium, as they profit from it.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 28 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
971

Alice Huson is allegedly tormented by the devil.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1661 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
972

Alice Huson allegedly has a witch's mark from which the devil sucks.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1664, April 28 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
973

A 'prodigal' woman (Anonymous 113), becomes bitter, after her husband got her pregnant, spent all her money, and left her. In her envious 'passions' over her sister's happiness (Anonymous 114), the devil persuades her to become a witch (and to kill her sister's child).

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1600? Oxford  Oxford  Oxford  Oxfordshire  England 
974

A woman (Anonymous 113) allegedly 'got upon a Bed-staff, said certain words' and flew into the bedroom where her sister and her sister's husband slept. This assertion came from Anonymous 113's seven year old daughter (Anonymous 115) who was allegedly left there on one of the 'hundreds' of times she made the trip.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Oxford  Oxford  Oxford  Oxfordshire  England 
975

Following the testimony given against her by her daughter (Anonymous 115), Anonymous 113 confesses, and is condemned and executed as a witch.

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1660 Oxford  Oxford  Oxford  Oxfordshire  England 
976

Anne Styles confessed to Mr. Chandler to having "received a peece of Silver of the Devill," and two pins from Anne Bodenham as signs of her demonic pack. She prophesied that she would become "troubled" because she had revealed these details after the Devil instructed her not to.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653   Stockbridge  Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
979

Anne Bodenham is brought to see Anne Styles who is finally able to sleep in prison, after being tormented by the devil. A group asks Anne Bodenham about Anne Styles and they pray for her. After the meeting, Anne Styles wakes up from sleep and is suddenly cured from her fits. When Anne Stiles walks, "she praised God she felt no paine."

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
981

Mr. Wayneman gives deposition alleging that Dr. John Lambe claimed to be able to "doe strange things, as intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children." Lambe also claimed to have four spirits bound to his crystal ball, of which Benias was chief.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
983

Dr. John Lambe allegedly tells Lady Fairfax "Madam, your Ladyship is very merry and pleasant, but within this few dayes your heart will ake, by occasion and accident of water." Three days later, her brothers Anonymous 118, the sons of the Earl of Moultgrave, drown. During his examination, Lambe "confessed that he knew of this accident before it befell by their complexions and the Planets which gouerned them."

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
984

Joan Peterson delivers a paper of witnesses to defend her during her trial; this results in the calling of physicians Dr. Bates and Dr. Colledon, and surgeons Mr. Stamford, and Mr. Page to give evidence. They describe Lady Powel's severe and lengthy sickness from "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies," and express wonder that she lived as long as she did. Their testimony vindicates Mrs. Levingston and Joan Peterson on the charge bewitching Lady Powel to death. Lady Powel is said to have been 80 years of age at the time of her death.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
985

Numerous Justices of the Peace at Hicks Hall and the Old Bailey declare that they are unsatisfied with the proceedings and proof against Jane Peterson; they indicate that there was a design to the whole affair related to a prejudice against Anne Levingston.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
986

The confederation of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 139, and their agents, repeatedly promise Jane Peterson a reprieve or pardon if she will confess that Anne Levingston had employed her to kill Lady Powel; Peterson refuses to make a false confession, going so far as to punch one member of the confederation in the nose and declare him a rogue.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, April 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
987

Joan Peterson is found not guilty of bewitching Lady Powel to death, but is found guilty of bewitching Christopher Wilson; she is condemned to die as a witch.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
988

Anthony Birch, attending a party at a gentleman's house where Dr. John Lambe performs juggling tricks, allegedly picks up Lambe's crystal ball when it is left on a table. He sees the shape of a hand in its depths, and then "a shepheard with a sheepehooke and tarbox on his backe." He is so amazed that he asks aloud what it is that he is seeing, and Dr. Lambe discontentedly snatches the ball back.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
989

Anthony Birch claims "it manifestly appeareth that the said Doctor Lambe was an absolute Witch, a Sorcerer and Iugling person absolutely giuen ouer to lewd wicked and diabolicall courses, an invocator and adorer of impious and wicked Spirits."

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
990

Dr. John Lambe can allegedly, through the spirits trapped in his crystal ball, "vndertake any difficult thing, and did very often discouer and bring to light goods and chattels although they had for a long time beene lost." Through the same means, he can also tell whether a person accused of witchcraft is truly a witch and diagnose disease without seeing the patient.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
991

While Dr. John Lambe is imprisoned, a gentlewoman (Anonymous 117) approaches him repeatedly to ask who her husband would be. When he finally agrees to the request, he allegedly bids her look into his crystal ball, which he sets on the ground. She reports seeing numerous people she know in its depths, and the image finally resolves to a gentleman she does not recognize, dressed all in green. Dr. Lambe tells her to take note of him, and said that though they would meet without him intending to make himself a suitor, he would feel compelled to be by the time they parted company. She describes this encounter and Dr. Lambe's prediction to numerous of her acquaintances, and a few days later the man in green come to her father's house as a client of her father's legal practice. However, the man's horse spooks and kicks him. He is taken into the gentlewoman's home to recover, and the two fall in love while he is under her care. They marry not long thereafter.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
992

Dr. John Lambe is visited while imprisoned at Worcester Castle by three gentlemen, who allegedly decide to send for wine. The keeper tells them it is too late in the evening and the Castle gates have been locked for the night. The gentlemen give up the idea, but Lambe asks them what it was they had wanted to drink. He calls for a wine glass, and a pot appeared on the table with the sign of the Globe Tavern on the pot. When the gentlemen left, they stopped at the Globe Tavern and asked if anyone had fetched a bottle of wine from him lately. The inkeeper replied that "a little boy in greene had since eight of the clocke fetched so much for Doctor Lambe."

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

1627 Worcester Castle    Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
994

Rebecca West allegedly takes the devil, in the shape of a gentleman, for her husband. He appeared to her at night and "desired of her, that he might have the same familiaritie with her, that others that appeared unto her before." She agreed to his terms, and the devil, cold as clay, kissed her, and lead her about the room before declaring they were married.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
995

John Hart allegedly dies from witchcraft administered by Rebecca West. Charges for this are presented Thomas Hart, his father, John Edes, a clerk, and an unnamed doctor (Anonymous 119). Rebbecca West allegedly pleads guilty to this murder, saying this had all been occasioned by her extreme poverty.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, March Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
996

Margaret Landis is identified as a witch by a passing child (Anonymous 120) who calls her "Pegg the witch."

The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches

1645 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
997

A child (Anonymous 120) falls sick and dies less three weeks after calling Margaret Landis "Pegg the witch." Margaret Landis had allegedly pointed at him threateningly. While the child was sick, he would have violent fits and call out saying Pegg the witch was by his bed.

The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches

1645 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
998

Abraham Chad and Elin Shearcraft testify that Susan Cock and Rose Hallybread made a large fire and used wax dolls resembling the Peak children to torment them. They stuck pins in the dolls and turned them on a spit over the fire. The children, allegedly unaware of what was happening, simultaneously felt pain.

The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches

1645, March Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1000

Matthew Hopkins claims there is a coven of seven or eight witches living in his hometown of Manningtree, Essex. These witches allegedly make sacrifices to the Devil, and bid their imps to go to one another.

The Discovery of Witches

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1001

The four ministers sent for by Anonymous 429 call on several other ministers and Christian members of the neighbourhood community to assist; all together they allegedly "kept several days in Fasting and Prayer" on behalf of Anonymous 28. During this time, two great bunches are observed to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and the rough voice is heard to speak blasphemies. One of the ministers "did earnestly beg of God, that he would plague and torment Satan for such his Blasphemies; upon which the Spirit made a most dreadful crying and bemoaning his condition, and said, I will do so no more: To which the Minister replid, Satan, that shall not serve thy turn." The spirits cried and roared hideously, and thereafter it was observed that only one bunch rose in Anonymous 28's throat. The onlookers conclude that one of the two spirits (Anonymous 190) has been banished.

Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire

1664   Dacorum Hundred  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1002

Elizabeth Clarke is watched for four nights as a witch, with up to ten people watching her.. On the fourth night her familiars as Holt, Jarmara, Vinegar Tom, Sack and Sugar, and Newes allegedly appear.

The Discovery of Witches

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1003

The remaining spirit possessing Anonymous 28, Anonymous 190, allegedly takes advantage of the ministers' pause for refreshment and begins to toss the girl up and down. It also takes the use of her legs and causes her chair to "fall down backwards almost to the ground, and then lift it up again."

Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire

1664   Dacorum Hundred  Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1004

"The Wisemen" from Knaresborough Forest (the home of many of the accused witch's in Edward Fairfax's account), allegedly teach the locals to burn calves as an act of counter magic when their cows will not give milk

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621   Forest of Knaresborough   North Yorkshire  York  England 
1005

"The Wisemen" of Knaresborough forest claim that supernatural sufferings experienced by Helen Fairfax, Elizabeth Fairfax, and Maud Jeffery, were the result play and counterfeit.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1006

Helen Fairfax falls into a 'trance' where she lays 'as though dead' for several hours. During this time, she imagined she had been in Leeds, hearing sermon given by Mr. Cooke.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, October 28 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1007

Anonymous 121 discloses the names other witches living with her (The Manningtree Witches) and their imp familiars called Elemauzer, Pyewacket, Peckin the Crown, and Grizzel Greedigut.

The Discovery of Witches

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1008

Helen Fairfax speaks to dead siblings during a series of trances. Her condition is attributed to hysteria.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, October Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1009

Matthew Hopkins claims that a witch's mark is defined by three criteria: first, the mark is found in an unusual place on the body, second, no pain is felt when a pin or needle is thrust through it, and third, the mark is dry and close to the flesh (this indicates that a familiar has been sucking from it).

The Discovery of Witches

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1010

Matthew Hopkins claims that the devil does not desire witch's blood for nourishment, but to further her damnation. Hopkins believes that in drawing blood out of teats (witch' marks) the devil is able to physically enter a witch's body, and then become another creature such as a cat, rat, or mouse.

The Discovery of Witches

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1011

Matthew Hopkins asserts that an early form of testing for witchcraft in Essex and Suffolk was to keep the accused witch awake for several days on end. The thought was that, if kept awake, the witch would call on her familiars, thus proving her guilty.

The Discovery of Witches

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1012

Matthew Hopkins asserts that one way to test for witchcraft is to make the accused witch walk continuously until she is so tired and sore that she must sit down. If the woman is indeed a witch, her familiars will come to her as soon as she stops walking.

The Discovery of Witches

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1013

Matthew Hopkins claims that the devil often tricks witches when they are facing persecution. He will tell a witch that her identifying marks are so small they will not be noticed, yet they are often noticed and the witch is, as a consequence, hanged. He will also tell a witch that if she sinks during a swimming test then her name will be cleared, but a witch will often float and thus be executed.

The Discovery of Witches

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1014

Matthew Hopkins claims that he denies the confession of a witch if: it is drawn from her by torture, violence, or flattery. Under those circumstances, she will confess to improbable acts such as flying in the air or riding a broom; words are put in her mouth.

The Discovery of Witches

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1015

The Manningtree witches are allegedly searched for witch's marks. Marks are allegedly found on all of them.

The Discovery of Witches

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1016

The Manningtree witches are hanged.

The Discovery of Witches

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1017

Johane Harrison allegedly practices image magic. She confesses to pricking a parchment with a pin to cause pain on the corresponding place on a human's body

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford  Gadsden  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
1018

Johane Harrison allegedly practices necromancy. She uses the bones and hair of a man and woman to help power her image magic. She claims that, with the help of her spirit, she can inflict pain on anyone just by pricking the piece of parchment at the spot which represents the body part on which she wished to inflict pain. The pain inflicted was allegedly so great that death was regarded as a happier fate.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1606, August 4 Hartford  Gadsden  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
1019

A Yeoman (Anonymous 122), convinced he is bewitched by Johane Harrison, is carried to a neighbor's home. He had previously called Johane Harrison and old hag and, in response, Johane Harrison threatened to harm him. While ill, the yeoman became convinced also that he would get better should he be able to scratch Johane Harrison in the face. The neighbor's wife, feigning some other need, invited Harrison over to their home. There, the Yeoman scratched Harrison, and within three days was recovered.

The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell

1604 Hartford  Gadsden  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
1020

John Palmer allegedly confesses that Marsh of Dunstable is the leader of the "College of Witches" coven. Marsh is considered a good witch by man, for he "hath so long gratified the Country people with his Conjurations." It is believed that he performs good deeds only as the blackest of Devils, meaning that they are all false in nature. Palmer further confesses that he himself had been a witch for some sixty years, "long enough to know and give in the totall summe of all the Conjuring conclave, and the society of Witches in England."

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1021

John Palmer confesses as to how the devil took advantage of him, when he "of a fretfull and revengfull nature," was not able to avenge himself of his adversaries, causing him to join the Devil. Upon this act, he was granted two familiars, one a dog called George, and the other a woman called Jezabell.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1022

John Palmer confesses that the Devil showed him his 'mark' by drawing it on the ground. The devil the drew Palmer's blood, and had him use it to make the same mark on the ground.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1023

John Palmer confesses that he seduced his kinswoman, Elizabeth Knott, into aiding him in his villainy. He and Elizabeth Knott made a clay image of Goodwife Pearls and laid it on the fire. While the image was "consuming and mouldring away the woman lay in miserable torments." Pearls died immediately after the image was finally and completely consumed by the fire.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1024

John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott allegedly murder Goodwife Pearls, through the burning of a clay figure of Pearls, which they burned. This was an act of revenge, as Goodwife Pearls hung a lock upon his door and he did not pay rent to her.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1025

John Palmer confesses to sending one of his familiars to kill Mr. Cleavers' horse.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1026

Elizabeth Knott allegedly sends a familiar (Anonymous 241) in the form of a cat to bewitch John Lamans' cow as an act of revenge. However, Knott "had no hand in the death of any thing, save the death of Goodwife Pearls," suggesting the cow lived. The familiar came to Elizabeth Knott three weeks before the cow was bewitched, and promised that she should have "her desire in any thing she would desire, except money." The reason Elizabeth Knott chose to bewitch the cow of Laman was because she was denied money that was due to her by Laman's wife. This familiar would suck from her breast as well.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1027

Master Avery, hearing of Mistress Belcher's affliction, comes to see his sister and is moved by her woeful condition. While at her bedside, he allegedly hears her "cry out against Ioane Vaughan alias Varnham, and her mother," and becomes convinced that Belcher has been afflicted by witchcraft when a neighbour reports the altercation between Vaughan and Belcher.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1028

Master Avery allegedly decides that the only way to help his sister, Mistress Belcher, is to draw blood from Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan. He attempts to approach their home to lure them out, but is forcibly prevented from getting close by an invisible barrier. Though he tries two or three more times, he is always halted at the same spot.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1029

Master Avery, defeated by his inability to help Mistress Belcher, returns to his own home, only to realize that he, too, has earned the enmity of Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan. Confident that he cannot reach them, they allegedly cause him to suffer the same torments and fits as his sister.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1030

Helen Fairfax claims that a cat had stole her breath and replaced it with a "filthy smell" which poisoned her. After this occurrence she began to gurgle and vomit blood during her fits.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, November 3 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1031

The devil in the shape of a gentleman appears to Helen Fairfax, promising to marry her and make her the queen of England. The man forbids her from naming God, and refuses to approach her, so that she can tell by touch if he is an apparition or not.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, November 14 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1032

Sir Kenelm Digby claims that the idea possession might be spread by sympathy. He presents the story of a gentlewoman whose hysteria was 'caught' by her retinue. They were healed by being separated; she was purged of ill humours.

Of The Sympathetick Powder. A Discourse in a Solemn Assembly at Montpellier

1658 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1033

The devil in the shape of a gentleman appears to Helen Fairfax and attempts to persuade her to kill herself with a knife, a rope, and a "great pin" which is in her petticoat. Fairfax refuses, and shows the pin to her family when she awakes from her fit.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, November 14 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1034

John Palmer confesses to Sampson Clark, the Keeper of the Prison, that he once transformed a young man (Anonymous 124) into a toad as an act of revenge; the boy had kicked Palmer in the shin, causing him great pain. The young man was bewitched for many years, "to his great woe and torment."

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1035

Minister Cook and William Fairfax exorcise the gentleman devil (who had been tormenting Helen Fairfax and tempting her to suicide) from the room by reciting prayers and reading psalms.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, November 14 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1036

The devil transforms from a "beast with many horns," to a calf, to a little dog. As a dog, he demands Helen Fairfax open her mouth so he could enter and possess her.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, November 15 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1037

The devil claims to have ten thousand angels working for him. He attempts to frighten and tempt Helen Fairfax with a series of strange visions; he presents her with the vision of a horse, chopping its head off when she refuses to mount it and fills the kitchen with fire.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, November 15 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1038

John Palmer is executed on 16 July, 1649, having been found guilty of witchcraft, the murder of Goodwife Pearls, the transformation of a young man (Anonymous 124) into a toad, sending his familiars to kill Mr. Cleaver's horse, and seducing his kinswoman towards witchcraft and malefic compact with the Devil as well.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649, July 16 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1039

Elizabeth Knott is executed on 16 July, 1649, having been found guilty of witchcraft, including the murder of Goodwife Pearls, and bewitching John Lamans' cow.

The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott

1649, July 16 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1040

John Walsh is examined by Thomas Williams on 20 August, 1566 on charges of witchcraft; John Butler, Robert Buller, William Blachford, and John Bordfield are present during the questioning.

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
1041

John Walsh confesses to practicing physic and surgery for the five years since his master Robert Dreiton died.

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
1042

John Walsh confesses to using one of his Masters books and two wax candles to call familiar spirits to him; Walsh would ask the spirits questions, and gather information on bewitched people.

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
1043

The devil in the shape of a gentleman appears to Helen Fairfax with the image of a naked child which he proceeds to beat. He admits the image is an image of her, which is used to bewitch her. He also offers to lay the image in bed with her (as one would lay in bed with their infant). The same image appears later in the afternoon when one of two 'boys' who had appeared to Helen stand it up, dance about it, throw their hats at, and kick it.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, January 2 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1044

Elizabeth Fairfax is "touched" by Elizabeth Fletcher, who picks up Fairfax, who is standing by the fire, and moves her, taking her spot and signifying the moment of possession contamination. Lady Fairfax suggested that if Fletcher was a witch, the child would soon ail; the bewitchment manifest 4 days later.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, January 2 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1045

Elizabeth Fairfax sees a poor boy lurking in the halls of her parent's home. Two day's later, while sitting on Elizabeth Smith's knee, the boy approached her again and threatened to drown her (as her sister had been threatened). At this time she identifies the boy as Elizabeth Fletcher's spirit.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, January 6 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1046

Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax, over a series of 4 days, allegedly experience simultaneous trances, during which they share visions of two cats fighting, a woman, an old man, and a "deformed thing, having the face of a woman, and all the body besides rough and mis-shapen."

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, January 27 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1047

Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax simultaneously experience "great agony" and great sickness from Jan 31-February 2; a week later they fall into fits which look like hysteria.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, January 31 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1048

John Walsh confesses that his first form of payment to his familiar was a drop of blood. After this time he would give his familiar two living creatures once a year as payment; the creatures included a chicken, a cat, and a dog.

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
1049

John Walsh confesses to using frankincense, Saint John's wort, and burning candles to call upon his familiar, which he instructs to send messages and return at an appointed hour.

The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams

1566, August 20 Netherbery  Netherbery  Dorset  Dorsetshire  England 
1050

Thomas Spatchet allegedly loses the ability to speak. He later regains his voice, but then loses it again, this pattern repeating for the rest of the day. The loss of speech coincides with a grinding pain at the crown of his head.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1051

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from benumbing fits, during which he appears lifeless. His limbs become heavy and hang down, his eyes shut and do not open, and his teeth clench together; these paralyzing fits can continue for two or three hours.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1052

An old wet woman, later revealed to be Jennet Dibble, appears to Helen Fairfax. She allegedly showed her images of herself, her sister, and Maud Jeffray.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, February 12 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1053

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from shaking fits. These fits would start off moderately, like a palsy, then become violent. They are said to start at his head and progress down his body, with only one part shaking at a time and the rest still, until it reached his legs, and then his whole body would shake violently.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1054

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from dancing fits, during which his legs and feet move with agility and harmony. His feet strike the ground as if they are bells ringing or are striking out a drumbeat, but Spatchet is said to have no previous musical talent.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1055

An old wet woman who is later identified as Jennet Dibble, claims to have been a witch for 40 years. She also identifies Elizabeth Fletcher as the witch who bewitched Elizabeth, Margaret Waite as a witch, and her daughter Maragaret Thorpe as the witch who had visited Helen.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, February 12 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1056

Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan are apprehended by Sir William Saunders and brought to Northampton Gaol.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1057

Master Avery and Mistress Belcher are brought, delirious with their afflictions, to Northampton Gaol to scratch Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan. Drawing blood from Brown and Vaughan allegedly delivers them from pain, but their fits resume with greater violence as soon as they are out Brown and Vaughan's sight.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
1058

Master Avery and Mistress Belcher, riding home to Guilesborough in a coach after visiting Northampton Gaol, allegedly encounter a man (Anonymous 125) and a woman (Anonymous 126) riding double on a black horse. Avery sees Anonymous 125 and Anonymous 126 gesturing strangely, and is moved to cry out "That either they or their Horses should presently miscarcy." This proves prophetic, for moments later the horses drawing the carriage fell down dead. Avery rose up praising the grace and mercy of God for delivering them and not suffering foul spirits to work their mischief on men.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1059

Master Avery's fits allegedly continue until he is standing next to the judges and Joan Vaughan was brought to him in the Northampton Castle yard. He is said to have been in the middle of a fit at the time.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1060

Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan are arraigned and indicted on charges of bewitching Master Avery and Mistress Belcher, and for bewitching a child to death. They both plead innocent, but are found guilty and sentenced to death. Brown and Vaughan are returned to Northampton Gaol to await their executions.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
1061

Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan are executed on July 22, 1611 for bewitching Master Avery and Mistress Belcher, and for bewitching a child to death. Both maintain their innocence until the end.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611, July 22 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
1062

It is alleged that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, she was seen riding a sow with Katherine Gardiner and Joan Lucas at night to visit an old witch named Mother Rhoades. However, Mother Rhoades is said to have died while the three were en route, and cried out with her last breath that "shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1063

Bill (Mother) allegedly faints often and complains pitifully that the law is stronger than her art; she becomes convinced that she would be hanged like her son Arthur Bill. After three or four days of horror at the possibility, in which she rails against her damnation, birth and conception, she cuts her own throat to save the hangman the work.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
1064

Hellen Jenkenson is apprehended from her home in Thrapston by Sir Thomas Brook for allegedly bewitching a child to death and committed to Northampton Gaol. She is suspected of the child's murder due to a reputation for living an evil life, and suspicion that she had bewitched cattle and caused other mischiefs in the past.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611, May 11 Thrapston  Thrapston  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1065

Hellen Jenkenson is searched for witch's marks shortly before her apprehension. The search is carried out by a jury of women led by Mistress Moulsho; they allegedly find a mark, much to their amazement.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611, May Thrapston  Thrapston  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1066

Mary Barber is apprehended from her home in Stanwicke by Sir Thomas T[...]ham for allegedly bewitching a man to death, causing harm to cattle and other mischief. She is committed to Northampton Gaol. She is said to be rude, degenerate, licentious, malicious, envious, cruel, violent and to possess devilish desires.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611, May 6 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1067

Thomas Spatchet's fits allegedly escalate. They are said to occur every fifteen minutes to half an hour, four to twenty times a day, for weeks and months on end. The more there are in a day, the shorter each individual fit is said to be, and he hardly has one day in a month or five weeks without a fit.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1660   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1068

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from skipping or jumping fits, where his feet come close together, move up and down, and side to side; these fits are said to continue until he has no strength left in his legs and has to rest.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1660   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1069

Thomas Spatchet allegedly loses the ability to speak whenever he tries to pray or attempts to participate in his religious duties. He is able to go a little way, but soon falters and fails.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1070

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from wringing fits, during which his hands lay over one another, with one hand wringing the other, moving about his body and winding about furniture. These fits were said to last half an hour and were not accompanied by shaking. When his hands were done, his head would be affected, and then his body until he would be wrung around or almost off his chair.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1693   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1071

Aubrey Grinset confesses to murdering John Collet of Cookly and Henry Winson of Walpoole through bewitchment.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1072

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly cured of his violent fits and inability to travel when Aubrey Grinset dies in prison. This is seen as confirmation that she is a witch.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1667   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1073

Joan Buts allegedly came to the house of Mr. Tuers and asked Elizabeth Burgiss for a pair of old gloves, but Burgiss, knowing Buts to be a person of ill repute, sends her away with a short, sharp refusal. Buts returns a short time later, this time asking for a pin for her neckcloth, which Burgiss provides.

Strange and Wonderful News from Yowel in Surry giving a True and Just Account of One Elizabeth Burgiss

1681, October 5 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
1074

Jane Buts alleges in court that Hakeing, one of the witnesses, "had given himself to the Devil Soul and Body" but is unable to answer Lord Chief Justice Sir Francis Pemberton when he demands how she knows this. Pemberton rebukes her for abusing the witnesses.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
1075

Mr. Chamblet alleges in his deposition that he had bargained with Jane Kent over two of his pigs, and that when he refused to deliver them without payment, she bewitched all of his swine.

A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1076

A woman (Anonymous 128) deposes that she had searched Jane Kent, and found her to have a teat on her back and unusual holes behind her ears.

A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1077

A coachman (Anonymous 129) gives deposition alleging that his coach was overthrown shortly after he refused to carry Jane Kent and her goods.

A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1078

Jane Kent provides evidence that she is honest, a great pains-taker and a regular Church-goer, on the strength of which the Jury finds her not guilty.

A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1079

Dorcas Coleman allegedly suffers from tormenting pains, with a pricking in her arms, stomach, and heart.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1680, August Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1080

Helen Fairfax loses the ability to move based on touch of a phantom hand on her bare legs and the touch of phantom fingertips on her eyelids.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, December 14 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1081

Fairfax's bewitchment is traced to the penny which Mrs. Fairfax had accepted from Margaret Waite Senior as a tariff on her corn sales. This penny, a penny which was never where it was supposed to be, and would not melt in the fire, would come to haunt Helen Fairfax. Edward Fairfax finally "dissolved with brimestone and fire and beat it to powder upon a stone."

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, November 23 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1082

A woman who appears like Helen Fairfax's aunt appears to her, giving her a handful of spice. Helen accuses the woman of being a witch and throws the spice into the fire, later revealing it was a handful of raisins.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, January 25 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1083

Margaret Wait Senior and Elizabeth Fletcher are imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, February 9 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1084

Margaret Thorpe appears to Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax and threatens to give them a witch's mark -- so that she might recognize them.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, February 11 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1085

Dorcas Coleman appeals to Thomas Bremincom and Dr. George Beare to remedy her pains. Beare attempts to heal her, but realizes the illness is beyond his skill level; he informs Coleman that she has been bewitched.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 26 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1086

Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax first meet Maud Jeffrey; they all instantaneously fall into fits.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, February 21 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1087

Margaret Thorpe, Peg Wait, and Jennit Dibble are searched as witches; Helen Fairfax is called in to identify Thorpe as the woman with a spot on her face who had tormented her. Helen identified Wait and Dibble (by name) as witches.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, February 23 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1088

Dorcas Coleman allegedly becomes speechless and stuck to a chair when Susanna Edwards comes into her presence. Coleman then slides out of the chair and is unable to get up until Edwards leaves the room.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1680 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1089

Grace Thomas is allegedly bewitched by Temperance Lloyd and becomes immobile as if she had been chained up. Thomas also, at the same time, suffers from a pain in her stomach that causes her belly to swell double in size.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1680, August Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1090

Temperance Lloyd is searched by a group of women (Anonymous 163) for witchs marks; two are found in her privy parts. The marks are described as inch long teats, which Lloyd confesses have been sucked on by a black man (the devil).

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1091

Temperance Lloyd confesses that the devil appeared in the shape of a bird outside Grace Thomas' house.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1098

Margaret Thorpe allegedly shows Helen Fairfax a paper signed with blood, describes as a 'lease,' the paper is Thorpe's malefic compact, and supposedly representative of all malefic compacts.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, March 9 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1099

Joan Williford alleges during her confession that her familiar, Bunne, promised that she would not sink if she were thrown in water, and came to her twice while she was in prison to suck from her in the form of a mouse.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 24 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1100

Joan Williford pleads guilty to the charges of witchcraft against her. On the day of her execution, Mayor Robert Greenstreet asks her if she thinks she deserves death, to which she says that she does, and adds that she wants "all good people to take warning by her, and not to suffer themselves to be deceived by the Divell, neither for lucre of money, malice, or any thing else, as she had done."

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 24 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1101

Joan Caridan, alias Argoll, is examined on September 25, 1645. She alleges that, nine months before, she was visited in the night by a "rugged soft thing" that lay on her breast, and that when she thrust it off her, she felt as though God had forsaken her. Caridan claims that this incident left her unable to pray as well as she had before. She thinks the thing was alive.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 25 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1102

Joan Caridan, alias Argoll, is examined a second time on September 25, 1645 before Mayor Robert Greenstreet. In this examination, she alleges that she was visited by the Devil in the shape of a "blacke rugged Dog" in the night, and this dog crept mumbling into her bed. He returned the next night, and this time demanded she deny God to rely on him instead, while promising her revenge her of anyone she wanted. Caridan agreed to this bargain, promised her soul and permitted this familiar to suck from her. He had sucked from her numerous times thereafter, and the sucking caused her no pain.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 25 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1103

A Justice of the Peace asks that Helen Fairfax and Margaret Thorpe appear before him, so that they can 'test' Thorpe. This JP later confides in Fairfax that he will test Thorpe a witch by making her recite the Lord's prayer.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, March 9 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1104

Edward Fairfax claims that 'witch testing' as demonstrated with witch-scratching, is, like witchcraft, the devil's work.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, March 9 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1105

Helen Fairfax allegedly finds a hazel staff which belongs to The Strange Woman (Anonymous 116), who confesses to leaving it out in the open as a bewitchment contaminate, and tries to wrestle it from Fairfax's hands. Fairfax escapes with it, runs inside and holds it in the fire -- an act of counter-magic to burn the spell off of it and render it benign again.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, March 19 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1106

Thomas Forrest is allegedly attacked by group of cats as he rides past Margaret Wait's home which follow him a great distance at a great speed. Helen Fairfax later claims these cats where witches that had shape shifted into cats to "touch" Forrest and bewitch him.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, March 20   Forest of Knaresborough   North Yorkshire  York  England 
1107

Henry Graver allegedly hired Margaret Waite and Margaret Thorpe to bewitch Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax and Maud Jeffray. He continued to pay for the witch's for silence on the matter (or they blackmailed him).

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, March 2   Forest of Knaresborough   North Yorkshire  York  England 
1108

The Strange Woman, (Anonymous 116) allegedly sat, in the form of a cat, in from of the fire at Margaret Waite's home, where she overheard Henry Graver hire Margaret Waite and Margaret Thorpe to bewitch Maud Jeffray and Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, March 2   Forest of Knaresborough   North Yorkshire  York  England 
1109

Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson are examined at the York Assize.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, April 1 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1110

Temperance Lloyd confesses to seeing something in the form of a grey cat at Grace Thomas' house. Lloyd also meets with the cat.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1111

The Strange Woman allegedly shows Helen Fairfax eight 'images' of people she bewitched; Jennit Dibble allegedly shows her eight eggs she had stolen.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, April 5 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1112

Jennit Dibble allegedly confesses to transforming herself into the shape of an old man and looming over the children in the nursery with a knife. She claims she helped cause Anne Fairfax's death in this way -- i.e. she scared her to death.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, October 9 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1113

Temperance Lloyd confesses that the devil appeared to her as a black man, was about the length of her arm in size, had very big eyes, and hopped towards her. After he appeared the devil sucked from teats in Lloyd's privy parts as she was lying on the ground.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1114

Margaret Waite (Sr) and Margaret Waite (Jr.) are released on bail.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1621, April 31 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1115

Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson are indicted before the Grand Jury at the York Assize.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, August 8 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1116

Thomas Eastchurch, Elizabeth Eastchurch, Honor Hooper, and Anne Wakely give evidence against Temperance Lloyd. The evidence supports claims that Lloyd practiced witchcraft against the body of Grace Thomas.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1117

The Judge (Anonymous 136) "withdrew the offenders from their trial by the jury of life and death," and dismissed Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, August 10 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1118

Helen Fairfax claims to see the Vicar Smithson and Margaret Waite (Jr.) "making hay."

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, August 13 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1119

John Dibble Jr. and Henry Graver allegedly produced sworn witnesses statements testifying to the fact that Jennit Dibble and the other witches accused (Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson had no known history of witchcraft.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, August 10 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1120

Temperance Lloyd is brought to the Bideford parish church and questioned by Mayor Thomas Gist and Rector Michael Ogilby as to how long she has been tempted by the devil.

A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1121

Helen Fairfax is unable to eat for close to two weeks; she appears close to death.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, August 15 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1122

Rachel Pinder and Agnes Brigges are determined to have faked vomiting pins, straws, old "clout" and other bodies.

The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London

1574 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1123

Mary Glover is pricked inside her nostril during a fit with a hot pin to see if she is pretending to be possessed. She remains unresponsive to this stimuli.

Satan's Invisible World Discovered

1603 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
1124

Margaret Waite (Jr.) and Margaret Thorpe are brought before Helen Fairfax, Elizabeth Fairfax, and Maud Jeffrays by a local constable. The young women remain otherwise senseless, but are able to speak with Margaret Waite and Margaret Thorpe. Upon waking, they also claim the have conversed with Peg Waite.

Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax

1622, February 22 Fuystone  Holme Valley  Yorkshire  York  England 
1125

Jennet Preston is reported executed at Yorke for the murder of Master Thomas Lister. This report appears in the list of witches alleged to have attended the feast at Malking Tower.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1126

Thomas Shovel and Cuthbert Nicholson bring a Scottish man to Newcastle as an expert witch searcher. He claims to be able to identify witches simply by their physical appearance. He strips women and uses the pin to test for witch's mark (as manifest as an insensible spot).

England's Grievance Discovered

1649 Newcastle    Borough of Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1127

Katherine Atkins disappears mysteriously after having given an old woman a pin. The woman had threatened that Katherine would disappear when the latter had offered her some victuals or thread from the shop.

A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent

1652, July 24 Warwick  Warwick  Warwickshire  Warwickshire  England 
1128

Richard Jones hallucinates and sees Jane Brooks on the wall. When he yells this, Gibson who is present (along with Richard Jones's father) stabs the wall. When they later go see Jane Brooks, she is holding her bloody hand and claims to have been scratched by a great pin.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1657     Somerset  Somerset  England 
1129

Mother Baker claims to be able to identify the person who bewitched the young maid Stupenny.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1584     Kent  Cantia  England 
1130

Julian Cox forces a young maid (Anonymous 33) to eat pins.

Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts

1663 Taunton    Somerset  Somersetshire  England 
1131

Mother Baker tells the Stuppeny family that a neighbour created a heart made of wax and pricked it with pins to cause their daughter to fall ill.

Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars

1585     Kent  Cantia  England 
1133

Elizabeth is terrified when she a woman (Anonymous 139) allegedly asks her for a pin. She runs inside screaming and falls ill shortly thereafter, refusing to eat meat from that point on.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, January 13 Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1134

Elizabeth Jennings accuses Margaret Russell (alias Countess, and potentially Anonymous 139), Jane Flower, Katherine Stubbs, and Nan Wood of bewitching her. She calls for the Countess' imprisonment.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 23 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1135

Elizabeth Jennings grows increasingly ill, losing the ability to walk.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, February 15 London Borough of Hounslow  Thistleworth (Syon House)  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1136

Lady Jennings, increasingly concerned with their daughter Elizabeth's languishing fits and "idle talk" send to word to London physician Dr. Fox. Dr. Fox brought Elizabeth back to London with him where she continued to suffer.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, February 19 London Borough of Hounslow  Thistleworth (Syon House)  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1137

Elizabeth Jennings, suffering from severe fits, convulsions, palsy, and memory loss, is treated by unnamed physicians, but the "medicines rather producing contrary effects," continued suffering.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, March 17 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1138

The physicians who were treating Elizabeth Jennings suggested three possible curatives, an emetic, blood letting, or a bath in oil. Although they did induce vomiting, Margaret Russell refused to let them bleed Jennings, citing the accidental death of the Earl of Exeter's Child after receiving this treatment.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 22 London (College of Physicians)    London, City of  London  England 
1139

Margaret Russell (aka The Countess) is examined by Sir William Slingsby on charges of having bewitched Elizabeth Jennings. At the end of the examination, he has her put in Newgate Prison.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 25 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
1140

Mrs. Dromondby instructs Margaret Russell, who has come looking for help curing the suffering Elizabeth Jennings, to ask Mrs. Goodcole for the name of a "female physician," rather than a "witch" or a "cunning woman." This suggests there is a known network of female healers in the London area and a concern with the potential damages which could be done by male physicians.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 24 London (Black and White Court in the Old Bailey)  London, City of  London  England 
1141

Mrs. Saxey of Gunpowder Alley is bewitched. Margaret Russell visits her to inquire after a book Saxey has which she feels might help Elizabeth Jennings.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, March London (Gunpowder Alley)  London, City of  London  England 
1142

Margaret Russell visits Anne Goodcole's house to request assistance in healing Elizabeth Jennings.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 24 Clerkenwell    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1143

Elizabeth Jennings claims, in one of her fits, that "the height of [her] disease is witchcraft," but that the witch's plaguing her can only make her sick, not kill her.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 26 London (College of Physicians)    London, City of  London  England 
1144

Margaret Russell is temporarily released from Newgate prison to speak with Anne and Henry Goodcole.

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 26 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
1145

Elizabeth Jennings is miraculously healed from a dire and deadly fit after she claims that one of her tormentors is imprisoned (Margaret Russell) and one is hanged (?).

The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings

1622, April 26 London (College of Physicians)    London, City of  London  England 
1146

Thomas Darling suffers from sore fits and violent vomiting after being separated from his uncle, Robert Toone, in Winsell Wood; the illnesses manifest after Darling wanders home.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597, February 27 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1147

Thomas Darling claims, during his violent fits and vomiting, to see a green angel in the window, and a green cat who troubles him.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1148

Thomas Darlings urine is collected and taken to a physician two times in an attempt to determine what illness he has. The physician first claimed he "saw no signes of anie natural disease in the Child, vnles it were the wormes." Darling's aunt took his urine to the physician again, "who iudged as before, saying further, he doubted that the Childe was be witched."

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1149

Thomas Darling suffers from a violent fit, during which he falls upon his back, raises his legs stiffly up in the air, contorts his belly so it is over his head, and roars loudly. Darling then rises up, walks around on his hands and feet, and says the Lord's name.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1150

Thomas Darling claims to have seen green cats during one of his violent fits. Darling would point out an invisible green cat which troubled him.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1151

Thomas Darling asks his friends (Friends of Thomas Darling), who in turn ask Jesse Bee, to read scriptures in between his fits so that he may hopefully be cured.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1152

Thomas Darling claims that he came across a little old woman wearing a gray gown, black fringe cape, broad hat, and who had three warts on her face. Darling angered the woman, causing her to curse him to go to hell. Darling believes this was the Witch of Stapen Hill, while others think it was Alice Gooderidge.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1153

Joan Cariden, alias Argoll, is examined a third time before Mayor Robert Greenwood on September 27, 1645. During this examination, Cariden made a confession alleging that Jane Hott told her there had been "a great meeting at Goodwife Panterys house, and that Goodwife Dadson was there, and that Goodwife Gardner should have been there, but did not come, and the Divell sat at the upper end of the Table."

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 27 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1154

Jane Hott is examined before Mayor Robert Greenwood on September 25, 1645. During this examination, Hott confesses that she has been visited by a thing like a hedgehog once or twice a month for the last 20 years. This thing would sometimes come in the night and suck her in her sleep; the pain would wake her up. She claims that when it lay on her breast, she would strike it off, and the creature would be "as soft as a Cat" under her hand.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September 25 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1155

Jane Hott, while imprisoned, allegedly speaks to the other accused witches and convinces them to confess their guilt. She, however, maintains her innocence and insists that she would sink if put into water.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1156

Jane Hott allegedly bets 20 shillings that she cannot be swum, but when put into the water she is seen to float on the surface. After, she claims that "the Divell went with her all the way, and told her that she should sinke; but when she was in the Water he sate upon a Crosse-beame and laughed at her."

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1645, September Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1157

Elizabeth Harris is examined on September 26, 1645 before Mayor Robert Greenstreet of Feversham. She alleges that the Devil appeared to her in the form of a mouse 19 years before and promised that she should have the revenge she desired.

The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott

1626 Faversham  Feversham  Kent  Kent  England 
1158

Thomas Darling is tormented by violent fits during the day and fearful dreams during the night. Darling claims that in these dreams he sometimes prays, and other times is tossed up and down on a string by a cat.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1159

Thomas Darlings grandmother (Mistress Walkden) and aunt (Mistress Saunders) visit him. After hearing his story of the woman in the wood, Darling's grandmother (Mistress Walkden) claims he does not have the falling sickness, but has been bewitched by Alice Gooderidge.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597, April 8 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1160

Alice Gooderidge is detained and questioned by Mistress Walkden about Thomas Darling about whether or not she has any knowledge of him. Gooderidge does not confess; she denies knowing Darling.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1161

Thomas Darling scratches Alice Gooderidges face and the back of her hands to draw her blood, in hopes of curing his bewitchment. Gooderidge wipes the blood from the back of her hand on Darling while saying God help thee, to which Darling answers, thy prayer can do me no good.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1162

Alice Gooderidge and her mother, Elizabeth Wright, are arrested on suspicion of witchcraft.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597, April 10 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1163

Master Graysley, in an attempt to cure Thomas Darling of his violent fits, commands the boy to read from the bible. Darling begins to read the first chapter of Johns Gospel, but by verse four, he starts to have "a most cruel fit."

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597, April 14 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1164

Master Graysley brings Elizabeth Wright to Thomas Darling, which causes Darling to go into a violent fit. Graysley asks Wright if she can do anything for Darling and Wright answers that her daughter (Alice Gooderidge) could help. Graysley tells Wright to kneel and pray for Darling. Wright prays in a language no one can understand and is then dismissed. Darling recovers after Wright leaves.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1165

Alice Gooderidge is scratched by Sir Humphrey in an attempt to cure Thomas Darling of his fits and illness.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1166

Alice Gooderidges husband (Oliver Gooderidge) and daughter (Daughter Gooderidge) are examined during her trial; they are found to disagree in their tales.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1167

Thomas Darling speaks with the Devil during one of his violent fits. The Devil tries to persuade Darling to worship him, but Darling says he will worship the Lord God alone.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1168

Elizabeth Wright, on the rare occasion of being in town, is apprehended, stripped of her clothing to show her witches mark, and cursed for being born. Wright is also questioned about who brought her to Burton, to which she allegedly replies, the devil.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1169

A stranger (Anonymous 142) visits Thomas Darling and greatly upsets him by questioning his belief in God, and by proposing that witches do not exist. Darling falls into another set of fits in the strangers presence; it is possible that the stranger is the Devil himself.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1170

Master Eccarshall, the Pastor of Burton, encourages Thomas Darling to not answer the Devil when he speaks to him, because the devil is a liar and is possibly making Darling ill.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1171

Jesse Bee reads from the bible and encourages Thomas Darling to fight the Devil. Although Darling has fits throughout the reading, Bee is able to finish the entire first chapter of the Gospel of John, a feat that had not been previously accomplished.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1172

Widow Worthington, the good witch of Hoppers, claims that Thomas Darling has been bewitched, and that she cannot help him.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1173

Alice Gooderidge is apprehended and brought to Robert Toone's home, where a Cunning man pressures her to confess to bewitching Thomas Darling. Unsuccessful at cajoling or coercion, the Cunning man puts a new pair of shoes on Gooderidge and places her near the fire so that the shoes will constrict and cause her pain, forcing her to confess.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1174

Alice Gooderidge is tried for supposedly bewitching Thomas Darling. Jerome Horabin, Edward Weightman, and Mistress Caldwall are among those who come to hear Gooderidge's confession.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1175

Alice Gooderidge confesses that the Devil appeared to her in the likeness of a little red and white coloured dog, which she calls Minny. Gooderidge allegedly sends Minny to seek revenge on a boy who called her a witch.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1176

Alice Gooderidge claims her familiar looks like William Gregories dog, an assertion which creates the rumor that Gregories dog actually is Gooderidges familiar. However, Gooderidge claims she received her familiar from her mother (Elizabeth Wright).

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1177

John Tonken allegedly suffers from fits in which he vomits strange objects that begin after a woman (Anonymous 6) in a blue jerkin and a red petticoat with yellow and green patches visits him; Tonken is the only person who can see or hear her, and she tell him that he will not be well until he vomits nutshells, pins, and nails. Soon after, he begins retching so hard two men can hardly hold him up and vomits up three pins and half a walnut shell.

A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall

1686, May 4 Pensans  Pensans  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
1178

John Tonken has a second fit a few days later in which he again vomits pins and walnut shells. This time, some of the pins are crooked.

A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall

1686, May 6 Pensans  Pensans  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
1179

John Tonken's vomiting fits allegedly begin to include stranger things, and he is searched with fingers in his mouth to see if he has been concealing them there; the searchers find nothing. The items he is said to vomit now include straw, an ear of rye with a stalk a half-yard long, yard-long rushes with broad knots in them, pins bent like fishhooks, dry brambles, and flat sticks that assemble into a breeting needle of the kind fishermen use to make nets.

A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall

1686, May Pensans  Pensans  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
1180

James Barrow suffers from a violent fit that is like being burned. The fit lasts for a week, during which Barrow also walks up and down a room, throws his hat from his head, lays his hands under his belly, screeches lamentably, and makes a croaking sound.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1181

Thomas Shevel and Cuthbert Nicholson examine thirty women alleged to be witches. The women are brought to the town hall in Newcastle. Shevel and Nicholson thrust pins into various parts of their bodies and found nearly twenty-seven of the thirty women guilty of witchcraft.

England's Grievance Discovered

1610 Newcastle    Borough of Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1182

Thomas Shovel and Cuthbert Nicholson examine a woman (Anonymous 143) to determine whether or not she is a witch. Upon first looking at her, they disagree whether she even needs to be tried. They try her by making her stand naked to the waist, pricking her thighs with pins. She does not bleed and so is determined to be a witch and child of the devil.

England's Grievance Discovered

1610 Newcastle    Borough of Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1183

Alice Gooderidge confesses to Robert Toone and a Cunning man that she is sorry for confusing Thomas Darling with another boy who broke her eggs.

The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1184

James Barrow allegedly sees rats (Anonymous 207) and cats (Anonymous 206) during his violent fits. The apparitions sometimes have glasses of sack (white wine) and pasties that they offer to Barrow. When Barrow refuses the food and drink, the rats and cats demand his soul. James Barrow refuses to condescend to them. When these tell Barrow that they will dine with him when "his Father and Mother was gone forth," he refuses to eat or drink, unless he "did first go behind the door and sing, with his hat off."

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1185

James Barrow suffers from thirty fits in one day, during which he strikes himself in the face and goes lame, dumb, and blind. It is believed this could only be accomplished "by the malice and power of the Devil."

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1186

James Barrow, in an effort to control his fits, is confined to one particular stool in the house. If any other person sits on the stool, Barrow is thrown flat on the ground as if dead, until the same person arises from the stool. When going to the houses of others, Barrow brings the stool with him. He counsels that no one should sit upon his stool, or he will know, however, having left the stool at a neighbour's house while at dinner with his household, he "fell down flat on his back," saying upon rising that he know "that some body hath sat upon my stool."

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1187

James Barrow declares he will not sing before he eats his food, but then chokes on his food when he attempts to eat it; Barrow cannot swallow one bite until he sings.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1188

James Barrow returns to his neighbour's house, where he accuses them of having sat upon his stool. After, he walks up and down in a frantic manner while holding a hammer, which he sometimes throws behind the door. He calls out the names of four people: Sam Man, John Sames, Mol Williams, and Mary Prett. This continues for part of the day, but none knew who those people were.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1189

James Barrows father (John Barrow) sees him sitting at a table with a pen, ink, and a pin. When John asks James what he is doing with the pin, James avoids answering the question. John thinks his sons put offs are the work of the devil.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1190

Lieutenant Colonel Hobson contests the former ruling that Anonymous 143 is a witch. Anonymous 143 is tried again. She is pricked again and blood gushes out. The former ruling is thus overturned.

England's Grievance Discovered

1610 Newcastle    Borough of Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1191

James Barrow suffers from a fit that causes his feet to become extremely cold. Barrow calls for his mother (Mother Barrow) to pull off his hose and shoes, and when she finds his feet to be cold she attempts to warm him with clothes; Barrows anguish continues until he becomes well again on his own.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1192

James Barrow roars and cries, making a hideous noise, whenever someone reads the bible in his presence; Barrow himself cannot utter the name of God or Christ.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1193

John Barrow employs the help of physician and astrologer John Hubbard to help cure his son, James Barrow. Hubbard states he is familiar with these sorts of conditions, and believes James Barrow has been bewitched.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1194

John Hubbard attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment by using "fopperies and charms," including hanging papers around Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver (liquid metal mercury) under the door. These attempts are unsuccessful.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1195

John Hubbard attempts a second time to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment. Barrows hair is cut off at the crown in a round circle, and his finger and toe nails trimmed; the trimmings are wrapped in paper. Barrow is also instructed to go to an oak tree, take some oak boughs home to sleep on, then return to the tree and ram the paper packet of hair and nail trimmings into a hole in the trunk; these attempts are also unsuccessful.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1196

Bartholomew Hobson, the reputed witch-finder, is imprisoned and executed. He is allegedly responsible for the execution of approximately 220 men and women across Scotland and England.

England's Grievance Discovered

1610       Unknown  England 
1197

After taking Physick from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for some time, working under a master as an Apprentice. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat suddenly appeared to him and then entered into his body. This invasion evidently causes Barrow to look and act like a Changeling (a fairy child) and be unable to eat any food unless in his own household, preventing him from being an apprentice.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1198

Elizabeth Device is examined at Read in Lancashire by Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell on March 30, 1612. During her examination, she claims that her mother, Elizabeth Southerns, "hath had a place on her left side by the space of fourty yeares."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, March 30 Reade  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1199

Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell orders Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike, Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, Alison Device and Anne Redferne imprisoned at the Castle at Lancaster to await their trials. They are imprisoned on the strength of their examinations and the accusations against them.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 2 Reade  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1200

About a week after imprisoning Elizabeth Southerns, Anne Whittle, Anne Redferne and Alison Device at Lancaster Castel, Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell becomes aware of a meeting at Malking Tower in the Forest of Pendle. He hears that at this meeting, numerous people plotted to murder Thomas Cowell and Thomas Lister, and to blow up Lancaster Castle before the next Assizes.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 9   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1201

The witchcraft trials begin at Lancaster Assizes on Tuesday, August 17, 1612. Lord Bromley, Justice of Assize for Lancaster, begins the trials with a "generall Proclamation, that all Iustices of Peace that had taken any Recognisaunces, or Examinations of Prisoners, should make Returne of them: And all such as were bound to prosecute Indictmentes, and giue Euidence against Witches, should proceede, and giue attendance: For hee now intended to proceed to the Arraignement and Tryall of VVitches."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1202

Anne Whittle stands trial indicted of witchcraft and of bewitching Robert Nutter to death. She pleads not guilty, and Lord Bromley commands the jury to enter the court. Robert Nowell is then called upon to read the evidence against her.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 17 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1203

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, starting fourteen or fifteen years before, a spirit would come to her in the shape of a man for four years. When he came, he would ask her for her soul. At the end of the four years, Whittle finally agreed, and the spirit promised that "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list." He commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie, and to call that name whenever she wanted anything of him. Not long after, Fancie tried to convince her to let him hurt Richard Baldwyn's wife, but she would not let him.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1597   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1204

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Robert Nutter desired to have his pleasure of her daughter, Anne Redferne, and became angry when she denied him. He left in a rage, saying "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard of this, she called her familiar Fancie to her. Fancie came in the shape of a man, and Whittle told him to go revenge her of Robert Nutter. Nutter died three months later.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1205

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Elizabeth Nutter, grandmother to Robert Nutter, approached her, Widow Lomeshaw and Jane Boothman to request their assistance in killing Robert, so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle claims that all three agreed initially, but that she backed out after her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Lomeshaw was angry with Redferne when Whittle withdrew her support, but was calmed down by Mr. Baldwyn, the schoolmaster for Covlne, and Redferne's gift of a capon. Whittle added that she thought Lomeshaw and Boothman did what they could to kill Robert. This took place before Robert made advances on Anne Redferne.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1206

Elizabeth Southerns alleges during her examination that one midsummer day, about half a year before Robert Nutter died, she went to Thomas Redferne's house, and saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne on either side of the ditch outside the house. Whittle was making two clay images, and Redferne one. Southerns asked her familar, Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, what they were doing. Tibb told her they were making pictures of Christopher Nutter, Robert Nutter, and Robert's wife Marie Nutter. When Southerns would not join them, Tibb became angry and shoved her into the ditch, spilling her can of milk, and vanished. Tibb reappeared in the shape of a hare once Southerns was a quarter mile from the Redferne house.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1207

James Robinson alleges during his examination that, six years before, his wife hired Anne Whittle to card wool. While Whittle worked, she drew drink several times. For the next eight or nine weeks, all the drink in the house was found to be spoiled; Robinson accused Whittle of causing the spoilage.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1606   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1208

John Barrow takes his bewitched son (James Barrow) to an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144) in the hopes of curing him. Anonymous 144 puts a cross on James Barrows head, which causes James Barrow to roar loudly.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1209

John Barrow takes his bewitched son (James Barrow) to the home of Lord Abony. Once there, a servant (Anonymous 145) pulls out a cross, causing James Barrow to roar.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1210

James Robinson alleges during his examination that, eighteen years before, he lived with Robert Nutter the elder. During this time, Robert Nutter the younger fell ill, and Robinson heard him complain several times that "he verily thought that the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and the said Redfernes wife, had bewitched him." Shortly after that, just before Nutter departed for Wales with his master, Sir Richard Shattleworth, Robinson heard him speaking to Thomas Redferne; Nutter told Redferne that "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." Nutter died on his way home, before Candlemas of the same year.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1211

John Barrow takes his bewitched son (James Barrow) to St. James to meet a gentleman (Anonymous 146) who can possibly heal him. The gentleman (Anonymous 146) brings James Barrow into the Queens Chapel; calls for a pot of holy water, ribbon, brimstone (sulphur), and a candle; and ties the ribbon three times around James Barrows neck while speaking in Latin. During this process James Barrow roars and stomps his feet.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661     Bristol  Bristol  England 
1212

John Barrow is told that if he makes his son (James Barrow) a Catholic, then his sons bewitchment and possession will stop. John Barrow believes this is foolish and refuses to convert his son.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661     Bristol  Bristol  England 
1213

James Barrow is told by a group of friars (St. James Friars) to pray to St. James in order to cure himself of his possession. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661     Bristol  Bristol  England 
1214

The Judges who will be presiding over the trials of the twenty people suspected of being witches arrive at Lancaster from Kendall. Thomas Cowell presents them with the full list of prisoners imprisoned in the castle of Lancaster as of August 16th, 1612. The trials are scheduled to begin the following day. Cowell's report shows that Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike, has died in prison.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 16 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1215

James Robinson claims during his examination that "Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 17   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1216

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that she called on Fancie, who was in the shape of a man, and bid him to kill Anthony Nutter's cow; the cow died not long after. Whittle claims that she did it because she thought Nutter favoured Elizabeth Southern over her.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1217

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that her familiar, Fancie, is responsible for her loss of most of her sight.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1218

Anne Whittle alleges that her familiar, Fancie, came to her one night the previous summer in the shape of a bear and gaped at her. He had appeared to her in this shape many times since. The last time he appeared to her, midsummer last, he was in this shape; Whittle would not speak to him and Fancie pulled her down.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1611, June   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1219

John Barrow claims he stripped and whipped his son (James Barrow) in the hopes of curing the boy of his possession and bewitchment.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1221

Allison Device alleges during her examination that, two years before, she heard that Anne Whittle was suspected of bewitching John Moore's drink, and that Whittle had said she would "meet with the said Iohn Moore, or his."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1222

Alison Device alleges during her examination that she had seen Anne Whittle with a clay image of John Moore Jr, child of John Moore. The child fell sick, languished for half a year and died.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1223

Alison Device alleges during her examination that, two years before, she was visiting with Anne Nutter, Anthony Nutter's daughter at their home, when Anne Whittle came to call. Device and Anne laughed at Whittle, and Whittle said to them "I will be meet with the one of you." Anne Nutter became sick the next day and died three weeks later.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1224

Allison Device alleges during her examination that, six or seven years before, Anne Whittle had a falling out with Hugh Moore when Moore accused her of bewitching his cattle. Whittle is said to have cursed Moore and said she would be revenged of him. He fell sick not long after, languished for about six months, and died. On his deathbed, Moore allegedly said that Whittle had bewitched him to death.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1605   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1225

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that she, Elizabeth Southerns and Alice Nutter joined together to bewitch Henry Mytton to death.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1226

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that her mother, Elizabeth Device, is a witch, and she knows this because she has seen a familiar spirit come to her numerous times at her home of Malking Tower. The spirit takes the shape of a brown dog, and is called Ball. When Ball came, he would ask her mother what she would have him do.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 17   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1227

James Device alleges during his examination that, two years before, his grandmother Elizabeth Southerns urged him to go to the new church in Pendle the day before Good Friday and take Communion, but not to eat the bread. Instead, he was to deliver it to whatever thing met him on the way back home. He went to church as requested, but decided to eat the Communion bread. On the way home, he met a thing in the shape of a hare, which demanded to know whether he had brought the bread. When Device answered that he had not, the hare threatened to pull him to pieces. It vanished when Device crossed himself.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610, April 8   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1228

James Device alleges during his examination that, four days after his grandmother sent him to get communion bread, a spirit appeared to him in the shape of a brown dog. The spirit asked for his soul, offering him revenge against anyone he desired in return. James replied that "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610, April 12   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1229

James Device alleges during his examination that two or three days after his familiar first appeared to him, he went to the Carre-Hall, where he argued with Anne Townley. Townley accused him and his mother Elizabeth Device of theft and kicked him out, hitting him between the shoulders on the way. A day or two after that, the spirit came again, this time in the shape of a black dog and calling itself Dandy, and urged him to make a clay image of Townley. Dandy said that if Device did, he would kill her for him. The next morning, Device made the clay image, dried it by the fire, and crumbled it over the course of the next week. Two days after the image was gone, Townley was dead.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610, April 15   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1230

Jennet Device alleges during her deposition that two years before, her brother James Device called his familiar Dandy in her presence and asked the familiar to help him kill Anne Townley. A week later, Jennet claims she saw Townley in the kitchen of the the Carre-Hall looking unwell, and she thinks that James and Dandy are responsible.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1231

James Device is indicted on two more counts of murder for bewitching to death John Hargraves and Blaze Hargreaves. He pleads not guilty to both.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 18   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1232

Grace Sowerbutts alleges in her deposition that this last April, on her way home from Pelham, Jennet Bierley appeared to her in the shape of a dog with two legs and tried to convince her to drown herself. She was rescued by a spirit in a white sheet, which carried her away. Its present made Bierley vanish.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 4 Preston    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1233

Grace Sowerbutts alleges during her examination that, the same night she was rescued by the spirit Anonymous 180, Jennet Bierley reappeared in the shape of a black dog and carried her to Hugh Walshman's barn. Bierley lay her on the barn floor, covered her with straw and hay, and lay on top of her for a long time. She robbed Sowerbutts of her speech and senses, and when Sowerbutts awoke, it was two nights later and she was in Walshman's home. She had been found in the barn and carried to the house by friends. The next night, her father fetched her home.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 4   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1234

Grace Sowerbutts alleges during her examination that at Two Brigges between Preston and Salmesbury, Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley appeared to her in their own shapes, caused her to fall down, and robbed her of speech for the next several days. They appeared to her again while she lay in her father's house, but did nothing at that time.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1235

Grace Sowerbutts accuses Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley of going into Thomas Walshman's house at night and stealing Walshman's child from their bed. Grace alleges that Jennet and Ellen set the child down by the fire and pierced its navel with a nail, then set a pen in the wound and sucked from it. They returned the child to the bed after. Grace claims the child did not cry when it was hurt, but it languished thereafter and died. The night after the child's burial, Jennet and Ellen dug it up from the churchyard. They boiled some of it in a pot and broiled the rest on the coals, and ate it. Grace said that they tried to get her and Ellen's daughter to eat as well, but both refused. After, they rendered fat from the child's bones to anoint themselves with so they could change shapes. They said they would return the bones to the grave the next night, but Grace did not know whether they did.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1236

Grace Sowerbutts alleged in her deposition that her grandmother, Jennet Bierley, brought her to meetings of witches on the north bank of the river Ribble six months before. Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth were also there; these meetings took place every Thursday and Sunday for two weeks. Four black things, going upright but not like men in the face, carried them across the water to feast. Grace claimed that she had never seen such meat, and refused to eat of it. They all danced afterward with the black things. After the dancing, "the said black things did pull downe the said three Women, and did abuse their bodies, as this Examinate thinketh, for shee saith, that the black thing that was with her, did abuse her bodie."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1237

Grace Sowerbutts alleges in her deposition that Jane Southworth repeatedly came to her, set her in haylofts and ditches, and robbed her of speech and senses.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1238

John Clayton, Richard Webb, and Richard Aylmore pray for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. The prayers cause Barrow to fall into extreme and violent fits.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1663 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1239

Grace Sowerbutts alleges in her deposition that after the black things carried her back across the Ribble, many other women came to the riverbank to meet, but she did not recognize any of them. She did not see them eat or dance, just watched; Grace thought they must live on the north side of the river, for she did not see them coming out of the water either.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1240

James Barrow is cured of his possession and bewitchment by prayers and an exorcism. This takes place over three days, during which time James Barrow progressively heals. At first, James Barrow cannot even stand to hear the name of God and Christ, crying out "Legat, go to the Devil Legat," although his mouth did not move. As well, he shies away from the Bible. By the end of the first day, however, he seemed to rejoice at the sight of the Bible. A second day of exorcism consisted of prayers for the better part of the day, which James Barrow endures well until night, when "he fell into a very great Agony." The third day, James Barrow admits to "strong temptations of the Devil, namely to cut his throat, or drown himself, or knock out his brains against a post." Prayer is still performed for the boy, and he roars like a dog, and tears at his clothing. A departure of five spirits is noted from the boy, after which time he is restored.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1663, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1241

John Crump attempts to cure his daughter (Hannah Crump) of her strange fits by calling on whatever physicians and experts he could find (and pay for) in his area. However, these attempts are unsuccessful.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1242

Thomas Walshman gives deposition stating that he did have a year-old child who died around Lent of the previous year, after a sickness lasting about three weeks. However, he could not say what the cause of its death had been.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1611, April   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1243

Thomas Walshman gives deposition confirming that Grace Sowerbutts was found in his father Hugh Walshman's barn under some straw around April 15 of that year. He says that Sowerbutts was carried to his home, and lay there until the following Monday night. She did not speak the whole time, just lay there as if dead.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, April 15   Salmesbury  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1244

Alison Device is found guilty of witchcraft, and convicted on the strength of her own confession. Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley sentences her to execution by hanging.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1245

John Bulcock and Jane Bulcock are found not guilty of felony by witchcraft.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1246

Alison Device is arraigned and tried for bewitching John Law so that his body wasted and consumed. When brought into the court, she is said to have "humbly asked forgiuenesse for her offence."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1248

Alison Device alleges in her confession that two years before, her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns persuaded her to allow a familiar to appear to her. Southerns advised her to allow it to suck on some part of her so that she might command it to do her bidding. Not long after, a thing like a black dog appeared to her and asked her to give it her soul. She agreed, and allowed the familiar to suck at her breasts below her nipples. The spot was blue for six months after.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1249

Alison Device alleges in her confession that her familiar (Anonymous 186) appeared to her in the form of a black dog this last March, when she tried to buy some pins from a pedlar, John Law, and was refused. Her familiar asked what she would have him do to Law, and she instructed him to lame him. Law fell down in the road.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, March 18 Coln  Colne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1250

Alison Device alleges in her confession that, five days after she bid her familiar (Anonymous 186) to lame John Law, she went begging and the familiar appeared to her again. Anonymous 186 asked her to "Stay and speake with me" but she would not, and the familiar had not appeared to her since.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, March 23   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1251

John Crump attempts to cure his daughter (Hannah Crump) of her strange fits by bringing her to London, however, she refused at Thomas Hospital in Southward. This leads John Crump to a man (Anonymous 147) who is said to know astrology. Anonymous 147 declares that Hannah Crump has been bewitched and that he cannot provide a perfect cure, and is thus dismissed by John Crump.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1252

Hannah Crump allegedly has violent fits whenever the bible is read to her; during the recitation, she bites herself in rage and grief.

The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1253

John Law gives deposition alleging that this last March, he walked through Colne with his pack of wares and there met Alison Device. Device demanded pins, but he would not give her any, and she became angry. When he left her, he fell down lame. After some time, he was able to make it to a nearby ale-house, and lay there in great pain unable to stir his limbs. He saw a great black dog standing by him, with fiery eyes, large feet and a "terrible countenance." Device came shortly thereafter, looked at him for a short time, and left. He claims that he was tormented day and night by Device thereafter, and remained lame.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, March 18 Coln  Colne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1254

Abraham Law gives deposition on March 30 before Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell, alleging that two Saturdays before, he had received a letter from his father John Law saying that John was speechless and had been lamed on his left side. Abraham went to his father, finding him recovered somewhat in his speech and complaining of a sensation of being pricked since Alison Device had tried to buy pins from him but could not pay; John claimed that he had given her the pins nevertheless. Abraham reported hearing his father say that Device was responsible for his hurt and lameness through witchcraft, and lay upon him to trouble him along with an old woman John did not know.

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, March 30 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1255

Alison Device is questioned in court as to whether she can help John Law to his former health. She replies that cannot; her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns would have been able to had she lived. John Law is seen in court to have "his head is drawne awrie, his Eyes and face deformed, His speech not well to bee vnderstood; his Thighes and Legges starcke lame: his Armes lame especially the left side, his handes lame and turned out of their course, his Bodie able to indure no trauell."

The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1612, August 19 Lancaster Assizes (Lancaster Castle)    Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1257

John Webster accuses Dr. Casaubon of being a sworn witchmonger.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1677       Unknown  England 
1258

John Webster claims denying a witch can transform into an animal, that she does not make a visible covenant with the Devil and allow him to suck on her body, or that she does not have carnal relations with the Devil, does not in itself deny the existence of witches.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1677       Unknown  England 
1259

John Webster claims that some witchcraft accusers counterfeit symptoms of witchcraft, including strange fits, diseases, and vomiting, in order to seek revenge on others, by accusing said people of causing these misfortunes.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1677       Unknown  England 
1260

John Webster recalls the confession of Alison Device, where Device stated that her grandmother (Elizabeth Southerns) persuaded her to let a devil or familiar appear to her, a creature which Device then allowed to suck from her body.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1677 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1261

Edmund Robinson Jr. is questioned about the witchcraft he had reported seeing, but is stopped from answering by two men who felt the questions were unnecessary.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1262

Edmund Robinson Jr. witnesses Dickensons Wife transform from a black greyhound into her human form. Dickensons Wife attempts to bribe Robinson Jr. with a silver coin to remain silent about what he saw, but he refuses and calls her a witch.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1263

Dickensons Wife allegedly uses a bridle to transform a little boy (Anonymous 148), whom she had been traveling with as a pair of greyhounds, into a white horse, an animal that is then used to carry Edmund Robinson Jr.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1264

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims that Loinds Wife and Dickensons Wife chased him after he witnessed them pulling on ropes and making strange faces in a barn.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1265

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims that he saw Loinds Wife sitting on a cross piece of wood in his fathers chimney. When Robinson Jr. called for Loind's Wife to come down to him, she went up the chimney out of his sight.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1266

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he was involved in a physical altercation with a boy (Anonymous 149) who has a cloven foot.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1267

Margaret Muschamp, eleven years old, allegedly falls into a trance around five o'clock in the afternoon. Her mother Mary Moore calls for help and they are able to recover her from this state. Margaret tries to reassure a distraught Mary, telling her "deare Mother, weepe not for me; for I have seene a happy Sight, and heard a blessed sound; for the Lord hath loved my poore soule, that he hath caused his blessed Trumpet to sound in my eares, and hath sent two blessed Angels to receive my sinfull soule."

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1645, July Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1268

Margaret Muschamp allegedly continues having visions throughout the night while the minister Mr. Huot prays with and for her. She finally falls to sleep, and awakens claiming to be without memory of anything she had said or done.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1645, July Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1269

Margaret Muschamp begs her Mary Moore to "send for my deare Brother, and honest Mr. HUET, perhaps the Lord will give me leave to see them; that faithfull man may helpe my soule forward in praying with me, and for me." The two allegedly come home from the Holy Island (Lindisfarne) in time to observe Margaret in her "Heavenly Rapture" and the minster declares it a blessing from God that a child has been shown such sights.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1645, July   Lindisfarne (Holy Island)  Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1270

Margaret Muschamp is at home on the afternoon of Candlemas Eve while Mary Moore and most of the household are at church and is allegedly "suddainely striken with a great deale of torment, called for a little beere, but ere they could come with it, the use of her tongue was gone, with all her limbs, pressing to vomit, and such torments, that no eyes could looke on her without compassion." When Moore returns, she is unable to ease Muschamp's suffering.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, February 1 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1271

Margaret Muschamp recovers from her first fit, a trance of religious rapture in which she claimed to talk to angels, and allegedly enjoys good health for the next seven months. She will not suffer her next fit until Candlemas.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1645, July Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1273

Mary Moore sends for physicians from Berwick the morning of Candlemas, who come along Lady Selby, Widow Fenwich and other friends to witness Mary Muschamp's fits. Muschamp, after suffering torments until late the previous night, awakens early to find she still lacks the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach. She signs to the onlookers that her senses are intact, but her jaws are closed to both speech and nourishment. The doctors are unable to assist, and Muschamp insists through gestures that "God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her."

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1274

Margaret Muschamp begs Mr. Balsom, Mr. Strother and Mr. Huet to pray for her while Mary Moore "to her great expences neglected no lawfull meanes that could be used" to help her daughter. Muschamp nevertheless has another tormenting fit around noon, lasting an hour.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1275

Margaret Muschamp allegedly suffers from tormenting fits for the 16 weeks between Candlemas and Whitson (Pentecost) Eve. During this time, she sleeps soundly at night, but her torments begin anew upon waking. At first, the fits last three or four hours, but over time this increases to eight hours a day. The fits are described as "every houre a severall torment, such strong cruell ones that cannot be exprest, as many with weping eyes beheld it." Ministers pray over the girl, but expect only her death to end her suffering. Sir William Selby, Lady Selby, Countess Lendrik, Lady Haggarston and others all observe at various times.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1276

Margaret Muschamp, during the 16 weeks between Candlemas and Whitson (Pentecost) Eve, is often seen to smile and sign that she feels no pain as soon as her tormenting fits have ended for the day. She habitually sits quietly for the remainder of the day.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1277

Margaret Muschamp allegedly fasts during the 16 weeks between Candlemas and Whitson (Pentecost) Eve. After her fits have ended each day, "she onely we wet her lips with a little milke and water; for nothing she would let come within her jawes." Muschamp claims, through signing, that "God fed her with Angels food" and she is not seen to lose any weight for the duration.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1278

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has a fit of bitter torment lasting eight hours on the morning of Whitson (Pentecost) Eve. In the afternoon, her mother Mary Moore leaves to go abroad for a time, entrusting Muschamp to the care of Muschamp's cousin, Elizabeth Muschamp.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, February 3 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1279

Margaret Muschamp, in the care of her cousin Elizabeth Muschamp on the afternoon of Whiston Eve, signs for Elizabeth to carry her into the garden. Elizabeth does so, and sits with Margaret on her knee. Margaret allegedly sits there limply for 15 minutes, then suddenly jumps up and runs three times around the garden while making a shrill, wordless yell. She climbs the stairs back into the house by herself and runs into Elizabeth's arms. This miraculous recovery is witnessed by Captain Falset, Mrs. Falset and their daughter, who send for Mary Moore to return from Berwick, three miles away. Margaret runs to meet her mother, calling "Mother, Mother welcome home."

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, May 19 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1280

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he was hit on the back by a boy who has a cloven foot (Anonymous 149).

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1281

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he saw Loinds Wife and two other women (Anonymous 152 and Anonymous 153) take six pictures (which were riddled with thorns) down from a beam in a barn.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February 10 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1282

Edmund Robinson Jr's testimony leads to the imprisonment of seven witches. While in prison, three died and one became deathly ill. One of these witches was named Margaret Johnson and another is named Mary Spencer.

Townships: Goldshaw Booth

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1283

Margaret Johnson of Lancaster repeatedly confesses to being a witch for the last six years.

Townships: Goldshaw Booth

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1284

Mary Spencer denies ever practicing witchcraft.

Townships: Goldshaw Booth

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1285

Frances Dickenson denies any involvement with witchcraft. She claims to have been wrongly accused by Edmund Robinson Jr.

Townships: Goldshaw Booth

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1286

Edmund Robinson Jr. admits having made up his testimony possibly in an attempt to avoid repercussions from his father for his own delinquencies or to help his father make money or for fear of repercussions from his mother.

Townships: Goldshaw Booth

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1287

King Charles' surgeons, ten midwives and five others are sent to re-examine the bodies of the women indicted at Lancaster. Jenet Hargreaves, Frances Dickenson and Mary Spencer are not found to have witch's marks or any other strange marks on their bodies.

Townships: Goldshaw Booth

1634, June 29 London (Mugwell Street, Barber-Surgeons' Hall)  St. Olaf  London, City of  Middlesex  England 
1288

Doctor Harvey, "although very learned otherwise," will not confirm or deny the existence of witches.

The Gentleman's Magazine Library

1636 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1289

Doctor Harvey explains that he went to a house on the edge of town where there allegedly lived a witch (Anonymous 154). When he first arrived, the woman seemed very suspicious, but when Harvey claimed to be a wizard she warmed up and reaffirmed this because of Harvey's allegedly "magical face."

The Gentleman's Magazine Library

1636 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1290

The old woman (Anonymous 154) puts out a saucer of milk and calls her familiar (for Dr. Harvey) which appears to her immediately in the shape of a toad.

The Gentleman's Magazine Library

1636 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1291

Doctor Harvey sends the woman off to get some ale. While she is away, Doctor Harvey captures her toad by throwing some milk as the old woman had done and opens it up using his scalpel to examine its entrails and determine whether it is different from a normal toad.

The Gentleman's Magazine Library

1636 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1292

Harvey notes that this toad is anatomically normal. He concludes the witch's purported familiar was an ordinary toad, tamed by the old woman.

The Gentleman's Magazine Library

1636 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1293

Doctor Harvey concludes that the old woman (Anonymous 154) had tamed an ordinary toad and then come to believe that it was a familiar.

The Gentleman's Magazine Library

1636 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1294

The old woman (Anonymous 154) attacks Doctor Harvey when she discovers he has killed her toad. In an effort to get her to stop, he tells her he is the king's physician sent to find out whether or not she is a witch.

The Gentleman's Magazine Library

1636 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1295

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims he saw a woman (Anonymous 155) pricking a picture with thorns.

The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft

1633, February Wheatley Lane in Pendle  Pendle  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1296

The author asserts that Edmund Robinson Jr.s claims align with what King James I claims about witches in Daemonologia.

The Life of William Harvey

1633, February Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1299

Margaret Johnson confesses that the Devil approached her in the shape of a man wearing a black suit and offered her whatever she wanted if she gave him her soul. Johnson accepted at which point the Devil asked her to call him Memillion.

Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1300

Margaret Johnson is found to have two teats on her body, "one betweene her secretts and the ffundament on the edge thereof he other on the middle of her left buttocke," but neither have a "hollowness" from which blood or juice could escape.

Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5

1634, June London (Mugwell Street, Barber-Surgeons' Hall)  St. Olaf  London, City of  Middlesex  England 
1302

Four of the seven witches arrested as a result of Edmund Robinson Jr.'s testimony are pardoned by the King.

Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5

1634, June London (Mugwell Street, Barber-Surgeons' Hall)  St. Olaf  London, City of  Middlesex  England 
1303

Edmund Robinson Jr. is re-examined. He allegedly constructed his last testimony from things he heard his neighbours say about certain women they knew, including Mary Spencer, Frances Dickenson, Margaret Johnson and Jenet Hergreaves, primarily that they were witches.

Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1304

Edmund Robinson, the elder, is re-examined and denies ever having identified Frances Dickenson or any other woman from the area (Lancaster) as a witch.

Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5

1634, July 16 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1305

Edmund Robinson Jr. is imprisonned for reasons of which he is allegedly initially unaware. He learns that the reason is a petition from Mr. Duxbury acting on behalf of Mr. Dickenson who wanted Robinson imprisoned for having falsely accused his wife.

Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5

1634 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
1306

Edmund Robinson Jr. and his father allegedly went from church to church where Edmund Robinson Jr. would identify witches in order to make a living.

Potts's Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1634 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1307

Edmund Robinson Jr. claims Frances Dickenson took him to a house where many people were feasting. He claims he was offered meat and bread by a woman he knew not (Anonymous 156), but he refused to eat it after one bite.

Potts's Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster

1632 Burton Agnes  Burton Agnes  Yorkshire  York  England 
1308

Mary Sykes is tried for witchcraft before Henry Tempest. Three people testify against her. Dorothy Rhodes claims that she and her daughter (Sara Rhodes) laid in bed one Sunday evening and just as they were falling asleep, Sara began "quaking" and holding her hands together. When Dorothy asked her daughter what was happening, her daughter related how Sykes came at the foot of the bed and grab her throat and put her fingers into her mouth while trying to cloak her. When asked why she did not speak, Sara Rhodes replied that she could not since Mary Sykes' fingers were in her throat. Dorothy Rhodes adds after that incident, Sara started suffering from a variety of fits and sometimes claimed Sykes were following her and also that Kellet's wife appeared to her, even though she had been dead for over two years. Richard Booth testifies that he saw Sara Rhodes on several occasion as being "strangely taken." He relates that he body would "quake" and her heart rate would rise so much that she could not speak. Henry Cordially testifies that Mary Sykes often threatened him with either killing or stealing his horses. He then testifies how one night he witnessed Mary Sykes riding one of his cows.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1309

Dorothy Rodes testifies against Mary Tempest before Henry Tempest. She explains that she was lying with her daughter, Sara, one Sunday evening when her daughter cried that Mary Sykes had come in through a hole in the bed, grabbed her by the throat and put her fingers down her mouth taking away her ability to speak.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1310

Dorothy Rodes claims that Sara Rodes is suddenly unable to move her limbs, has great pains in her extremities, is unable to speak, and has an irregular heartbeat for days shortly after Mary Sykes allegedly grabbed her throat and stuck her fingers down her mouth.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1311

Dorothy Rodes relates that her daughter told her that Kellet's wife appeared to her on several occasions even though she had been dead for two years.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1312

Sara Rodes allegedly often exhibits strange behaviour, according to Richard Booth, her body "quakeing" and her heart beating so hard that she could not speak.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1313

Richard Booth testifies that Mary Syke's "blessings" were followed by the wasting of his goods by death (aka the death of his livestock).

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1314

Henry Cordially claims that Mary Sykes had threatened to diminish his livestock; although he might have nine or ten beasts, she "wold make them fewer."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1315

Henry Cordially claims that while feeding his cattle during the night, he once saw Mary Sykes riding one of his cows. When she realized he had seen her, she flew away.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1316

Mary Sykes allegedly bewitched Henry Cordially's horse. Cordially explains that a few days after he saw Mary Sykes sitting on one of his cows in the middle of the night, one of his horses died.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March Bierley    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1317

Mary Sykes is searched for witch's marks by Isabella Pollard and five other women, a search ordered by Henry Tempest. The searchers find a red lump on her right buttock (which issued liquid) and a mark on her left arm that could be stretched out half an inch.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March Bierley    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1318

Margaret Morton is accused by Joan Booth of bewitching her son (Anonymous 157). Morton allegedly came to Booth's house "and gave her sonn (about fower yeares old) and then in good health [...] a peece of bread." After Morton gave the child this bread, he became sick "and his body swelled very much," with his skin wasting away daily till he could not stand anymore. To counteract the bewitchment, Booth sent to have Morton brought to her house again, at which time Morton "asked the child for forgiveness three times." At this time Booth also drew Morton's blood "with a pin," and immediately after "the child was amended."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, January 1 Kirkethropp    Yorkshire  Yokshire  England 
1320

Margaret Morton is searched for witch's marks by Frances Ward. Ward "found upon her two black spotts between her thigh and her body." One of the marks is described as being "like a wart, but it was none. And the other was black on both sides, an inch break, and blew in the middest."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, January 1 Kirkethropp    Yorkshire  Yokshire  England 
1321

Margaret Morton is suspected by many of practicing witchcraft, in part because her mother (Anonymous 158) and sister (Anonymous 159) were previously suspected of practicing witchcraft.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, January 1 Kirkethropp    Yorkshire  Yokshire  England 
1322

Hester France is accused by Hester Spivey (during her testimony in front of Henry Tempest) of cursing and bewitching her servant, Elizabeth Johnson, so that she should never cook again. Spivey explained to authorities that France "had beene at her howse" and mended the fire with the firepot, left the house,"but came in againe and cursed the sayde Elizabeth, and prayed to God that she sho[u]ld never bake againe."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1651, January 23 Hothersfeilde    North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1323

Elizabeth Johnson is unable to speak or stand from the hours of six until eight or nine in the evening (speaking only once in that time to her brother) after interacting with suspected witch, Hester France.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1651, January 23 Hothersfeilde    North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1324

Hester France is called to Elizabeth Johnson, who is ill. Elizabeth Johnson claims that Hester France had spoken to her, thus causing her illness. Elizabeth Johnson then scratches Hester France in an act of counter magic, after which she feels somewhat better, yet still ill.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1651, January 23 Hothersfeilde    North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1325

Robert Cliff accused Hester France of having bewitched him because he, as testified by John Johnson, had been ill for a long time. When Hester France came to see Robert Cliff, he scratcht her very sore, and sayed, I thinke thou art the woman that hath done me this wrong, as an act of counter magic. Hester France told Robert Cliff that she never did hurt in her life.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1652, January 23 Hothersfeilde    North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1326

Elizabeth Lambe is tried for witchcraft before Wm. Adams. Lambe is accused of appearing with an old man to John Johnson in the night, causing Johnson to be unable to speak; with wronging Thomas Rennerdi's wife and child; and with causing Nicholas Baldwin's and Richard Brown's illnesses.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1652, March 17 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1327

Hester France is tried for witchcraft before Henry Tempest. France is accused of bewitching Hester Spivy's servant, Elizabeth Johnson, with being unable to speak or stand between eight and nine o'clock one evening.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1651, March York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1328

Margaret Morton is tried for witchcraft before Sir John Saville, Kt. Alex. Johnson, Henry Tempest, John Stanhope, and John Hewley. Morton is accused of bewitching Joan Booth's four year old son (Anonymous 157), by having given the boy a piece of bread, and with having witch's marks, as attested by witch searcher Frances Ward.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1650, March Wakefield    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1330

Elizabeth Lambe allegedly appears next to John Johnson's bed at night, along with an old man in brown clothes (Anonymous 160). Johnson claims he is unable to speak to her because he is so frightened, and that after the visit "his goods fell sick, and the farrier could not tell what disease they were ill of."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1652, March 17 Reednes    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1332

Elizabeth Lambe is beaten by John Johnson and some "of his neighbours" for allegedly causing John Johnson to become mysteriously ill, after allegedly visiting him with "an old man in browne clothes" (Anonymous 160) in the night. After this act of counter magic, Johnson claims he "was never afterwards dis-quited by her" again.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1652, March 17 Reednes    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1334

Thomas Rennerd asserts that his wife, suspecting Elizabeth Lambe of being responsible for their child's illness, asks Elizabeth Lambe forgiveness by going to her door and falling down on her knees. Soon after asking Elizabeth Lambe for forgivness, the Rennerd child recovers.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1652, March 17 Reednes    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1335

Nicholas Baldwin is allegedly bewitched with illness. His illness comes after he cudgels Elizabeth Lambe, whom he suspects of using magic to kill three of his four fowls. Baldwain notes that he beats Lambe all the more savagely when she begs for mercy.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1648 Reednes    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1336

Elizabeth Lambe allegedly draws blood from John Wright's heart, making him ill. Wright believes drawing Lambe's blood will save him, but asserts if he should die shortly after scratching her, she would be to blame. John Wright scratches Elizabeth Lambe, and dies shortly after, as witnessed by Richard Brown.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1652, March 17 Reednes    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1337

Anne Greene is tried for witchcraft before John Ashton and Edgar Coats. Greene is charged with bewitching John Tatterson, appearing to Margaret Wade in the form of a dog, using charms to heal hearts, and of healing headaches by boiling the afflicted person's hair.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1653, February 16 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1338

John Tatterson asks Anne Greene for help while feeling ill. She advises that black wool will help, but he is skeptical. Greene then pulls out her garter, runs it around his ear three times, and then takes hair from his neck. Shortly after this, Tatterson feels worse; however, after returning and threatening Greene, she crosses his ear again (three times). Tatterson begins to heal as "corruptible matter [runs] outt of his eare."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1653, February 16 Gargreave  Gargrave  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1339

Anne Greene allegedly tells Jeanette Hudson that John Tatterson "was overgone with ill tongues, and that hee should have one side taken from him."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1653, February 16 Gargreave  Gargrave  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1340

Anne Greene and Mary Nunweeke allegedly appear in the form of dogs to Margaret Wade while she is in bed.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1653, February 16 Gargreave  Gargrave  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1341

Anne Greene confesses that she sometimes used charms to heal hearts, including John Tatterson's. When she healed Tatterson's heart, she did so"by crosseinge a garter over his eare and sayeinge these words, 'Boate, a God's Name' 9 times over."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1653, February 16 Gargreave  Gargrave  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1342

Anne Greene claims she can heal headaches by taking their urine "and a locke of their heire, the which she boyles together, and afterwards throwes them in the fire and burnos them. Greene claims this is the only medical treatment she administers.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1653, February 16 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1343

Elizabeth Roberts is tried for witchcraft. She is accused of transforming herself into the form of a cat, and also a bee, and with causing bodily harm to John Greendife.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, October 14 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1344

Elizabeth Roberts vanished before John Greendifes eyes and reappeared transformed into a cat which clawed onto his leg and would not be released. After disentangling himself from the fiend (which then disappears), Greendliefe is plagued by a pain in his heart.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, October Beverley    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1345

John Greendife claims that a cat appeared to him, struck him in the head, and sent him into a trance. After receiving the blow, he allegedly saw Elizabeth Roberts escape from his room, wearing her regular attire.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, October Beverley    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1346

Elizabeth Roberts allegedly appears to John Greendife in the shape of a bee. Greendife's body writhes in such torment that he must be held down by about five or six people.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, October Beverley    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1347

Katherine Earle is tried for witchcraft before John Hewley.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, January 11 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1348

Katherine Earle is accused by Henry Hatfield of striking him and his mare in the neck. Shortly thereafter, the mare dies and Hatfield develops a terrible pain in his neck.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1653, December York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1349

Katherine Earle is searched and a witch's mark "in the likeness of a papp" is discovered upon her.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, October York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1350

Ann Earle (daughter of Katherine Earle), seeing that John Hatfield has pains in neck says to him: "Doth the divell nipp the in the necke? but he will nipp the better yet."

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, January York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1351

Katherine Earle allegedly causes Mr. Frank's death. She taps in on the shoulder and asks him to kiss her. He immediately becomes ill and never recovers. As he dies, he claims that Katherine Earle is responsible for his death.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1654, January York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1352

Jennet and George Benton are tried for witchcraft before Jo. Warde.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, June 7 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1353

Richard Jackson testifies that shortly after throwing stones at Jennet and George Benton for trespassing on his property, his wife, his son, and he himself, started suffering from various fits. His wife lost her hearing; his child started having fits in the night; Jackson started having pains throughout his body.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, June 7 Wakefield    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1354

Richard Jackson claims he heard strange noises like music, groans, and the ringing of small bells when his fits commenced, noises his wife also hears and which cause dogs to howl.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, June 7 Wakefield    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1355

Richard Jackson claims that strange things have been happening around his barn. The pigs have broken through the doors, apparitions that look like cats and/or dogs have been seen around the house, and boxes as well as trunks have started disappearing.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, June 7 Wakefield    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1356

George and Jennet Benton are accused by Richard Jackson of causing the death of eighteen of his horses by witchcraft.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, June 7 Wakefield    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1357

George and Jennet Benton deny all accusations made against them.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, June 7 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1358

William and Mary Wade are tried for witchcraft before Thomas Brathwaite.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, July 12 York  York  Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1359

Ann Duffield and Mary Wilson accuse Mary Wade of bewitching fourteen-year old Elizabeth Mallory. During one of her fits, Mallory yells out in fear "she comes, she comes," referring to Wade.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, July 12 Studley Royal Park    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1360

Elizabeth Mallory allegedly vomits foreign bodies including pins, wool, and feathers. When she is told what she vomited, she claims to have seen these objects in her hands earlier.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, July 12 Studley Royal Park    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1361

Elizabeth Mallory claims that if Mary Wade will tell her she did her wrong, she (Mallory) would be better. When Wade asks forgiveness for doing her wrong, Mallory is suddenly able to stand. Mallory asserts that she would never be well until Wade admits to have "done her wrong" or until Wade is punished by a jury.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, July 12 Studley Royal Park    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1362

Elizabeth Mallory suffers from fits for twelve weeks. She allegedly loses the use of her limbs and is unable to rise from her bed. Sometimes the fits target parts of her body such as her arms and legs.

Depositions from the Castle of York

1656, July 12 Studley Royal Park    Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1363

Doctor Cole and Master Foscue examine and hear the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse and Joan Waterhouse.

The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches

1566, July 26   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1364

Thomas Simpson claims Phillip Flower bewitched him, a bewitchment manifest in the inability to leave her and the sensation that he was marvelously altered both in mind and body since he met her.

Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1365

Joan Flower is considered, in popular opinion, to be a witch because she looks and acts like a witch. She has fiery, hollow eyes, a strange and exotic demeanor, considerable knowledge of oaths and curses, and seems to lack the Christian faith.

Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1366

Joan Flower, Philip Flower, and Margaret Flower are offered services from the Devil who states that, in return for their souls, that he will appear to the women in the form of a dog, rat, or cat, and do their bidding. They ratify the contract with "certaine charmes and conjurations," and "abominable kisses, and an odious sacrifice of blood."

Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1367

Sir Francis Manners, the Earl of Rutland and his wife, the Countess of Rutland, suffer from sickness and extraordinary convulsions. These ailments are thought to be the work of accused witches Margaret Flower, Phillip Flower, and their mother, Joan Flower.

Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1368

A witness (Anonymous 375) gives deposition alleging that Joan Buts said, regarding Mary Farmer, "That if she had not bewitched her, if all the Devils in Hell could help her, she would bewitch her." Buts admitted to the statement, pleading that she said it in passion, but intended no such thing.

An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress

1682, March 27 Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
1369

Elizabeth Burgiss is seen to have many household objects thrown about in her wake without anyone having touched them, including bellows and candlesticks.

Strange and Wonderful News from Yowel in Surry giving a True and Just Account of One Elizabeth Burgiss

1681, October Yowel  Yowel  Surrey  Surrey  England 
1370

Joseph Weedon is advised by his neighbors to burn the sheep that have been killed, who tell him that doing so "would make the Witch come to the place, that so they might know who was the Authour of the Mischief." When he does, Mary/Ann Foster approaches the fire and demands to know what he is doing, though "it is not known or believed she had any business there or that way."

Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton

1673, August 22   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1371

A jury of five women, including Melier Damer, Alice Cleverly, and Grace Stockes, claim at trial to have discovered witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." They reexamine one of the marks again at Bodenham's trial, where they confess it did not look newly sucked.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Salisbury    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
1372

Mr. Chandler throws the pins Anne Bodenham allegedly pressed on Anne Styles and the money the Devil allegedly gave her into a fire at an Inn in Stockbridge as a way of undoing their magic. The pins allegedly disappeared, but the money remained.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653   Stockbridge  Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
1373

A midwife and a Matron claim to have searched Rebecca West, Margaret Landis, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread for witch's marks and found "several large Teates in the secret Parts of their Bodies." They claim they questioned the women as to "how the marks' came there, they both made Answer, that the Devils Imps had done it."

The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches

1645 Worcester  Worcester  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1374

A woman, allegedly a witch, approaches Elizabeth Brooker, a servant of Mistress Heiron (who worked in her mercer's shop), and asks her for a pin. The woman is unsatisfied with Brooker's gift of a pin from her sleeve, wanting a specific one, leaves in a "great Fume and Rage, and told the Maid, she should hear farther from her, she would e'er long wish she had given her the Pin she desired; with many threatning Speeches."

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
1375

Anthony Smith, a surgeon from Kingston Devon, does surgery on Elizabeth Brooker, finding under her skin, despite its invisibility, a pin which was magically inserted into her muscle.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1681 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1376

Mr. Salter, a "skilful Apothecary" in Honiton, Devon, is called in to provide treatment for Elizabeth Brooker's severe leg pain. He evidently "advised them well, whose Counsel they followed, but all in vain."

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
1377

Eleanor Holland and Elizabeth Hardman fortell how many fits they will have the next day before they go to sleep. Eleanor Holland alleges that she will have her fit before noon, and that it will last three hours. When the time comes, she insists an hourglass be set to record the length of the fit; her companions do so in a place where she cannot see it. Though senseless, she accurately states the quarter and half hours, and bid them turn the glass as the last sand runs down three times. When Eleanor is asked how she was able to do this, she says a white dove told her.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1378

Anthony Smith, a surgeon from Kingston, designed a Suppurative Cataplasm (a plaster designed to draw out infection) to Elizabeth Brooker's mysteriously aching leg. Brooker was dissatisfied with the treatment.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1681 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1379

MIstress Starchie questions the five children (Anne and John Starchie, Margaret and Elizabeth Hardman, and Eleanor Holland) on how they have been handled, hoping for information she can take to preachers; they tell her that an angel came from God in the shape of a dove came to them and said they must follow it to heaven through a hole it would draw them through. They ran under the beds, where Elizabeth Hardman begins to make a hole, believing there is a boy on the other side who would help her do so.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, Winter Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1380

Anne Bodenham allegedly sent Anne Styles to a local Apothecary (along with one of the eight shilling Styles Mistress Rosewell has given as payment) to buy some white arsenic, which she promised to burn to prevent the poisoning. Mistress Roswell and Thomas Mason laughed at Styles when she returned eight shillings poorer, with only a promise to suggest potential counter-magic.

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Fisherton Anger    Wiltshire  Wiltshire  England 
1381

A man (Anonymous 182), long troubled with Ague (a fever), allegedly saw an Apothecary who "delivered unto him six very small rouls of paper, rouled up very close, and bid him eat them." The man ate three of the paper rolls, and unrolled three of them; he read upon them "Do well, or, All is well." Assuming "there could be no Magick in this," he ate the rest, and developed terrible stomach pain, but was soon cured.

A Treatise Proving Spirits, Witches, and Supernatural Operations

1672 Canterbury    Kent  Kent  England 
1382

Richard Galis alleges that Richard Redforth's order to free Mother Dutton taught her and her confederates that the Magistrates are little concerned with justice, and that they are consequently free to practice all manner of mischief. He claims that he was vexed, troubled and molested all the more from that point on, and that Mother Dutton stirred up others to do the same.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1383

Richard Galis is allegedly sporadically "greuouslye vexed, troubled and tormented aswell in Body as in Minde," suffering from "raging fits detesting & abhorring all Company," and imaging himself to be stricken with a "straunge disease and gref" that would "abate [his] flesh and weaken [his] Body."

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1384

Richard Galis alleges to have been visited by the apparition of "huge and mightie black Cat," creeping towards him from the shadows at midnight. In fear and terror, he calls for a maid with a candle to light the room so he can find the creature. The maid neither sees the cat nor can keep her taper illuminated.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1385

Richard Galis alleges that the apparition of the Mightie Black Catte and his night-time affliction is similar to the bewitchment his brother James Galis suffered at the age of fifteen at the hands of Mother Dutton or one of her colleagues; James is said to be "bereft of his wits, which vntil this day are not his owne stil crying away with the Witch away with the Witch." Galis takes this as proof that he too is bewitched.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1386

Richard Galis brings Mother Dutton before Mayor of Windsor Richard Redforth. When Redforth hears Gails' allegations against Dutton, he commends him to let her go without delay; Galis laments the "lack of better Magistrates to wed out such Malefactors. "

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 Clewer Village  Clewer  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1387

Richard Galis seizes Mother Dutton when they have a chance encounter on the road to Clewar, and drags her to the prison in Windsor. The gaoler efuses to take Dutton without a warrant from the Mayor or Justice.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1388

Oster of Windsor, unable to find a remedy for the pain in his limbs allegedly caused by Elizabeth Stile, calls on Father Rosimund, a wiseman, to cure his bewitchment. Father Rosimund advises him to scratch Stile, and says that if he can draw blood, his limbs will mend.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1389

Rebecca West confesses to attending a gathering of five or more witches that included her mother, Anne West, Mother Benefield, and Mother Goodwin. During the gathering the women prayed from a book provided by Mother Goodwin, after which their imps appeared in the form of kittens. Mother Benefield kisses the kittens and states that they were all her children which she had by as handsome a man as any was in England."

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1390

Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton are apprehended, imprisoned at Bedford Gaol and finally tried on March 30, 1612. They are found guilty of bewitchment and murder on the strength of their confessions and of the confession given by Henry Sutton.

Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed

1612, March 30 Bedford    Bedfordshire  Bedfordshire  England 
1391

Rebecca West, according to the testimony of Matthew Hopkins, confessed to taking the devil, in the shape of a Gentleman, for "her God, and thought he could doe as God," after he killed "the sonne of the said Thomas Hart," within one fortnight of being asked.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, April 13 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1392

Rebecca West confesses to commanding imps to kill a horse, cow, and a child (Anonymous 193). Rebecca West also asserts that this command was given by Anne West, Mother Benefield, and Mother Goodwin as well.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1393

Rebecca West claims that, because Mother Benefield questioned her ability to keep their gathering of witches a secret, she was instructed to deny God and Jesus Christ. After West does this the devil in the shape of a little black dog allegedly appears, leaps into her lap, and kisses her three times, after which West feels very cold.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1394

Rebecca West confesses that the devil appeared to her in the form of a handsome young man, saying that he had come to marry her. The devil allegedly took West by the hand, led her about the room, and promised to be her loving husband until death. West also confesses that she engaged in carnal copulation with the devil.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1395

Rebecca West claims that she felt the need to confess her witchcraft related deeds as soon as one of the witches was in prison, implying that she had been bewitched to keep secrets up until that point.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1396

Rebecca West claims that, on her way to the Grand Inquest, she informed Mother Miller that she would tell the Inquest nothing, even if they pulled her to pieces with pincers. After saying this, West further claims that she looked upon the ground [and] saw her self encompassed in flames of fire, a possible prediction of torture or execution.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1397

A witch (Anonymous 194) sends her maid (Anonymous 195) to fetch a handful of herbs; she returns home, late having spent time with her lover, but with a handful of herbs, regardless. The maid (Anonymous 195) witnesses her mistress (Anonymous 194) cutting the herbs and strewing them about the room. The next morning the witchs husband (Anonymous 196) finds twelve or fourteen dead hogs in his yard, which he believes is the work of his wife (Anonymous 194) and the maid (Anonymous 195). It may be, however, that Anonymous 195's sweetheart pointed her to the wrong herbs, and seeking to cover up the grievous mistake, the story shifts to the suspicious actions of he mistress scattering the herbs.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25 Ipswich  Ipswich; Gippeswick  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
1400

Elizabeth Clarke confesses to sending a spirit in the shape of a red dog to kill Mr. Long (by throwing him off his horse to break his neck). The spirit, however, did not perform the task. When asked by the Inquiry the reason for this, Goodwife Clarke explains, because the power of God was above the power of the Devil.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25 Colchester    Essex  Essex  England 
1401

Mr. Withers, who lives in Romesy Hampshire, is identified by Anne Bodenham of being in possession of the Devil's Red Book (by signing one's name in this book a woman becomes a witch).

Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham

1653 Rumsey    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
1402

Mr. Long describes an encounter he had with an alleged witch (Anonymous 197), where the witch called upon God as her witness to judge her, and as soon as she spoke she was struck to the ground on her back. The witch was evidently in a most lamentable condition, trembling and crying for two days after this occurred.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25 Colchester    Essex  Essex  England 
1403

Richard Galis abducts Mistress Audrey, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton and Mother Deveil, and delivers them to Robert Handley, who believed himself to be bewitched in his limbs. Galis forces the women to kneel before while Master Henry Bust, a Student of Physick, stands over them with a cudgel over their backs, threatening them harm should they lie. Galis demands that the women diagnose and cure Handley's bewitchment. They cannot tell what disease afflicts him, nor help him with it. Handley nevertheless recovers to his former health shortly thereafter.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1404

Robert Handely suffers an ailment of his limbs he alleges to be a bewitchment; unable to seek out a remedy himself, he summons his friend Richard Galis to him at his country house and beseeches Galis to bring him some witches in the hope that they can be persuaded to break the bewitchment.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1405

Richard Galis, while MIstress Audrey, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton, and Mother Devell are held at Richard Handley's home, interrogates the women on their time in service to God; he demands they recite the Lord's Prayer, tests their belief, quizzes them on the Ten Commandments, and scornfully finds them wanting in all three. Pressed to explain why, the women claim they had never been taught, nor had they anyone to instruct them. Feeling guilty for his ill treatment of them, Gallis gives each a penny and a lecture, then permits them to go free.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1406

Anonymous 197, after being in a most lamentable condition, trembling and crying for two days, confesses to Mr. Long that she has a malefic compact with the devil, stating that he usually appears to her in the form of a squirrel.

A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex

1645, July 25 Colchester    Essex  Essex  England 
1407

Richard Galis is taken into custody, manacled, and imprisoned in what he describes as "a dep dungion, into the which I was let vp and downe with a rope," and held without bail after abducting and falsely imprisoning Audrey the Mistresse, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton, and Mother Devell. He alleges that the four are directly responsible, and effected this imprisonment by using their familiars to incense the Mayor of Windsor against him. In the dark, deprived of human company or even a bed, he begins to mistrust himself and fears the possibility of dying while imprisoned.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1409

Richard Galis, imprisoned and shackled in a dark cell for the abduction and unlawful imprisonment of MIstress Audrey, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton and Mother Devell, sings the 42nd and 43rd Psalms; his irons miraculously fall off with a great noise like a smith working metal despite having been firmly riveted on.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1410

Richard Galis is freed from prison some two days after he is shut in for the abduction of Audrey the Mistresse, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton, and Mother Devell, as the charges against him are determined to be insufficient to hold him. Upon release, he "weaue the webbe of mine owne banisheme[n]t" and decides it prudent to leave the country.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1411

John Rivet accuses Elizabeth Clarke of bewitching his wife (Mrs. Rivet). Rivet claims that his wife was taken sick and lame, withviolent fits, and was told by a cunning woman Mrs. Hoyve that two neighbors had cursed his wife. Rivet suspects Elizabeth Clarke and her mother because of the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, July 29 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1412

Richard Galis beings to suffer from "extreame torturs and greuous paines sustained in the night" once again following MIstress Audrey's and Mother Nelson's sudden deaths; this is joined by the reappearance of the the apparition of the Mightie Black cat.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1413

Richard Galis, allegedly tormented by "infinite paines both in body and purse eche" storms into Father Rosimond's home with a cudgel in hand, drags him out by his hair and shoulders, furiously demands the man diagnose his ailment and its cause. Rosimond cries out "you are bewitched, you are bewitched," and identifies Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton, and Mother Devell, as the cause.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1414

Richard Galis abducts Elizabeth Stile, alleging that she has bewitched him, and when she resists binds a rope "about her myddle, and layde the rope on [his] shoulder, wherewith forceably [he] pulled her out of her house, drawing her a long the streate" and forces her to come before Sir Henry Nevel. Cursing and foaming at the mouth, she manages to escape.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1415

Thomas Addy claims that physicians must be inculcated in the production of witch beliefs, because when faced by their inability to diagnose a natural cause of illness, they are willing to accept the patient's belief that it might be witchcraft causing their (or their livestock's) disease.

A Candle in the Dark

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1416

Thomas Addy accuses 'ignorant' physicians of diagnosing natural disease as bewitchment, making sick children into demoniacs.

A Candle in the Dark

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1417

The Merideth Children of Bristol suffer from a series of terrifying fits and torments. They would cry, creep, fling about, hang on the walls, fall down, contort their bodies, rest at night, and repeat their fits the next day.

Pandaemonium

1632, between January and May ?     Bristol  Bristol  England 
1418

One of the Merideth Daughters (Merideth daughter) prophesies her imminent death, her blissful afterlife, and the happy and "also several things which should speedily befal her Father, and Family; but nothing of it ever came to pass."

Pandaemonium

1632, between January and May ?     Bristol  Bristol  England 
1419

One of the Merideth Children of Bristol (Merideth daughter 2) vomits pins (a classic sign of possession).

Pandaemonium

1632, between January and May ?     Bristol  Bristol  England 
1420

The Merideth Children of Bristol are treated "by the advice of the Ablest Doctors in the City." They recover in May (of 1632?) approximately five months after their torments began in January, and "they did not appear the least weakened by them."

Pandaemonium

1632, May ?     Bristol  Bristol  England 
1421

The morning after an altercation where Mary Smith threatens Cecily Bayle, Bayle awakes to discover a great cat on her chest and Mary Smith in her room. Immediately "after [she] fell sicke, languished, and grew exceeding leane." Her suffering continued for six months and was only finally relieved when she quit her job and moved.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1422

Mary Smith, angry with Edmund Newton for his success in the trade of Holland cheese, was threatening her business. She allegedly appeared to Newton in the dead of the night, and "whisked about his face (as he lay in bed) a wet cloath of very loathsome sauour," as a means of threatening him or contaminating him (with illness/ malefic magic, or both).

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1423

Edmund Newton sees the vision of "one cloathed in russet with a little bush beard," who promised to heal the sore on his leg. Perceiving that this being came from Mary Smith and seeing that he "had clouen feet," Newton refused to be healed by the man, and it disappeared instantaneously.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1424

Allegedly tormented by a familiar Toad and familiar Crabs sent by Mary Smith, Newton had one of his servants put the toad "into the fire, where it made a groaning noyse for one quarter of an houre before it was consume." Elsewhere, Mary Smith allegedly endured simultaneous "torturing paines, testifying the felt griefe by her out-cryes."

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1425

Edmund Newton suffers from a "madnesse or phrensie," the "ioynts and parts of his body were benummed, besides other pains and greifes." By the time of publication, Newton is "not yet freed, but continueth in great weakenesse, disabled to performe any labour, whereby hee may get sufficient and competent maintenance."

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1426

Edmund Newton, on the counsel of others, attempts to scratch Mary Smith as a a means of undoing her witchcraft. He finds, however, that he could not hurt her; his nails turned "like feathers" at the attempt.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1427

Henry Smith stops Elizabeth Hancocke as she travels home and, seeming in jest, accuses her of stealing his wife Mary Smith's hen. Smith herself arrives and repeats the accusation adding, that she "wished that the bones thereof might sticke in her throat, when she should eate the same." Hancocke, seeing the hen she was accused of stealing roosting in the thatch of the shop door, in "some passion and angry manner," wished "the pox to light vpon" Mary Smith.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1428

Elizabeth Hancocke begins to suffer from a strange, debilitating illness within four hours of cursing at Mary Smith. Although she could still eat, she felt "pinched at the heart, and felt a sodaine weaknesse in all the parts of her body," a sensation which lasted for three weeks. In the moments she felt well enough to stand, Smith would taunt and curse her again, asking "the poxe light vpon you, can you yet come to the doore?"

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1429

Elizabeth Hancocke, at the sight of Mary Smith, falls into a fit. Throughout the rest of the day and night she suffered extreme pains across her whole body, tore at her hair, became distraught and bereaved of her senses, and was mysteriously tossed about and lifted off bed, all the while she thought Mary Smith stood in the room glowering at her.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1430

Edward Drake, Elizabeth Hancocke's father, visits a local wizard or cunningman, who diagnoses Elizabeth's illness as bewitchment and names Mary Smith as the culprit by showing Drake a black glass where he sees her image. He then instructs Drake on how to make a witch-cake, (by mixing Hancocke's urine with flour, baking the loaf, and covering it with an ointment and a powder). The cake was to be split, applied to her heart and back, and a paper (with a spell on it?) was also meant to be laid on her.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1431

Elizabeth Hancocke recovers after six weeks of torments after her father administers a counter-magic remedy prescribed by a local wise-man.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1432

A Great Cat (a pet cum familiar of Mary Smith's) appears at Hancocke's home. Despite being stabbed with a sword, beaten over the head with a staff, and thrown in a sack, the cat does not die. It is finally stashed under the stairs, where it disappears of its own accord.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1433

After he hit her son (allegedly with cause) Mary Smith cursed John Orkton and "wished in a most earnest and bitter manner, that his fingers might rotte off." He lost his appetite, grew weak, and fell ill with a mysterious disease which lasted approximately eight months. His fingers and toes grew gangerous and were amputated.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1434

John Orkton visits a surgeon (Anonymous 201) in Yarmouth hoping to find a cure for the purification of his flesh. Although the surgeon was believed to have considerable skill, no remedy he applied lasted more than a day. The surgeon's remedies were not taking care of Orkton's ailment. At the time of publication, Orkton was still "rotting."

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1435

Henry Smith allegedly curses Thomas Younges, after he tries to call in an old debt owed to his new wife. Three days later Younges "fell sicke, and was tortured with exceeding and massacring griefes."

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1436

Thomas Young visits a number of "sundry learned and experienced Physitians in Norwich." Despite following their advice, he does not recover from his (supernatural) suffering.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616 Norwich    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1437

Mary Smith is executed as a witch on January 12, 1616 (?), having confessed "her confederacy with the Diuell, cursing, banning, and enuy towards her neighbours, and hurts done to them, expressing euery one by name," including John Orkton, Cecily Bayles, Elizabeth Hancocke, and Edmund Newton.

A Treatise of Witchcraft

1616, January 12     Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1438

Elizabeth Stile is executed as a witch at Abingdon on February 26, 1579. She confessed to, and was found guilty of, participating in the malefic murders of Maister Gallis, former mayor of Windsor, the murder of Lanckforde's maides, the murder of a Butcher named Switcher, the murder of a Butcher named Mastlyn, the murder of a man named Saddocke, as well as sundry other acts of witchcraft.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, February 26 Abingdon  Abbington  Oxfordshire  Berkshire  England 
1439

Mother Devell is executed as a witch at Abingdon on February 26, 1579. She was accused of, and was found guilty of, participating in the malefic murders of Maister Gallis, former mayor of Windsor, the murder of Lanckforde's maides, the murder of a Butcher named Switcher, and the murder of a Butcher named Mastlyn, as well as sundry other acts of witchcraft.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, February 26 Abingdon  Abbington  Oxfordshire  Berkshire  England 
1440

Mother Dutton is executed as a witch at Abingdon on February 26, 1579. She was accused of, and was found guilty of, participating in the malefic murders of Maister Gallis, former mayor of Windsor, the murder of Lanckforde's maides, the murder of a Butcher named Switcher, and the murder of a Butcher named Mastlyn, as well as sundry other acts of witchcraft.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, February 26 Abingdon  Abbington  Oxfordshire  Berkshire  England 
1441

Mother Margaret is executed as a witch at Abingdon on February 26, 1579. She was accused of, and was found guilty of, participating in the malefic murders of Maister Gallis, former mayor of Windsor, the murder of Lanckforde's maides, the murder of a Butcher named Switcher, and the murder of a Butcher named Mastlyn, as well as sundry other acts of witchcraft.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, February 26 Abingdon  Abbington  Oxfordshire  Berkshire  England 
1442

Mistress Audrey and Mother Nelson die after Richard Galis forces them to appear at church; Richard Galis believes they died from being touched to the quick by the Preacher's instruction or the gnawing of their consciences.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1443

Richard Galis has Mistress Audrey, Mother Nelson, Elizabeth Stile and Mother Dutton brought to the Church, where they heard the sermon, were instructed by the Preacher and were "schooled for their lewd behauiour and idle life spent to no profit."

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1444

Mary Poole is tried at the Old-Bailey on December 13, 1699 for allegedly having stolen seven pounds and ten shillings from Richard Walburton last January and a piece of silver from another gentleman (Anonymous 204) some time ago. Many others (Anonymous 205) also claim that she stole money from them.

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699.

1699, December 13 London (Old Bailey)    London, City of  London  England 
1445

Mary Poole is accused of being a witch. A gentleman claims that about seven years ago, he crossed paths with Mary Poole on Sutors-Hill, between Graves-end and Rochester. After an exchange of words, he gives her a cut with his whip and rides away, but within forty yards, his horse fell and she overtook him. Believing his horse had been bewitched, he concludes Mary Poole must be a witch.

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699.

1692     Kent  Cantia  England 
1446

Mary Poole is found guilty of theft (but not of witchcraft) on 13 December, 1699. She is sent to be branded. She is burned on the hand.

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699.

1699, December 13 London (Old Bailey)    London, City of  London  England 
1451

Edmund Robinson testifies to George Long that that he did not believe his son (Edmund Robinson Jr.) when he first came to him and his wife telling of witches. However, his son's persistence and his tears made Edmund Robinson begin to wonder whether the boy had had a vision of sorts concerning witches in the area.

Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5

1634, July 12   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1453

Thomas Addy, author of "A Perfect Discovery of Witches," claims that there Verrucae pensiles, called "Biggs, or Teats," Thymion (Thymic Tumors), called the devil's bigges, Tonsillae, (tonsils), like "little Biggs," and "black and blew,"spots, called "Fairy-nips" have all been identified as witch's marks by "ignorant" witch-searcher and witch-mongers.

A Perfect Discovery of Witches

1661 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1454

Mary Moore takes Margaret Muschamp to the Holy Island (Lindisfarne) the Thursday after her miraculous recovery on Whitson Eve to pray with Mr. Huet and other members of the parish. They then attend a lecture in Berwick, and Muschamp prays with Mr. Balsome and Mr. Strother. Her health is said to improve and her appetite return over the next seven weeks.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, May 24   Lindisfarne (Holy Island)  Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1455

Margaret Muschamp remains well until Mary Moore takes her to Berwick seven or eight weeks after Whitson (Pentecost). The musket fire from the Berwick Garrison allegedly causes the girl to "fall into very great extasies, being there severall times for 24 hours space, she would be suddenly taken with her former torments." This lasts for the duration of their three week stay in Berwick. In addition to the fits, Muschamp also loses the use of her stomach and limbs.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, July   Berwick  Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1456

Mary Moore removes Margaret Muschamp from Berwick after three weeks of fits allegedly triggered by the musket fire at the garrison. They take lodging a mile out of Berwick instead, where Muschamp's fits continue for another seven weeks.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, August   Berwick  Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1457

George Muschamp Jr., Margaret Muschamp's eldest brother, is allegedly stricken by illness in the night to such a degree "it was thought he would not live." He is slightly improved the next morning, but cannot eat or use his legs and requires assistance to dress. He must be lifted into a chair, and sits there throughout the day. He begins to consume away, unable to tolerate anything but a little milk, water or sour milk, but maintains good spirits.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1646, December 25 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1458

Grace Matthew goes to Guildhall seeking help for her husband (Anonymous 209) who has been ill for three years and whom she believes has been bewitched. Dr. Browne offers her "phisicall directions" but they did not help her. He refers her to a former servant of his (Anonymous 210).

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652, November 13 Exeter (Guildhall, High Street)    Devon  Devon  England 
1459

Grace Matthew consults Dr. Browne's former servant (Anonymous 210) about her husband's (Anonymous 209) illness. Anonymous 210 gives her some remedies and warns her that if a woman "tall of stature, of a pale face, and blinking eye, "and useing to goe by a staff when she did come to her house" (Anonymous 211), that she should give this woman nothing, but instead say that her husband is bewitched and that a plot is laid for the suspected one.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652 Broadclist  Broadclist  Devon  Devon  England 
1460

Joan Baker, allegedly feeling that her "spells were being interfered with," shows up immediately at Grace Matthew's door just as she was applying remedy to her husband.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652, November Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1461

Joan Baker allegedly sneaks into Anonymous 209's house to find out that the remedy offered by the Broadclyst woman (Anonymous 210) worked, and he was healed.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652, November Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1462

Joan Baker, seeing that her first victim (Anonymous 209) is healed, bewitches a servant-maid who is present. The maid becomes ill for three quarters of a year, often yelling that she is bewitched, and then dies.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652, November Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1463

Joan Baker is committed to the goal for being found by her relative Peter Baker to be sitting next to a fire in her house with a toad on her lap and two others at her feet.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1464

Diana Crosse, a suspected witch, stands trial at the City Assizes. She is accused by Mr. Ezekiel Trible of burning down his house, rendering him unable to smoke his pipe properly, and making one of his employees (Anonymous 213) sick by "cast[ing] her evil eye."

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1654, August 12 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1465

Mrs. Dicker testifies that shortly after she refused to help Diana Crosse, her child (Anonymous 214) becomes quite ill. She suddenly discovers the presence of a toad and a number of small worms in her house.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1654, August 12 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1466

A woman (Anonymous 215) claims that because she refused to give Diana Crosse some milk, two of her children (Anonymous 216 and Anonymous 217) fell sick.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1654, August 14 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1467

The witness (Anonymous 215), in her testimony about Diana Crosse, claims that her husband (Anonymous 218) fell ill about two years ago and that she consulted Dr. Browne who recommended that she give him some hot broth.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1654, August 14 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1468

The witness (Anonymous 215) claims that she came home on certain occasions and the chimney was ablaze with either little or no fire in the hearth. She was not surprised, however, because she had heard that Diana Crosse had surreptitiously entered her room.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652, August 14 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1469

Mary Moore calls for doctors from Newcastle, Durham and Edenborough to examine her eldest son, George Muschamp Jr., who began wasting away and lost the use of his legs at Christmas. They are allegedly unable to determine the cause of George Jr.'s illness, but agree that "by the course of nature he could not live a month to an end."

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, January Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1470

Margaret Muschamp's fits allegedly resume once more two or three weeks after her brother, George Jr., begins wasting away. This continues for three or four weeks, during which she cries out against something she calls the Rogue, and is seen shielding herself with her hands and bedclothes as if someone is striking her. She claims this Rogue is fighting her, sometimes in the shape of a dragon, bear, horse or cow, and sometimes with a club, staff, sword or dagger. She also claims that her Good Things, or angels, are fighting in her defense.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, January Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1471

The next witness (Anonymous 220) testifies that he refused Diana Crosse when she came to him asking him to bring a petition to the mayor on her behalf. Shortly thereafter, his wife (Anonymous 221) became ill and his son (Anonymous 222) broke his arm and the brew Anonymous 220 had made would "not run at the 'penn'."

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1652, August Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1472

Diana Crosse is allegedly pricked twelve times by a needle by Mary Cleake because Crosse had come near her sister, Joan Poole, who was allegedly ill. Crosse does not bleed.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1654, August Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1473

Mrs. Southcott testifies against Diana Crosse. She claims that her daughter went to Crosse's school but since she (Southcott) was displeased, she removed her daughter and put her in Goodwife Woodman's school. Shortly after, her daughter became ill. She was ill for five years and then died. Mrs. Southcott's husband died five weeks later and Goodwife Woodman died seven weeks after.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1643 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1474

Joan Willimott is examined by Alexander Amcots, and claims that her master, William Berry, willed her to open her mouth so that he could blow a fairy into it, which Berry said would do her good. Willimott did as she was told, after which a being came out of her mouth in the form of a woman (Pretty) who asked for Willimotts soul.

Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1475

Lord Francis Grant Cullen, author of Sadducimus Debellatus: or, a True Narrative of the Sorceries and Witchcrafts, asserts that the devil has altered his form over time to suit his varying purposes, stating that In the darkness of Popery he was transformed into a more innocent sort of Spirit called Brownie or Fairy.

Sadducimus Debellatus

1698 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1476

A woman (Anonymous 224), living in the house of Francis Jordan, allegedly suffers from a variety of ailments that are thought to be the product of witchcraft or bewitchment. Anonymous 224's flesh was often torn up together as if it had been done with Hooks, her Body swelled like a Bladder, puf[fed] up with wind ready to burst; [and] her Limbs distorted in several unnatural figures. She was also allegedly thrown to the floor with great violence and was sometimes unable to eat or drink, save for water and chalk.

Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil

1678 London (Goswell Street)    London, City of  London  England 
1477

Anonymous 224 is visited by several physicians (Anonymous 319) who attempt to cure her aliments. It is determined that Anonymous 224 cannot be afflicted by Melancholy, Hysterial Passions, "or Fits of the Mother." However, the physicians prescribe various chemicals "both Cathartick and Emetick," and administer them in increasingly high doses, but to no avail. After determining that they cannot cure her, the physicians conclude that Anonymous 224 has been bewitched.

Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil

1678 London (Goswell Street)    London, City of  London  England 
1478

Johan Furnace is accused of bewitching "one Greene, who gets taken with fits in his head and distempers in his body." Greene is able to talk in Johan Furnace's presence, but gets distracted as soon as she leaves.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1658, January 4 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1479

Johan Furnace allegedly bewitches Greene's child who had been "creemed," and Greene believes it would happen again with furnace was not fed "scutes," or small pieces of silver.

Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter

1658, Jaunary 4 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1480

Thomas Addy, author of A Perfect Discovery of Witches, claims that a witch can go invisible by the help of the devil, especially if one of the Ladies of the Fairie will but lend her Giges invisible ring.

A Perfect Discovery of Witches

1661 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1482

Daniel, a speaker in George Giffords A Dialogue Concerning Witches, claims that if a person is haunted with a fayrie, or a spirit: he must learne a charme compounded of some straunge speaches, and the names of God intermingled to combat such forces.

A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcraftes

1593 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1483

The morning after MIstress Moulsho searched Hellen Jenkenson, Moulsho's maid (Anonymous 402) discovers that the laundry, and especially Moulsho's smock, has been "all bespotted with the pictures of Toades, Snakes, and other ougly Creatures." Anonymous 402 reported this immediately to Moulsho, who "smild, saying nothing else but this; Heere are fine Hobgoblins inded." Moulsho went directly to Jenkenson's house and threatened "that if her Linnen were not shortly clered from those foule spots, she would scratch out both her eyes." This threat proved effective - on returning home, the linen was found to be white and clean once more.

The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber

1611, May Thrapston  Thrapston  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1484

Sarah Griffith, long suspected of being a witch, enters the shop of Mr. John ---, and encounters "a good jolly fellow for his Apprentice." This apprentice laughs and "cryed out he thought that they were be witch'd", and the old woman, feeling ridiculed leaves and threatens revenge.

A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,

1704 London (Well-Close)    London, City of  London  England 
1485

Mr. John ---'s apprentice happens upon Mother Griffith, and together with two or three young men, tossed her in the river to discover if she was a witch. "So this Witch was no sooner in but Swam like a Corke" and at last they let her out.

A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,

1704 London (Well-Close)    London, City of  London  England 
1486

Following the death of his apprentice due to strange ailments, Mr. John --- goes to the constable to charge Mother Griffith. She made many attempts to escape, "she tried to leap over the Wall and had done it had not the Constable knocked her down."

A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,

1704 London (Well-Close)    London, City of  London  England 
1487

Margaret Wellam is suspected of being a witch and feeding evil spirits. Andrew Cansfield of London testifies against her.

County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16

1616, August 1 Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1488

Anne Piers, a suspected witch, becomes the subject of an investigation in which three examiners, Sir Rich. Greynevile, Thomas Roscarrock, and George Greynevile, question a number of Padstow residents on whether they had heard that Anne Piers practices witchcraft.

Calendar of State Papers, Domestic: Edward VI, Mary Elizabeth I, James I: 1581-1590, Volume 2

1581, October 25 Padstow  Padstow  Cornwall  Cornwall  England 
1489

Barbara Bartle allegedly bewitches Elizabeth Gyan. Gyan languishes in pain, is lame, and is left speechless for nearly a month.

Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67

1653, June 17 Stepney  Stepney  Middlesex  Middlesex  England 
1491

Barbara Bartle of Stepney, Middlesex is tried for allegedly bewitching Elizabeth Gyan of Stepney, Middlesex. Gyan is allegedly made lame, languishes, and is speechless for nearly a month by the time the trial takes place. Bartle pleads not guilty.

Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67

1653, July 12 Stepney  Stepney  Middlesex  Middlesex  England 
1492

Elizabeth Newman allegedly bewitches three children named John, Elizabeth and James Gale. The children languish and eventually become deaf and dumb.

Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67

1653, August 1 Whitechapell  Whitechapell  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1493

Elizabeth Newman allegedly bewitches Joan Holland. From August to January, Holland "was wasted consumed and pyned in her body."

Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67

1653, August 1 Whitechapell  Whitechapell  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1494

Elizabeth Newman puts herself on trial for bewitching Joan Holland. She pleads guilty, but her punishment is unknown.

Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67

1653, August 1 Whitechapell  Whitechapell  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1495

Agnes Berry of Enfield allegedly bewitches Grace Hasley of Enfield. Hasley becomes "lame, and languished from 25 August until 3 September then next following and wasted away in her whole body."

County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16

1615 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
1496

Agnes Berry of Enfield is sentenced to be hanged for allegedly bewitching Grace Hasley.

County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16

1653 Enfield (London Borough of Enfield)    London, Greater  London  England 
1497

Mary Prowting allegedly bewitches Anne Waldron. Anne Waldron becomes ill.

Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles: 1633-1634. Vol 6

1635, November 13       Unknown  England 
1498

Mary Prowting is indicted for allegedly bewitching Anne Waldron.

Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles: 1633-1634. Vol 6

1635, November 13       Unknown  England 
1499

Anne Waldron allegedly fakes her convulsions and fasting. She confesses to the deception.

Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles: 1633-1634. Vol 6

1635, November 13       Unknown  England 
1500

Emma Branch allegedly bewitched the infant Edward Wheeler, Anne Howell, and Joan Aldridge. Wheeler eventually dies while the other two languish but live.

County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16

1616, June 5 Tottenham    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1501

Emma Branch, suspected witch, is committed to the goal for allegedly bewitching Edward Wheeler, Anne Howell, and Joan Aldridge. The charges are brought against her by Mary Aldridge, Katherine Barbor, and Alice Smythe. She is released due to lack of evidence.

County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16

1616, June 5 Tottenham    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1502

Mr. Amyce believes he has been bewitched by "a notable witch" (Anonymous 225).

Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600

1600, September Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
1503

Mr. Amyce has a woman who be believes to be a witch (Anonymous 225) committed to the goal in Hertford for allegedly bewitching him.

Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600

1600, September   Hatford  Hertfordshire  Oxford  England 
1504

Mr. Amyce is examined by several doctors (Anonymous 226) who are unable to determine what is wrong with him. In the end, Mr. Amyce claims he must have been bewitched by "that lewd woman" (Anonymous 225).

Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600

1600, September Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
1505

Mr. Amyce sees a woman (Anonymous 227) who has been sent to him by Jo. Stileman about his having been allegedly bewitched by a witch (Anonymous 225). The woman (Anonymous 227) gives him something to take before bed that night. He does and has an "alteration in himself" and ate more meat than he had in all the time he was sick.

Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600

1600, September Hatfield Peverel   Hatfield Peverel   Essex  Essex  England 
1506

Thomas Addy, in _A Candle in The Dark_ (1655) claims that an old woman (Anonymous 228) taught her neighbor the following charm when the butter would not churn: Come butter come, come butter come, Peter stands at the gate, waiting for a butterd cake, Come butter come. The same charm also appears in George Sinclair's _Satan's Invisible World Discovered_ (1685).

A Candle in the Dark

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1508

Margaret Muschamp, after fighting off the Rogue during her fits, allegedly writes with her hand on her breast while her eyes are fixed on her angels. When given a pen and paper, she will write "Jo Hu. Do. Swo. have beene the death of one deare friend, consume another, and torment mee" while shrinking back as if anticipating a blow. She falls into a convulsive fit if someone takes the paper from her, lasting until she can burn it or chew it into illegibility.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, January Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1509

Mary Moore speaks to her niece, Elizabeth Muschamp, about Margaret Muschamp's writing. They both agree that "Jo Hu. Do. Swo. have beene the death of one deare friend, consume another, and torment mee" can only mean that Dorothy Swinow is responsible for Margaret's torments and George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption. Elizabeth claims that Swinow came to visit Margaret once when Moore was away, and spoke harshly of Moore to the child.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1510

Mary Moore travels to Newcastle on business, accompanied by her trusted servant William Hall. Hall, noting her sadness, asks if she will confide confide in him the cause. Moore does so, revealing her suspicions about Dorothy Swinow being the cause of Margaret Muschamp's and George Muschamp Jr.'s afflictions. Moore allegedly takes care that "no living soule being by." She concludes her business and returns home to Spital.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Newcastle    Borough of Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1511

Margaret Muschamp, at home while Mary Moore journeyed to Newcastle, allegedly runs "up and downe with a staffe in her hand, saying she would kill the Rogue." She claims to have apprehended her good things while they are in the form of a dove and a partridge. She sings "Judgo and revenge my cause O Lord: Next, How long wilt thou forget me Lord; shall I never be remembred? And concluded, Behold and have regard, ye servants of the Lord," and on completion of her song emerges from her fit, claiming not to remember anything she had said or done while in it. She also claims that she did not know any of the psalms she recited prior to her fit. This is witnessed by numerous neighbors and relatives.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1512

A poor and base woman and suspected witch (Anonymous 229) is sent to prison in Wisbech for allegedly being "the first mover of the mutiny" according to a complaint made to the Earl of Bedford. The woman (Anonymous 229) and the other accused (Anonymous 230) are said to be so miserably poor and base that they cannot appear before Lords.

Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637

1637, May 25 Wisbech    Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
1513

Anonymous 229 allegedly puts a curse on messengers (Anonymous 231) who passed by her house in a boat.

Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637

1637, May Wisbech    Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
1514

A waterman (Anonymous 232) is "stricken with such a lamentable crick in his back that he was constrained to get help" soon after the messengers (Anonymous 231) are allegedly cursed by Anonymous 229.

Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637

1637, May 25 Wisbech    Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
1518

Joan Haddon is indicted for allegedly bewitching Joan, the wife of Robert Bowltell, Thomas Emmerye, and others. She is also accused of allegedly fraudulently receiving money from them.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1560, July 4   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1519

Joan Haddon pleads not guilty to having bewitched Joan Bowltell, Thomas Emmerye, and others and to having fraudulently taken money from them. She is found innocent of witchcraft but guilty on the other counts.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1560, July 4   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1520

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has a fit upon Mary Moore's return from Newcastle, in which she claims that "if she had two drops of his blood or hers, within ten dayes, it would save her life; if not death long comming, but torment perpetually." These fits occur daily, with Muschamp counting down the days as they progress. When she reaches three days, she writes again, weeping all the while, "JO. HU. DO. SVVI. hath been the death of one deare friend, consumes mother deare friend, and torments me," this time adding "two drops of his or her bloud would save my life, if I have it not I am undone, for seven yeares to be tormented before death come."

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1521

Mary Moore allegedly sends her trusted servant William Hall to John Hutton in Sunderland, "one it was suspected that could do more then God allowed of." Hall bear a message bidding Hutton to reveal who had wronged Margaret Muschamp. Moore's message also threatens to have Hutton apprehended if he did not cooperate, on the grounds that Margaret had written the first two letters of his name along with another's.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Sunderland    Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1523

John Samond is indicted for allegedly bewitching John Grant and Bridget Peacock with the intention of killing them. He is also accused of bewitching Anthony.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1560, July 4   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1524

John Samond allegedly murders Bridget Peacock and Anthony. The two are allegedly bewitched by Samond, languish, and then die.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1560, July 4   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1525

John Samond gives no plea to the charge of bewitching three people (Bridget Peacock, Anthony, and John Grant) and consequently causing the death of two of them (Bridget Peacock and Anthony). His verdict is unknown.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1560, July 4   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1526

William Hall, servant to Mary Moore, receives a reply from John Hutton. Hutton allegedly tell him "your Mrs. knowes as well who hath wrong'd he[r] child as I: for the party that with a troubled minde your Mrs. had concealed all this time, and at Newcastle in her chamber all alone told you is she that hath done her all this wrong." Hutton then adds that it was Dorothy Swinow who bewitched Margaret Muschamp and caused all of Moore's other troubles.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Sunderland    Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1527

Anonymous 236, the brother-in-law of a woman (Anonymous 224) allegedly bewitched, decides to pursue that "Devil's instrument" (Anonymous 244) which is responsible for her affliction on June 13, 1678. Anonymous 236 prepares a fire, and "phasied the Evil Spirit to be got into a Stone-Bottle that hung over the fire," a bottle which roared loudly. The room he finds himself in becomes filled with unexplained smoke and fire. Anonymous 236 also hears a noise like a Clap of Thunder, or the report of a Cannon, and suffers a blow to the side of his head that makes him feel as if he has been stuck with awls (tools) or needles, which throws him to the ground. The Evil Spirit then departs up the Chimney, "carrying away the Pot-hangers and Bottle with him; but the Bottle came down again, still roaring and casting a dismal tract of Smoak, but not in any part broken." The spirit seems gone.

Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil

1685 London (Goswell Street)    London, City of  London  England 
1528

Anonymous 224 is cured of her bewitchment, and is again able to eat and drink, after her Brother-in-law (Anonymous 236) traps an Evil Spirit that was thought to be the cause of her bewitchment in a stone bottle. She finds her Brother-in-law unhurt as well.

Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil

1678, June 13 London (Goswell Street)    London, City of  London  England 
1529

Mary Moore allegedly travels to meet with John Hutton herself after receiving his reply, accompanied by numerous others including William Hall, Edward Moore, George Armorer and Elizabeth Muschamp. Hutton recognizes them and knows all their names, despite only having met Hall previously. Moore demands to know how he knew what she had confided privately in Hall; Hutton only repeats the message he had sent prior, that Dorothy Swinow is the cause of Margaret Muschamp's bewitchment and her other troubles. When she tells him of George Muschamp Jr.'s illness and her cousin Lady Margery Hambleton's demise, Hutton accuses Swinow of causing those as well.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Sunderland    Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1530

Mary Moore allegedly demands two drops of blood from John Hutton. He attempts unsuccessfully to convince her to allow him to let his blood privately. Margaret Muschamp pricks him six times on his forehead, but no blood appeared. Hutton offers his right arm after Moore threatens to take his heart's blood; he lays a thumb on his arm and blood wells up from the spot. Muschamp soaks up the drops with a piece of paper she had written on during once of her trances.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Sunderland    Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1531

John Hutton, after Margaret Muschamp takes two drops of his blood, allegedly bids Mary Moore and her party to "ride softly, they had both tide and time enough, it being a fine quiet day." Yet, "of a sudden as soon as they were on horse back it grew very boystrous" and they have difficulty remaining ahorse in the foul weather. They are forced to hurry to Bambrough to take shelter and cross deep water to get there.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Sunderland    Tyne and Wear  Northumberland  England 
1532

Mary Muschamp allegedly falls into a rapture in which she claims that her angels have bid her to speak out. Echoing John Hutton, she accuses Dorothy Swinow of causing the death of her aunt the Lady Margery Hambleton, consuming her brother George Muschamp Jr. and her own torments. Muschamp also accuses Swinow of causing James Fauset, whose sister had married Hambeton's son, to suffer unnatural fits in an attempt to kill him so that his sister would inherit instead. She claims Swinow stopped tormenting Fauset when Swinow turned her attention to Muschamp and her family.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1533

Margaret Muschamp claims that the two drops of blood taken from John Hutton saved her from "seaven yeares in torment without any ease, or death had come." She allegedly falls into a two-hour rapture in which she converses with her angels, and emerges from this conversation with the insistence that her brother George Muschamp Jr. also required two drops of John Hutton's blood in order to live. Her stepfather Edward Moore and Moore's seven children witness this, as does her cousin Elizabeth Muschamp and numerous neighbours and friends of the family.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1534

Elizabeth Francis is indicted for allegedly bewitching John, the son of William Auger, so that he became decrepit.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1566   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1535

Elizabeth Francis confesses to bewitching John, son of William Auger, making him decrepit. She is imprisoned for one year.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1566   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1536

George Lee's ship is allegedly nearly thrown off course by a "fearfull tempest" when entering Barwick Harbour; he is journeying to to Spital to see Margaret Muschamp in her raptures. John Hutton is blamed for raising the storm.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Barwick Harbour    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1537

Margaret Hogdin is indicted for allegedly bewitching and enchanting Margaret, wife of John Hull, so that she languished until January then died.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1582   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1538

Margaret Hodgin is determined by the jurors to have premeditated the murder of Margaret Hull.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1582   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1539

Mary Moore fetches John Hutton back to Spital after Margaret Muschamp insists that Hutton's blood will save her brother George Muschamp Jr. Hutton comes quietly and allows Moore to take his blood; she holds Hutton in her custody after.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1540

Elizabeth Francis is determined by the jurors to have premeditated the murder of Poole's wife.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1578   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1541

John Hutton, in Mary Moore's custody, alleges to Edward Moore that Dorothy Swinow has "two bad women about her, the Millers and the Websters Wives, who had beene the death of Jo. CUSTERD and his Wife, with many other things of their wickednesse." He refuses to give any more information to either Edward or Mary Moore when they try to question him further.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1542

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has a fit soon after John Hutton is allowed to leave the Moore household; she is said to have been free of them for the entire duration of Hutton's stay. In this fit, she echos Hutton's claims once more, saying "DOROTHT SVVINOVV with two Witches more were come to torment her worse then ever HUTTON did, and the one was a yong woman, and the other an old: So that till they had Justice of DOROTHY SVVINOVV, her mother and they should never be at peace."

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1543

Mary Moore, hearing Margaret Muschamp's renewed accusations against Dorothy Swinow and her claim that John Hutton, too, has been tormenting her, travels to Nuham and gives information against both Swinow and Hutton to Judge Foster. Foster, after some delay, has Hutton apprehended and sent to Newcastle Gaol. He refuses to have Swinow apprehended.

Wonderfull Newes from the North

1647, February Nuham    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1544

Following the threat of Mother Griffith after visiting the Sugarloaf shop, overnight, loud noises are heard and the shop is discovered to be "a strange confusion, every thing turn'd topsy turvy all the goods out of order" by the shopkeeper, Mr. John ---. Mr John ---'s apprentice also falls ill the next day, only to be cured by good prayers of the neighbourhood.

A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,

1704 London (Well-Close)    London, City of  London  England 
1545

Mother Griffith is taken before Justice Bateman where evidence was lain forth in the witness to Mr. John ---'s apprentice's sickness, and although Mother Griffith pleaded innocent, she was committed to Bridewell.

A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,

1704 London (Bridewel)    London, City of  London  England 
1546

After Mr. John ---'s apprentice and a few other men swam Mother Griffith, "she smote that Young man on the Arm, and told him he should pay dear for what he had done: Immediately he found a strange pain on his arm, and looking on it found the exact mark of her Hand and Fingers as black as Cole."

A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,

1704 London (Well-Close)    London, City of  London  England 
1547

Upon returning home from being marked by Mother Griffith, Mr. John ---'s apprentice is strangely afflicted, dies, and is buried in St. Pulcher's Churchyard.

A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,

1704 London (St. Pulcher's Churchyard)  St. Sepulchre  London, City of  London  England 
1548

Joseph Weeden, of the Town of Eastcoat near Fosters-Booth in Northampton Shire, refused to spare the old woman, Ann Foster, some of his mutton, no matter how much she offered him for it. Ann Foster "went away murmerring and grumbing," warning Joseph Weeden that he should have done as she asked.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1549

After Joseph Weedon draws blood using a knife from Mary/Ann Foster, her wound "wrankled and swell'd extreamly," and she returns to threaten Joseph Weedon with arrest.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1550

After drawing blood from Mary/Ann Foster and causing a swelling wound, Joseph Weedon offers Mary/Ann Foster some "twenty shillings towards her cure," which she refuses, claiming that she would punish him.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1551

While Joseph Weedon's property burns, many of his neighbours come out to help, including Mary/Ann Foster, who was observed to tell several people that "all they did was but in vain, and that do what they could, they should never be able to quench the fire," confirming among the minds of the town that Mary/Ann Foster is involved with "devilish art."

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674, May 22   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1552

Joseph Weedon's neighbours suspicions are confirmed when Mary/Ann Foster comes to Joseph Weedon's barn fire, and "thereupon laying hands on this suspected witch," carry her before the next Justice of the Peace.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1553

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that wizards and witches will often meet in a place and time appointed with the Devil, who "appears to them in humane shape." During these meetings the Devil will ask "if the party will renounce the Christian Faith, the Sacraments, and tread upon the Cross," after which the Devil gives "his hand, adding moreover, that this is not alone sufficient, but that he will have an homage also."

A Pleasant Treatise of Witches

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1554

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that "In the Year 1553. two Witches stoe a Child from her neighbour, kild it, cut it in peices, and put it into a Kittle to boil, when the sorrowful Mother looking for her infant, came by chance into the house, and found the limbs thereof horribly consumed."

A Pleasant Treatise of Witches

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1555

Alice Swallow is indicted for allegedly bewitching Alice Basticke so that she languished and died.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1570, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1556

Alice Swallow pleads not guilty to murdering Alice Basticke by bewitching her.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1570, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1557

Susan Havering, "being a comon witch and inchantrix," is indicted for allegedly bewitching three colts "worth 4," belonging to Robert Smyth.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1653, March 24   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1558

Once incarcerated in the Northampton Goal, Mary/Ann Foster is chained to a post. Her body swells up, and she is forced to be unchained, giving her more opportunity to allow the Devil to come and suck from her body.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
1559

The Devil comes at night in the form of a rat, in order to suck on Ann Foster, causing a "most lamentable and hideous noise which affrighted the people that did belong to the Goal."

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674 Eastcote  Pattishall  Northamptonshire  Northampton  England 
1560

Ann Foster is put on trial, where she at first pleads not-guilty, "but it being so evidently proved that she was the person that had committed al those things before mentioned, she then confessed," all of which she accomplished with the help of the Devil.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1561

After confessing to her crimes, Mary/Ann Foster is sentenced to death. She begs forgiveness and to be burned, but the court deems that she "should be hanged at the Common place of Execution, which accordingly was performed," on the 22nd of August, 1674.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674, August 22 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1562

Ann Foster bewitches the farmer Joseph Weedon's horses and his other cattle.

A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster

1674   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1563

Seven women living in Queen-Street in Coven-Garden illegally declared themselves Confessors, ordained by Father Ciprian. Their names were Katherin Wels, Susan Baker, Anne Parker, Katherin Smith, Elinor Hall, Maior Jones, and Dorathie Marsh and almost all were young and beautiful. At this abode, he or she who came to be confessed would bring money to the chief Matron Katherin Wels, and would presently go into a room with one or several of the women, where they were sworn to a number of rules before confessing.

The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden

1641 London (Queen Street in Coven Garden)    London, City of  London  England 
1564

John Stockden visits the seven women confessors (con artists and possible prostitution racket) of Queen Street in Covent Garden: Katherin Wels, Susan Baker, Anne Parker, Katherin Smith, Elinor Hall, Maior Jones, and Dorathie Marsh. John Stockden is "willing to have a wench, but not to swear to their Articles," and so the witches, "by which way they stuffe their purses with gold, and their bellies with children," are discovered, and their con is ended.

The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden

1641 London (Queen Street in Coven Garden)    London, City of  London  England 
1565

Margaret Ganne and Joan Norfolk of Borley, Essex are indicted at the Assizes in Chelmsford for allegedly bewitching John Furmyn so that he languished for months and died.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1578, March 1   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1567

The jurors (Anonymous 240) find Margaret Ganne and Joan Norfolk guilty of murdering John Furmyn by witchcraft, while the justice of the peace (Anonymous 241) finds them not guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1578, March 1   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1568

Laura Wynchester of Hatfield, Essex is indicted at the Assizes in Chelmsford under the charge of bewitching a cow, six sheep and four pigs belonging to William Highman.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1566, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1569

Lora Whynchester pleads not guilty at the Assizes in Chelmsford to bewitching a cow, six sheep, and four pigs belonging to William Highman. Wynchester is found not guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1566, July 25   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1570

A woman (Anonymous 242) allegedly confesses to being a witch, a confession she makes before one Archdeacon Cole (perhaps during an unofficial examination, done under duress) and flees shortly thereafter. These events are presented during the Midsummer session at Chemlsford.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1566 Borham  Boreham  Essex  Essex  England 
1571

Joan Cocke is indicted for allegedly bewitching Agnes Cryspe. Cryspe was a one-year-old infant who allegedly was lame, enfeebled and maimed so that the jurors said her life "was despaired of."

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1567 Brentwood    Essex  Essex  England 
1572

Joan Cocke of Kelvedon, Essex pleads not guilty at the Assizes in Chelmsford to the charge of bewitching the infant Agne Cryspe. She is found not guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1566, December 1   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1573

Richard Burt, servent to M. Edling, goes to his master's barn, accompanied by a "great massive dogge." Along the way there, a hare crosses their path and the dog "in stead of following began to faint, and runne rounde his maister, and to whine pitifully."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1574

Richard Burts, a servant to the gentleman M. Edling, greets Mother Atkins as she passes by his master's barn. Mother Atkins, " like a peruerse woman, like a perilous waspe, like a pestiferous witch, incensed with hate at the sight of him held downe hir head, not baigning to speake."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 7 (Tuesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1575

The servant Richard Burt follows a hare that crossed the path of him and his dog to Mother Atkin's house, "whome before that time he knew to be a notorious witche."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1576

The servant Richard Burt, while taking his lunch at work in his master's barn around the hour of noon is visited by a "monstrous blacke Cat among the straw." The animal acts strangely and startles him.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 8 (Wednesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1577

Richard Burt, after being startled by a monstrous black cat during the course of his lunch around noon, hears a strange voice that commands him to leave his master's workplace. Upon asking where he is expected the go, "the Spirit answering againe sayde: Come and leave thy vittles behind thee and thy knife also."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 8 (Wednesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1578

After being commanded by a voice to leave his master's barn, the servant Richard Burt is "hoised up into the aire" and carried over many fields and a great pond where his hat fell, and over Harrow Church. Even though he cried out, none could hear him, and he ended up "into a place which was all fire, where was heard such lamentable howling and dollful crieng, as if all the damned fiends of hell had been tortured, and tormenten in that Limbo."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 8 (Wednesday) London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1579

Richard Burt finds himself after he has been magically "hoised up into the aire," in a strange place, which is dark, "plentiful in filthy odors and stinches," full of noise, and full of fire. This causes an "unquenchable drouth in his stomach," although there is nowhere for him to find refreshment.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1580

Richard Burt, imprisoned for four days in a dark, unknown location in Middlesex that full of fire, filthy odors, and noises, is told that he is forbidden to speak of what has befallen him upon returning home. Richard Burt asserts that he must tell his mother, and was then made to suffer by his tongue doubling and being severely burned and scratched with thornes and briers, "that it is both lamentable and terrible to behold him."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 8 Ilseworth    London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1581

The servant, Richard Burt, is returned from some unknown location full of darkness and fire in Middlesex to Pinner in Middlesex, where he drinks from a ditch. Although some four days had passed during which he was missing, he does not visit his home or his friends.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1582

Maister Edling of Woodhall passes a man on the way to Church four days after his servant, Richard Burt disappeared. Maister Edling asks the man if he can find him a new servant, and the man is revealed to be the lost Richard Burt. Maister Edling beseeches Richard Burt to tell him where he has been, but the servant cannot talk and only gestures towards the witch Mother Atkin's house.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1583

The servant of Maister Edling, Richard Burt who has been rendered mute, is treated by the parson of the town, M. Smith, and Master Burbridge of Pinner.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1584

Upon being healed of the inability to speak by the parson M. Smith of Pinner, the servant Richard Burt cries, "Woe worth mother Atkins, woe worth mother Atkins, for she hath bewitched me: whereupon he would not be quiet, but ever requested that he might speak with hir," thereby accusing Mother Atkins.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1585

Mother Atkins, after being accused of bewitching the servant Richard Burt, is sent for by Master Burbidge and the parson P. Smith. Richard Burt scratchs her until he draws blood, which makes him well and ends her bewitchment over him.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592, March 11 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1586

Mother Atkins, a notorious witch, goes to M. Burbidge's house to ask for milk, at which time the maids were busy at the dairy, and is denied.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1587

After Mother Atkins is denied milk at Master Burbridge's house, "immediately upon hir departure out of the doores, the Creame beganne to swell and rise in the cherne," so that it ran about the kitchen and down the sink-hole. All chores were wrecked that day.

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1588

Mother Atkins visits the grounds of Gregorie Coulson to ask for charity, but she found him busy working with the lambs. This caused him some delay in bringing her charity, and "she flung forth in a fume."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1589

After Mother Atkins is angered by the slow speed Gregory Coulson uses to bring her charity, two lambs of Gregory Coulson are let forth into a yard, and "suddenly they began so nimbly to skip and frilke to and fro, that they never ceased after til they died."

A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England)

1592 London   Pinner  London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1590

Joan Cocke indicted at the assizes in Brentwood for initially laying her hands on Richard Sherman's knees while in his house and then clapping her hands on his knees, allegedly causing him to become lame.

Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4

1557 Brentwood    Essex  Essex  England 
1591

Joan Cocke's daughter (Anonymous 243) is suspected of being a witch because Noble's wife claims to be unable to properly churn her butter.

Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4

1557 Brentwood    Essex  Essex  England 
1592

Joan Cocke's daughter (Anonymous 243) is suspected of using "witcherie" on Belfild's wife's cows causing one to die and two "miche neate" (dairy cows) to give milk of "all colours."

Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4

1557 Brentwood    Essex  Essex  England 
1593

Joan Cocke of Hatfield is indicted under suspicion of bewitching Anne Willson. Willson eventually died in May of 1584.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1584, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1594

Joan Cocke of Hatfield pleads not guilty to bewitching Anne Willson, the daughter of a local smith, Richard Willson of Purleigh, who died 23rd of May. The jurors found her not guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1584, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1595

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that all witches and wizards have "a Spirit or Imp attending on, and assigned to them, which never leave those to whom they are subject, but assist and render them all the service they command."

A Pleasant Treatise of Witches

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1596

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that witches have appointments and meetings with other witches "which are ordinarily on Tuesday or Wednesday night." Before these meetings, the witches "strip themselves naked, and anoint themselves with their Oyntments. Then are they carryed out of the house, either by the Window, Door, or Chimney, mounted on their Imps in the form of a Goat, Sheep, or Dragon." Once at the meeting the witches "make their accustomed homage, Adoring, and Proclaiming" to Lucifer who "takes his place in his Throne as King."

A Pleasant Treatise of Witches

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1597

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that when witches and wizards gather together "the pleasant consort [the Devil] invites them to a Ball; but the dance is strange, and wonderful, as well as diabolical, for turning themselves back to back; they take one another by the arms and raise each other from the ground, then shake their heads to a fro like Anticks, & turn themselves as if they were mad." Following this, "the Incubus's in the shap[e]s of proper men satisfy the desires of the Witches, and the Succubus's serve for whores to the WIzards."

A Pleasant Treatise of Witches

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1598

Margaret Stanton is indicted at the assizes in Chelmsford for allegedly bewitching a gelding worth 3 and a cow worth 40s.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1578, August 20   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1599

Margaret Stanton is found guilty by the jurors of bewitching the gelding and the cow so that they languished and died while the justice of the peace finds her innocent.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1578, August   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1600

A charm, which according to Thomas Addy, was a bit of "popish" superstition, taught by the clergy to their congregants: "Matthew, Mark, Luke, and Iohn,/ The Bed be blest that I lye on." This was passed on to an old woman (Anonymous 244), who still recites it before sleep.

A Candle in the Dark

1655     Essex  Essex  England 
1601

A butcher (Anonymous 245) visits a local cunning-man (Anonymous 247) who promises him, with the help of the devil, to help him find his missing cattle. The cunning-man instructs the butcher to look in a glass, and to look "East and West, North and South to finde his Cattel," but not turn around, as the cunning-man's partner(Anonymous 248), dressed in a hide and horns supposedly meant to exemplify the Devil, is reflected. The butcher does not find his cattle and returns later with his son (Anonymous 246) to expose the con, by releasing a mastiff dog on the disguised man.

A Candle in the Dark

1655     Essex  Essex  England 
1602

Anonymous 249 is allegedly executed as a witch in Cambridge in the county of Cambridgshire in 1645. Proof of her crime is provided by the fact that she keeps "a tame Frogge in a Box for sport and Phantasie." This frog must have been read as her familiar; in owning a familiar she was by default a witch.

A Candle in the Dark

1645 Cambridge    Cambridgeshire  Cambridgeshire  England 
1603

Agnes Sawen is indicted at the assize in Essex for allegedly bewitching Christopher Veele, son of Roger Veele rendering him lame and causing his feet to curve inwards that he could barely walk because of the pain.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1574   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1604

Agnes Sawen is issued a capias from the court, a writ outlining her penalty for allegedly bewitching Christopher Veele.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1574, September   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1605

Agnes Berden is indicted at the Easter Session at the Assize in Essex for allegedly enchanting a one and a half year old infant named Thomas Barlee so that he languished for three days after which his body was so "vexed and trouble" that his life was determined to be essentially "disposed of."

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1576, April 15   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1606

Thomas Paman confesses to having feigned mental illness and bewitchment, and having assaulted alleged witch Alice Read who had been sent to see him by Sir Martin Stuteville.

Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles I, 1629-1631

1630 Newmercat   Forest Heath  Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1607

Samuel, a speaker in George Gifford's "A DIalogue Concerning Witches," claims that his neighbour's wife (Anonymous 250) was much troubled because "she was haunted with a fairy."

A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcraftes

1593 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1608

Dr. Woodhouse diagnoses and begins to treat Mary Hall for her distemper. He prepares "stinking Suffumigations, over which she held her head, and sometimes did strain to vomit." Her illness seems, at least for "some weekes" to be somewhat abated. Woodhouse appears to continue acting as her physician during this time.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1663, (Fall) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1609

Mary-by-chance was swum as a witch in St. Albans in the county of Hertforshire. She allegedly "could not be made sink, though she strove, by putting her head under the Water, and was thrust down with Poles." According to the justices of that town, who related the story to William Drage, she confessed, One of her Imps leaped upon her Breast in the Water, and she could not sink." Evidently, she attempted to weigh herself down with iron to help her sink.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1637 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1610

Mary-by-chance, and "another man in Prison" (Anonymous 252) are examined as witches. Being made to "shew their Teats; the Man [showed that he] had like a Breast on his side" and by being made to recite the Lord's Prayer, Mary-by-chance evidently could not say "Our Father, but [could only say] Your Father," a sure sign of demonic leanings.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1637 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1611

Mary-by-chance allegedly confesses that "she did exactly all those things that were alleged against her."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1637 St Albans    Hertfordshire  Hertfordshire  England 
1612

Goodwife Rose is swum as a witch after she bewitched a Maid's (Anonymous' 253) Pease (pease pudding or porridge), cursing it to become mealy, after she refused to give her some. She also wished "another-fellow" to be louse-ridden, even if she would change cloths everyday. Goodwife Rose is swum along with Anonymous 253, who volunteered to act as a litmus test, and "sank presently, and they could scarce bring her to life with all their hast and Arts." Goodwife Rose floated.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1637 Bedford    Bedfordshire  Bedfordshire  England 
1613

Anonymous 254 is allegedly visited by a thing "like a Mouse" which "came to him, which none could hinder." Shortly thereafter he begins to have "strange fits" which are read as supernatural in origin.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1665 Isle of Ely    Cambridgeshire  Isle of Ely  England 
1614

A possessed man from the Isle of Ely (Anonymous 254) visits a wizard / cunning-man in search of a cure for his "strange fits." This "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician," who gave him an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1665 Isle of Ely    Cambridgeshire  Isle of Ely  England 
1615

Mr. Lowes Parson of Branson in Suffolk bewitched a ship near Harwidge, so that "with the extreame tempesteous Seas raised by blusterous windes" the ship sank, drowning all its passengers.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Harwidge    Essex  Essex  England 
1616

Mr. Lowes Parson of Branson in Suffolke commits "many other most hanous, wicked, and accursed acts" with the help of six imps which visit him daily.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Branson    Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1617

Mr. Lowes Parson of Branson in Suffolke "preached about threescore sermons after he had made his Covenent with the Devill," thereby engaging in anti-Catholic activities and working with the Devil.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Branson    Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1618

Mr. Lowes Parson of Branson in Suffolke is found to have a teat on the crown of his head, and two under his tongue. This confirms his "Covenant with the Devill."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Branson    Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1619

Mr. Lowes Parson of Branson in Suffolke confesses to bewitching a ship near Harwidge, raising "blusterous windes," which sink the ship and kill all passengers.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1620

Mr. Lowes Parson confesses "that he had done many other most hanous, wicked, and accursed acts," with the help of six imps which are his daily visitors.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1621

WIlliam Whycherly, while being examined by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that Croxton's wife, in Golding-lane in Saint Giles parishe, occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools], and she only speaketh with the fayrayes [fairies]."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1549 Golding Lane, London  St Giles   London, City of  London  England 
1622

A woman (Anonymous 256) allegedly claims (the story come to William Drage via a Lawyer who heard this assertion) that regardless of what happened to her in court, she was "sure not to die yet: for all the mischief she had done, was in transforming her self into the shape of a Bumble Boe; and biting the Maids thread often in pieces as she spun," proclaiming a certain immortality and the ability to go on doing maleficium.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1665   Hatford  Hertfordshire  Oxford  England 
1623

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, confesses to being able to "invocate the spirite into the cristalle glasse assone as any man, but he cannot bynde the spirit so sure as other from their lyinge lyes."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1549 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1624

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, confesses to attempting to conjure a circle with a consecrated sword and ring, but was unsuccessful because "an old priest being there was so sore afraide that he ran away before the spirit called Ambrose Waterduke could appeare."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1625

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "he knoweth that one Lowth, in Flete-strete, a broderer, useth the cristall stone, and goeth about daily to dygge for treasure."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 London (Fleet Street)    London, City of  Middlesex  England 
1626

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "Thomas Malfrey of Goldstone besides Yarmouth, [and] a woman [Anonymous 257] besides Stoke Clare, whose name [he] knoweth not, are skryers of the glasse [divination tools]."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1627

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that Sir John Lloyd, and "Maier, a preest, and now say-master of the mynt at Durham house, hath conjured for treasure and their stolne goods."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 London (Durham House in the Strand)    London, City of  Middlesex  England 
1628

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "Thomas Owldring, of Yarmouth, is a conjurer, and hath very good bookes of conjuring, and that a great nomber."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 Yarmouth    Norfolk  Norfolk  England 
1629

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that the priest Sir Robert Brian of Highgate is sometimes "a conjureth with a syve and a pair of sheeres, invocating saith Paule and Saint Peter. And that he also useth the psalter and the key with a psalme."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 Highgate     London, Greater  Middlesex  England 
1630

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "One Thomas Shakilton occupieth the syve and sheeres, and he dwellith in Aldersgate-strete, a laborer."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 London (Aldersgate Street)    London, City of  Middlesex  England 
1631

WIlliam Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "Christopher Morgan, a plaisterer, and his wife (Mrs. Morgan), dwelling in Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane, occupieth the syve and sheeres also."

Narratives of the Days of the Reformation

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1633

Nathan Crab, the son of Mr. Zacheus Crab, suffered from convulsions and falling fits for about nine years. After these nine years, a charm was administered in the hopes of curing Nathan of his afflictions. The charm consisted of a bag to hang around Nathan's neck, and "powder to take in White wine for one weeks time," and after wearing the bag for a week Nathan was to take it off and burn it. The bag, however, was taken off Nathan's neck after only "two Days and a Night," at which time a piece of paper was found inside with the words "Callen Dan Dant/Dan Dant Callen/ Dan Callen Dant" on it. The charm was ultimately thought to be "a Cure from the Devil" and was discarded.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1691 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1634

Alice Aylett is indicted for being "a witch and enchantress." She allegedly enchanted Margery Egles, Rachel Skynner, Henry Joye, Susan Parman and an anonymous boy (Anonymous 259).

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1589   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1635

Alice Aylett is found guilty by the jurors of "slew[ing) and murder[ing]" Susan Parman and Simon (possibly Anonymous 259). She is said to have done so "by her charms and enhantments and of her malice aforethought."

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1589   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1636

Margaret Bell is allegedly scratched to persuade her to lift a bewitchment off a local child.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1665 Lutterworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1637

The two spirits which allegedly possess Mary Hall, returning to her body, after almost a year of health, begin to taunt her and her physician. They define themselves as "two little Imps," sent by Goodwife Harods, and Goodwife Youngs that appear "sometimes we are in the shape of Serpents, sometimes of Flyes, sometimes of Rats or Mice; and Gfe Harod sent us to choak this Maid, Mary Hall." They suggest that they would have possessed her father, Goodman Hall," but were unable to, therefor possessed Mary instead. They claim they "came down the Chimny, riding on a stick, and went first to Mary's foot, whereupon her foot trembled first of all her distemper," thus situating the possession as beginning the previous year, during Mary's illness.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 (August) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1638

The two spirits possessing Mary Hall refuse to be exorcised / dispossessed. Although they sometimes answer questions, they also mock God (claiming to be four evil entities, two spirits and two witches, against one of him). They would blaspheme, saying "God was a Bastard, let him come if he dare." They would threaten that those bothering them would be "benighted." And claim they had to do "a few prankes more, ere they went out," which included choking Mary.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1639

The two spirits which possess Mary Hall tempt her to hurt herself and kill herself in any number gruesome ways, including drowning, burning, and scalding herself.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1640

The spirits which possessed Mary Hall stop her from normative and spiritual behavior. When she attempted to ride her horse, they "would lift her up, and make her shake, so that they were fain to hold her on the Horse," when she attempted to read the Bible, "they would say, Mary, do not read; or, Mary you shall not read, for Books are all against us," and then "convulse her Arms, and threw the Books far from her." Moreover, even if others attempted to pray for her, "they would make her to tremble, and her knees to bow; and when so done, laugh and sing, We know how to cheat you, and make you believe any thing."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1665 (September) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1641

The spirits which allegedly possess Mary Hall mock Dr. Woodhouse's medical treatment (medical dispossession), violently react against Nicholas Culpeper's suggestion (derived from his book) of Oak Mistletoe (Viscaceae) and other "anti-daemoniack-Medicines boiled," by Woodhouse, but suggest that the Hall family consult Mr. Redman of Amersom, "whom some say is a Conjurer, others say, He is an honest and able Physician, and doth abundance of good) [because] he would cast them out."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1642

Dr. Redman recommends an act of countermagic to treat Mary Hall's possession, an act which when done, appears to provide temporary relief. He suggests that "a Child being very sick, likely to die, Redman bids them, Take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1643

Doctor Woodhouse uses countermagic to test Goodwife Harwoods' culpability for bewitching Mary Hall. Woodhouse "got Mary Halls nailes that were cut off, and with somewhat he added, hung them up in the Chimny a reesing over-night; and by next morning Gfe Harwood came, which they thought to be caused by the aforesaid things."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1644

Anne Lamperill is imprisoned at Colchester Castle. She was committed by Edward Eltonhead for being accused and suspected of being a witch.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1639, July 29 Colchester    Essex  Essex  England 
1645

Robert Garnett is imprisoned at Colchester Castle. He was committed by William Lynne because he allegedly trusted witches and talked with them which was considered dishonouring God.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1639, July 29 Colchester    Essex  Essex  England 
1646

William Drage concludes that 'natural remedies,' those used to heal those suffering from natural, as opposed to supernatural illnesses, would not cure Mary Hall. Regardless, he lists a series of cures he might have attempted to use to treat her, including, "powder of Coral (to stop excess [menstrual] bleeding), of Piony (treat signs of hysteria), of Misleto (to treat convulsive nervous disorders), of Herb True-Love (a narcotic), and of Saint Johns-wort (to treat depression)," or to hang "Rosemary, Misleto, Ivy and Coral in the house, and about her neck." He also suggested her could have given Hall a "Decoction of them at any time, specially in the fits, in such manner as she could best take them." This appears to suggest he is medically diagnosing her as being bewitched.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1647

Mary Hall's bewitchment appears to be, at least in part, in remission throughout September-November, 1664. The spirits allegedly "lie still for the most part, unless by questions, or praying, they are disturbed; sometimes they say, they lift her upto a great height, but say, they cannot hurt one Hair of her head."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 (September) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1648

After nearly three months of reprieve from her possession symptoms, William Drage visits Mary Hall (December 1, 1664). At the beginning of his visit, she looked "well-bleed, seemingly she was very well." Drage took this as an opportunity to interrogate the spirits within her on the hierarchies of demons. Soon after, "both in her reading and feeding, both her fits of speaking, and convulsive fits molested her." Her "throat swelled, her Face grew red, her head shook, and was wreathed about." Drage pulled her tongue from out of her mouth, to attempt to force the demons to speak from inside her, and found "their voice was more obscure; it is sometimes hoarser, sometimes shriller; sometimes small, sometimes great." He continues to man-handle her for the rest of his visit, and her fits return in full force.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 (December) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1649

Dr. Woodhouse gives Mary Hall opium in order to calm the spirits which rage inside of her, he administers, it "many times in a Grain, [but it] makes very little alteration in the body."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 (December) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1650

Dr. Woodhouse gives Mary Hall a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," a medicine which "rid her, in part for a while, of her fits."

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1651

Dr. Woodhouse allegedly treats those in Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire with a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," he also treats Mary Hall with. He evidently administered it to a bewitched boy in Berkhamstead (Anonymous 262) after the remedies for "convulsion fits" were unsuccessful. Woodhouse, after questioning the Querents on the details of the fits, went to see the boy for himself and found the boy began his fit by "pulling off its headcloaths; then it fell a pulling off its Hair, and then scratching the skin off its face." Woodhouse presumably concluded, at this point, that the boy was possessed and provided the appropriate medical treatment.

Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft

1665 Berkhamsted   Berkhamsted  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1652

After the hearing of a Sermon, Joyce Dovey begins to feel "much wrought upon and dejected," a depression which leads her to fall "into some passions, and (as was conceived by her friends) Convulsion fits," which in time grew stronger and stronger, especially during prayer.

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1653

Joyce Dovey's ecstatic despair is so violent that a Chaplain of Religion and a Captain, by some discourse, and other informations, strongly imagined, that she was possessed.

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1637 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1654

Mr. Lowes Parson is put on trial for witchcraft in Branson in Suffolk, being both tried and convicted. He allegedly bewitched a ship, capsizing it and drowning the crew; had the help of six imps to cause mischief, and "he had done many other more hanous, wicked, and accursed acts." He is one among eighteen witches at the session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Branson    Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1655

Mr. Lowes Parson is convicted by the judge and justices at a "sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke," and he is condemned to death for witchcraft. Mr. Lowes Parson had confessed to: bewitching a ship, sinking it and all its passengers, and many other "accursed acts" through the help of six imps. He is one among eighteen witches at the session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1656

Mr. Lowes Parson is executed on the 27th of August, 1645 after confessing to witchcraft. Mr. Lowes Parson confessed to: bewitching a ship, sinking it and all its passengers; and causing "accursed acts" with the help of six imps.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1657

Thomas and Mary Evererd, both employed in a Brewhouse at Halsworth, bewtiched beer, "and that the odiousnesse of the infectious stinke of it was such & so intollerable that by the noysomnesse of the smel or tast many people dyed."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Halsworth  Halesworth  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
1658

Thomas Evererd, a Cooper, and his wife Mary perpetrate "many other mischiefes" that they "acted by their witchcrafts and damnable Sorceries." This happens in a brewhouse where they work in Halesworth, Suffolk.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Halsworth  Halesworth  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
1659

Thomas and Mary Evererd of Halesworth, Suffolk, "had their impes to whom they gave suck."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Halsworth  Halesworth  Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
1660

Alice Aylett allegedly enchants Margery Egles so that she "gravely languished" from August until November of 1589.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1689, August 10 Braintree    Essex  Essex  England 
1661

Alice Aylett allegedly enchants Rachel Skynner so that she "gravely languished" from August until November of 1589.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1589, August 1 Braintree    Essex  Essex  England 
1662

Alice Aylett allegedly enchants Henry Joye so that he "gravely languished" from November to December of 1589.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1589, November 5 Braintree    Essex  Essex  England 
1663

Alice Aylett allegedly enchants Susan Parman so that she languished from March of 1579/80 until April of 1583 at which point she died.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1579, March 6 Braintree    Essex  Essex  England 
1664

Alice Aylett allegedly enchants A boy (Anonymous 259 who most likely named Simon) so that he languished from April of 1583 until August of 1586 when he died.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1583, April 26 Braintree    Essex  Essex  England 
1665

The cooper Thomas Evererd, and his wife Mary, who both work in a brewhouse in Halesworth confess that "they had bewitched Beere in that Brewhouse," causing such an "infectious stinke" that it caused many people to die.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1666

Thomas and Mary Evererd of Halesworth, Suffolk confess to many "mischiefes they had perpetrated and acted by their witchcrafts and damnable Sorceries."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1667

Thomas Evererd and his wife Mary of Halesworth, Suffolk confess that they had impes "to whom they gave suck."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1668

Thomas Evererd, a cooper from Halesworth, Suffolk, as well as his wife Mary are tried for witchcraft "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." They had previously confessed to: bewitching beer at the brewery they worked at, killing several people; various mischiefs; and having several imps. They are two among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1669

The cooper Thomas Evererd and his wife Mary are convicted of witchcraft and executed the 27th of August, 1645, in St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1670

Mary Bacon is tried for witchcraft at a "sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1671

Anne Alderman of Suffolk is tried for witchcraft "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1672

Rebecca Morris of Suffolk is tried for witchcraft at "a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1673

Mary Fuller is tried at "a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke," for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1674

Mary Clowes is tried as a witch "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches present at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1675

Margery Sparham is tried for witchcraft "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches tried.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1676

Katherine Tooley is tried as a witch "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1677

Sarah Spinlow is one among eighteen witches tried for witchcraft, at a "sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1678

Ian Limstead is tried for witchcraft "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." He is one among eighteen witches at the session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1679

Anne Wright is tried for witchcraft "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches present at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1680

Mary Smith is one among eighteen witches present "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is tried for witchcraft.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1681

Ian Rivert is tried for witchcraft at a "sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." He is one of eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1682

Susan Manners is tried at a "sessions holden in St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke," for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1683

Mary Skipper is tried for witchcraft "at a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one of eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1684

Anne Leech is tried for witchcraft at a "sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." She is one among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1685

Joyce Dovey's Keeper (Anonymous 265), wanting a divine consultation on the possibility of her possession, silently prayed that if she were possessed, that a sign would manifest. The Devil, in a voice described as "bigger and grosser tone then her ordinary speech," began with "swearing, Wounds, Blood, &c.," behavior he would resume any time there was talk of divine matters around her.

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1686

Religious symbols, in the form of "crucifixes, and crosses," allegedly appeared on Joce Dovey's "breast or throat" after three soldiers near her speak of Catholicism around her. The Devil cries out "haw, haw, haw, sayes," as they react in fear.

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1687

Thomas Evererd and his wife Mary are convicted of witchcraft, and condemned to death by "the judges and justices of the said sessions," which took place at "St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." They had previously confessed to: bewitching beer at the brewery they worked at, killing several people; various mischiefs; and having several imps. They are two among eighteen witches at the sessions.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1688

Joyce Dovey, returning from the "House of an honest religious man," where she was a spectacle or a kind of oracle, "she began to be so distempered," that she could barely return home. Upon returning, she attempted to throw herself out of the window, and made it more than half way through, before her Keeper caught "by the coats, and took her in again."

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1689

Mary Bacon is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1690

Joyce Dovey is "oft thrown against the walls, and into the fire, but all without any hurt." One one occasion, she was "cast into a great fire, some would have taken her out, but her Keeper said, let her alone, and observe the providence of God. She was magically "snatched out without humane help, not having any hurt, or so much as the smell of fire on her clothes." She did the same to a bible, throwing it into the fire, and it too would not burn.

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1691

Mary Bacon is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1692

Joyce Dovey attempts to slice her own jugular to kill herself. She evidently "snatched a paire of Cizzers from a womans girdle, and applyed them to her throat; and another time a knife from another, in an admirable quick way, and strook her breast, yet both without so much as a scarre in either place."

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1693

Anne Alderman is convicted and condemned to death by "the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1694

Anne Alderman is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1695

Rebecca Morris is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1696

Rebecca Morris is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1697

Mary Fuller is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1698

Joyce Dovey, finding that her Keeper (who had evidently been keeping a written record of her torments), had some kind of written record about her, "fell upon him very violently, and would have taken the paper from him, but he contended with her very toughly."

A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey

1622 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1699

Mary Fuller is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1700

Mary Clowes is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1701

Mary Clowes is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1702

Margery Sparham is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1703

Margery Sparham is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1704

Katherine Tooley is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1705

Katherine Tooley is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1706

Sarah Spinlow is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1707

Sarah Spinlow is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1708

Ian Limstead is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. He is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1709

Ian Limstead is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. He is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1710

Anne Wright is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1711

Anne Wright is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1712

Mary Smith is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1713

Mary Smith is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1714

Ian Rivert is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. He is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1715

Susan Manners is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1716

Mary Skipper is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1717

Anne Leech is convicted and condemned to death "by the judge and justices" for witchcraft, at the sessions at Bury St. Edmonds, in Suffolk. She is one of eighteen witches condemned at that session.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1718

Ian Rivert is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. He is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1719

Susan Manners is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1720

Mary Skipper is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1721

Anne Leech is executed for witchcraft on the 27th day of August, 1645, at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. She is one among eighteen witches executed that day.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645, August 27 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1722

An old woman (Anonymous 271) "had done many very wicked things" by bewitching cattle and corn. She is one among eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds in Suffolk.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1723

An old woman (Anonymous 271) bewitched "seven persons of one family to death." The family consisted of one man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and their five children (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). The old woman was one of eighteen witches on trial in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1724

An old woman (Anonymous 271) has imps come to her "in severall shapes." She is one among eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1725

An old woman (Anonymous 271), one among eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmonds, Suffolk, confesses "she had beene a Witch the space of above fifty yeares," during which time she bewitched cattle and corn.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1726

An old woman (Anonymous 271) confesses to bewitching seven people of one family to death, "a man together with his wife and five children." She is one among eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolke.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1727

An old woman (Anonymous 271) confesses to having several imps "which came to her in severall shapes." She is one among eighteen witches on trial at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1728

A woman, described as "another of the women witches" (Anonymous 272), who "had beene a Witch above five and twenty yeares," bewitched a child (Anonymous 283) to death. She is one among eighteen witches at a session held in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1729

A woman, described as "another of the women witches" (Anonymous 272), one among eighteen at a session at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, bewitched a "great store of Cattle," causing the owners to be hindered by either the death or the "unserviceablenesse of them"

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1730

A woman, described as "another of the women witches" (Anonymous 272), one among eighteen at a session at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, bewitched "standing corne," causing great losses to the owners, as they could not "benefit of there long, hard, and by her made, fruitlesse labours."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1731

A woman, described as "another of the women witches" (Anonymous 272) confesses she "had beene a Witch above five and twenty yeares," during which time among "many other such like evill deeds" she bewitched a child (Anonymous 283) to death. She is one among eighteen witches at a session held in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1732

A woman, described as "another of the women witches" (Anonymous 272), one among eighteen at a session at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, confessed to bewitching a "great store of Cattle," causing hardship to the owners who "were much impoverished" by the death of their stock, or their "unserviceablenesse."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1733

A woman described as "another of the women witches" (Anonymous 272), one among eighteen at a session at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, confessed to bewitching "standing corne," causing great losses to the owners, as they could not "benefit of there long, hard, and by her made, fruitlesse labours."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1734

Thomas Evererd, and his wife Mary, both workers at a brewhouse in Halesworth, Suffolk are convicted of witchcraft and condemned to death by "the judge and justices" of "a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." They are guilty of: bewitching beer, causing the death of many; mischief through witchcraft; and giving suck to imps.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1735

Four searchers from the county of Suffolk, two men (Anonymous 277 and Anonymous 278) searchers to search men suspected to be witches, and two women searchers (Anonymous 279 and Anonymous 280) to search women suspected to be witches, examine eighteen suspected witches at a session in Bury St. Edmunds: Mr. Lowes Parson, Thomas Evererd and his wife Mary, Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Ian Limstead, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Ian Rivert, Susan Manners, Mary Skipper, and Anne Leech. They were all found "to have Teats or Dugs which their Impes used to suck so often as they came to them." These teats were found all over their bodies. Imps visited "in the shape of Mice, sometimes in the shape of Kitens, sometimes in the shape of Snayles, and other-while in the shape of Snakes, Hornets, Waspes, and divers other shapes."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1736

A woman (Anonymous 273), one of 120 being held in prison at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, had "carnall copulation with the Devill," before her husband died. She conceived twice by the Devil, but as soon as the offspring was born, "they run away in most horrid long and ugly shapes."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1737

A woman (Anonymous 273), one of 120 being held in prison at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, confesses that she had "carnall copulation with the Devill," before her husband died, and by this deed, she conceived twice by the Devil, but as soon as the offspring was born, "they run away in most horrid long and ugly shapes."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1738

A woman, described as "another of these witches" (Anonymous 274) from Suffolk held a grudge against a gentleman(Anonymous 281) and his wife (Anonymous 282), for "they seemed discontented at her comming often to their house." She sends one of her imps "in the likenesses of a little black smoth dog" to play with their young son and only child (Anonymous 275).

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1739

A woman, described as "another of these witches" (Anonymous 274) from Suffolk sends her imp "in the likenesse of a little black smoth dog" to play with the son (Anonymous 275) of a gentleman (Anonymous 281) and his wife(Anonymous 282) whom she held a grudge against; the imp "brought the child to a water side, and there drowned the said child to the great grief of the parents."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1740

A woman, described as "another of these witches" (Anonymous 274) from Suffolk confessed to sending one of her imps "in the likenesse of a little black smoth dog" to play with the young son (Anonymous 275) of a gentleman (Anonymous 281) and his wife (Anonymous 282) to whom she felt a grudge, as they were unhappy with her frequent visits.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1741

A woman, described as "another of these witches" (Anonymous 274) from Suffolk confessed at a session in Bury St. Edmund to sending her imp to play with the child (Anonymous 275) of a gentleman (Anonymous 281) and his wife (Anonymous 282) to whom she felt a grudge; and the imp "brought the child to a water side, and there drowned the said child to the great grief of the parents."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1742

A woman, described as "one witch" (Anonymous 276) in prison at Bury St. Edmunds was very penitent for her "lewd and abominable indevours" and asked to have "petitions put up to divers godly Ministers that they would be pleased to pray in their severall Congregations" so that her imps can no longer harm others.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Bury St. Edmunds  Bury St. Edmunds  Suffolk  West Suffolk  England 
1743

James Mason, author of "The Anatomy of Sorcery," claims that "By the turning of a sieue [sieve; a tool used in divination]," one may determine who the culprit behind a bewitchment is.

The Anatomy of Sorcery

1612 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1744

William Skelton and his wife Margery are indicted for allegedly bewitching John Churcheman who died instantly.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1573, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1745

William and Margery Skelton allegedly bewitch John Churcheman. Churcheman dies instantly.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1658, November 16 Barling  Barling  Essex  Essex  England 
1746

William Skelton and his wife, Margery plead not guilty to bewitching John Churcheman who died immediately. They are found guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1573, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1748

William Skelton and his wife, Margery, are indicted for allegedly bewitching the infant Agnes Collen so that she languished for a long time.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1573, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1750

William Skelton and his wife, Margery, allegedly bewitch Agnes Collen causing her to languish for a long time.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1571, July 29   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1751

William Skelton and his wife, Margery, plead not guilty to bewitching Agnes Collen, a one year old infant. They are found guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1573, March 2   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1752

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses to sending her gray imp with Elizabeth Clarke's black imp and Elizabeth Gooding's white imp, to "kill a black Cowe and a white Cowe of Mr. Edwards."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1753

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk sent her gray imp with Elizabeth Clarke's black imp and Elizabeth Gooding's white imp, to "kill a black Cowe and a white Cowe of Mr. Edwards."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
1754

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk sent a gray Imp to kill two horses of Mr. Bragge of Mistley, "which were killed accordingly."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
1755

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses she sent some thirty years before 1645 a gray Imp to kill two horses of Mr. Bragge of Mistley, "which were killed accordingly."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1756

Mistress Bragge of Mistley, Suffolk, accuses Anne Leech of being "a naughty woman," causing Anne Leech to send an imp to kill two of the Bragge's horses. Leech confesses to this crime, saying that "shee sent a gray Imp to kill two Horses of one Mr. Bragge of Misley, which were killed accordingly."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
1757

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk sent a white imp and Elizabeth Gooding, a black imp, "to destroy the child of the said Mr. Edwards" so that the "childe was taken sick, and had very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes, and within two dayes after dyed."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
1758

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk allegedly sent a white imp, and Elizabeth Gooding a black imp, "to destroy the child of the said Mr. Edwards." This crime is also attributed to Elizabeth Clarke and Margaret Moone.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1644     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1759

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk exchanges a white imp, a gray imp, and a black imp between herself and her sister-in-law, one Anne, the wife of Robert Pearce of Stoke in Suffolk, so that "these Jmpes went commingly from one two another, and did mischiefe where ever they went."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1760

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses that she and her sister-in-law, Anne, the wife of Robert Pearce of Stoke in Suffolk, exchanged a white imp, a gray imp, and a black imp between themselves, so that "these Jmpes went commingly from one two another, and did mischiefe where ever they went."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1615     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1761

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses that if she did "not send and imploy" her imps to do mischief, her health suffered. Conversely, if her imps were "imployed, she was healthfull and well."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1762

Anne Leech, a woman from Mistley, Suffolk, confesses that imps came to her and "did usually suck those teats which were found about the private parts of her body."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1763

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses that her imps often spoke to her, "and told her, she should never feele hell torments, and that they spake to her in an hollow voyee, which she plainly understood."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1764

Nathan Crab, after leaving a religious meeting hosted by the Minister Robert Atkins, is allegedly pushed and tript up his Heels by an unknown force, after which he "rose again presently."

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1765

Nathan Crab, some weeks after being pushed by an unknown force, experiences falling-fits and foaming at the mouth. These ailments continue on for a year and a half before any means were used suspected for Witchcraft.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1766

Doctor Pordage is accused of "entertaining at His House one Everard a reputed Conjurer" and conversing with angels. He is said to have looked "toward the unlawful Art of Black Magick." He is visited by two spirits, four years prior "for about three Weeks and no longer." They appeared in the form of a giant and a dragon. He assures the Commissioners that these visitations of apparitions were not initiated by him, but the work of "the Malice of the Devil toward [him]."

A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft

1654, September 18 Bradfield  Bradfield  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
1767

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk sent her gray imp to Elizabeth Kirk of Manningtree, Sufflk, so that "Elizabeth lanhished by the space of one whole year, untill she dyed."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1768

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses to sending her gray imp to Elizabeth Kirk to destroy her, "and upon the sending of the said Jmpe, the said Elizabeth lanhished by the space of one whole year, untill she dyed."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1769

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk took offense from Elizabeth Kirk of Manningtree, Suffolk when Elizabeth refused to share a comb. This causes Anne Leech to send a gray imp "to destroy her."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1770

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk sent her gray imp "to kill the daughter of the widow Rawlyns."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
1771

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses to sending her gray imp "to kill the daughter of the widow Rawlyns" And further, this Examinant saith, that long since, but the exact time she cannot remember, she sent her gray Imp to kill the daughter of the widow Rawlyns of Misley aforesaid; and the reason was, because this Examinant was put out of her Farm, and the said widow Rawlyns put in, where shee dwelleth at this present.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1772

Widow Rawlyns offends Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk when Anne Leech "was put out of her Farm, and the said widow Rawlyns put in." This causes Anne Leech to send a gray imp after Widow Rawlyns' daughter.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
1773

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses to knowledge of the "sending of an Jmpe by the aforesaid Elizabeth Gooding, to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Mannyntree." Elizabeth Gooding does so for Mary Tayler "refused to give the said Elizabeth some Beeregood."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1774

Elizabeth Gooding sends an imp "to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Manningtree."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1642 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1775

Mary Tayler, the wife of John Tayler of Manningtree, refuses to give Elizabeth Gooding "some Beergood," resulting in Elizabeth Gooding's "malice" and sending of an imp to torment Mary Tayler.

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1642 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1776

Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk confesses that "Elizabeth Gooding, and one Anne West of Lawford widow, met together at the house of the said Elizabeth Clarke, where there was a Booke read, wherein she thinks there was no goodnesse."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Suffolk  Suffolke  England 
1777

Anne Leech, Elizabeth Gooding, Anne West of Lawford, and Elizabeth Clarke meet at Elizabeth Clarke's house in Mistley, Suffolk, "where there was a Booke read," that contained "no goodnesse."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645 Mistley  Mistley  Northeast Essex  Essex  England 
1778

Zacheus Crab and his daughter (Daughter Crab) seek out the help of Mr. Gibs, a man whom they believe may cure Nathan Crab of his unexplained falling-fits and foaming at the mouth. They visit Mr. Gibs once every Week for a Month with the Youth's [Nathan Crab] Water.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1779

Mrs. Wayt, a minister's wife, is falsely accused of being a witch in the Book of the Essex Witches. She is excused in print, "for it is very well knowne that she is a gentlewoman of a very godly and religious life, and a very good conuersations: and this was set on purpose to vindicate her."

A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches

1645     Essex  Essex  England 
1780

Anne Leech is tried and executed in the County of Essex, after being condemned as a witch "at the late Sessions, holden at Chelmesford," before Rovert, Earl of Warwick on the 29th of July, 1645.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, July 29   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1781

Mr. Gibs, after a month of being brought Nathan Crabs urine, states that weeks Papers of Powder would make a perfect Cure, but there would be an alteration, [and] that he [Nathan Crab] would have two or three panging fits different from the former because of it. This prediction comes to pass, which causes Zacheus Crab and his daughter (Daughter Crab) to question Mr. Gibs healing methods.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1782

Mr. Gibs, in a further attempt to cure Nathan Crab of his unexplained falling-fits and foaming at the mouth, gives Zacheus Crab and his daughter (Daughter Crab) a bag to hang around Nathan Crabs neck. They are also given Powder to take in White wine, which, along with the bag, are supposed to be administered for one week; it is instructed that Nathan Crab should take the bag off himself and burn it after the appropriate amount of time has passed.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1783

Mr. Elson removes the bag hanging around Nathan Crabs neck after it had been on [only] two Days and a Night. Mr. Elson shewed it to some, to inquire, whether it were not a charm," and a piece of paper is found inside the bag "with this writing, Callen Dan Dant, Dan Dant Callen, Dan Callen Dant.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1784

Mr. Elson keeps the piece of paper from the bag, which had been hanging around Nathan Crabs neck, for eighteen weeks. For these eighteen weeks Nathan Crab does not suffer from any falling-fits, and is able to return to sorting Wooll at his Trade, which he had not been able to do in a Year and quarter before. At the sixth week of the eighteen weeks, Mr. Gibs states that if Nathan Crabs fits return they will be more terrible than before.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1785

Nathan Crabs unexplained fits return about eighteen or nineteen weeks, upon a Shrove-Tuesday, after they had ceased. Mr. Elson believes the fits returned because he burned the piece of paper, which he had been unwilling to keep any longer, from the bag that had been hanging around Nathan Crabs neck.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1786

Nathan Crab is set upon a stool at the sign of an approaching fit. During the fit he falls off the stool, breaking his Leg, the main Bone, in two pieces, another Bone in many pieces.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1788

During his five week recovery from a broken leg, Nathan Crab does not suffer from any fits. When he is able to walk with crutches, however, his Fits returned in the same manner as before his Bone was broken.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1789

Nathan Crab is taken to Mr. Pridham in order to cure the boy of his tormenting fits. Mr. Pridham prescribes pills, but before the Pills, he had ordered a Vomit to be taken. Nathan Crab is given pills, which he then vomits up after they had stay'd above an Hour in his Stomach. Mr. Pridham notes how the pills have not dissolved at all, and states that, certainly there is something extraordinary in the case.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Morchard  Morchard Bishop  Devon  Devonshire  England 
1790

Nathan Crabs mother (Mrs. Crab) claims that Mr. Staddon drop'd some such words that her Son was bewitch'd or possess'd. Mr. Straddon evidently went through a Course of Physick with the Youth [Nathan Crab], but found no obvious reasons to explain his fits.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1682 Exeter    Devon  Devonshire  England 
1791

A soldier (Anonymous 291) stationed on his Watch, near the Chappel of St. James's House is thrown over by an unknown being in the form of an affrightening shape. The soldier (Anonymous 291) saw the shape coming towards him and told it to stop or he would shoot it, when it ran upon him, and threm him over the way far off.

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls

1671 London (Queen's Chapel at St. James' Palace)    London, City of  Middlesex  England 
1792

Agnes Steadman allegedly bewitches Sibyl Bentall, wife of Thomas Bentall, so that for twelve days she was violently ill and feared for her life.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, July 1 Halstead    Essex  Essex  England 
1793

Agnes Steadman is indicted at the assizes in Chelmsford for allegedly bewitching Sibyl Bentall. Bentall was violently ill for twelve days and feared for her life.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, August 28   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1794

Agnes Steadman pleads not guilty to bewitching Sybil Bentall causing her to be violently ill for twelve days and fear for her life. Steadman is found guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, August 28   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1795

Agnes Steadman is indicted for allegedly bewitching three cows worth 4 belonging to John Rome. The cows languished for three days.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, August 28   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1796

Agnes Steadman allegedly bewitches 3 cows worth 4 belonging to John Rome causing them to languish for three days.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, May 1 Halstead    Essex  Essex  England 
1797

Agnes Steadman pleads not guilty to bewitching 3 cows worth 4 belonging to John Rome. She is found guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, August 28   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1798

Agnes Steadman is indicted for allegedly bewitching a cow worth 30 shilling belonging to Owen Norman.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, August 28   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1799

Agnes Steadman pleads not guilty to bewitching a cow worth 30 shillings belonging to Owen Norman. She is nevertheless found guilty.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, August 28   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1800

Agnes Steadman allegedly bewitches a cow worth 30 shillings belonging to Owen Norman causing it to become violently ill.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1572, June 7 Halstead    Essex  Essex  England 
1801

Anne Neale is indicted at the Assize in Maidstone, Kent before Sergeant Francis Pemberton and Thomas Twisden as well as a grand jury composed of seventeen people for allegedly bewitching Elizabeth Morgan, a 6-week old infant, so that she languished and died. The charge is brought forward by Jane Haselby.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1676, March 14 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1802

Anne Neale's indictment in the case of the baby Elizabeth Morgan does not proceed as the grand jury claims there is not enough evidence.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1676, March 14 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1803

Anne Neale is accused by Jane Haselby of bewitching Elizabeth Morgan, a 6-week old baby, so that she languished for two weeks and then died.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1672, July 5 Gravesend    Kent  Kent  England 
1805

Anne Neale is indicted at the Assizes in Maidstone, Kent before Thomas Twisden and Sergeant Francis Pemberton and a grand jury of 17 people for bewitching William Eason so that he languished for a week and then died. The charge is brought forward by Walter Nynn.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1676, March 14 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1806

Anne Neale's indictment in the case of William Eason does not proceed as the grand jury claims there is not enough evidence.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1676, March 14 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1807

Anne Neale is accused by Walter Nynn of bewitching William Eason, so that he (Eason) languished for seven days and then died.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1672, March 20 Gravesend    Kent  Kent  England 
1808

Anne Neale is indicted at the Assize in Maidstone, Kent before Sergeant Francis Pemberton and Thomas Twisden as well as a grand jury composed of seventeen people for allegedly bewitching Walter Warren so that he languished for three months and then died. The charge is brought forward by Thomas Warren.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1676, March 14 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1809

Anne Neale's indictment in the case of Walter Warren does not proceed as the grand jury claims there is not enough evidence.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1676, March 14 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1810

Anne Neale is accused by Thomas Warren of bewitching Walter Warren, so that he (Walter Warren) languished for three months and then died.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1672, April 1 Gravesend    Kent  Kent  England 
1811

Anonymous 269 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1618, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1812

Sir Humphrey Winch and Sargent Randolf Crewe order the imprisonment of six unnamed women on the l5th of October at Husbands Bosworth Leicester, for the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, October 15 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1813

By order of King James, who personally examined John Smyth and encouraged him to retract his accusations of bewitchment, five women were released on October 16, 1616 from the goal at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, October 16 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1814

Anonymous 301, one of six women imprisoned and examined in October 1616 for bewitching John Smyth, allegedly admitted to the jailer that she was working in concert with her familiar, and with the other accused witches, to torment Smyth. She begged him not to reveal her secret, lest the other women torment her for speaking against them.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, October 15 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1815

John Smyth begins to have "dyvars wonderful straunge fyts," where he exhibited inhuman strength so that he could not be held down and where he would beat himself, administering anywhere from fifty to three hundred blows to his body. Smyth was miraculously unhurt by these efforts.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1816

While in his foaming fits, John Smith allegedly is able to "contract his whole Body, within the Compass of a Joyn'd-stool, and write in Hebrew, and Greek Characters."

A Miscellany of Sundry Essayes, Paradoxes, and Problematicall Discourses, Letters and Characters

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1817

John Smyth exhibits a attributes of the six familiar spirits (a horse, a dog, a cat, pullemar, a fish, and a code) which allegedly possess and bewitch him. When the horse "tormented him, he woold whinny; when the cat tormented him, he would cry like a cat, &c."

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1818

Six of the nine women accused of bewitching John Smyth in July 1616 are made to recite a bit of counter-magic to call back the spirits which that allegedly sent to plague and torment Symth. If they spoke this charm (which identified them as a witches), "I such a one chardge the hors, yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld," Smyth would be at peace, and fall asleep; if they did not, he would become agitated.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1819

Mary Foster is indicted at the Maidstone assizes in Kent before judges William Ellis and Francis Pemberton as well as a trial jury for allegedly bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became " greatly wasted and consumed."

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1679, July 29 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1820

Mary Foster is found not guilty by judges Francis Pemberton and William Ellis as well as a grand jury of bewitching Michael Jordan.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1679, July 29 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1821

Mary Foster is accused by Sarah Rigden, Frances Williams, Martha Glover, Parnel Bourn, Elizabeth Sheerman, Jane Moverley, Anne Joad, Elizabeth West and Henry Rigden of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became wasted and consumed.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1679, July 29 Ramsgate    Kent  Kent  England 
1822

Anonymous 301 dies on October 15, 1616 while in custody at the goal in Husbands Bosworth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, October 15 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1823

Anonymous 292 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1824

Anonymous 293 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1825

Anonymous 294 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1826

Anonymous 295 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1827

Anonymous 297 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1828

Anonymous 298 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1829

Anonymous 299 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1830

Anonymous 300 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.

A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1831

Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark is ensnared by music for many years, so much so that he treasured music above his family and "fel to his musick" upon his wife's death bed against her wishes. Mr. Goodwin's obsession is allegedly the fault of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1832

Thomas Whiteing allegedly bewitches Sarah Curtis at Hoo so that her body became "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." He is accused by Robert Rogers, Joseph Miller, Sarah Curtis, William Burman, John Ellis, Simon Beadell, Bridget Gilbert, Joan Stephens, Thomas Haley, Robert Witherley, Robert Beadle, Dr Faber, Dr Hooker, Dr Robinson, Anne Seares, Faber Armitage, William Tucke, Barbara Cena, and William Verron.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1681, Junary 20 Hoo    Kent  Kent  England 
1833

Thomas Whiteing is indicted at the Maidstone Assizes in Kent before judges Francis Pemberton and Job Charlton as well as a trial jury for allegedly bewitching Sarah Curtis.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1682, March 13 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1834

Thomas Whiteing's indictment in the case of Sarah Curtis does not proceed as the grand jury claims there is not enough evidence.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1682, March 13 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1835

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones of London Borough of Southwark allegedly "cast a net of pretended piety and fained extraordinary holyness" over Mr. Goodwin, despite being wicked women in reality.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1836

Upon her deathbed, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, the wife of Mr. Wessell Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, implores her children to take their husband away from music and "especially the frequentation of Mr. Edward Jones; and that not so much out of dislike to him as to his wife, whom shee saw to be a subtil undermining woman, that would be ready to make her own advantage of old Mr. Goodwins weakness."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1837

Elizabeth Scott is indicted at the Assizes in Maidstone before Francis Pemberton and Job Charlton as well as a trial jury for allegedly murdering John Colman by use of witchcraft.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1681, July 26 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1838

Elizabeth Scott's indictment in the case of John Colman does not proceed as the grand jury claims there is not enough evidence.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1681, July 26 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1839

Elizabeth Scott is accused by Samuel Bradshaw, Mary Colman, and Anne Butler of using witchcraft to murder John Colman. Colman languished for a week and then died.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1679, April 25 Cranbrook  Cranbrooke  Kent  Kent  England 
1840

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones allegedly bewitch Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, so that he tells his son-in-law and Daughter Vernon that the passion he claims for a future wife is placed upon a woman "so eminent in Piety and wisdome, that his former wife deserved not to be named the same day." Although he refuses to identify this woman, "yet his daily converse and familiarity with Mrs. Jones put them in strange thoughts."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1841

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "woried [her husband Mr. Starkey an Apothecarie] out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." Shortly after, she marries Mr. Pigeon a lieutenant in the regiment. Her "old imperious carriage" continues in this marriage.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1842

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly urged her husband, Mr. Pigeon to partake in meat and drinks "compounded" of provocative drugs to convince him to leave her everything in his estate. Mr. Pigeon refuses to consent.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1843

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly practices behaviour that causes her husband Mr. Pigeon to fly "into such a passion, and was so transported, that he became altogether senselesse, feeble, and irrationall."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1844

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark sends for Doctor Burges, a Physician, to attend to her husband after she causes him to fly into a rage. Mr. Pigeon is healed of his rage by being vomitted twice in one day, and thus restored to a feeble state by Doctor Burges.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1845

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly confesses to her husband, Mr. Pigeon that she behaved in such a wicked manner to her first husband, Mr. Starky, that he "committed a sin, for which he was tormented in his conscience, and fell into such an agony that as she then said, she thought he would have dyed." She promises Mr. Pigeon to never act so again.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1846

Despite promising to behave, Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "returnes to her old practises, and so wrought with Mr. Pigeon at the last, to part with his estate to her."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1847

Mrs. Jones, still a married woman, is allegedly observed by her husband Mr. Pigeon to be seducing Mr. Goodwin, by taking his hand "and putting it under her apron, holding it against the bottom of her belly, with many repeated mutual kisses."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1646 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1848

Mrs. Jones leaves her husband for Mr. Goodwin, allegedly turning him into a "poore deluded old man" and Mr. Goodwin promises to provide for her.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1849

Mr. Goodwin is quite sick for ten days after being attacked by Mr. Pigeon, but Mrs. Jones "made him forget his paine, and speeded the cure, which else might have been dangerous." Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin lie, a most un-Christian act, and say that Mr. Goodwin had been thrown from a horse, "to salve his reputation."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1850

Mr. Goodwin, who has been allegedly seduced by Mrs. Jones, is made to believe his relationship with her is lawful as Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "work [him] to believe."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1851

Mr. Goodwin's children attempt to draw their father out of his bewitchment daily, and try to "perswade him against these women." But is is all in vaine, for "he is so bewitched with her."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1852

The minister Mr. Cooper, at the urging of neighbours, justices, and ministers, allegedly attempts to break Mr. Goodwin's bewitchment, caused by Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon. Mr. Goodwin is thus suspended from the Sacrament, which he cares little about being restored to.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1853

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "possesse him [Mr. Goodwin] at their pleasure, and plye him daily to beware of his children" so that he will refuse his own children's advice. Further, Mr. Goodwin "can scarce speak for joy" upon seeing Mrs. Jones and Mrs Pigeon, and dotes them with goods and presents, at the ruin of his family's accounts.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1854

Mr. Goodwin is allegedly so bewitched with Mrs. Jones that it causes him to "fall a dancing, and capering, that he protested he thought he had been distraught."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London  St. Paul  London, City of  Surrey  England 
1855

Roger Crey, Mr. Goodwin's eldest apprentice who allegedly spoke out against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon fell sick, and the two women "physick him, he growes worse." When Mr. Goodwin's son asks a doctor be sent for, but "the old man refuses to give his consent, boasting highly of the great skill of those two she."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1856

Mr. Goodwin's son privately caries some of the ill Roger Crey's water to Doctor Burnet and Mr. Clarke, an apothecary, suspecting foul play on Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon's part. "At the first sight of the water he tells him, the party was a dead man, past all recovery; and that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well," confirming Mr. Goodwin's son's suspicions.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1857

Roger Crey is allegedly continually "plye(d) with druggs" by both Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during his illness despite his pleadings for them to stop, so that "he lies raging in the violence of a burning feaver, in all probability caused by the contrary medicines they had administred to hime." He dies under these ministration.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1858

After Roger Crey's death, Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "tooke coach and departed, though in the dead of the night," allegedly "terrified with the guilt of what they've done."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1859

The parents (Anonymous 308 and Anonymous 309) of a "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is also visited by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during her illness allegedly "watc'ht diligently that she should take nothing from them" after the death of Roger Crey.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1860

A "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is attended in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones "dyed of griefe, having her heart broke by the occasion of the practises of these women."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1861

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly attempts to get her husband Mr. Pigeon to "draw up a declaration" against the present Governors, but he refuses, "for which she vowes to be revenged of him."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1862

Mr. Pigeon allegedly "got cold by his carefull tending of the childe," and tells his wife Mrs. Pigeon that he fears he has gout. She "presently with violence affirmes, that it was the Pox."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1863

Mr. Pigeon sends for Mr. Knowles to come and examine him in his sickness, in order to persuade his wife, Mrs. Pigeon.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1864

Upon examining Mr. Pigeon, Mr. Knowles is confronted by Mrs. Pigeon. The two argue over the nature of his sickness, which Mrs. Pigeon maintains is the pox despite having no grounds for knowing his sickness.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1865

Mr. Pigeon, in his sickness, recommends to Mr. Knowles and Mrs. Pigeon that he should send for "two able Physicians," and he "will submit to a search."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1866

Mr. Knowles pleads with Mr. Pigeon to leave his wife when she insists that Mr. Pigeon is afflicted with the Pox, "to avoyd evill." Mr. Pigeon refuses.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1867

Mr. Pigeon becomes violent with Mr. Knowles upon being told to leave his wife, causing him to be strangely "transported by this strange provocation, that he can scarce give account of what he did." Mrs. Pigeon may have allegedly been responsible for causing such a strange rage.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1868

During the strange rage visited on Mr. Pigeon, Mrs. Pigeon "hath got a strange black face, which by her art she yet makes more visible."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1869

Mrs. Pigeon indulges in unnatural acts when she "so endeavoured with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army" as an appeal to the Lord General (Anonymous 310), causing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1870

The young son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin, is made "maillable" by the labours of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1871

The bewitched son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin is married to Mrs. Jones' daughter, making Mr. Goodwin and Mrs. Jones to "become brothers and sisters," rendering their own relationship unnatural in the eyes of God. This further allows Mrs. Jones to move into Mr. Goodwin's estate.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1872

Mr. Goodwin becomes "so evill spoken of for his shamefull scandalous frequentation of these wicked women [Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon], unable to beare up under such a burden, he gave up himselfe to melancholly and carelesse stupidity, that he let his bookes run into some disorder."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1873

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly fetch two bailiffs (Anonymous 311 and Anonymous 312) to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin in his own home, "in the dead of the night." This is a "Divelish action" that the women were afraid to do in the light of day for fear of their neighbour's reactions.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1874

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are directed by Mr. Colbourne, who is "the man midwife" that helps them bring about the "the monster" of a judgment seizing all of Mr. Goodwin's estates.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1875

Mr. Goodwin's hildren, allegedly ruined by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, and seeing "that their father is now captivated more than ever to these women" presented a petition to the Justices of the County and Borough of South-wark, which brings Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones to St. Margarets Hill.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1876

Upon meeting with the Justices of Southwark, Mr. Goodwin is "seriously reproved and admonished to forsake the scandalous company of these women," Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. A witness, Mr. Gold of Clapham appears and testifies that Mrs. Pigeon in particular is "a most Angelical woman."

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1877

The Justices of Southwark request that Mr. Goodwin's children produce proof against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon for what they alleged in their petition, which they would not do "should they incurr trouble from these Litigious women." The justices dismiss the case with only an admonition to Mr. Goodwin.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1878

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are cast out of their churches, "and all communion with them," because of their scandalous nature. They spend Sabbath "at the Dye house," instead.

A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1879

Anne Blundy is indicted before Richard Weston and Edward Lancelot Lee for allegedly using witchcraft on Mary Griffin so that she languished for two days and then died.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1681, March 15 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1880

Anne Blundy is accused by Anne Griffin, Judith King, Mary F--ham, and an unnamed person (Anonymous 313) of using witchcraft to murder Mary Griffin. Griffin languished for two days and then died.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1681, February 5 Strood    Kent  Kent  England 
1881

Anne Blundy is found not guilty of using witchcraft to murder Mary Griffin.

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1681, March 15 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1882

Alice Hunt, Annis Herd, Alice Manfeild, Elizabeth Eustace, Margaret Grevell, Annis Glascock, Joan Pechye, Alice Newman, Elizabeth Bennett, and Ursley Kempe (alias Gray) are all imprisoned together in the goal examined at the Chelmsford Assizes, March 1582. Their crimes would be recorded in W. W's A True and Just Recorde, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Ofes in the Countie of Essex, 1582.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1582, 29 March   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1883

Mary Cooke is found dead in the goal at Chelmsford, circa July 17, 1645

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645, July 17   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1884

Anne Cooper is found dead in the goal at Chelmsford, circa July 17, 1645

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645, July 17   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1885

Elizabeth Gibson is found dead in the goal at Chelmsford, circa July 17, 1645

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645, July 17   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1886

Thomas Spatchet allegedly becomes entirely unable to participate in acts of worship or attend any religious service, ask for a blessing for his meat or give thanks for it without falling into a benumbing or violent fit.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1661   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1887

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from daily shaking fits that start first thing in the morning and continue until 6 or 7 o'clock in the evening. These fits are said to prevent him from eating until the evening, when he must eat a morsel at a time while walking lest he lose his ability to speak, be unable to rise again, or be unable to keep his seat. This continued for 16 or 17 weeks.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1663, winter   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1888

Thomas Spatchet allegedly receives a ten-day respite from his fits due to the prayers of people who sympathize with his condition. After those ten days, his fits are said to return, but now no more than eight a week, where before he suffered eight to twelve a day.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1663, spring   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1889

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly granted freedom from shaking and wringing fits, attributed to prayers on his behalf, for a period of twenty-two weeks. He continued to suffer benumbings, but is able to participate to a degree in religious life again. Persons deeply affected by his condition prayed over him while he had a violent fit until he lay quiet again. During this period, he was able to read Scripture and other books for as long as an hour, and write mostly without weariness.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1663, summer   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1890

Thomas Spatchet allegedly has three weeks without fits, except when he tries to eat his meat. He is left unable to eat more than four morsels at a time before being rendered unable to move or speak, and often with the last morsel trapped in his mouth. When afflicted, he cannot take any other food or refreshment except a little beer or thin broth, and is soon brought low and famished. After a few weeks, he is able to eat nine or ten morsels at a time, and as of the next day is able to eat his fill if he is fast about it, but suffers violent fits after eating for two more weeks.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1664   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1891

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly afflicted with Roaring Howling Fits, accompanied by all manner of bodily contortions if he lay back upon his bed, and fears he will bring harm to others. These roaring fits come after ten hours of shaking, and last for two hours, in which he roared, howled or barked like a dog and would be left hoarse. On the days he is so afflicted, he is unable to eat until they are done, and fears that he will become raging mad and attack others.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1892

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from kneading fits, attributed to Aubrey Grinset. During these fits, he would be cast into heaviness and benumbment, as if asleep, but be aware of others in the room and hear them if they spoke. While benumbed, he would feel a blow on his breast, side or shoulder, and then a kneading like his flesh were bread until he became sore. There would be an intermission, and the kneading would repeat, until he seemed to be near death, but would revive. At times, he seemed to catch a hand, and was sometimes able to bring it to his mouth and bite it. Once he thought he had bitten a thumb, and at the same time Aubrey Grinset was observed to wear an unusually large shoe on one foot. When she was searched, Aubrey's toe was found to have an impression on it as if sawn at. After biting the hand, the kneading fits ceased for a year.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1893

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from fits in which he feels like he is being is grasped in arms while someone gropes his crotch, attributed to Aubrey Grinset. These fits are infrequent, but he finds them particularly troubling and frightening.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1894

Audrey Grinset confesses to Thomas Spatchet that she employed an imp, and that she had sent it to him to cause his fits. She expresses remorse for having done so, for he had been kind to her, and says that Devil would not let her be until she had. Grinset adds, however, that she had no part in his roaring fits.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1895

Aubrey Grinset is searched a second time by an anonymous jury of women (Anonymous 166), a few days after the first time. On this search, she is found to be covered in scratches, like those left by briars and thorns. It is thought that the Devil has been tormenting her for her confession, for a rumbling noise has been heard from her prison, and she has been seen wandering in distant places at night.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1896

Aubrey Grinset is called before some unnamed Gentlemen (Anonymous 314), and some Credible Persons (Anonymous 317) give testimony corroborating her confessions of having a familiar and causing deaths. Depositions are taken, but the testimonies are not sufficient. It is decided that nothing can be done under the law, and she is sent home. Nonetheless, it is clear that she is of sound mind and knew what she was doing when she confessed, and that her confessions cannot be discounted.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1897

Aubrey Grinset is questioned once again, by two unknown Gentlemen (Anonymous 314), and she again confesses how she became a witch and how she hurt Thomas Spatchet. However, this time she does not confess to causing the deaths of John Collet and Henry Winson, and outright denies some things she had confessed to before.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1898

Thomas Spatchet is urged to scratch Aubrey Grinset, but he is too tender-hearted though his fits continue. Instead, it is said that he took comfort in Scripture and was content to leave any acts of vengeance to God.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1899

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from fits that prevent him from traveling, attributed to Aubrey Grinset, in which his feet would be as if nailed to the ground or his legs buckle under him, he would lose all strength, or find himself violently moved in a direction he did not wish to go. These fits are said to have stopped on Aubrey Grinset's death.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1900

Thomas Spatchet is observed in his fits by a Professing Physick (Anonymous 320) and is prescribed physick for them. This physick seems to increase the frequency and violence of his fits, such that he stops taking it for two years, though his violent fits continue until eight weeks before Aubrey Grinset's death. The Professing Physick concludes that his violent fits are no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion that sometimes ends with him stretched out like a dead man. The Professing Physick also observes that at the times when Spatchet's fits prevent him from eating, he becomes weak but is spared from losing much weight or muscle.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1901

Aubrey Grinset dies, and it is alleged that her death frees Thomas Spatchet from his violent fits and restraint from travel.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1902

A week before Aubrey Grinset's death, Mr. R., a conformist, invites Thomas Spatchet to visit her. When Spatchet tries to get close to her, he is prevented from setting one foot in front of the other, and is forced to make curtseys and similar actions all the way back again.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1903

Mr. R. visits Aubrey Grinset in Thomas Spatchet's place, and tells Spatchet of what transpired after. He alleges that the skin on her hands and arms has been torn, with hardly a finger's breadth spared. She would not confess any witchery to him, but only that she had made an agreement with the Devil, and that it was too later for her to repent of it for she was damned. He asked her what the two cudgels on her bed were for, to which she answered that they were to fight the Devil for his misuse of her. She told him that when she was alone, the Devil would come to her and drag her out of the bed and under it until someone in the house heard the noise and found her bloody.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1904

Aubrey Grinset alleges shortly before her death that there are others who have Thomas Spatchet in hand, and thus he would not be entirely free when she died.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1905

Elizabeth Clarke, while being watched as a witch, allegedly attempt to strike a bargain with Matthew Hopkins, suggesting if John Sterne and himself would promise to not hurt her, that she would call one of her familiar spirits to come and play on her lap. Hopkins and Sterne refused the offer and Clarke did not produce her white spirit, one of the five familiars she allegedly kept.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1906

Elizabeth Clarke, at the behest of Satan, who would otherwise never let "her rest, or be quiet," allegedly sends her familiars to kill Mr. Edwards hogs Robert Tayler's horse. Tayler himself believed that Elizabeth Gooding had committed this crime, having fallen out with his wife when Gooding wanted to have the cheese on credit.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1907

Elizabeth Clarke, presumably through familiar magic, allegedly kills Robert Okes, a man from Lawford in the county of Essex. He appears to have died a week after she bewitched him (or circa March 18th, 1645).

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1908

Elizabeth Clarke allegedly bewitches the child of a Dedham clothier to death, presumably through familiar magic.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1909

Elizabeth Clarke allegedly bewitches Mrs. Cole to death, presumably through familiar magic.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1910

Anne West, presumably through an act of weather magic, allegedly raised a storm which caused Thomas Turner's boat to sink and killed Turner himself.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1642, September. Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1911

Elizabeth Clarke becomes a witch one night as she picked up firewood, around six months after she met Anne West; West, pitying Clarke, for her lameness and her poverty, promised she would send her a thing like a "little Kitlyn, which would fetch home some victuals for this Examinant; and that it should doe her no hurt." Within four nights, a white and a familiar spirit came to her and promised to help her to a husband. They visited nightly "and sucked upon the lower parts of her body."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, September Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1912

Elizabeth Gooding, having been found guilty of "murder and raising spirits" is hanged as a witch in 1645.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1913

Anne Leech allegedly bewitches two of Richard Edwards' cows. She accomplished this simply by walking by Richard Edwards' pasture. A black cow fell down as she passed; a white cow died one day after its fellow, dieing on the same spot. Edwards has an autopsy performed on the cows, but "no disease discovered, which might occasion their death."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1644 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1914

Mary Parsely grows sick and dies within six weeks of Hellen Clarke uttering "that Mary the daughter of the said Edward and Mary Parsley should rue for all" a prognostication and curse grounded in Hellen Clarke's outrage after she had a disagreement with Mary Sr. The legal indictment for this event names the victim as "Anne."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, April 5 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1915

Hellen Clarke is hanged as a witch for having committed two murders, in 1645.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1916

Prudence Hart begins to have a sudden and tragic miscarriage as she walks home one Sunday. There is no apparent cause for this; she had been about "twenty weeks gone with childe, and to her thinking, very well and healthfull," and rapidly developed "great pains, and miscarried before shee could be got home." Hart blames Anne West and Rebecca West for this tragedy, suggesting that Rebecca West thought Hart was her greatest enemy.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1917

Prudence Hart feels something fall down upon her right side as she lays in bed one night, "but being dark, she cannot tell in what shape it was." She loses mobility on that side, and experiences "extraordinary pains and burning," which last a few days. Presumably Anne West and / or Rebecca West had sent a familiar spirit to plague her.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1918

Mary Greenliefe allegedly allows her familiar spirits to feed from Susan Sparrow's fourteen year old daughter and her own teenage daughter. Greenliefe's daughter had awoken one night and was heard "to cry out in a fearefull manner; Oh Mother, now it comes, it comes, oh helpe mother, it hurts me, it hurts me." Having been told to quiet her daughter, Greenliefe allegedly suggested to Sparrow, "I will fee with them (meaning her said Impes,) that they shall suck my daughter one night, and thine another." The next night Sparrow's daughter awoke "much affrighted, sweating, and shrieking in a terrible manner, complaining that shee was nipped and pinched on her thigh. Sparrow's child had a large bruse on her thigh and complained of pain in her leg for a month after.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1615 Alresford    Essex  Essex  England 
1919

A mysterious leveret (a year old Hare) which allegedly haunts the home shared by Susan Sparrow and Mary Greenliefe is suspected of bewitching Anthony Sharlock's son. Sharlock brings his greyhound which courses the leveret, "but whether the dog killed it this Informant knows not."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1630 Alresford    Essex  Essex  England 
1920

Mary Greenleife is searched as a witch; she allegedly has "bigges or teates in her secret parts, not like Emerods, nor in those places where women use to be troubled with them; and that they verily beleeve, these teates are sucked by her Impes. Greenleife says she does not "how she came by those teats which were discovered in her secret parts, She saith she knows not unlesse she were born with them; but she never knew she had any such untill this time, they were found in those parts upon the said search."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
1921

Anne Cooper allegedly curses William Cottingam's colt. It broke its neck and died shortly thereafter.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Clacton    Essex  Essex  England 
1922

Anne Cooper allegedly attempts to give her daughter Sarah a familiar in the form of "gray Kite, to suck on [her]"

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
1923

Elizabeth Hare, accused of giving Mary Smith "two Impes" exclaimed, with her hands "upward, that if she were guilty of any such thing, He would shew some example upon her." Immediately "after she shaked and quivered, and fell down to the ground backward, and tumbled up and down upon the ground, and hath continued sick ever since."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
1924

Rachel Pindar confesses to "hypocrisie" on the part of some of her alleged possessions, "whereof shee seemeth to be very sorie and repauntaunt" to the preacher at St. Paul's Cross, London on August 15, 1574.

The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London

1574, August 15 London (Paul's Cross)    London, City of  London   England 
1925

Agnes Brigges confesses to "hypocrisie" on the part of some of her alleged possessions, "whereof shee seemeth to be very sorie and repauntaunt" to the preacher at St. Paul's Cross, London on August 15, 1574.

The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London

1574, August 15 London (Paul's Cross)    London, City of  London   England 
1926

William Longe, William Turner, John Bowthe and several other witnesses including William Pindar, Peter Pindar, Role Harris, Katherine of Borne, Elizabeth Long, Jane Turner, Margaret Barkers, Katherine Chawke, Elizabeth Pindar, Anne Pindar, Sarah Dauars, Susan Pindar, Maryanne Resue and Sarah Daders, argue with the devil who possesses the child, Rachel Pindar, until he is cast out and "shallt have nothinge."

The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London

1574, July 16 London (Paul's Cross)    London, City of  London   England 
1927

William Long performs the alleged exorcism of Agnes Brigges, charging Satan to "depart, and neuer enter aney more." He succeeds in expelling Satan, causing the child Agnes Brigges to "helld up hur hands and said, he is gone, he will come no more." Her body contorts and her throat swells during these proceedings, as witnessed by George Allen, William Turner, William Pindar, William Edwards, and Sarah Dauars.

The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London

1574 London (Paul's Cross)    London, City of  London   England 
1928

Agnes Brigges confesses at her examination by Roger Dogeson, James Style, a minister, and John Kent Percer to having "faigned and counterfelt" her possession, during which time a black silk thread, a feather, hair, a crooked pin, and two nails were pulled out of her mouth, all of which she placed there at diverse times. She performed all of this so "that no body was priuie to her doings, but herselfe."

The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London

1574 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1929

Rachel Pindar confesses during her examination before the Reverend Father Matthew L, Archbishop of Canterbury, Sir Rosalind and William Fleetwood that her possession allegedly caused by Joan Thornton during which she took a feather and hair from her mouth, and during which she spoke in "diuers strange and hollowe speeches within her throate," was "untrue and the other feyned, for the which shee is nowe very sorie, and defyreus to aske the sayde Joane Thorneton forgivenesse."

The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London

1574 London (Paul's Cross)    London, City of  London   England 
1930

Thomas Spatchet continues to suffer fits for the rest of his life, as Aubrey Grinset had warned. The fits are infrequent, often weeks in between. He continues to have difficulty praying.

A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits

1667   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1931

Mary Johnson allegedly bewitches Annaball Durrant's child; she appears to have used both word magic, calling the child pretty, and spread maleficium through touch, by stroking its cheek, and instrumental magic, poisoning it though a kind of bad magic spread through bread and butter.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, February? Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
1932

Having eaten a piece of bread a butter given to it by Mary Johnson, the Durrant child, "shricked and cried," falls lame, and continues, for "the space of eight dayes shricking and tearing it self." Although her mother consults a local surgeon is, he can find no natural cause, nor administer a natural cure. The Durrant child dies. Mary Johnson is blamed.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1644, February? Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
1933

Annaball Durrant, after the death of her child, is seized with labor-like pains which last for seven or eight months.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1644 Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
1934

Annaball Durrant sees a vision of Mary Johnson while she is "setting up of broome in an out-house presently after her child was dead." She is suddenly "struck with a lamenesse in her Arms, and such a stiffnesse that three or foure that came to help her, were not able to bow her Arms." She loses the ability to speak, has to be carried how by friends, and continues in this condition for two weeks, before she returns to health.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1644, February? Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
1935

George Durrant, having encouraged his wife Annaball to testify against Mary Johnson, suddenly gave a great shrick, and said the said Mary Johnson would be his death, and had a great swelling risen up in his breast, and now lies sweating, and in great extremity." He continues to cry out "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life." Durrant does not seen to be hallucinating this torment; he buzz of a hornet fills the room; a wall falls down.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, April Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
1936

Margaret Moone allegedly bewitched Stephen Cookers cow to death, a crime she is said to confess to.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1937

Margaret Moone allegedly bewitched Stephen Cooker's cows to death, livestock held in "Handling," a crime she is said to confess to.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1938

Margaret Moone allegedly bewitched one of Henry Robinson's cows and one of his sows to death, a crime she is said to confess to.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1939

Margaret Moone, pushed to confessed her status as a witch and the crimes attributed to her, loses her patience, and cries out that "she had been told fourty times, that this Informant thought in his conscience she was no Witch."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1940

Mrs. and Mr. Rawbood, having moved into a house formerly occupied by Margaret Moone (they had offered her landlord ten shillings more rent), "never [did] thrive after,' but were always "lame of sick untill they died."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1625   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1941

Margaret Moone curses Mr. and Mrs. Rawbood after they take possession of a house she had lived in, saying "they (meaning the said Rawbood and his wife) had as good they had not medled with the house."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1625   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1942

Mrs Rawbood, having moved into Margaret Moone's home, and suspecting the act has made her possessed, found herself, "a little before it was time to go to Church" one Easter day, suddenly "so filled with Lice" described as "long, and lean, and not like other Lice," that they "might have been swept off her cloaths with a stick."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1625   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1943

Francis Milles searches Margaret Moone as a witch and finds "three long teats or bigges in her secret parts, which seemed to have been lately sucked." Milles dismisses the possibility that these marks were some natural protuberance like pyles; "having been troubled with them herself" she new these marks were not that.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1944

Margaret Moone and Elizabeth Clarke are accused of bewitching John Edwards, the infant son of Mr. Richard Edwards to death. This crime is also blamed on Anne Leech and Elizabeth Gooding.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1644 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1945

Margaret Moone allegedly spoiled a batch of Philip Berriman's bread.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1946

Margaret Moone and Elizabeth Clarke allegedly spoil three batches of Richard Edwards' beer.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1947

Margaret Moone allegedly bewitched Philip Daniel's horse. It fell and broke its neck while pulling Daniel's wagon down hill.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1948

Henry Cornwall, after bringing home a half a peck of apples given to him by Margaret Moone as payment for a hook, eats one of said apples, and was suddenly "taken sick with an extreme shaking and pain in all parts of his body," a condition he suffered with "in great extremity for the space of twelve weeks, and most part of that; time deprived of his senses."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1949

Although she had identified Margaret Moone as "a woman of a very bad fame and suspected for a Witch, [who] had formerly been questioned at an Assize [as a witch and she] flung away the Ap[p]les" her husband had brought into their home, courtesy of Margaret Moone, Mrs. Cornwall begins to experience a series of fits. She is taken sick with an extreme shaking and pain in all parts of [her] body" and never fully recovers.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1950

One day after her father had done some labour for Margaret Moone, Joan Cornwall becomes sick. She suffers from "strange fits, and shrickings out, and so continued languishing for a moneth, and died." Margaret Moone is blamed for the child's death.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1951

Margaret Moone can allegedly conjure her familiar spirits with a bowl of beer and a little bread. She allegedly offers to demonstrate this to Francis Milles and "put the bread into the beere, and set it against an hole in the wall, and made a circle round about the pot, and then cried, Come Christ, come Christ, come Mounsier, come Mounsier." When the imps failed to appear, she blamed her daughter, claiming they had carried them away.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1952

Judith Moone and her sister, the two daughters of Margaret Moone are searched as witches. Marks are found on them, described as marks like their mother's, which are "three long teats or bigges in her secret parts, which seemed to have been lately sucked."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1953

Mary Philips, while "going over a broad foot Bridge, this Informant sensibly felt a great blow on her head, which strook her into a ditch up to the neck." This event is recorded in terms of her examinations of Margaret Moone, who seems to recognize her, presumably because she had magically administered the blow.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1954

Judith Moone having refused to fetch her mother a bundle of wood the day before, feels something crawl into her bed, her bed, "about her legges, being at that time broad awake, and that shee searched to see what it should be, but could not finde any thing." Presumably this is one of her Mother Margaret Moone's familiars.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Thorpe-le-Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1955

John Munt is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Grew "so that he died instanly." Grewe is also indicted and convicted of having a familiar named Jay, which may have been used in this crime.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645 Walton-le-Soken  Soken  Essex  Essex  England 
1956

George Fossett is allegedly bewitched by Mary Wiles "whereby his body was consumed."

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645 Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
1957

Robert Potter Jr. is allegedly bewitched by Mary Sterling; he dies within a month.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645   Langholme  Rutland  Rutlandshire  England 
1958

Mary Knights is allegedly bewitched by Anne Cooper; she dies within a month. Cooper is found not guilty of this crime.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1637 ? Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
1959

James Curstissurre was allegedly bewitched by Anne Cooper; he dies within one day (or one year?). Anne Cooper is found guilty of this murder.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645 Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
1960

Anne Thurston allegedly bewitches John Aldurton's "black cow," a bovine worth five shilling, to the point where it had to be destroyed. It may be that her two spirits were used to bewitch this cow.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
1961

Elizabeth Occlam is allegedly bewitched by Mary Johnson; she dies within three days.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645 Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
1962

George Durrell is allegedly bewitched by Mary Johnson; he dies within five days.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1644, June 20 Wivenhoe    North Eastern Essex  Essex  England 
1963

Thomas Bragge is bewitched by Margaret Landish so that he was "was wasted, consumed." Thomas Bragge may be the man represented in _A True and Exact Relation_ as Robert Turners's servant (see Anonymous 331).

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
1964

Lionel Jefferson is allegedly bewitched by Hatting; he dies twenty four days later.

Calendar of Essex Assize Records

1625 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1965

Thomas Greene is allegedly bewitched by Sara Hatting. He dies within two months.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1642, May 20 Rumsey    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
1966

James Watts is indicted at the assizes at Maidstone before Thomas Twisden and Timothy Littleton for allegedly bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became "wasted and consumed."

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1678, March 11 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
1967

James Watts is accused by Anne Huggins, John Batty, Margaret Day, Elizabeth Hartridge, Anne Benson, and Anne Staines of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body was "wasted and consumed."

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1678, March 5 Rochester  St Margaret's, St Nicholas' and the Cathedral  Kent  Kent  England 
1968

William Sommers allegedly begins to have fits at the age of 19 or 20, claiming that he has been possessed by a wicked spirit.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, October Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1969

On 7 November 1597, Darrell appoints the exercise of prayer and fasting so that Sommers might be dispossessed; the prayers are said by Darrell and a group totaling 150 people.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 7 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1970

William Power, John Pepper and John Cooper all allege that when John Darrell cast the Devil out of William Sommers, he neglected to appoint the Devil anywhere to go. William Power and John Pepper both add that Darrell claimed afterward to have sent the Devil into a herd of swine, while John Cooper says that Darrell claimed to have sent the Devil into Collwick Hill. Thus, since the Devil was not told where to go, he was free to repossess William Sommers as Sommers had claimed.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1971

William Sommers, now dispossessed, alleges to discover witches in the town of Nottingham. He accuses Doll Freeman, kinswoman of an Alderman of Nottingham, of being a witch.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1972

William Sommers alleges that his initial possession was faked, as per his agreement with the Devil at the time of his repossession.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1973

William Sommers is brought back before the Commission to see if he would confess who had persuaded him to insist his initial possession was faked. Sommers tries to run up the stairs and throw himself over the gallery to break his neck, but is prevented. When questioned this time, he is treated more roughly than before, until the Commission and all present are satisfied that he is indeed possessed once again. Mr. Walter Archdeacon acknowledges that the finger of God must be upon the whole affair. There is rejoicing in Nottingham, as the Commission is said to have pleased God for the truth to have been so revealed.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1974

William Sommers is committed to the custody of certain residents of Nottingham after the Commission returns to Yorke, where he continues to be tormented by fits and tells of his ordeal to his captors. Sommers recounts how the Devil appeared to him in prison in the shape of a mouse, and that the Devil and certain persons urged him to say he had counterfeited his first possession, making promises to him should he do as they asked. His confessions are written down by some of his listeners.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1975

The Archbishop of Yorke receives the depositions taken by the high Commission on William Sommers' possession and is satisfied that Sommers is truly possessed. He chastises John Darrell for his actions in Sommers' case, demanding that Darrell keep his insistence that the Devil might be driven out of a person through prayer and fasting to himself, as it is Darrell's opinion only. The Archbishop declines to enlighten Darrell on how the Devil might be better driven out, preferring to leave Darrell with the demand to cease claiming that prayer and fasting are effective.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597 York  York  North Yorkshire  Yorkshire  England 
1976

John Darrell, after his chastisement by the Archbishop of Yorke, is summoned before the Commissioners of Canterbury, and after a day of harsh speeches, is sent to the Gatehouse.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597 Canterbury    Kent  Kent  England 
1977

William Sommers is brought to London, where he continues to allege that his first possession was a fake, and accuses John Darrell of hiring him to do it. He says that he has known Darrell for four years, and that Darrell first hired him to counterfeit possession in Ashbie Park. Sommers alleges that Darrell instructed him on how to act during his dispossession. Darrell denies these accusations, but Sommers has become a man of great credit and is believed over Darrell. During his time in London, Sommers is kept first in the custody of a barber of East Smithfield, and then in the home of the Bishop of London.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1978

John Darrell is held prisoner for a week in London, then convented at Lambeth, for allegedly having William Sommers counterfeit possession. He is held on the strength of there being many known counterfeited possessions, and for Sommers' own insistence that his possession was not real. There are, however, doubts regarding Sommers' possession, as the depositions against him claim that he had done things that could not be faked.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1979

Richard Dugdale, a young man from Lancashire, begs leave of his master to go to a rushbearing, or a rural festival at the dedication of a church, in Whalley. The following morning, returning to work, Richard Dugdale "being troubled in Mind, he thought that he saw several Apparitions, but could not tell the resemblance thereof."

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Whalley  Whalley  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1980

Richard Dugdale of Lancashire becomes ill while making hay, and upon the advice of a well reputed neighbour and serving woman, goes to take a drink and lie down in the Hall he works at. After "some time being laid down upon the Bed, the Chamber-Door opened of it self," and several apparitions appear to him. First, smoke or mist, then a "Hard-favoured man" he mistakes for a fellow servant or a Black man, which turns into a naked child. "All this was done when he was awake." The apparitions disappear after dancing in front of him, in a burst of flame.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Gisburne  Gisburne  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1981

Upon a violent fit, where Richard Dugdale of Lancashire could scarce be held down, his uncle and family take him to see the neighbouring doctor, Dr. Chew. After "taking the physick from Dr. Chrew, " he had "to the best of his knowledg, [...] little advantage by the first Physick."

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1982

Richard Dugdale of Lancaster consults Dr. Crabtree after his first Physick from Dr. Chew fails to cure his fits, but was amazed at Richard Dugdale's "precise fore-telling various sorts of Weather." Even though he was "blooded several times, the first of which was as black as Ink," Richard Dugdale's fits continually worsen. His father, Thomas Dugdale, stops the treatments. Dr. Chew concludes that " if the Spirit in Richard Dugdale was a Water-Spirit, there was no cure for it," and that the disease is not natural, leading to his recommendation to seek out ministers.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1983

Sara Hatting is searched as a witch. Bridget Reynolds, the witch-searcher, claims Hatting has "foure Teats, or Bigges in those parts, almost an inch long, and as bigge as this Informants little finger."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1984

Elizabeth Harvey is searched as a witch. Bridget Reynolds, the woman who searched her, claims she had "had three such Bigges, and about the said scantling."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1985

Marion Hocket is searched as a witch; Bridget Reynolds can discover no witches marks on her.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1986

Richard Dugdale returns to see Dr. Chew concerning his fits, which have yet to resolve themselves after having seeing Dr. Crabtree and the minister, Mr. Jolly. He takes "Physick from Dr. Chew, and says, that the Physick worked well with him, and since that time, he says, he never had any Fit," allowing him to marry and continue with his gardening profession, although it is agreed his "disease was not ordinary."

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1987

Elizabeth Harvey allegedly claimed that Marion Hocket made her into a witch circa 1638 by making her have witch's mark. Hocket has allegedly brought her "three things were of a reddish color," which in pulling and sucking at her, "made her have the said marks or bigs," These familiars, which Harvey claimed she tried to send back, allegedly "tormented her in her bed, in the places aforesaid, as if they had pulled her in pieces."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1638 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1988

A mysterious snake appears on a shelf Mrs. Stock's house, after her husband, Francis Stock, tells an enraged William Hatting that his wife was a "scolder." When Mrs. Stock "endeavoured to kill [it] with a Spade; and striking at it, the Snake suddenly vanished away, and could no where be found."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1989

Mrs. Stock is is suddenly "taken sick with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body," after she attempts to kills a mysterious snake in her home. Within a week, in death-throws, she cries out that "Sarah [Hatting] was the cause of her death," and dies. The illness and death happened shortly after Francis Stock fights with William Hatting and insults his wife Sara Hatting and before the death of her two children, who perish in a similar manner shortly after Mrs. Stock.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1990

Francis Stock's daughter dies "within two or three dayes after the death" of his wife. Stock suspects Sara Hatting is culpable for the child's suffering and death. The illness and death happened shortly after Francis Stock fights with William Hatting and insults his wife Sara Hatting and after Mrs. Francis attempts to kill a snakes which unexpectedly appeared in her home, but found upon administering a death blow, that the serpent has disappeared. This Stock daughter is the second to perish in her family; her mother's death precedes hers and a sibling dies shortly after her.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
1991

Richard Dugdale experiences a number of Fits, believed to be caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by his ability to foretell things "which he could not possibly know by any ordinary means." This includes predicting the weather, when visitors will come to call, where persons might travel to, and the time and length of his next fit. These various fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly; James Abbot; Thomas Dugdale, his father; Nathaniel Waddington; John Fielding; William Livesay; Ann Whittaker; and Joshua Thomason.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
1992

Thomas Westfield gives deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers with swelling behind his ear the size of a walnut that then moved to his eye where it reduced in size but caused a blackness in the eye. When Westfield touched the swelling, it moved, and the eye returned to its natural colour. Westfield witnessed the eye change colour eight more times.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1993

William Sommers, as alleged by Joan Pie in her deposition, would have a clapping or knocking in his bed no-one could discern the source of, and a motion as if kittens were crawling beneath the covers which his minders could not catch; during the knocking he would sometimes cry "now she comes, now she comes, now she will break my neck" and his neck would be thrown about.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, October Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1994

John Strelley gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that he visited Sommers a second time, John Darrell and William Aldred there, and witnessed Sommers violently thrown from where he sat and hit his head against the chimney. After this, Sommers was laid out on the bed and suffered a fit, in which his neck bent double, one of his legs became tremendously heavy, and a swelling was seen to appear on various parts of his body. Strelley also witnessed Sommers gnash his teeth, foam at the mouth, and make a variety of strange noises.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, February 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1995

Elizabeth Milward gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that the day Mr. Darrell came to town, Sommers was extremely tormented. At this time, she saw Sommers lay senseless and cold without any discernible breath while his hands became unnaturally black. They gave him aquavitae and other things hoping to revive him, but could not, and he was so heavy he could not be moved. When he finally revived, his first words were "Darrel comes, he will have me out." She adds that the first time she called neighbors to help him, she heard a thumping or knocking from the bed, and putting a hand on the bed, felt it coming from a hollow place above his chest.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 5 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1996

John Pare gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that he came to Nottingham to pray for Sommers, and found Mr. Darrell, Mr. Aldridge and others there. They preached and prayed over Sommers through the afternoon, during which Pare saw Sommers grovelling face-down on the bed, and a swelling under his clothes the size of a mouse that moved all over his body. Pare also heard a knocking from the bed in several places at once, which could be felt when Pare put his hand on the bed and was found to be so low that there was no way Sommers could reach with his hand to do it.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 7 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1997

John Clerk gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that he heard Sommers in torment one day and went to see him at the home of Thomas Porter, finding him in a fit. During this fit, Sommers said to Edward Garland: "Edward Garland art thou here, how doe thy children, i will have one of them, even the youngest" to which Garland responded that he defied the Devil, that the Devil could have no power over him or his children. When Sommers came to his senses and was dressed to get out of bed, Clerk say a swelling the size of a rat at his breast. Clerk tried to grab the swelling and hold it, finding it to be as soft as a pillow, but it escaped his hand and wend down into Sommers' leg. When asked why he went to see Sommers, Clerk said that he did it to be persuaded after hearing of so many strange things and accidents.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1597, November 6 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1998

W. Hunt gives deposition against William Sommers alleging that he saw Sommers in a fit lying as if dead, speaking for a full quarter hour with his lips shut and without moving his mouth or jaws. Hunt also saw a lump the size of a walnut running about Sommers' face, forehead, eyes and to his ears.

A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers

1598, March 20 Nottingham    Nottinghamshire  Nottinhamshire  England 
1999

Richard Dugdale of Lancaster experiences a number of fits, where "his ability of body is beyond the Joint Strength of many Lusty men." His fits are deemed beyond ordinary, possibly caused by the Devil, and witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly; the apothecary Mr. Ainsworth; another apothecary (Anonymous 335); John Whitehead; and John Walmsly.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1689 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2000

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits characterized by his ability to speak in "another Voice, besides his own," and further, his voice can be heard at great distances. Sometimes, noises arise from Richard Dugdale that are not human, but animal or strange. These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, John Walmsly, William Loond, John Fielding, Thomas Core, Grace Whalley, Nathaniel Waddington, John Fletcher, and Edmund Haworth.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2001

Richard Dugdale is allegedly seized by fits possibly caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by extreme weight change, being at "one while as heavy as a Lump of Lead of that bigness, and other while as light as a Bag of Feathers of 14 or 16 pound weight." These fits are also characterized by his lifeless appearance for a considerable amount of time. Witnesses to Richard Dugdales fits of this nature include: the minister Mr. Jolly, his father Thomas Dugdale, John Walmsly, John Livesay, William Livesay, John Smalley, John Hindle, Joseph Hargreaves, Thomas Booth, John Grimshaw, and William Sellars.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2002

Francis Stock's child falls sick, appearing to catch the same disease which appears to have claimed its sister and mother, this child also dies. The illness and death happened shortly after Francis Stock fights with William Hatting and insults his wife Sara Hatting and after Mrs. Francis attempts to kill a snakes which unexpectedly appeared in her home, but found upon administering a death blow, that the serpent has disappeared. This Stock child is the third person to perish in its family; its mother and sister's death precedes this person's demise.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2003

A verbal altercation between Francis Stock's servant, Anonymous 336, and John Hatting, son of William and Sara Hatting, turns into a physical altercation. The "very next day hee was taken sick, and so continued in a pining and languishing condition, crying out often of the said Sarah, that she had bewitched him, and was the cause of his death, which soon after ensued."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1640 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2004

Richard Dugdale, allegedly suffers from many fits thought to be caused by Satan characterized by "his diabolical rage and blasphemy against God, and Christ," and at other times, "Satan sometimes in his Fits, transform himself into an Angel of Light," and recited sermons and scriptures that he had never heard. These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, John Livesay, and Nathaniel Waddington.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2005

Richard Dugdale is allegedly seized by a number of fits possibly caused by the Devil, characterized by his ability to "his speaking several languages, which he never learned." These fits are witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly, William Fort, and Robert Waddington.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2006

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from lumps on his chest and stomach, which sometimes become mice, or rats, and at other times sounds like "a little dog." This is witnessed by Mr. Jolly and John Fletcher.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2007

Richad Dugdale allegedly vomits a number objects during his fits which are believed to be caused by the Devil, including gold, silver, and brass rings; a hair button; stones; and a curtain-ring. These fits were witnessed by the minister Mr. Jolly; Richard Dugdale's father, Thomas Dugdale; Edmund Hayworth; Grace Whalley; and John Hindle.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2008

Richard Dugdale suffers from a number of alleged fits, during which objects such as goose-dung and stones appear in his hands, although there are none near. Further, these stones are often warm to the touch. Both Thomas Dugdale, Richard Dugdale's father, and John Whalley are witness to these fits.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2009

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, possibly caused by the Devil. These fits are characterized by strange contortions of his body, "begun in the Calf of his Leg, and wrought upwards into the Chest of his Body, and then he was thrown down." As well, he engaged in strange movements during the length of these fits, as witnessed by John Walmsly, William Loond, John Fletcher, William Fort, and Joshua Thomason. After these strange contortions of the body, Richard Dugdale apparently looks "in far better liking, when out of his Fits, then ever he was before," however, Richard Dugdale allegedlly cannot recall what transpires during his fits.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2010

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, possibly caused by The Devil, characterized by "dancing and roreing hidiously." These fits are witnessed by Ann Whittaker, John Walmsly, William Livesay, John Fletcher, and Henry Page.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2011

Richard Dugdale allegedly suffers from a number of fits, during which time John Hindle "prickt a large pin in his Feet, and he neither stirred nor complained at all." John Fletcher was witness.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2012

Dr. Whittaker refuses to treat Richard Dugdale for his fits, "for that he concluded it to be more than a Natural Distemper."

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2013

Richard Dugdale visits the minister Mr. Jolly in Lancaster, where a fit seized him while Mr. Jolly read and prayed. This fit was violence and strange, and "he raged as if the Devil had been in his bodily Shape."

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1689, April 29 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2014

Richard Dugdale visits the minister, Mr. Jolly, when he is seized by a fit, and "the Devil raged in the young Man exceedingly," and discovering things by "Diabolical Means."

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1689, August 13 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2015

During a fit in front of a junior minister (Anonymous 338), Richard Dugdale confesses to having a contract with the Devil, "That he might excel all others in Dancing," in order to gain the favour of a young woman at a rushbearing. Richard Dugdale allegedly could not dance before his fits seized him, but could afterward. When Richard Dugdale is not in a fit, he does not confess to having any knowledge of a contract with the Devil.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1689, September 6 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2016

Richard Dugdale is seized by a fit, during which he allegedly tells the minister Mr. Jolly "the young Man was his own." Mr. Jolly believes a spirit spoke through Richard Dugdale.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1689, October 11 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2018

Richard Dugdale confesses to seeing an apparition of the Devil while "in his Drink," and so "The Devil, in his Drink, drew him into a blind Consent, and Compact, to satisfy his curiosity, and Dancing Humour."

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690, Feb 20 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2019

Richard Dugdale suffers a violent fit on March 24, 1690, as he previously predicted in another fit. After this fit, "the Evil Spirit took it's leave of him." The spirit does so, by crying out, "Now Dicky, I must leave thee, and must afflict thee no more as I have done, I have troubled thee thus long by Obsessions, and also by a Combination, that never shall be discover'd as long as the World endures." This fit also occurs after Richard Dugdale's confession to a contract with the Devil, that was thought to expire after eighteen months. This was his final fit, after which he was freed.

A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter

1690, March 24 Lancaster  Lancaster  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2020

Sara Barton allegedly receives three familiars from her sister Marian Hockey; they were named Littleman, Pretty-man, and Dainty.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2021

Marian Hocket allegedly slices off her witch's marks to avoid detection, according to her sister Sara Barton.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2022

Having been promised that they would "do her good." Elizabeth Harvey allegedly receives three familiars from Marian Hocket. After receiving these familiars, "shee was very much pained in those parts of her body where the said teats or bigs were discovered by the said searchers."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Ramsey    Essex  Essex  England 
2023

Robert Turner's servant (Anonymous 331) is allegedly bewitched by Joyce Boanes, Rose Hallybread, Susan Cock, and Margaret Landish, by virtue of their familiars. Sometimes he would be " struggling with such strength (being but a youth) that four or five strong men were not able to hold him down in his bed."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2024

Robert Turner's servant (Anonymous 331) is heard to crow "perfectly as a cock," an affliction blamed on the torments caused by, or possession by, Susan Cock's familiar.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, April   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2025

Robert Turner's servant (Anonymous 331) is heard to bark like a dog, an affliction blamed on the torments caused by, or possession by, Joyce Boanes familiar Rug.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, April   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2026

Robert Turner's servant (Anonymous 331) is heard to "groan in such an extraordinary manner," and "beyond the ordinary course of nature" an affliction blamed on the torments caused by, or possession by, Margaret Landish's familiar.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, April   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2027

John Starchie allegedly suffers his first fit at the age of ten, a week after his sister Anne suffers her first fit, in which he is compelled to shout on the way to school. These fits become extreme, lasting 9-10 weeks.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1594, February Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2028

NIcholas Starchie hires Edmund Hartley, reputed to be a conjurer with certain papist charms and herbs at his disposal, who alleges he can keep Anne and John Starchie from having fits. For the first year and a half of Hartley's employment, the Starchie children are quiet and seem to be well.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1594, April Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2029

John Starchie allegedly has a fit in which he falls to bleeding when Edmund Hartley pretends he is leaving Lancashire and is setting out on his way. Nicholas Starchie has Hartley stopped and returned to Cleworth; Hartley claims that no man but him could have staunched John's bleeding. Several similar incidents follow.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1595, October Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2030

Edmund Hartley convinces Nicholas Starchie that he is indispensible to the well-being of the Starchie children by September 1596, but is dissatisfied with the terms Starchie offers him; he sends a loud whupping noise in his anger. Starchie had first given him room and board, then promised and annual pension in writing, effective Michaels Day (September 25) of 1598. Hartley demanded a house and ground, which Starchie refused. By mid-November, the fits and strange events resumed.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1596, September Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2031

Edmund Hartley travels with NIcholas Starchie to visit his father and is tormented all night; the next day he goes into the woods and makes a circle divided in four with a cross in each part. When finished, he fetches Starchie and attempts to get Starchie to walk the circle in his place; Starchie refuses.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1596 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2032

Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman and Eleanor Holland are asked for testimony against Edmund Hartley by Justice of Peace Hopwood, but they are all rendered speechless whether questioned together or individually. The most they will say is that Hardman will not suffer them to speak against him.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2033

Jane Ashton, a maidservant in the Starchie household, allegedly begins to bark and howl when she tries to give testimony against Edmund Hartley to Justice of the Peace Hopwood. Though Jane is prevented from speaking, others in the house recall that this is the second time she has been afflicted - she had become sick and vomited blood a year before after going into Hartley's chamber and looking in his chest.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2034

Robert Turner's servant (Anonymous 331) is heard to "to sing sundry tunes in his great extremity of paines," an affliction blamed on the torments caused by, or possession by Rose Hallybread's familiar.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645, April   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2035

Rose Hallybread allegedly accepts a familiar spirit from Goodwife Hagtree (circa 1630). She entertains the familiar for around a year and a half, feeding it with blood and oatmeal, and the loses it.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1630   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2036

Margaret Byrom travels from Cleworth to Salford with Edmund Hartley, where Hartley is made to take her before two Justice of the Peace to take her testimony against him; she is struck speechless and cast backward to the ground three times. To explain, she alleges to see a great black dog with a monstrous tail and a chain in its mouth, which runs at her and casts her into the fire, keeping her from speaking but leaving her able to use her eyes and hands. A short time later, a large black cat stared at her, knocked her down once more, and took the use of her eyes and hands. A half hour later, she is visited by an apparition in the shape of a big mouse, which knocks her down and takes her tongue, eyes and senses.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598. January Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2037

Ten or twelve of Richard Welch's lambs are allegedly killed by Joyce Boane's familiars, at her behest.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1632   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2038

A calf, a sheep, and a lamb, owned by Thomas Clynch are allegedly killed by Joyce Boane's familiars, at her behest.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1632 ?   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2039

Susan Cock allegedly receives two familiar spirits, a mouse named Susan, and a cat names Bess, from her mother, Margery Stokes while she is on her death-bed.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1641   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2040

Ten or twelve of John Spall's sheep are allegedly killed by familiars employed by Susan Cock, Rose Hallybread, Joyce Boanes, and Margaret Landish, allegedly at their best. Spall had evidently earned this malice when his wife refused to give or sell cheese curds to a preganant Susan Cock.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2041

Margaret Byrom allegedly suffers six instances in as many weeks in which the spirit possessing her will not permit her to eat or drink. If urged to by others, the spirit causes Byrom and the food or drink to be cast to the ground together. When able to eat, she does so greedily and feels hungry no matter how much she has consumed.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2042

Margaret Byrom allegedly suffers a fit in which she feels as if she is being pulled to pieces, and a stinking smoke emerges from her mouth. Her voice and the sound of her crying changes, and she reeks so badly for a day and a night that no-one can bear to come near her.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, February 10 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2043

The Devil appears to Margaret Byrom in the shape of Edmund Hartley two nights in a row, promising her silver and gold if she takes heed what she says and speaks the truth during her forthcoming examination regarding Hartley. Thinking it's Hartley, Byrom tells him that she already has told the truth, and she will not favor him now for silver nor gold. The second night he leaves her with the words "do as thou wilt." She is troubled by fits the day before Hartley's execution, causing her to go to the morning prayer daily thereafter.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2044

Nicholas Starchie consults with preachers for advice on the possessions within his household, and is eventually referred to John Darrell. Starchie writes to Darrell twice requesting help, the second time with a letter of reference from a Justice of the Peace. After the second letter, Darrell agrees to consult on the matter.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, February Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2045

John Darrell arrives at the Starchie household in the company of George More; at dinner, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman and Eleanor Holland suffer fits in which they are thrown about. their faces disfigured and their bodies swell. One of them is heard to say, regarding Edmund Hartley's recent execution, "Do you think you can hang the Devil?"

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March 16 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2046

John Darrell, accompanied by George More, local pastor Mr. Dickens, and 30 others, gathers Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Byrom and Jane Ashton in the parlor for a day of prayer and fasting; all seven have fits throughout the day and six are allegedly successfully dispossessed. At the end, the seven are extremely tormented, beating their bodies and needing to be held, crying in a supernatural manner and lying as if dead. Margaret Byrom is the first dispossessed, followed by John Starchie. Jane Ashton allegedly pretends to be dispossessed at the end of the day, but has not truly been.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2047

Jane Ashton allegedly suffers a howling fit the night of John Darrell and George More's arrival. Darrell declares this proof of her possession, coupled with an account of how her belly had swollen to the size of late pregnancy earlier that day.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March 16 Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2048

John Darrell takes accounts from Margaret Byrom, John Starchie, Anne Starchie, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Hardman and Elizabeth Hardman, asking them to describe how the Devil looked when he left them. Byrom alleges that she felt something come up from her belly to her breast and saw a dark mist emerge from her throat that left a foul smell behind, and went out the window in a flash of fire. John Starchie alleges it left him like an ill-favored hunchbacked man; Margaret Hardman says the same. Anne Starchie alleges he left like a foul ugly man with a white beard and a bulge on his breast the size of a man's head; Eleanor Hardman says she saw the same thing save the beard. Eleanor Hardman alleges it was like an urchin, who left through a tiny hole only to return in a foul shape promising gold; he threatened her when she refused and left again in the urchin shape.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2049

The Devil appears to Anne Starchie, John Starchie, Elizabeth Hardman, Margaret Hardman and Eleanor Holland in the night immediately after their dispossession, and attempts to get their permission to repossess them with gold and threats. He appears to them variously as a hunchbacked man, a man with a bulge at his neck, a bear with fire in its mouth, an ape and a dove.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2050

Jane Ashton is alleged to still be possessed the day after the exorcism of Margaret Byrom, John Starchie, Anne Starchie, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Hardman and Elizabeth Hardman; she is observed to be tormented, vomiting, shaking and weeping. She lays as dead for a while after John Darrell performs another exorcism on her, and rises up giving thanks for her deliverance. She claims that the Devil rose up in her throat and bid her to say that he was gone from her, promising not to hurt her any longer and to ensure that she lacked for nothing if she did.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2051

John Darrell alleges that the Devil returned over the next few days following the exorcisms to torment Margaret Byrom, John Starchie, Anne Starchie, Eleanor Holland, Margaret Hardman, Elizabeth Hardman, and Jane Ashton. It throws them down, deprives them of the use of their limbs, promises worldly goods and makes threats to try to get them to consent to repossession. They resist, and are not tormented further to his knowledge.

A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham

1598, March Greater Manchester  Leigh  Lancashire  Lancashire  England 
2052

Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates offer Joan Simpson money to swear that Anne Levington used witchcraft to take Lady Powel's life, as part of a plot to kill Levington.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1651, December Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2053

Anne Hook, in the employ of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates, approaches Joan Simpson and successfully persuades her to swear against Anne Levingston by offering Simpson half the six score pounds Hook is being paid to do so herself; Simpson discovers the murder plot against Levingston shortly thereafter and refuses to swear, finding the whole business abominable.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, January 10 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2054

Anne Hook, in the employ of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and their confederates, approaches Joan Peterson and offers her money to swear that Anne Levingston had procured powders and seeds from Peterson to help her in her lawsuits, and to provoke unlawful love; Peterson refuses.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, January Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2055

Joan Peterson is indicted for bewitching Christopher Wilson, as alleged by Margaret Austin and two other witnesses; Peterson is said to have first cured Wilson then caused him to become ill again after he was unable to pay for her services. Notably, Wilson himself does not claim any such thing, though he is alleged to suffer fits and "rot as he lies". Numerous witnesses are called against her, but give only hearsay; Peterson is able to produce only a few witnesses, and those who do appear to support her are mocked and sent away by the Officer of the Court.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
2056

A stranger offers to depose in court that Thomas Southwick, a servant of Thomas Cromton's, has been standing in the sessions yard proclaiming Peterson a witch and offering money to anyone who will swear the same in court; when the Justices on the Bench is call for Southwick, he cannot be found. The Recorder is made to take note of it, and an Order given that Southwick is to be brought before the court.

A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
2057

Joan Peterson is alleged to have conspired with another Gentlewoman (presumed to be Anne Levingston) "to administer a potion, or posset, to the Lady Powel," who died shortly after drinking it.

The Tryall and Examination of Mrs. Joan Peterson

1591 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2058

Joan Peterson, at her trial, allegedly renounces all witchcraft and confesses that "she administer'd not any thing to the Lady, but what was comfortable and nourishing."

The Tryall and Examination of Mrs. Joan Peterson

1652, April 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2059

A "very handsome young man" appears to Rebecca Jones, standing at the door of her employer's home in Great Clacton, asked Jones how she was, asked to see her her left wrist, and taking a pin from out of her sleeve, and pricked her wrist. This man, a person Jones comes to 'believe' is the devil, carries a drop Jones' blood away on her finger tip.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1620 Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
2060

While en route to St. Osyth, Rebecca Jones encounters a man wearing "a ragged sute, and having such great eyes, that this Examinant was much afraid of him." This man gave (loaned) Jones three familiars like moles, described as having "foure feete apiece, but without tayles, and of a blacke colour" and named Margaret, Amie, and Susan. This wide eyed ragged man also instructed Jones on how to entertain and employ these familiars: nursing them, giving them milk, and using them for select acts of vengeance and murder.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1620 Clacton-on-Sea  Great Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
2061

Rebecca Jones allegedly sends one of her three familiars to kill Bejamin Howes' swine, which dies accordingly. She does not name which familiar allegedly did this crime.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1620   Little Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
2062

Rebecca Jones allegedly teams with Joyce Boanes and they send their familiars (Jones: Margaret, Boanes: Anonymous 45) to kill Thomas Bumstead "who died about three weekes after. Jones was allegedly irate with Bumstead after he had beaten her son for stealing his honey. Jones is tried and found guilty for bewitching Bumstead.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2063

Rebecca Jones allegedly sends her familiar named Amie to kill Katherine Bumsteads, who died "within a short time after." This crime was allegedly spurred on after Thomas Bumstead beat Jones' son for eating his honey. Jones was tried and found guilty for the malefic murder of Katherine Bumstead.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2064

Rebecca Jones allegedly sends her familiar spirit Margaret to torment Mistress Darcy's child. She claims that she did send Margaret to torment Darcy's child, but that she recalled it.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   St. Osyth; St. Ofes; St. Oses  Essex  Essex  England 
2065

Joan Cooper sometime during her twenty years as a practicing witch, claims to have acquired "three Familiars, two like Mouses, and the third like a Frog: The names of the two like Mouses, are Jack, and the other Prickeare, and the name of the third like a Frog, is Frog"

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1625 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2066

Thomas Woodward's child is allegedly bewitched by one of Joan Cooper's familiars (likely Jack or Prickeare) and dies within two weeks.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2067

Two of John Cartwright's children are allegedly bewitched by Anne Cooper's familiar Frog. They die within two or three weeks of the onset of their bewitchment.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2068

Mrs. Parby, wife of George Parby of Great Holland, is allegedly bewitched by Joan Cooper's familiar Frog at her behest. Mrs. Parby dies within three days of the onset of her bewitchment.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2069

Joan Peterson allegedly helped a cow-keeper's wife (Anonymous 342) with a bewitched cow; Peterson first boiled the woman's urine and divined the identity of the bewitcher in the liquid's surface, then advised her on what to do to reverse the bewitchment.

The Witch of Wapping

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2070

James Watts is found not guilty of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became "wasted and consumed."

Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688

1678, March 11 Maidstone    Kent  Kent  England 
2071

Joan Peterson is alleged to have a familiar in the shape of a squirrel, which a maidservant saw and heard talking with Peterson through the night; the maidservant is so frightened by this she lay as if in a trance, and the next day recalls hearing every word but was bewitched by hearing it and rendered unable to remember a thing of what was said. Peterson's son also allegedly tells his schoolfellows that his mother can do such strange things because of the squirrel's teachings.

The Witch of Wapping

1652 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
2072

Anne Cate (Maidenhead) allegedly sends one of her three mole imps (either James, Prickeare, or Robyn) "to nip the knee of one Robert Freeman." The imp lamed Freeman and he died six month later of related injuries.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645   Little Clacton  Essex  Essex  England 
2073

The Susan Rawlins / Rowlandson is allegedly bewitched by Anne Cate's (Maidenhead) familiar Prickeare. She dies a short time after.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2074

John Tillet is allegedly bewitched by Anne Cate (Maidenhead) via her familiar, Prickeare. He dies suddenly.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2075

The child of George Parby is allegedly bewitched by Anne Cate, by virtue of her familiar Sparrow. The Parby child dies immediately at the onset of this bewitchment. Mrs. Parby, wife of George Parby, had allegedly refused to give Anne Cate (Maidenhead) a pint of milk which she requests and Cate sought malefic retribution by bewitching her child.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2077

Mrs. Ray is allegedly bewitched by Anne Cate (Maidenhead) by virtue of her familiar after the two women squabble over a two pence loan. Mrs. Ray dies a short time after.

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Great Holland    Essex  Essex  England 
2078

An honest man from Manningtree allegedly spots "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits, leaping and skipping about him," at four o'clock in the morning outside Anne West's door. Without knowing what they are, he attempts to brain one to death with a stick, the wring its neck, drown it, only to experience it as having "vanished away."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
2079

Anonymous 346 accuses Anne West of sending her familiars, in the shape of four black rabbits, to trouble him. West allegedly retorts that "that they were not sent to trouble him, but were sent out as Scouts upon another designe."

A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex.

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
2080

Joan Upney alleges that her eldest daughter "would neuer abide to meddle with her Toades," meaning that she refused to participate in witchcraft, but her youngest daughter "would handle them, and vse them as well as her selfe," suggesting that she was a practicing witch.

The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches

1589, May   Chelnes-forde; Chelmesforde; Chelmifforde; Chensforde;Chelmes-forde  Essex  Essex  England 
2081

Richard Galis returns to England to reconcile with his father Master Richard Gallis, and be there while Master Gallis lies dying; Galis believes that his father died through the actions of "these helhoundes and Impes of the deuell."

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2082

Richard Galis buys sheep and cattle after the death of his father in an attempt to build up his family's fortunes, only to have almost all die; thereafter many other attempts to raise funds turn sour and his raging fits return until he is convinced that witches are once again seeking his ruin. Galis swears to Sir Henry Nevel that either the witches will be brought to justice, or he will himself suffer their punishment.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2083

Richard Galis rounds up Mistress Audrey, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton and Mother Nelson and brings them before Sir Henry Nevel on the day Nevel had appointed for their examination. The four insist that Galis' accusations are contrary and malicious. Galis beseeches Nevel to have them examined in the Articles of the Christian Faith, which they fail. Rather than using this to charge the four for witchcraft, Nevel appoints Galis overseer of their religious education, and makes him responsible for ensuring they appear before the pulpit at Service.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2084

Richard Galis alleges that, after the deaths of Mistress Audrey and Mother Nelson, the remaining witches resolved to either see him dead or make his life a torment, thus giving over to their lusts and wallowing in their wickedness.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2085

Richard Galis, riding home late one night, alleges to have encountered a being in the shape of an ugly fiend with fiery eyes (Anonymous 68) sitting in a poor man's cart; Galis thinks it Satan himself, and bid it leave in God's name, while attacking it with his sword. A great light appears around the cart, and the fiend dispersed with the light leaving nothing but the stench of brimstone behind.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2086

Richard Galis alleges that he tried to burn down Mother Dutton's straw pile by thrusting a cloth dipped in brimstone into the pile and lighting it with a brand; despite these measures, not a single straw is scorched.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2087

Richard Galis claims he tried to burn down Mother Dutton's house by binding gunpowder and brimstone to an arrow and thrusting it into a hole in a straw pile next to the house; though he lights it with a match on the end of a long stick, only the arrow is consumed. Not even the straw is damaged in the attempt.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2088

Mother Dutton is apprehended in Windsor in the county of Berkshire.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, February 26 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2089

Elizabeth Stile is tried and examined by Sir Henry Nevel. At the trial, Nevel finds her an offender and orders her committed to Reading Gaol.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2090

Elizabeth Stile, while imprisoned at Reading Gaol, gives a full itemized confession, stating that she did much harm to many people through the use of sorcery, witchcraft and enchantments. In this confession, she names numerous others as witches: Father Rosimond and his daughter, Mother Dutton, Mother Devell, Mother Margaret and MIstress Audrey.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 Readyng    Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2091

Mother Dutton, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, keeps a familiar in the shape of a toad named Mawde and fed on blood from Dutton's flank; with Mawde's assistance, Dutton can tell every man's errand on sight. Mawde lives in Dutton's garden, in a border of green herbs.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2092

Mother Devell, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, keeps a familiar in the shape of a black cat named Gille who assists in her witchcraft and is fed on milk mingled with her own blood.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2093

Father Rosimond's daughter, as alleged in Elizabeth Stile's confession, keeps a familiar in the shape of a white cat (Anonymous 1).

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2094

Mother Margaret, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, keeps a familiar in the shape of a kitten named Ginnie, which she feeds with breadcrumbs and her blood.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2095

Elizabeth Stile alleges in her confession that she and her fellow witches have given their right sides to the Devil.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2096

Mother Devell, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, would beg alms of her neighbors and, if they refused, cause mischief to them and their cattle.

A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2097

Elizabeth Stile alleges in her confession that she and her fellow witches conspired to kill a farmer named Lanckford and his maid; Mother Dutton made images of them in wax and stuck hawthorn needles in them, then set the images in a hole in the chimney so that they would be consumed as the wax melted.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579 London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2098

Elizabeth Stile alleges in her confession to have conspired with her fellow witches to kill former Mayor of Windsor Richard Galis, father of Richard and James Galis.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2099

Elizabeth Stile alleges in her confession that she conspired with her fellow witches to kill a butcher names Switcher; Mother Dutton made an image of him in wax and stuck a hawthorn needle in it, then set the image in a hole in the chimney so that he would be consumed as the wax melted.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2100

Elizabeth Stile, in her confession, alleges that she and her fellow witches forespoke numerous people, causing some to become ill and one, a butcher named Mastlyne, to die.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2101

Elizabeth Stile alleges in her confession that Mother Dutton and Mother Devell enticed her to witchcraft, and that under their guidance she became forsaken to God and gave herself to the Devil.

A Rehearsal both Strange and True

1579, January London  Windsore  Berkshire  Berkshire  England 
2102

Mistress Aubrey, as alleged by Elizabeth Stile in her confession, was the ch