Go back
26 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific oldcounty

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
483

Margaret Gurr is allegedly visited by a grey devil, who urges her to hang herself "with Clock-Lines that was in the Room," and should she fail to do that, he urges her to "put or thrust Knitting-Needles in my Ears," in order to kill herself.(1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

1681, July 19     Kent  Cantia  England 
484

Margaret Gurr is allegedly visited by two Devils who appear to her on July 19, 1681. One of the devils was "of stout thick squat Stature" dressed in grey; the other was "of little Stature and short," and dressed in black.(1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

1681, July 19     Kent  Cantia  England 
610

Partner, the familiar spirit possessing Mildred Norrington, confesses that its owner, Old Alice had sent it, and her other familiar Little Devil, to kill Richard Anger, his son, Edward Anger, and Wolston's wife(72)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 72

1574     Kent  Cantia  England 
668

Margaret Simons is accused by John Ferrall, a vicar in Kent, of bewitching his son (Anonymous 74). Allegedly, Simons cursed Ferrall's son (Anonymous 74) after he attacked her dog with a knife. Five days after the incident the boy (Anonymous 74) became very ill, but was able to recover with the help of another witch. (3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

1581     Kent  Cantia  England 
675

A Yeoman (Anonymous 76) is swindled by an Alchemist (Anonymous 77) who appears trustworthy. Convinced that the Alchemist can multiply angels, the Yeoman gives the Alchemist all his money to put in a ball of wax for doubling, but the money is turned into lead (likely switched for another ball of wax as the angels were) leaving the Yeoman with no money and the Alchemist gone to London.(252-253)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 252-253

1651, Printed     Kent  Cantia  England 
1129

Mother Baker claims to be able to identify the person who bewitched the young maid Stupenny.(146)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 146

1584     Kent  Cantia  England 
1131

Mother Baker tells the Stuppeny family that a neighbour created a heart made of wax and pricked it with pins to cause their daughter to fall ill.(146)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 146

1585     Kent  Cantia  England 
1445

Mary Poole is accused of being a witch. A gentleman claims that about seven years ago, he crossed paths with Mary Poole on Sutors-Hill, between Graves-end and Rochester. After an exchange of words, he gives her a cut with his whip and rides away, but within forty yards, his horse fell and she overtook him. Believing his horse had been bewitched, he concludes Mary Poole must be a witch.(2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

1692     Kent  Cantia  England 
2275

Margaret Gurr is visited by a gray devil on July 20, 1681, while she lying in Bed. The Devil "took me by the Wrists and Hands and held them so very tall, that I could not wag or stir them," and griped her so hard that her hands swelled and ached for a whole day afterward. When Margaret Gurr tried to rise, the Devil would not let her, but as soon as he left, she "was in good ease."(2)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 2

1681, July 20     Kent  Cantia  England 
2276

Margaret Gurr goes about her work after being visited by a grey devil on July 20, 1681, and is "taken with a most grievous pain in my Neck," and in her head. These pains last an entire afternoon.(2)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 2

1681, July 20     Kent  Cantia  England 
2277

While experiencing "a most grievous pain" in her neck and head, Margaret Gurr is visited by a black Devil who stared at her awhile before vanishing, after which her "pains were abated."(2)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 2

1681, July 20     Kent  Cantia  England 
2278

Margaret Gurr takes ill on August 4, 1681, and is possessed by a black Devil, who uses her body to speak, "wishing sad Wishes, and most ughly Shreiking noises," and to curse and swear. This recurs on the following day, August 5, 1681.(2-3)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 2-3

1681, August 4     Kent  Cantia  England 
2282

Margaret Gurr is allegedly possessed by a witch on August 5, 1861, where "she spake in me with most hideous and strange Noises," and demands that Margaret Gurr not go to Dr. Skinner for help. The witch promises that if she does not seek Dr. Skinner, she "shall be well." Margaret Gurr experiences "a most lamentable pain in my Limbs" during this possession, and she was tempted not to pray, "but curse and sware."(3-4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 3-4

1681, August 5     Kent  Cantia  England 
2283

Margaret Gurr is "hitcht up by the Devils," and carried about in the air, while she was fetching water on August 6, 1681.(4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4

1681, August 6     Kent  Cantia  England 
2284

Dr. Skinner advises Margaret Gurr to pray "when [...] tempted." When she yields to temptations, Margaret Gurr goes "flying in the Air;" for a second time. However, when she prays, Margaret Gurr is "in good ease."(4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2285

A witch (Anonymous 382) speaks for a second time through possession of Margaret Gurr, saying, "Go you not to that Devil Doctor Skinner for help."(4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2286

While Margaret Gurr is "in the Chamber with the [...] Devil," down the stairs by her master and his family, strange voices speak, and there was a "great lumberings and clatter [...] as if the Chairs and Stools had been thrown about the Chamber." Margaret Gurr concludes that if she had not been cured quickly, her master and his family would have been forced to leave the house.(4-5)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4-5

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2287

The master and mistress of Margaret Gurr, Christopher Elderidge and his wife, pray for Margaret Gurr while she is possessed by "the Devils and the Witch, that there was continual Noises and Voice speaking in me, and I was always moveable." The Elderidges admit to being terrified of Margaret Gurr during her possession.(5)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 5

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2288

Dr. Skinner cast out the Devils and witch from Margaret Gurr, "and also Cured me of the Scurby and Gout," in a period of twelve days. After being restored to her health, Margaret Gurr is no longer troubled by the Devils.(5-6)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 5-6

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2289

After being restored by Dr. Skinner and cured of her possession by two devils and a witch, Margaret Gurr is able to "read the Divine word of God," having before her affliction, no knowledge of "any Letters in the Bible or Testament." Blessed with the power to read, Margaret Gurr allegedly spends her time in reading and in prayers after her affliction.(6)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2290

During her possession and torture caused by two devils and a witch, Margaret Gurr's brother and friends avoided her, and continue to so after Margaret Gurr is cured, "being still afraid."(6-7)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6-7

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2291

A young seventeen-year old male servant of Henry Chowning allegedly had "appear unto him a Spirit in the form of a Grey-hound," which told him he must go into Virginia, before vanishing.(8)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2292

Upon being visited by a devil in the shape of a greyhound, a young servant returns to his master, Henry Chowning, and told what had happened to him. Shortly afterward, the servant becomes strangely ill, and "grew worse and worse," so that his neighbours suppose him to be bewitched. Henry Chowning and his neighbours decide to seek out help for him.(8)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2297

Henry Chowning sends for Dr. John Skinner to come and treat his servant, who had taken ill after seeing an apparition of a greyhound. Dr. Skinner concludes that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," through the boy's pain; admonitions that "he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea;" and the boy's speaking in a voice that was not his own. (9-13)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 9-13

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2298

Dr. Skinner finds that a young servant boy "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound" is much less ill around the doctor, and gives the boy an "order for the putting up of Medicines, for the means must be speedy, or else it cannot be performed." The boy takes the medicine, and within a week, the boy's mother reported that "he was much ammended," and that the evil spirit had been cast out of him.(9-13)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 9-13

1681     Kent  Cantia  England 
2299

After being treated by Dr. Skinner, a young servant boy who had been "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound" complains of "a pain in his belly." Dr. Skinner accordingly sends more medicine, and within eighteen days, the boy is restored, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since."(13)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 13

1681     Kent  Cantia  England