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35 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific oldcounty

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
328

Aubrey Grinset confesses she made league with the Devil, and has been a witch for over twenty years.(18-19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18-19

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
377

Aubrey Grinset confesses to afflicting Thomas Spatchet and several others.(17-18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 17-18

1665, October or November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
378

Aubrey Grinset confesses to bewitching John Collet of Cookly and Henry Winson of Walpoole to death. She lured John Collet and his household out of their home, by calling out that there was the biggest snake anyone had ever seen, and used the opportunity to get close to him; he died two days later. She provides no details on Henry Winson's demise.(19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
379

Aubrey Grinset confesses that the Devil appeared to her repeatedly, first in the form of a handsome young man and later in the form of a greyish-black cat or kitten, and that she allowed him to suck blood from a teat on her body.(19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
380

Aubrey Grinset is searched by an anonymous jury of women (Anonymous 166) after her confession. They find a teat exactly where she said it would be, but her body is otherwise whole.(20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 20

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1050

Thomas Spatchet allegedly loses the ability to speak. He later regains his voice, but then loses it again, this pattern repeating for the rest of the day. The loss of speech coincides with a grinding pain at the crown of his head. (4-5, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 4-5, 18

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1051

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from benumbing fits, during which he appears lifeless. His limbs become heavy and hang down, his eyes shut and do not open, and his teeth clench together; these paralyzing fits can continue for two or three hours.(5, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 5, 18

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1053

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from shaking fits. These fits would start off moderately, like a palsy, then become violent. They are said to start at his head and progress down his body, with only one part shaking at a time and the rest still, until it reached his legs, and then his whole body would shake violently.(6, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 6, 18

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1054

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from dancing fits, during which his legs and feet move with agility and harmony. His feet strike the ground as if they are bells ringing or are striking out a drumbeat, but Spatchet is said to have no previous musical talent.(6, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 6, 18

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1067

Thomas Spatchet's fits allegedly escalate. They are said to occur every fifteen minutes to half an hour, four to twenty times a day, for weeks and months on end. The more there are in a day, the shorter each individual fit is said to be, and he hardly has one day in a month or five weeks without a fit.(6-7, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 6-7, 18

1660   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1068

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from skipping or jumping fits, where his feet come close together, move up and down, and side to side; these fits are said to continue until he has no strength left in his legs and has to rest.(7, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 7, 18

1660   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1069

Thomas Spatchet allegedly loses the ability to speak whenever he tries to pray or attempts to participate in his religious duties. He is able to go a little way, but soon falters and fails.(5, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 5, 18

1660, March   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1070

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from wringing fits, during which his hands lay over one another, with one hand wringing the other, moving about his body and winding about furniture. These fits were said to last half an hour and were not accompanied by shaking. When his hands were done, his head would be affected, and then his body until he would be wrung around or almost off his chair.(8, 9, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 8, 9, 18

1693   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1071

Aubrey Grinset confesses to murdering John Collet of Cookly and Henry Winson of Walpoole through bewitchment.(19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1072

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly cured of his violent fits and inability to travel when Aubrey Grinset dies in prison. This is seen as confirmation that she is a witch.(28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 28

1667   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1886

Thomas Spatchet allegedly becomes entirely unable to participate in acts of worship or attend any religious service, ask for a blessing for his meat or give thanks for it without falling into a benumbing or violent fit.(7-8, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 7-8, 18

1661   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1887

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from daily shaking fits that start first thing in the morning and continue until 6 or 7 o'clock in the evening. These fits are said to prevent him from eating until the evening, when he must eat a morsel at a time while walking lest he lose his ability to speak, be unable to rise again, or be unable to keep his seat. This continued for 16 or 17 weeks.(9)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 9

1663, winter   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1888

Thomas Spatchet allegedly receives a ten-day respite from his fits due to the prayers of people who sympathize with his condition. After those ten days, his fits are said to return, but now no more than eight a week, where before he suffered eight to twelve a day.(9-10, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 9-10, 18

1663, spring   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1889

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly granted freedom from shaking and wringing fits, attributed to prayers on his behalf, for a period of twenty-two weeks. He continued to suffer benumbings, but is able to participate to a degree in religious life again. Persons deeply affected by his condition prayed over him while he had a violent fit until he lay quiet again. During this period, he was able to read Scripture and other books for as long as an hour, and write mostly without weariness.(11-12, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 11-12, 18

1663, summer   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1890

Thomas Spatchet allegedly has three weeks without fits, except when he tries to eat his meat. He is left unable to eat more than four morsels at a time before being rendered unable to move or speak, and often with the last morsel trapped in his mouth. When afflicted, he cannot take any other food or refreshment except a little beer or thin broth, and is soon brought low and famished. After a few weeks, he is able to eat nine or ten morsels at a time, and as of the next day is able to eat his fill if he is fast about it, but suffers violent fits after eating for two more weeks.(14, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 14, 18

1664   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1891

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly afflicted with Roaring Howling Fits, accompanied by all manner of bodily contortions if he lay back upon his bed, and fears he will bring harm to others. These roaring fits come after ten hours of shaking, and last for two hours, in which he roared, howled or barked like a dog and would be left hoarse. On the days he is so afflicted, he is unable to eat until they are done, and fears that he will become raging mad and attack others.(14-16, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 14-16, 18

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1892

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from kneading fits, attributed to Aubrey Grinset. During these fits, he would be cast into heaviness and benumbment, as if asleep, but be aware of others in the room and hear them if they spoke. While benumbed, he would feel a blow on his breast, side or shoulder, and then a kneading like his flesh were bread until he became sore. There would be an intermission, and the kneading would repeat, until he seemed to be near death, but would revive. At times, he seemed to catch a hand, and was sometimes able to bring it to his mouth and bite it. Once he thought he had bitten a thumb, and at the same time Aubrey Grinset was observed to wear an unusually large shoe on one foot. When she was searched, Aubrey's toe was found to have an impression on it as if sawn at. After biting the hand, the kneading fits ceased for a year.()

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693,

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1893

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from fits in which he feels like he is being is grasped in arms while someone gropes his crotch, attributed to Aubrey Grinset. These fits are infrequent, but he finds them particularly troubling and frightening.(17, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 17, 18

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1894

Audrey Grinset confesses to Thomas Spatchet that she employed an imp, and that she had sent it to him to cause his fits. She expresses remorse for having done so, for he had been kind to her, and says that Devil would not let her be until she had. Grinset adds, however, that she had no part in his roaring fits.(18-19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18-19

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1895

Aubrey Grinset is searched a second time by an anonymous jury of women (Anonymous 166), a few days after the first time. On this search, she is found to be covered in scratches, like those left by briars and thorns. It is thought that the Devil has been tormenting her for her confession, for a rumbling noise has been heard from her prison, and she has been seen wandering in distant places at night.(20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 20

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1896

Aubrey Grinset is called before some unnamed Gentlemen (Anonymous 314), and some Credible Persons (Anonymous 317) give testimony corroborating her confessions of having a familiar and causing deaths. Depositions are taken, but the testimonies are not sufficient. It is decided that nothing can be done under the law, and she is sent home. Nonetheless, it is clear that she is of sound mind and knew what she was doing when she confessed, and that her confessions cannot be discounted.(20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 20

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1897

Aubrey Grinset is questioned once again, by two unknown Gentlemen (Anonymous 314), and she again confesses how she became a witch and how she hurt Thomas Spatchet. However, this time she does not confess to causing the deaths of John Collet and Henry Winson, and outright denies some things she had confessed to before.(19-20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19-20

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1898

Thomas Spatchet is urged to scratch Aubrey Grinset, but he is too tender-hearted though his fits continue. Instead, it is said that he took comfort in Scripture and was content to leave any acts of vengeance to God.(20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 20

1665, November   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1899

Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffers from fits that prevent him from traveling, attributed to Aubrey Grinset, in which his feet would be as if nailed to the ground or his legs buckle under him, he would lose all strength, or find himself violently moved in a direction he did not wish to go. These fits are said to have stopped on Aubrey Grinset's death.(21-23, 28, 18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 21-23, 28, 18

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1900

Thomas Spatchet is observed in his fits by a Professing Physick (Anonymous 320) and is prescribed physick for them. This physick seems to increase the frequency and violence of his fits, such that he stops taking it for two years, though his violent fits continue until eight weeks before Aubrey Grinset's death. The Professing Physick concludes that his violent fits are no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion that sometimes ends with him stretched out like a dead man. The Professing Physick also observes that at the times when Spatchet's fits prevent him from eating, he becomes weak but is spared from losing much weight or muscle.(26, 27)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 26, 27

1665   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1901

Aubrey Grinset dies, and it is alleged that her death frees Thomas Spatchet from his violent fits and restraint from travel.(27, 28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 27, 28

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1902

A week before Aubrey Grinset's death, Mr. R., a conformist, invites Thomas Spatchet to visit her. When Spatchet tries to get close to her, he is prevented from setting one foot in front of the other, and is forced to make curtseys and similar actions all the way back again.(27)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 27

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1903

Mr. R. visits Aubrey Grinset in Thomas Spatchet's place, and tells Spatchet of what transpired after. He alleges that the skin on her hands and arms has been torn, with hardly a finger's breadth spared. She would not confess any witchery to him, but only that she had made an agreement with the Devil, and that it was too later for her to repent of it for she was damned. He asked her what the two cudgels on her bed were for, to which she answered that they were to fight the Devil for his misuse of her. She told him that when she was alone, the Devil would come to her and drag her out of the bed and under it until someone in the house heard the noise and found her bloody.(27-28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 27-28

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1904

Aubrey Grinset alleges shortly before her death that there are others who have Thomas Spatchet in hand, and thus he would not be entirely free when she died.(28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 28

1667, April   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1930

Thomas Spatchet continues to suffer fits for the rest of his life, as Aubrey Grinset had warned. The fits are infrequent, often weeks in between. He continues to have difficulty praying.(28, Postscript)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 28, Postscript

1667   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England