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72 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific oldcounty

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
142

Temperance Lloyd is apprehended and put in prison.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 9

1682, August 14 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
143

Mary Trembles allegedly confesses to pricking and tormenting Grace Barnes of Bideford.(30-31)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 30-31

1682, July Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
144

Susanna Edwards confesses that devil had carnal knowledge of her body and sucked on her breasts and secret parts.(29)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 29

1682, July 17 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
206

Dorcas Colesman accuses Susanna Edwards of causing her tormenting pains that have lasted for many weeks. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 2

1680, August Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
207

Temperance Lloyd is accused of bewitching Grace Thomas, by causing her to feel as though she had been pricked with 'pins and awls.'(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 8

1680, September 30 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
208

Temperance Lloyd of Bideford is searched for and is allegedly found to have witch's marks.(11)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 11

1682, July 2 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
210

Temperance Lloyd allegedly met with the devil, who appeared in the likeness of a black man and convinced her to torment Grace Thomas.(13-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 13-14

1682, September 30 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
211

Temperance Lloyd pinches Grace Thomas' shoulders, arms, thighs and legs to torment her.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 14

1682, September 30 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
212

Temperance Lloyd confesses to being involved with the devil for twelve years, and participating in William Herbert's death.(18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 18

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
213

Temperance Lloyd confesses to causing the death of Anne Fellow.(19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 19

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
214

Temperance Lloyd allegedly 'secretly' pricked Jane Dallyn, the wife of Symon Dallyn of Biddiford, Marriner, in one of her eyes, causing her death. Lloyd recounts she did this act in secret, and that "she was never discovered or punished for the same."(19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 19

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
215

Temperance Lloyd confesses to bewitching Lydia Burman to death by appearing to her in the form of a red pig.(19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 19

1682, July 4 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
217

Mary Trembles allegedly arrives at Agnes Whitefield's door. It is at that moment that Whitefield comes to understand that "Mary Trembles, together with the said Susanna Edwards, were the very persons that had tormented her, by using some Magical Art or Witchcraft upon her said Body as aforesaid." (28)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 28

1682, July 16 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
218

Mary Trembles and Susanna Edwards are accused of pricking a Bideford woman named Grace Barns.(31)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 31

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
219

Susanna Edwards confesses that the devil did carry her spirit around.(31)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 31

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
220

Susanna Edwards confesses to pricking and tormenting Dorcas Coleman.(31)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 31

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
221

Mary Trembles confesses that Susanna Edwards taught her the practice of witchcraft.(34)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 34

1682, July 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
222

Mary Trembles confesses that the devil appeared to her in the shape of a lion.(37)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 37

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
224

Temperance Floyd, Mary Floyd, and Susanna Edwards of Bideford cause a cow to give blood instead of milk.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches. London: 1682, 3

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
225

Temperance Floyd of Bideford confesses to causing ships to be cast away at sea and men dying as a result.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches. London: 1682, 4

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
226

Temperance Floyd of Bideford confesses to having sexual relations with the devil for nine nights.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches. London: 1682, 4

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
227

Temperance Floyd of Bideford confesses to killing Hannah Thomas, by squeezing the girl's arm till blood came out of her mouth.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches. London: 1682, 4

1682, August 18 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
238

Temperance Lloyd is accused of pricking and tormenting her accuser, Grace Thomas, causing intense bodily harm.(10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 10

1682, July 1 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
370

Elizabeth Brooker of Hointon, Devon is treated by a midwife for a severe pain in her leg after she turns a woman, who had been begging for pins, away. The midwife applies plasters, and many other cures, but none relieve the pain. (66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
925

Temperance Lloyd allegedly causes nine thorn pricks to appear on Grace Thomas' knees by pricking a piece of leather nine times.(13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 13

1682 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1079

Dorcas Coleman allegedly suffers from tormenting pains, with a pricking in her arms, stomach, and heart.(1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 1-2

1680, August Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1085

Dorcas Coleman appeals to Thomas Bremincom and Dr. George Beare to remedy her pains. Beare attempts to heal her, but realizes the illness is beyond his skill level; he informs Coleman that she has been bewitched. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 2

1682, July 26 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1088

Dorcas Coleman allegedly becomes speechless and stuck to a chair when Susanna Edwards comes into her presence. Coleman then slides out of the chair and is unable to get up until Edwards leaves the room.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 5-6

1680 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1089

Grace Thomas is allegedly bewitched by Temperance Lloyd and becomes immobile as if she had been chained up. Thomas also, at the same time, suffers from a pain in her stomach that causes her belly to swell double in size.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 8

1680, August Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1090

Temperance Lloyd is searched by a group of women (Anonymous 163) for witchs marks; two are found in her privy parts. The marks are described as inch long teats, which Lloyd confesses have been sucked on by a black man (the devil).(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 11

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1091

Temperance Lloyd confesses that the devil appeared in the shape of a bird outside Grace Thomas' house.(12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 12

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1110

Temperance Lloyd confesses to seeing something in the form of a grey cat at Grace Thomas' house. Lloyd also meets with the cat. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 14

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1113

Temperance Lloyd confesses that the devil appeared to her as a black man, was about the length of her arm in size, had very big eyes, and hopped towards her. After he appeared the devil sucked from teats in Lloyd's privy parts as she was lying on the ground.(15)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 15

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1116

Thomas Eastchurch, Elizabeth Eastchurch, Honor Hooper, and Anne Wakely give evidence against Temperance Lloyd. The evidence supports claims that Lloyd practiced witchcraft against the body of Grace Thomas.(17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 17

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1120

Temperance Lloyd is brought to the Bideford parish church and questioned by Mayor Thomas Gist and Rector Michael Ogilby as to how long she has been tempted by the devil.(18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 18

1682, July 3 Biddiford    Devon  Devon  England 
1374

A woman, allegedly a witch, approaches Elizabeth Brooker, a servant of Mistress Heiron (who worked in her mercer's shop), and asks her for a pin. The woman is unsatisfied with Brooker's gift of a pin from her sleeve, wanting a specific one, leaves in a "great Fume and Rage, and told the Maid, she should hear farther from her, she would e'er long wish she had given her the Pin she desired; with many threatning Speeches."(66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
1376

Mr. Salter, a "skilful Apothecary" in Honiton, Devon, is called in to provide treatment for Elizabeth Brooker's severe leg pain. He evidently "advised them well, whose Counsel they followed, but all in vain."(66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

1681   Honyton  East Devon  Devon  England 
1458

Grace Matthew goes to Guildhall seeking help for her husband (Anonymous 209) who has been ill for three years and whom she believes has been bewitched. Dr. Browne offers her "phisicall directions" but they did not help her. He refers her to a former servant of his (Anonymous 210).(149-150)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 149-150

1652, November 13 Exeter (Guildhall, High Street)    Devon  Devon  England 
1459

Grace Matthew consults Dr. Browne's former servant (Anonymous 210) about her husband's (Anonymous 209) illness. Anonymous 210 gives her some remedies and warns her that if a woman "tall of stature, of a pale face, and blinking eye, "and useing to goe by a staff when she did come to her house" (Anonymous 211), that she should give this woman nothing, but instead say that her husband is bewitched and that a plot is laid for the suspected one. (150)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150

1652 Broadclist  Broadclist  Devon  Devon  England 
2308

Joseph Buxford, the fifteen year old son of the wool worker, John Buxford in Bow in the county of Devon, "being a stubborne and untowardly Boy," decided he did not want to be an apprentice to a weaver, as his father desired. He "secretly departed away to the Kings Army" after a month, where at "the defeat with the Cavaliers received at Langport-Moore," Joseph Buxford is "stripped and turned into rages," so he was left with no choice but to return home. His father entreats him to return to the weaver, but "no perswasions or entreaties could prevaile or worke upon the forward disposion of this obstinate and disobedient Boy," which caused his father to swear "in great fury," and to promise "he would bin him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." John Buxford further promises to "put the same in execution."(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

1645 Bow    Devon  Devon  England 
2309

On the morning of November 5, 1645, John Buxford insists his son "prepare himself for to goe along with him to Crediton," in order to bind himself as an apprentice to the weaver, Simon Culsver. Joseph Buxford, the boy, refuses to go, "saying he would rather go to the Devill," causing his father to beat him, and force him to come along. This continued "for above halfe a miles distance from the Towne."(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

1645, November 5 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2310

While taking his fifteen year old son, Joseph Buxford, to Crediton to apprentice him to the weaver Simon Culsver, John Buxford and Joseph Buxford encounter a carrier (Anonymous 390) "halfe a miles distance from the Towne." This carrier has four horses, "loaden with packes of Cloath," and is very familiar to John Buxford as "one whome he had often observed to frequend the Roade." When the Carrier stops to inquire as to why John Buxford is forcing his son further along the road by beating him, John Buxford explains his son's "refractory behaviour in running from his Master." The carrier replied that he could find a master for the boy, "and such employment as would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself," a proposition John Buxford agrees to, under the condition that the boy should return in eight days at the latest. They agree that if Joseph Buxford does not like the work he will undertake with the carrier, he must return to his old master, the weaver.(2-3)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2-3

1645, November 5 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2311

Joseph Buxford, a fifteen year old boy whose father has signed him on to work with a carrier after threatening to apprentice the boy to the Devil, is witness to the "stupendious Miracle," which begins with the horses and packs of the carrier vanishing, and the carrier "metamorphosed in a trice from a man to a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour."(3)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 3

1645, November 5 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2312

After Joseph Buxford's new master, a carrier, turns into a "flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour," he takes the boy unto his back, and "snatches him up forthwith into the aire," with "violence and motion swifter then imagination." Joseph Buxford and the flying horse rise so far above the earth, that "London and other magnificent Cities on greater then small Cottages." They fly past the moon, and under the "watrie dominions" of the earth, where "the Boy observed the most strange and unutterable wonders of the deepe diversified," before finally entering a cave which is like "the earth seeming to open it selfe." All the sights the boy sees are greater than what astrologers, Neptune, and philosophers have seen, and the entering of the cave is likened to "the swallowing up of Korah, Datham and Abiram." All this is described as part of a "stupendious Miracle."(3-4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 3-4

1645, November 5 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2313

Joseph Buxford descends the flying Horse, who was once his new master, a carrier, which turns into "a more terrible shape then that of the flying Horse." This is actually the Devil.(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

1645 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2314

The Devil tells Joseph Buxford after arriving in Hell, "Bee not dismayed, thy employment here shall be onely to take a view of divers men, who thou hast formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army," and whose decision to join the army led to their deaths and place in Hell. While Joseph Buxford is in Hell, he hears "a most hideous and fearfull howling, and a great many gastly apparitions presented themselves before him," many of whom he recognizes. These men wail, "Woe, Woe, unto us that ever we undertooke the devence of such an unjust Cause."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

1645 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2315

Joseph Buxford, who has been brought to Hell as the new apprentice to the Devil disguised as a Carrier, sees "that which made the greatest impression." Several apparitions appear to him of men from the army who have been sent to Hell, in particular, Sir Peter Ball, "one of the commissioners of Excester lately deceased." Sir Peter Ball is "lying all along after a strange manner, his Legs and Feet schorching in furious flames, his Buttockes upon a Crediton, his Backe and Shoulders in a frying pan, his Head in a boyling kettle of pitch." Sir Peter Ball is also cursing, and being accused of "extorting, coveteousnesse, and cheating of the Country."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

1645 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2316

Joseph Buxford, who has been brought to Hell as the new apprentice to the Devil disguised as a Carrier, sees "preparation made for Greenvile and Goring," two men who are close in proximity to Sir Peter Ball, also a man in Hell because of his service to the army. These two men are attended by three furies, whose office is the Ladies of Scalding in Hell. They pour acomite down the throats of these men, to torture them.(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

1645 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2317

Joseph Buxford, who has been brought to Hell as the new apprentice to the Devil disguised as a Carrier, sees the Lady Scot, the sister of a man being tormented in Hell for being part of the army. She "was to behung up by the tongue upon hot burning tender hooks."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

1645 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2318

Joseph Buxford, who has been brought to Hell as the new apprentice to the Devil disguised as a Carrier, sees "the Lady Dolkeat, Nurse to the young Princesse lying at Bedford House in Excester."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

1645 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2319

Having spent eight days in Hell, observing the torments of those who were "in the Malignant Army," that he himself once wished to join, Joseph Buxford was "so full of dread and horrour," that he retracted his earlier desire to join the army. Instead, "he earnestly wished himselfe out of this place, to undergoe any servitude."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

1645, November 5 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2401

The servant of Mr. Philip Furze, one Francis Fey from the county of Devon, had appear "unto him, the resemblance of an Aged Gentleman, like his masters Father," in a field near his master's house. The resemblance had "a Pole or Staff in his hand, resembling that he was wont to carry when living, to kill the moles withal." The specter approached Francis Fey, and "bid him not be afraid of him, but tell his Master (who was his Son) that several Legacies which by his Testament he had bequeathed were unpaid." The specter further named two persons who each should receive ten shillings, but the young man replied that "the party he last named was dead, and so it could not be paid to him." The Ghost then desired the money be paid to the next relation of that person. Finally, the specter ordered Francis Fey to deliver twenty shillings to a gentleman, sister of the deceased, and promised that "if these things were performed to trouble him no further. The specter spoke of his second wife as a "wicked woman," though she was generally esteemed to be "a very good woman." Having had this conversation with Francis Fey, the specter left.(177 - 178)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 177 - 178

1682, November Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2402

After the ghost of his master, Mr. Philip Furze's father appears to the young servant Francis Fey, asking him to fulfill "several Legacies" that had been left unpaid after the death of the ghost, Francis Fey "according to the direction of the Spirit took care to see the small Legacies satisfied." However, the ghost's last request was to carry twenty shillings to "a Gentlewoman, Sister to the deceased,"(Anonymous 412) and she "utterly refused to receive it," as she believed it was sent her "from the Devil." Staying the night at her house, Francis Fey sees the specter again, "whereupon the young man challenged his promise, not to trouble him any more, saying he had performed all according to his appointment," but that the gentlewoman would not take the money. The specter then directed "the young man ride to Totness, and buy for her a Ring of that value," which he believed she would accept. This proved true, and she received the ring. The specter after this, "hath seemed to be at rest, having never given the young man any further trouble."(179)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 179

1682, November Totness  Totnes  Devon  Devon  England 
2403

While returning from Totnes to his master's house in Spreyton, Francis Fey, a servant, along with the servant of a gentlewoman (Anonymous 413), had appear to him "upon the horse behind the young man, the resemblance of the second wife of the old Gentleman," who was the spectre of his master, Mr. Philip Furze's father. This "Daemon" threw the young man off his horse, "and cast him with such violence to the ground," that "the ground resounding with great noise, by reason of the incredible force," to the astonishment of the servant of the gentlewoman (Anonymous 413). The horse is also capable of leaping "one spring 25 foot," despite being "very poor, & out of case." (180)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2404

The ghost of the second of wife of the deceased father of the master of Francis Fey appears to the household of Francis Fey, including "mistress Thomasin Gidly, Ann Langdon [...] and a little Child." These people are "fair to remove from that house," because of the "troublesomeness" of the spirit. She appears to these people "sometimes in her own shape," and at other times "in forms very horrid." She also takes on the appearance of "a monstrous Dog belching out fire," which flies out the window; as well as the shape "of a Horse, carrying with it only one pane of glass, & a small piece of Iron."(180 - 181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180 - 181

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2405

Francis Fey is tormented by the ghost of his master's father's second wife. On one occasion, "the young mans head was thrust into a very strait place, betwixt a Beds head, and a Wall." It took the strength of "divers men" to be removed from this space. Francis Fey was not "much hurt, and bruised," but "much blood appeared about it."(181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 181

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2406

After an accident where his head was "bruised" with "much blood," it was advised that Francis Fey, a servant, should "be bleeded, to prevent any ill accident that might come out of the bruise." After bleeding, "the ligature, or binder of his Arm was removed from thence, and conveyed about his middle, where it was strained with such violence," that the girding almost suffocated him, and killed him. When the girding was "cut asunder, it made a strange and dismal noise, so that standers by were affrighted by it." This may be caused by the daemon (Anonymous 169) who is the ghost of the second wife of Francis Fey's master's deceased father. (181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 181

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2407

The servant, Francis Fey, is "at divers other times," been "strangled with Cravats, and Handkerchiefs, that he hath worn about his Neck." On these occasions, he is "with the sudden violence he hath near been choaked,," and barely escaped death. These events are likely caused by the daemon (Anonymous 169) who is the ghost of the second wife of Francis Fey's master's deceased father. (181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 181

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2408

The specter (Anonymous 169) who is in fact the ghost of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife, "shewed great offence at the Perriwigs which the young man used to wear," often tearing them off of Francis Fey's head "after a very strange manner." When Francis Fey attempts to keep one "he esteemed above the rest," by putting it into a small box, and placing that box into another, which he set against the wall of his chamber. He put a "Joint-stool, with other weight" on top of it. However, in a short time, "the boxes were broken in sunder, and the Perriwig rended into small parts and tatters," by the specter.(182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2409

The servant, Francis Fey, lies "in his Masters Chamber, with his Perriwig on his Head, to secure it from danger," from the specter of his master's father's second wife (Anonymous 169). However, "within a little time it was torn from him, and reduced into very small fragments."(182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2410

The shoestrings of Francis Fey's shoes were observed "without the assistance of any hand" to come out of his shoe, "and fling itself to the other side of the Room." When a Maid (Anonymous 415) goes to pick it up, it "strangely clas'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel, or Serpent." This was witnessed by a "Lady of considerable Quality." (Anonymous 416) This event was likely caused by the specter (Anonymous 169) of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife.(182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2411

A lady of "considerable Quality" (Anonymous 416) found one of Francis Fey's gloves, "which was torn in his pocket, whilst she was by." The glove was "so dexterously tatter'd, and so artificially torn," that it is believed that "a Cutler could not have contrived an Instrument, to have laid it abroad so accurately." However, this happened entirely in his pocket, "in the compass of one minute." This was likely to have caused by the specter (Anonymous 169) of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife.(182 - 183)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182 - 183

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2412

A specter (Anonymous 169) of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife who haunts Francis Fey, a servant, causes havoc in the household by tearing people's clothes. If "the aforesaid young man, or another person, who is a Servant Maid in the house," decided to "wear their own Clothes," then those clothes "are certainly torn in pieces on their backs." However, if "the Clothes belong to any other," then their clothes are "not injured."(183)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 183

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2413

The "Daemon or Spirit," (Anonymous 169) who is the ghost of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife, causes many "strange and fantastical" things to happen in the house of Francis Fey. This includes making "a Barrel of Salt of considerable quantity," move by marching "from room to room without any human assistance."(183)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 183

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2414

The "Daemon or Spirit," (Anonymous 169) who is the ghost of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife, causes many "strange and fantastical" things to happen in the house of Francis Fey. This includes making "an hand-iron seem[...] to lay it self cross overthwart a pan of Milk that hath been scalding over the fire," at the same time that "two flitches of Bacon [...] of their own accord descended from the Chimney, where they were hung, and placed themselves upon the hand iron." (183)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 183

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2415

The "Daemon or Spirit," (Anonymous 169) who is the ghost of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife, causes many "strange and fantastical" things to happen in the house of Francis Fey. When the specter appears, she often wares the same clothing. The specter causes "the feet and legs of the young man (Francis Fey) aforesaid [to be] so intangled about his Neck, that he hath been loosed with great difficulty." On other occasions, the specter causes this to happen "about the frames of Chairs, and Stools, that they have hardly been set at liberty."(183-184)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 183-184

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2416

The servant, Francis Fey, is "taken up by the skirt of his doublet," one day, when returning home from his labour, and "carried a heighth into the Air." This was done by the "Female Daemon," (Anonymous 169) who is the ghost of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife.(184)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 184

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2417

On the same day the "Female Daemon" (Anonymous 169) who is the ghost of Francis Fey's master's father's second wife, carries the servant Francis Fey through the air "by the skirt of his doublet," his Master Mr. Philip Furze and several other servants look for him, but could not find him for half an hour. After that time, he was "heard singing, and whistling in a bog, or quagmire, where they found him in a kind of Trance, or extatick fit." After this time, he was affected by many more fits.(184 - 185)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 184 - 185

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2418

Upon being found in a bog, where "he was heard singing," and in a "Trance, or extatick fit," it takes the servant Francis Fey about an hour to "return[...] again to himself." When he is returned, Francis Fey "solemnly protested [...] that the Daemon (Anonymous 169) had carried him so high," that his master's house seemed "but as a Hay-cock," and he was fully aware of what was happening to him at that time. He further "prayed to Almighty God not to suffer the Devil to destroy him," and then the daemon set him down in the bog. A workman found a shoe on the side of Mr. Philip Furze's house, and another person found "his Perriwig hanging on the top of a Tree." This confirmed that Francis Fey was "carried a considerable heighth," and that his confession "was not a Fiction."(185)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 185

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England 
2419

After it was observed that part of Francis Fey's body "was somewhat benummed, and seemingly deader than the other," he was taken to Crediton "to be bleeded," by a company of people (Anonymous 417). He is left alone "for some little space," after which he is found "in one of his Fits, with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to a great bigness." None were able to guess how it happened.(185 - 186)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 185 - 186

1628 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2420

Upon being found "with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to great bigness," after being left alone to be bled, Francis Fey recovered from a fit and was able to recount what happened to his head. He tells the company (Anonymous 417) that "a Bird had with great swiftness, and force flown in at the Window, with a stone in its beak," which it threw at his forehead. The company "diligently sought the stone," and under where Francis Fey sat, they found "a weight of Brass or Copper" rather than a stone. It is believed that a "Daemon" (Anonymous 169) was the cause of the event.(186)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 186

1628 Crediton  Crediton  Mid Devon  Devon  England 
2421

The young man, Francis Fey, a servant to Mr. Philip Furze, is continually "molested" by the spirit of his master's father's second wife, "in a very severe and rugged manner," and "often handled with great extremity." This continues indefinitely.(186 - 187)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 186 - 187

1628 Spraiton  Spraiton  Devon  Devon  England