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20 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific oldcounty

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
401

Mary Hall, begins to grow ill in the autumn of 1663. Her illness begins 'first in one foot with a trembling shaking and Convulsive motion, afterwards it possessed both; she would sit stamping very much; she had sometimes like Epileptick, sometimes like Convulsive fits, and strange ejaculations." (32)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32

1663, (Fall) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1608

Dr. Woodhouse diagnoses and begins to treat Mary Hall for her distemper. He prepares "stinking Suffumigations, over which she held her head, and sometimes did strain to vomit." Her illness seems, at least for "some weekes" to be somewhat abated. Woodhouse appears to continue acting as her physician during this time.(32)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32

1663, (Fall) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1637

The two spirits which allegedly possess Mary Hall, returning to her body, after almost a year of health, begin to taunt her and her physician. They define themselves as "two little Imps," sent by Goodwife Harods, and Goodwife Youngs that appear "sometimes we are in the shape of Serpents, sometimes of Flyes, sometimes of Rats or Mice; and Gfe Harod sent us to choak this Maid, Mary Hall." They suggest that they would have possessed her father, Goodman Hall," but were unable to, therefor possessed Mary instead. They claim they "came down the Chimny, riding on a stick, and went first to Mary's foot, whereupon her foot trembled first of all her distemper," thus situating the possession as beginning the previous year, during Mary's illness. (32-33)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32-33

1664 (August) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1638

The two spirits possessing Mary Hall refuse to be exorcised / dispossessed. Although they sometimes answer questions, they also mock God (claiming to be four evil entities, two spirits and two witches, against one of him). They would blaspheme, saying "God was a Bastard, let him come if he dare." They would threaten that those bothering them would be "benighted." And claim they had to do "a few prankes more, ere they went out," which included choking Mary. (32-33, 33-34)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32-33, 33-34

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1639

The two spirits which possess Mary Hall tempt her to hurt herself and kill herself in any number gruesome ways, including drowning, burning, and scalding herself.(33)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 33

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1640

The spirits which possessed Mary Hall stop her from normative and spiritual behavior. When she attempted to ride her horse, they "would lift her up, and make her shake, so that they were fain to hold her on the Horse," when she attempted to read the Bible, "they would say, Mary, do not read; or, Mary you shall not read, for Books are all against us," and then "convulse her Arms, and threw the Books far from her." Moreover, even if others attempted to pray for her, "they would make her to tremble, and her knees to bow; and when so done, laugh and sing, We know how to cheat you, and make you believe any thing."(33)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 33

1665 (September) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1641

The spirits which allegedly possess Mary Hall mock Dr. Woodhouse's medical treatment (medical dispossession), violently react against Nicholas Culpeper's suggestion (derived from his book) of Oak Mistletoe (Viscaceae) and other "anti-daemoniack-Medicines boiled," by Woodhouse, but suggest that the Hall family consult Mr. Redman of Amersom, "whom some say is a Conjurer, others say, He is an honest and able Physician, and doth abundance of good) [because] he would cast them out."(34, 36, 36. 39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 34, 36, 36. 39

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1642

Dr. Redman recommends an act of countermagic to treat Mary Hall's possession, an act which when done, appears to provide temporary relief. He suggests that "a Child being very sick, likely to die, Redman bids them, Take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length."(39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1643

Doctor Woodhouse uses countermagic to test Goodwife Harwoods' culpability for bewitching Mary Hall. Woodhouse "got Mary Halls nailes that were cut off, and with somewhat he added, hung them up in the Chimny a reesing over-night; and by next morning Gfe Harwood came, which they thought to be caused by the aforesaid things."(34)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 34

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1646

William Drage concludes that 'natural remedies,' those used to heal those suffering from natural, as opposed to supernatural illnesses, would not cure Mary Hall. Regardless, he lists a series of cures he might have attempted to use to treat her, including, "powder of Coral (to stop excess [menstrual] bleeding), of Piony (treat signs of hysteria), of Misleto (to treat convulsive nervous disorders), of Herb True-Love (a narcotic), and of Saint Johns-wort (to treat depression)," or to hang "Rosemary, Misleto, Ivy and Coral in the house, and about her neck." He also suggested her could have given Hall a "Decoction of them at any time, specially in the fits, in such manner as she could best take them." This appears to suggest he is medically diagnosing her as being bewitched. (36)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 36

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1647

Mary Hall's bewitchment appears to be, at least in part, in remission throughout September-November, 1664. The spirits allegedly "lie still for the most part, unless by questions, or praying, they are disturbed; sometimes they say, they lift her upto a great height, but say, they cannot hurt one Hair of her head."(37)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 37

1664 (September) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1648

After nearly three months of reprieve from her possession symptoms, William Drage visits Mary Hall (December 1, 1664). At the beginning of his visit, she looked "well-bleed, seemingly she was very well." Drage took this as an opportunity to interrogate the spirits within her on the hierarchies of demons. Soon after, "both in her reading and feeding, both her fits of speaking, and convulsive fits molested her." Her "throat swelled, her Face grew red, her head shook, and was wreathed about." Drage pulled her tongue from out of her mouth, to attempt to force the demons to speak from inside her, and found "their voice was more obscure; it is sometimes hoarser, sometimes shriller; sometimes small, sometimes great." He continues to man-handle her for the rest of his visit, and her fits return in full force. (37-38)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 37-38

1664 (December) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1649

Dr. Woodhouse gives Mary Hall opium in order to calm the spirits which rage inside of her, he administers, it "many times in a Grain, [but it] makes very little alteration in the body."(38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38-39

1664 (December) Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1650

Dr. Woodhouse gives Mary Hall a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," a medicine which "rid her, in part for a while, of her fits."(38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38-39

1664 Gadsden  Gadsden  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
1651

Dr. Woodhouse allegedly treats those in Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire with a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," he also treats Mary Hall with. He evidently administered it to a bewitched boy in Berkhamstead (Anonymous 262) after the remedies for "convulsion fits" were unsuccessful. Woodhouse, after questioning the Querents on the details of the fits, went to see the boy for himself and found the boy began his fit by "pulling off its headcloaths; then it fell a pulling off its Hair, and then scratching the skin off its face." Woodhouse presumably concluded, at this point, that the boy was possessed and provided the appropriate medical treatment.(38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38-39

1665 Berkhamsted   Berkhamsted  Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
2988

Anon 489, a rich farmer with three half-acres of oats to mow, allegedly sent for his neighbor, Anon 490 to hire him for the harvest. When Anon 490, a poor mower, tried to bargain for a better price for his labor, Anon 489 took "some exceptions at, bid him much more under the usual Rate than the poor Man asked above it; So that some sharp Words had past." Offended, Anon 490 refused to discuss the matter any further.(Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

1678, August     Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
2989

Anon 490, afraid of losing work and Anon 489's patronage, ran after Anon 489 and begged to be hired on at a rate lower than he had charged for any mowing in the past year. The farmer, Anon 489, allegedly replied "That the Devil himself should Mow his Oats before he should have anything to do with them." With that, the two finally parted ways.(Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

1678, August     Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
2990

The night after the farmer Anon 489 declared the Devil would mow his oats before Anon 489 would be hired to, several passers by allegedly saw the Anon 489's three half-acres of oats burn for some time.(Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

1678, August     Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
2991

The morning after Anon 489's three half-acres of oats were allegedly seen to burn, Anon 489 received news of the event. He traveled to the field to witness it for himself, expecting destruction, and instead "found the Crop was Cut down ready to his hands; and as if the Devil had a mind to shew his dexterity in the art of Husbandry, and scorn'd to mow them after the usual manner, he cut them in round Circles, and plac't every straw with the exactness that would have taken up above an Age, for any Man to perform what he did in that one night."(Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

1678, August     Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England 
2992

Anon 489 is allegedly to afraid to have his oats removed from the field after finding them "so neatly Mow'd by the Devil, or some Infernal Spirit, that no Mortal Man was able to do the like."(Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

1678, August     Hertfordshire  Hertforshire  England