Go back
71 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific oldcounty

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
77

Sir Francis Manners succeeds his brother as the Earl of Rutland and takes up residence at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Joan Flower, and her daughters Margaret and Phillip, are hired as charwomen to assist with the household's upkeep. Margaret earns a residency as both a poultry-keeper and a laundress. This lasts until the Countess hears accusations that the Flower women have been engaged in various misdemeanors during their employment.(C2-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
78

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Joan Flowers, the mother, is said to be "a monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious, and for any thing they saw by her, a plaine Atheist; besides of late dayes her very countenance was estranged, her eyes were fiery and hollow, her speech fell and enuious, her de[m]eanour strange and exoticke, and her conuersation sequestred; so that the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse."(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
79

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Phillip Flower, one of the daughters, is said to rob the Lady and maintain debauched and base company. Phillip is also accused of being "lewdly transported with the loue of one Th: Simpson" and to have bewitched Thomas so that "hee had no power to lea[v]e her, and was as hee supposed maruellously altred both in m[in]de and body."(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
102

Countess Manners hears numerous accusations against the Flower women. Margaret Flower, one of the daughters, is said to have "often resorted from the Castle to her Mother, bringing such prouision as they thought was vnbefitting for a seruant to purloyne, and comming at such vnseasonable houres, that they could not but coniecture some mischiefe between them." She is also accused of robbing the Lady and maintaining debauched and base company.(C2-C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
103

Sir Francis Manners, the Earl of Rutland, develops a dislike of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower and ceases to hear their complaints. The Countess, the Earl's wife, eventually discharges Margaret for "[i]ndecencies both in her life and neglect of her businesse." Margaret is turned out of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle with a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. In the aftermath, Joan Flower is "exprobrated by her neighbours for her Daughters casting out of dores, and other conceiued displeasures" and "many times cursed them all that were the cause of this discontentment, and made her so loathsome to her former familiar friends, and beneficiall acquaintance."(C4-C4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C4-C4v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
104

Henry Lord Rosse allegedly sickens strangely and dies. Joan, Margaret, and Phillip Flowers are suspected of bewitching him to death.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
411

A pond in Garraton turns from water to blood and is a supposed sign from God as to how the people are all of one blood.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire. London: 1645, 4

1645   Garraton  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
600

Mother Staunton allegedly demanded a leather thong from John Hopwood, and when denied left offended; the same night, Hopwood's gelding died suddenly in its stable.(13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 13

1579   Waltham on the Wolds  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
621

The Devil allegedly "perceiued the inficious disposition of this wretch, and that she and her Daughters might easily bee made instruments to enlarge his Kingdome, and bee as it were the executioners of his vengeance" and offered his services to Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower. The Flower women are said to have agreed to give their souls in exchange for the service of spirits and the knowledge of incantations, spells and charms. The conditions of the agreement are sealed through "abhominable kisses, and an odious sacrifice of blood, not leauing out certaine charmes and coniurations with which the Diuell deceiued them, as though nothing could bee done without ceremony, and a solemnity of orderly ratification."(C4v-Dv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C4v-Dv

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
624

Francis Lord Rosse is allegedly afflicted by strange sickness, which causes him to be "most barbarously and inhumanely tortured," following the death of his brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected to have bewitched him.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
625

Lady Katherine begins to suffer "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" leaving her "many times in great danger of life" following the death of her brother Henry Lord Rosse. Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are suspected of bewitching her.(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
628

Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners are allegedly afflicted such that they are unable to have any more children, resulting in a miscarriage before Christmas. However, they do not connect this misfortune to the actions of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower until later.(Dv-D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
629

Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower are apprehended around Christmas and imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol on suspicion of bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death, causing the illnesses of Francis Lord Rosse and Lady Katherine, and Countess Manners' miscarriage. (D2-D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2-D2v

1618 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
646

Joan Willimott is examined on February 28, 1618 by Alexander Amcotts, Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester.(E2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v

1618, February 28     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
653

Joan Willimot alleges during her examination that Joan Flower told her that "my Lord of Rutland had dealt badly with her and that they had put away her Daughter, and that although she could not haue her will of my Lord himselfe, yet she had spied my Lords Sonne and had stricken him to the heart." Willimott claimed that Henry Lord Rosse's death was due to being "striken with a white Spirit." She added that she could cure people afflicted in this manner.(E2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v

1618, February 28     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
654

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that, the week before, her spirit came to her and told her that "there was a bad woman at Deeping who had giuen her soule to the Diuell." Her spirit appeared in a form uglier than usual, and urged Willimott to give it something, even just a piece of her girdle, in payment for its services. She told it she would give it nothing, for she had not sent it there - she had only once sent it on an errand, to check on Francis Lord Rosse. Willimott added that the spirit had reported that Francis Lord Rosse would recover.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v-E3

1618, February 28     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
655

Joan Willimott is examined a second time before Alexander Amcots, on March 2, 1618.(E3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E3v

1618, March 2     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
657

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that "shee neuer hurt any body, but did helpe diuers that sent for her, which were stricken or fore-spoken." Pretty would assist her in this, by coming to her weekly and reporting who was afflicted so she could go to them and undo it through "certaine prayers which she vsed." Willimott insisted that she did not use Pretty to do anything, only to bring word of people needing to be cured.(E3v-E4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E3v-E4

1618, March 2     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
658

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that Pretty came to her the night before in the shape of a woman, and mumbled something she could not understand. When asked whether she had dreamed it, she insisted that she was awake at the time.(E3v-E4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E3v-E4

1618, March 1     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
659

Joan Willimott is examined a third time on March 17, 1618, this time before Sir Henry Hastings and Samuel Fleming, Justices of the Peace for the County of Leicester.(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
660

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that she had spoken to Mrs. Cooke of Stathorne about John Patchett, and that she had told Mrs. Cooke that Patchett's child might have lived had he sought help for it in time. She also claimed to have told Mrs. Cooke that Mrs. Patchett had "an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
677

T. E. confesses in writing to Reginald Scot that he learned the illusion and invention of art and science from an Anglo-Saxon book written by Sir John Malborne, a divine of Oxenford, written three hundred years earlier. T. E. has left the book with the parson of Slangham (Anonymous 78) in Sussex, and should Scot want to look at the book, he may write the parson in T. E's name and request it. T. E. appears to be writing from prison because he has been condemned to die. (337-338)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 337-338

1582, March 8     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1474

Joan Willimott is examined by Alexander Amcots, and claims that her master, William Berry, willed her to open her mouth so that he could blow a fairy into it, which Berry said would do her good. Willimott did as she was told, after which a being came out of her mouth in the form of a woman (Pretty) who asked for Willimotts soul.(13)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 13

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1636

Margaret Bell is allegedly scratched to persuade her to lift a bewitchment off a local child. (21)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 21

1665 Lutterworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1811

Anonymous 269 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1618, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1812

Sir Humphrey Winch and Sargent Randolf Crewe order the imprisonment of six unnamed women on the l5th of October at Husbands Bosworth Leicester, for the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, October 15 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1813

By order of King James, who personally examined John Smyth and encouraged him to retract his accusations of bewitchment, five women were released on October 16, 1616 from the goal at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, October 16 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1814

Anonymous 301, one of six women imprisoned and examined in October 1616 for bewitching John Smyth, allegedly admitted to the jailer that she was working in concert with her familiar, and with the other accused witches, to torment Smyth. She begged him not to reveal her secret, lest the other women torment her for speaking against them. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, October 15 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1815

John Smyth begins to have "dyvars wonderful straunge fyts," where he exhibited inhuman strength so that he could not be held down and where he would beat himself, administering anywhere from fifty to three hundred blows to his body. Smyth was miraculously unhurt by these efforts. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1816

While in his foaming fits, John Smith allegedly is able to "contract his whole Body, within the Compass of a Joyn'd-stool, and write in Hebrew, and Greek Characters."(6-9)

Appears in:
Osborne, Francis. A Miscellany of Sundry Essayes, Paradoxes, and Problematicall Discourses, Letters and Characters. London: 1659, 6-9

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1817

John Smyth exhibits a attributes of the six familiar spirits (a horse, a dog, a cat, pullemar, a fish, and a code) which allegedly possess and bewitch him. When the horse "tormented him, he woold whinny; when the cat tormented him, he would cry like a cat, &c."(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1818

Six of the nine women accused of bewitching John Smyth in July 1616 are made to recite a bit of counter-magic to call back the spirits which that allegedly sent to plague and torment Symth. If they spoke this charm (which identified them as a witches), "I such a one chardge the hors, yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld," Smyth would be at peace, and fall asleep; if they did not, he would become agitated.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1822

Anonymous 301 dies on October 15, 1616 while in custody at the goal in Husbands Bosworth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, October 15 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1823

Anonymous 292 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1824

Anonymous 293 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1825

Anonymous 294 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1826

Anonymous 295 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1827

Anonymous 297 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1828

Anonymous 298 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1829

Anonymous 299 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
1830

Anonymous 300 is hanged as a witch on July 18th, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth, Liescester. She was executed for her supposed involvement in the alleged bewitchment of John Smyth.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

1616, July 18 Husbands Bosworth    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2334

Elizabeth Lowe allegedly bewitched John Canell, a three year old infant, causing him to languish and die.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331645)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331645

1564, April 20   Waltham on the Wolds  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2440

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that a man named Gamaliel Greete, a shepherd in Waltham, had a white spirit in the shape of a mouse possess him, an invasion enabled by Greete's excessive swearing. While embodying this agent, Greet could also hurt anything he looked at, should he do so with the intent to injure it. Willimot added that he had a mark on his left arm, which had been cut away. Willimott identified her spirit Pretty as the source of her information.(E5v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E5v-F

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2441

Joan WIllimott alleges during her examination that she had met with Joan and Margaret Flower a week before their apprehension, and that the three of them had gone to Joan Flower's house, where Willimott saw two spirits, one in the shape of an owl and one in the shape of a rat, suck from Joan Flower under her right ear. According to Willimott, Joan Flower then told her "that her spirits did say that shee should neyther be hanged nor burnt."(E5v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E5v-F

1618, March 17 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2442

Joan Willimott alleges during her examination that she saw Joan Flowers take up some earth, spit on it, work it in her fingers and put it in her purse. Willimott claimed Flowers then said that "though shee could not hurt the Lord himselfe, yet shee had sped his Sonne, which is dead," referring to Sir Francis Manners and his son Henry Lord Rosse.(E5v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E5v-F

1618, March 17 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2443

Ellen Greene is examined on March 17, 1618 before Justices of the Peace for Leicester Sir Henry Hastings and Samuel Fleming.(Fv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2444

Ellen Greene alleges during her examination that Joan Willimott had come to her six year before and persuaded her to forsake God and take the Devil instead. When Greene agreed, Willimott gave her two spirits, one in the shape of a kitten which she called Pusse, and one in the shape of a mole which she called Hisse Hisse. The two familiars leaped on her shoulders and began sucking from her neck under her ears, the kitten on the right and the mole on the left.(Fv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv

1612   Waltham on the Wolds  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2445

Ellen Greene alleges during her examination that, immediately after receiving her familiars Hisse Hisse and Pusse from Joan Willimott, she sent them out to bewitch the baker for Goadby (Anonymous 65) and Anne Dawse to death. Pusse went to the baker, who had called Greene a witch and stricken her, and Hisse Hisse went to Dawse, who had called Greene a witch, a whore and a jade. Both died within a fortnight.(Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

1612 Goadby  Goadby  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2446

Ellen Greene alleges during her examination that, soon after receiving her familiars Pusse and Hisse Hisse six years before, she sent them to Stonesby to bewitch a husbandman named Willson and a husbandman's son named Robert Williman to death. Pusse went to Willson, and Hisse Hisse to Robert Williman; both died within ten days.(Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

1612   Stonesby / Sproxton  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England  
2447

Ellen Greene alleged during her examination that, three years before, she sent her familiars Pusse and Hisse Hisse to kill John Patchett's wife and child at Joan Willimott's behest. The child died the day after Greene touched it, while Mrs. Patchett languished for over a month before dying.(Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

1615 Stathorne    Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2449

Ellen Greene alleged during her examination that, during the last barley harvest, she had seen Joan Willimott in her home, and that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a little white dog sucking on her under the left flank.(Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

1617 Goadby  Goadby  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2450

Ellen Greene alleged during her examination that she had given her soul to the Devil in order to have Hisse Hisse and Pusse at her command, and that as part of the compact, she suffered them to suck her at the change and the full of the moon.(Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

1618, March 17     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2451

Phillip Flower is examined at the Assizes at Leicester on February 4, 1618 to give evidence against her sister Margaret Flower. Sir William Pelham and Mr. Butler are the Justices of the Peace presiding over the examination.(F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

1618, February 4     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2452

Phillip Flower alleges during her examination that her mother Joan Flower and sister Margaret Flower "maliced the Earle of Rutland, his Countesse, and their Children, because her Sister Margaret, was put out of the Ladies seruice of Laundry, and exempted from other seruices about the house." Phillip claimed that Margaret stole a glove from Henry Lord Rosse and delivered it to Joan, and that Joan rubbed the glove on her familiar Rutterkin's back, put it in boiling water, pricked it and buried it in the yard while wishing that Lord Henry "might neuer thriue." Phillip added that she often saw Rutterkin sit on Joan's shoulder and suck her neck.(F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

1618, February 4     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2453

Phillip Flower alleges during her examination that she often heard her mother Joan Flower "curse the Earle and his Lady, and therevpon would boyle feathers and blood together, vsing many Diuellish speeches and strange gestures."(F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

1618, February 4     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2454

Margaret Flower is examined on January 22, 1618. (F3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v

1618, January 22     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2455

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that four or five years before, her mother Joan Flower sent her to take Henry Lord Rosse's right hand glove. After she did so, her mother asked her to bring her another glove or personal item from Henry Lord Rosse. Margaret asked what they were for, and Joan replied they were to hurt Lord Henry with. Joan stroked her familiar Rutterkin with the glove, dipped it in hot water and pricked it; Margaret claims that Lord Henry fell sick within a week and became tormented.(F3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v

1613 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2456

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that two or three years before, she found one of Francis Lord Rosse's gloves on a dung-hill and delivered it to her mother, Joan Flower. Joan put the glove in hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bade Rutterkin to go upwards. Joan then buried the glove in the yard, and said "a mischiefe light on him, but he will mend againe."(F3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v

1615 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2457

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that she, her sister Phillip Flower and their mother Joan Flower all agreed to bewitch Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners so that they would not have any more children. Margaret claimed it was retribution for Countess Manners turning her out four years before, and for Sir Francis' refusal to take Joan's part in a dispute. To bewitch them, Joan took wool from a mattress that was included in Margaret's severance, and a pair of gloves, and put them both into warm water mixed with blood, stirring it all together. Joan then took the wool and gloves out of the mixture, rubbed them on her familiar Rutterkin's belly, and said "the Lord and the Lady should haue more Children, but it would be long first."(F3v-F4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v-F4

1614 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2458

Margaret Flower alleges during her examination that she, by her mother Joan's command, stole a handkerchief from Lady Katherine, Sir Francis Manner's daughter. Joan put the handkerchief into hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bid him to fly and go. However, "Rutterkin whined and cryed Mew: whereupon shee said, that Rutterkin had no power ouer the Lady Katherine to hurt her."(F3v-F4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3v-F4

1618, January 22 (Bever Castle)  Belvoir  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2459

Phillip Flower is examined a second time on February 25, 1618, this time before Justices of the Peace Sir Francis Manners, Francis Lord Willoughby, Sir George Manners and Sir William Pelham.(F4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v

1618, February 25     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2460

Phillip Flower confesses during her second examination, alleging that she has had a familiar spirit in the shape of a white rat for the last three or four years, and that it would suck on her left breast. She claims that when it first came to her, she promised it her soul, and in exchange it promised to "doe her good, and cause Thomas Simpson to loue her, if shee would suffer it to sucke her, which shee agreed vnto." Phillip adds that the familiar last sucked on February 23, two days before her examination.(F4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v

1618, February 25     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2461

Margaret Flower is examined a third time on February 25, 1618, this time before Justices of the Peace Sir Francis Manners, Francis Lord Willoughby, Sir George Manners and Sir William Pelham.(F4v-G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v-G

1618, February 25     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2462

Margaret Flower confesses during her examination that she has two familiar spirits. One is white and sucks under her left breast, and the other has black spots and sucks "within the inward parts of her secrets." She maintains that when they first came to her, she promised them her soul, and they "couenanted to doe all things which she commanded them."(G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

1618, February 25     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2464

Margaret Flower is examined a second time on February 4, 1818. (G-Gv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G-Gv

1618, February 4     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2465

Margaret Flower's second examination gives a slightly different version of Henry Lord Rosse's bewitchment: On this occasion, Margaret alleged that her mother, Jane Flower, commanded her to steal Lord Henry's right-hand glove, and that she found the glove on the rushes in the nursery. When she delivered the glove to her mother, Joan, she put it in hot water, pricked it with her knife, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bid him to "height and goe, and doe some hurt to Henry Lord Rosse." Joan then threw the glove onto the fire and burnt it. Margaret notes that Lord Henry fell sick and died shortly after. (G-Gv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G-Gv

1618, February 4     Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2852

John Darrell writes an apology denying that William Sommers' possession has been faked, addressed to Sir Thomas Eggerton, Keeper of the Great Seal of England, Sir John Popham, Lord Chief Justice, Sir William Periam, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer and the body of Judges of the Common Law. He claims that Sommers' possession was genuine, as was his dispossession of him.(3-4)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 3-4

1599 Ashbie de la zouche  Ashbie de la zouche  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2853

John Darrell claims that, by commission of the Archbishop of York, the depositions of 17 witnesses supporting Sommers' possession were sent to 12 notable persons near Nottingham, and that the names of 60 more witnesses willing to give deposition were taken. They allegedly witnessed Sommers' fits of bodily contortion, pinpricks in his limbs, and senselessness. They also witnessed a large black dog sniffing about his head while he was in a fit, the same black dog that supposedly spoke to Sommers and brought him a bag of gold. Darrell also lists several preachers who second his story, including George More. He adds that they have been rebuked for it, and their petitions to have the allegations and depositions circulated have been ignored.(4-5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 4-5

1599 Ashbie de la zouche  Ashbie de la zouche  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2857

John Darrell alleges that William Sommer's claims that Darrell taught him to counterfeit possession and that they met for four years prior to November 1597 are ridiculous. Darrell maintains that he never met Sommers before November 1597, and that he did not even know that Sommers was possessed until numerous persons, including the the Mayor of Nottingham, sent him letters inviting him to come dispossess Sommers. Darrell also maintains that, if Sommers did come to Ashbie, they were never there at the same time. He concludes that Sommers is lying about their prior association.(22-27)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 22-27

1599 Ashbie de la zouche  Ashbie de la zouche  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2858

John Darrell claims that, if William Sommers faked his possession, then so must have the Lancashire Seven (the Starchie children and household) and Thomas Darling. He claims that the Lancashire Seven have been proven genuine, and that though Darling is also said to have faked his possession, he exhibited strength far beyond what a boy of thirteen should. Darrell also asks how it is that Darling "should thrust his bones out of their iointes, and in againe, and presentlie after vse his armes all one," or make speeches without moving his mouth, if he was not truly possessed?(27-29)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 27-29

1599 Ashbie de la zouche  Ashbie de la zouche  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England 
2859

John Darrell provides a full account of all of the signs of possession William Sommers exhibited, as deposed by numerous people on March 20, 1597. After each sign, he lists who is on record as having witnessed it, including the article in which their deposition can be found.(35-40)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 35-40

1597, March 20 Ashbie de la zouche  Ashbie de la zouche  Leicestershire  Leicestershire  England