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53 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific oldcounty

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
69

Joan Vaughan allegedly "committed something either in spech, or gesture, so [u]nfitting, and [u]nseming the nature of woman-hood, that it displeased the most that were there present," deeply offending Mistress Belcher. Belcher struck Vaugan for the transgression, and forced her out of her company. Vaughan, enraged, replied "shee would remember this iniury, and re[v]enge it." Belcher was unimpressed, and ended the encounter by saying that Vaughan "neither seared her nor her mother: but bad her doe her worst." Vaughan is said to have reported this altercation to her mother, Agnes Brown, and they decided to take revenge on Belcher, after a wait of three or four days to avoid suspicion.(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B3

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
71

MIstress Belcher is allegedly suddenly struck with an intolerable pain in her body, which has the side effect of horribly disfiguring her face. While in pain, Belcher is heard crying out, "Heere comes Ioane Uaughan, away with Ioane Uaughan."(B3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
140

Mary/Ann Foster is examined before a Justice of the Peace and confesses to setting Joseph Weedon's barns on fire. She claims that "she lighted Touchwood, and the Devil carryed her up by the Arms to the top of the Roof, and there with her Touchwood she set fire in the Thatch." Foster also confesses to destroying Weedon's sheep.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 6-7

1674, August 22 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
187

Mary/Ann Foster allegedly mutters "You had been better let me have it, for you shall have more Mutton shortly lye upon your hands then you know what to do with" after Joseph Weedon refuses to sell her mutton for the price she offered.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 4

1674   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
188

For the next several days after Joseph Weedon refused to sell Mary/Ann Foster mutton, he allegedly finds over 30 of his sheep "in a miserable condition, with all their Leggs broken to pieces in several places" and "their Bones all shattered in their Skins." Foster is suspected in their demise.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 4

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
189

Joseph Weedon attempts to scratch Mary/Ann Foster with his fingernails, and when they prove too dull, slices her hand open with a knife. He is encouraged in this endeavour by the "general opinion, that fetching blood of the witch takes a way her power of doing any harm." (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 4-5

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
190

Joseph Weedon's hay barn catches on fire and burns to the ground on the 22nd of May following a threat from Mary/Ann Foster. The fire is almost impossible to put out. Weedon moves his family out of their home, fearing for their safety, and indeed they, and the barn, remain safe for the whole two weeks of his absence. Days later, his corn barn also catches on fire, as do his wheat crops. The fire jumps to his house, which also burns to the ground. The damages total over 300 pound, and he blames Mary/Ann Foster for his loss.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 5-6

1674, May 22   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
191

Mary/Ann Foster is apprehended in connection to the damages to Joseph Weedon's livestock and property, and a Justice of the Peace orders her examined by a Jury of Women. They find her to have "five several strange and unusual excrescencies which appeared exactly like a Sows Teats, and seemed to be usually suckt by something."(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 5

1674, August 18 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
192

Mary/Ann Foster confesses to setting Joseph Weedon's barn on fire with the help of the Devil, as well as causing his sheep to die "in that strange and miserable manner." She further boasts that she would make many more die as well as herself.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 6

1674, August 18   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
193

At her trial, Mary/Ann Foster denies being a witch while confessing to causing the destruction of Joseph Weedon's sheep and property. She is condemned to be hanged on the strength of her previous confession.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 7

1674, August 18 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
194

Mary Foster is hanged for witchcraft at the Northampton Assises on August 22, 1674. She refuses to speak a word beyond requesting her hands be untied.(Title Page, 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, Title Page, 7

1674, August Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
739

Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh allege in their depositions that they heard Anne Desborough confess to naming the brown mouse Tib, and the mouse with the white belly Jone. Tib's purpose was to hurt men, and Jone's purpose to hurt cattle. They would appear to her daily to suck blood from the places where marks had been found.(11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 11

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
751

Thomas Becke alleges in his deposition that Anne Desborough confessed to a second visitation by the brown mouse-spirit, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit with a white belly, slightly smaller than the first. The brown mouse-spirit told her that the spirits were to stay with her, and must suck her blood. Desborough agreed to allow them her blood. This visitation is not included in Joseph Coysh's account of her confession.(10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
752

Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh give deposition before Justice Nicholas Pedley alleging that they heard Anne Desborogh confess to having been visited by a mouse-spirit 30 years before, while living in Tichmarch. The mouse-spirit, which was brown and slightly larger than a real mouse, came to her while she was asleep, and nipped her on her breast to wake her. It then demanded she give it part of her soul. Desborough was terrified by this and prayed to God, which caused the mouse-spirit to leave. (10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
753

Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh give deposition alleging that Anne Desborough agreed to allow two mouse-spirits, one brown, and one with a white belly, to suck her blood and have her soul upon her death. She also agreed to forsake God and Christ. (11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 11

1616   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1027

Master Avery, hearing of Mistress Belcher's affliction, comes to see his sister and is moved by her woeful condition. While at her bedside, he allegedly hears her "cry out against Ioane Vaughan alias Varnham, and her mother," and becomes convinced that Belcher has been afflicted by witchcraft when a neighbour reports the altercation between Vaughan and Belcher. (B3-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3-B4

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1028

Master Avery allegedly decides that the only way to help his sister, Mistress Belcher, is to draw blood from Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan. He attempts to approach their home to lure them out, but is forcibly prevented from getting close by an invisible barrier. Though he tries two or three more times, he is always halted at the same spot.(B3-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3-B4

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1029

Master Avery, defeated by his inability to help Mistress Belcher, returns to his own home, only to realize that he, too, has earned the enmity of Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan. Confident that he cannot reach them, they allegedly cause him to suffer the same torments and fits as his sister. (B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1056

Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan are apprehended by Sir William Saunders and brought to Northampton Gaol.(B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1058

Master Avery and Mistress Belcher, riding home to Guilesborough in a coach after visiting Northampton Gaol, allegedly encounter a man (Anonymous 125) and a woman (Anonymous 126) riding double on a black horse. Avery sees Anonymous 125 and Anonymous 126 gesturing strangely, and is moved to cry out "That either they or their Horses should presently miscarcy." This proves prophetic, for moments later the horses drawing the carriage fell down dead. Avery rose up praising the grace and mercy of God for delivering them and not suffering foul spirits to work their mischief on men.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

1611 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1059

Master Avery's fits allegedly continue until he is standing next to the judges and Joan Vaughan was brought to him in the Northampton Castle yard. He is said to have been in the middle of a fit at the time.(B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4

1611 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1062

It is alleged that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, she was seen riding a sow with Katherine Gardiner and Joan Lucas at night to visit an old witch named Mother Rhoades. However, Mother Rhoades is said to have died while the three were en route, and cried out with her last breath that "shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."(B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B5

1611 Guilsborough  Gilsborough  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1064

Hellen Jenkenson is apprehended from her home in Thrapston by Sir Thomas Brook for allegedly bewitching a child to death and committed to Northampton Gaol. She is suspected of the child's murder due to a reputation for living an evil life, and suspicion that she had bewitched cattle and caused other mischiefs in the past.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

1611, May 11 Thrapston  Thrapston  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1065

Hellen Jenkenson is searched for witch's marks shortly before her apprehension. The search is carried out by a jury of women led by Mistress Moulsho; they allegedly find a mark, much to their amazement.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

1611, May Thrapston  Thrapston  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1066

Mary Barber is apprehended from her home in Stanwicke by Sir Thomas T[...]ham for allegedly bewitching a man to death, causing harm to cattle and other mischief. She is committed to Northampton Gaol. She is said to be rude, degenerate, licentious, malicious, envious, cruel, violent and to possess devilish desires.(D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D3

1611, May 6 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1364

Thomas Simpson claims Phillip Flower bewitched him, a bewitchment manifest in the inability to leave her and the sensation that he was marvelously altered both in mind and body since he met her. (7)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 7

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1365

Joan Flower is considered, in popular opinion, to be a witch because she looks and acts like a witch. She has fiery, hollow eyes, a strange and exotic demeanor, considerable knowledge of oaths and curses, and seems to lack the Christian faith.(7-8)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 7-8

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1366

Joan Flower, Philip Flower, and Margaret Flower are offered services from the Devil who states that, in return for their souls, that he will appear to the women in the form of a dog, rat, or cat, and do their bidding. They ratify the contract with "certaine charmes and conjurations," and "abominable kisses, and an odious sacrifice of blood."(9)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 9

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1367

Sir Francis Manners, the Earl of Rutland and his wife, the Countess of Rutland, suffer from sickness and extraordinary convulsions. These ailments are thought to be the work of accused witches Margaret Flower, Phillip Flower, and their mother, Joan Flower.(8-9)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 8-9

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1370

Joseph Weedon is advised by his neighbors to burn the sheep that have been killed, who tell him that doing so "would make the Witch come to the place, that so they might know who was the Authour of the Mischief." When he does, Mary/Ann Foster approaches the fire and demands to know what he is doing, though "it is not known or believed she had any business there or that way."(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 4-5

1673, August 22   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1483

The morning after MIstress Moulsho searched Hellen Jenkenson, Moulsho's maid (Anonymous 402) discovers that the laundry, and especially Moulsho's smock, has been "all bespotted with the pictures of Toades, Snakes, and other ougly Creatures." Anonymous 402 reported this immediately to Moulsho, who "smild, saying nothing else but this; Heere are fine Hobgoblins inded." Moulsho went directly to Jenkenson's house and threatened "that if her Linnen were not shortly clered from those foule spots, she would scratch out both her eyes." This threat proved effective - on returning home, the linen was found to be white and clean once more.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

1611, May Thrapston  Thrapston  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1548

Joseph Weeden, of the Town of Eastcoat near Fosters-Booth in Northampton Shire, refused to spare the old woman, Ann Foster, some of his mutton, no matter how much she offered him for it. Ann Foster "went away murmerring and grumbing," warning Joseph Weeden that he should have done as she asked.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 4

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1549

After Joseph Weedon draws blood using a knife from Mary/Ann Foster, her wound "wrankled and swell'd extreamly," and she returns to threaten Joseph Weedon with arrest.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 5

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1550

After drawing blood from Mary/Ann Foster and causing a swelling wound, Joseph Weedon offers Mary/Ann Foster some "twenty shillings towards her cure," which she refuses, claiming that she would punish him. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 5

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1551

While Joseph Weedon's property burns, many of his neighbours come out to help, including Mary/Ann Foster, who was observed to tell several people that "all they did was but in vain, and that do what they could, they should never be able to quench the fire," confirming among the minds of the town that Mary/Ann Foster is involved with "devilish art."(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 6

1674, May 22   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1552

Joseph Weedon's neighbours suspicions are confirmed when Mary/Ann Foster comes to Joseph Weedon's barn fire, and "thereupon laying hands on this suspected witch," carry her before the next Justice of the Peace.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 6

1674   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1560

Ann Foster is put on trial, where she at first pleads not-guilty, "but it being so evidently proved that she was the person that had committed al those things before mentioned, she then confessed," all of which she accomplished with the help of the Devil.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 7

1674 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1561

After confessing to her crimes, Mary/Ann Foster is sentenced to death. She begs forgiveness and to be burned, but the court deems that she "should be hanged at the Common place of Execution, which accordingly was performed," on the 22nd of August, 1674.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 7-8

1674, August 22 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1562

Ann Foster bewitches the farmer Joseph Weedon's horses and his other cattle.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, Cover

1674   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2388

As a small boy, Thomas Woodcock head a well in Oundle in Northamptonshire "drum like any Drum beating a March." The first he heard this, was "about the Scots coming into England." The well was at a distance from him, so Thomas Woodcock "went and put [his] Head into the Mouth of the Well, and heard it distinctly." Further, there was "no Body in the Well." The drumming allegedly lasts "several Days and Nights, so as all the Country-People came to hear it." The well was rumoured to drum "on several Changes of Times."(157)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 157

1650 Oundle    Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2389

As a full grown man, Thomas Woodcock returns to Oundle, where he lived as a boy, upon the death of King Charles II. The innkeeper tells Thomas Woodcock that "their Well had drumm'd" of its own accord, as it did when he was a child and the Scots were coming into England. The well is believed to drum "on several Changes of Times." Going to the well, Thomas Woodcok "heard, it drumm'd once since." (157)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 157

1685 Oundle    Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2666

On St. Valentine's Day, Gilbert Pickering takes the Throckmorton girls back to his home in Tichmarch. Elizabeth Throckmorton is allegedly in the throes of a fit until she gets on her horse, and her fits are absent for the entire journey. However, the moment she crosses the threshold of Pickering's home, her fits resume. They cause her to gasp, thrash and become dumb, deaf and blind. When she emerges from the fits, she claims that she was merely sleeping and not to remember anything of what transpired.(12-13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 12-13

1590, February 14   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2667

Elizabeth Throckmorton, visiting her uncle Glibert Pickering, allegedly experiences fits whenever someone prays or reads from the Bible. Her torments, screeching and sneezing last for the duration of the prayer or reading, and end when it does. When asked whether she had prayed herself, she claims that "it would not suffer her: then whether shee used to pray at home, shee answered that it would not giue her so much time." When another guest tells her to "pray to your selfe secretly in your hart and spirite, and beginning to tell her that God understoode the inward sighs and grones of the hart, as well as the lowdest cries of the mouth," she falls into the strongest torments yet.(12-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 12-14

1590, February 14   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2668

Elizabeth Throckmorton falls into a fit during dinner during which the spirit possessing her allegedly plays with her body. It causes her to put "her hand besides her meate and her meate besides her mouth, mocking her, and making her misse her mouth," preventing her from eating. It also makes her smile and laugh exceedingly, and to be sweet and cheerful despite the tormenting of her body.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 14

1590, February 15   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2669

Gilbert Pickering, recalling that the Throckmorton children would come out of their fits when taken into a churchyard, tries removing Elizabeth from his house while in throes of a fit. For three days, this causes her to come out of the fit, but it resumes as soon as she reenters the house. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 14

1590, February 15   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2670

Elizabeth Throckmorton experiences fits in which she gasps and gapes, claiming that the spirit possessing her is coming and going with her breaths; she also claps her hands to her mouth while claiming that Mother Alice Samuel is trying to force mice, cats, frogs and toads into it. At one time, she cries out "away with your mouse mother Samuel, I wil none of your mouse" and imagines that she has one in her belly.(15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 15-16

1590, February 16   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2671

Elizabeth Throckmorton experiences fits in which she allegedly sneezes violently and says "now the Witches would kill her Father, destroy both her and al her sisters." Her nose then bleeds profusely. The next morning, she remembers nothing of this.(16-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 16-17

1590, March 1   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2672

Elizabeth Throckmorton begs to go home to Warboys; along the way the company stops at a pond. She allegedly has strange fits there for three days, which she awakens out of every time she is taken to the pond's edge to the amazement of passing travelers. After the three days, she hits her head on a door and has continual fits thereafter, forcing her to remain in Titchmarsh.(17-18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 17-18

1590, March 5   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2673

Elizabeth Throckmorton's spirit allegedly becomes more active She claims to hear it lapping milk from within her belly, it causes her to thrash and throw books whenever she reads anything "good," and it answers questions posed to it by causing her to react or remain quiet. Its responses show it likes papistry and witchcraft, but despises prayer and gospel: "love you the woord of God: whereas shee was sore troubled and vexed. But love you Witchcraft? it seemed content: or love you the Bible? Againe, it shaked hir, but love you Papistry: it was quiet. Love you praiers: it raged. Love you the Masse: it was stil. Love you the Gospell? againe it heaued up hir belly: so that what good thing soever you named, it miss-liked, but whatsoever concerning the Popes paltrie, it seemed, pleased, and pacified. "(18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 18

1590, March 10   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2674

Elizabeth Throckmorton experiences fits of sickness in which she complains of pain in her heart and belly; it ends after several days only to be replaced by weeping, drowsiness and trances. Taking her outside stops bringing her out of her fits. While in a trance, she will often sew or knit, mourning if it is taken from her. During this time, she is able to read the Bible again, and has a three-day stretch in which the names of Satan, the Devil and Mother Samuel distress her.(19-22)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 19-22

1590, July 29   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2675

Elizabeth Throckmorton has fit in which she claims to see Mother Alice Samuel standing before her, wearing a white sheet and with a black child sitting on her shoulders. She is heard to say "looke where shee is, looke where shee is, away with your Childe mother Samuell I will none of your Childe, trembling every ioint, and sweating marvellously, calling upon her Uncle master Pickering and others to save her from mother Samuels Childe, and wich such lamentable speeches because no body would helpe her." When the fit ends, her teeth are set and her speech is taken from her. Though she gestures that she is hungry and thirsty, she can only drink milk through a quill.(22-23)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 22-23

1590, August 31   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2677

Elizabeth Throckmorton is carried back to Tichmarsh, allegedly "more like the Image and Shaddowe of a childe, then so in deede." She is unable to eat anything except "such melthing meats as woulde passe through a quill, onely somtimes she would take some buttered meats, very small minced, & rub it against the outside of her teeth, & so suck in the iuyce and moysture of it," and only then able to when she was carried into the field. After several days of this, Elizabeth is finally carried successfully to her father's home in Warboys. Along the way, she awakens "in very healthfull sort and merry, onely her greatest care and greife was, that shee was departed from Tichemarshe grove."(29-30)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 29-30

1590, September 3   Titchmarsh  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
2849

Mary/Ann Foster's hand becomes infected after Joseph Weedon cuts her with a knife, and she threatens to sue him for damages. Weedon gives her 20 shillings in reparation, but she is soon heard boasting that "it was the devil in her shape that received it of VVeedon, and that now she had thereby power to do him further mischief."(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 5

1674, April   Eastcote  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England