Go back
47 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific oldcounty

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
166

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) batch of bread moves overnight, seemingly of its own accord, from a table to another room, where they were "hid in Tubs and covered with linnen Cloathes." The tenant had the keys to all the doors at all times, and found the doors to all her rooms locked as she had left them overnight. A similar incident occurs with her cheeses and meat.(2)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
167

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) cattle are killed in a strange manner. Among these, are a sow that "leap'd and danc'd in several unusual postures and at last fell down dead."(3)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 3

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
168

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) stack of hay, and the building it was kept in, were set on fire. This fire is believed to be linked to other mysterious fires that start within the house.(4)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 4

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
169

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) cheese and meat allegedly move to another room of their own accord.(2)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
170

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) cabbage plants are moved by an unknown force. At night the plants are pulled up and laid down in "several formes, as Crosses, Flower-de-luces, and the like." Even upon raking the ground, no footsteps were found the following morning, but the plants had been pulled up again. Upon being replanted a third time, they were left alone.(2)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
171

A Tenant's (Anonymous 2) roasted pig is allegedly defleshed by an unknown force. Its bones are left in perfect order.(3)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 3

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
321

A tenant (Anonymous 2) leaves a bottle of vinegar in the dairy house along with the milk of six cows; in the morning she returns to find the bottle empty and the milk turned into a "perfect possett."(3)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 3

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
393

Elizabeth Wright is searched for witch's marks by Anonymous 165 and allegedly has two teats like warts behind her arm, and a large collection of marks towards the top of her shoulder which is described as "udder of an ewe." Sir Humphrey and Master Graysley examine the marks.(9-10)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 9-10

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
395

Alice Gooderigde is searched for witch's marks by Anonymous 165 and is found to have a bloody hole as big as two pence on her stomach; the searchers believe the bloody hole is a result of a wart or teat being cut off; Gooderidge claims the hole is a result of holding a knife while falling off a ladder, which caused the knife to be thrust into her stomach; the hole is not festering, and therefore the searchers do not believe her story. The marks are examined by Sir Humphrey and Master Graysley.(9)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 9

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
458

John Darrell alleges that when Alice Gooderidge sent her familiar Minny against Thomas Darling, she "streyned all hir body, & vomited," and that Darling was inflicted with the exact same torments. He adds that she "named the tyme, place, occasion, and the vvordes shee vsed, when shee sent the Deuil to vexe and torment him in his body."(29-31)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 29-31

1599 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
459

According to John Darrell, Alice Goodridge confessed to sending her familiar, Minnie, to torment and cause the possession of Thomas Darling of Burton upon Trent, whom Darrell allegedly dispossessed. Darrell uses this to counter the charges that he is himself a fraud, for "if Darling did counterfeit, then hee was not bewitched: and if he was not bewitched, then was the iudgement and execution against Alice Goodridge erroniously and wrongfullie awarded."(6-8)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 6-8

1599 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
956

Faith Corbet makes the first of many claims that medical intervention will not cure her so long as her tormentors walked free. This is also the first time Doll Bilby is implicated in Corbet's fits, and by implication, identified as a witch.(54)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54

1660 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1146

Thomas Darling suffers from sore fits and violent vomiting after being separated from his uncle, Robert Toone, in Winsell Wood; the illnesses manifest after Darling wanders home.(1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

1597, February 27 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1147

Thomas Darling claims, during his violent fits and vomiting, to see a green angel in the window, and a green cat who troubles him.(1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1148

Thomas Darlings urine is collected and taken to a physician two times in an attempt to determine what illness he has. The physician first claimed he "saw no signes of anie natural disease in the Child, vnles it were the wormes." Darling's aunt took his urine to the physician again, "who iudged as before, saying further, he doubted that the Childe was be witched."(2)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 2

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1149

Thomas Darling suffers from a violent fit, during which he falls upon his back, raises his legs stiffly up in the air, contorts his belly so it is over his head, and roars loudly. Darling then rises up, walks around on his hands and feet, and says the Lord's name.(2-3)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 2-3

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1150

Thomas Darling claims to have seen green cats during one of his violent fits. Darling would point out an invisible green cat which troubled him.(3)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 3

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1151

Thomas Darling asks his friends (Friends of Thomas Darling), who in turn ask Jesse Bee, to read scriptures in between his fits so that he may hopefully be cured.(3)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 3

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1152

Thomas Darling claims that he came across a little old woman wearing a gray gown, black fringe cape, broad hat, and who had three warts on her face. Darling angered the woman, causing her to curse him to go to hell. Darling believes this was the Witch of Stapen Hill, while others think it was Alice Gooderidge. (4)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 4

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1158

Thomas Darling is tormented by violent fits during the day and fearful dreams during the night. Darling claims that in these dreams he sometimes prays, and other times is tossed up and down on a string by a cat.(5)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 5

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1159

Thomas Darlings grandmother (Mistress Walkden) and aunt (Mistress Saunders) visit him. After hearing his story of the woman in the wood, Darling's grandmother (Mistress Walkden) claims he does not have the falling sickness, but has been bewitched by Alice Gooderidge.(5)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 5

1597, April 8 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1160

Alice Gooderidge is detained and questioned by Mistress Walkden about Thomas Darling about whether or not she has any knowledge of him. Gooderidge does not confess; she denies knowing Darling.(5)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 5

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1161

Thomas Darling scratches Alice Gooderidges face and the back of her hands to draw her blood, in hopes of curing his bewitchment. Gooderidge wipes the blood from the back of her hand on Darling while saying God help thee, to which Darling answers, thy prayer can do me no good.(5-6)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 5-6

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1162

Alice Gooderidge and her mother, Elizabeth Wright, are arrested on suspicion of witchcraft. (7)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 7

1597, April 10 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1163

Master Graysley, in an attempt to cure Thomas Darling of his violent fits, commands the boy to read from the bible. Darling begins to read the first chapter of Johns Gospel, but by verse four, he starts to have "a most cruel fit."(8)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 8

1597, April 14 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1164

Master Graysley brings Elizabeth Wright to Thomas Darling, which causes Darling to go into a violent fit. Graysley asks Wright if she can do anything for Darling and Wright answers that her daughter (Alice Gooderidge) could help. Graysley tells Wright to kneel and pray for Darling. Wright prays in a language no one can understand and is then dismissed. Darling recovers after Wright leaves.(8)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 8

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1165

Alice Gooderidge is scratched by Sir Humphrey in an attempt to cure Thomas Darling of his fits and illness.(9)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 9

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1166

Alice Gooderidges husband (Oliver Gooderidge) and daughter (Daughter Gooderidge) are examined during her trial; they are found to disagree in their tales.(10)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 10

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1167

Thomas Darling speaks with the Devil during one of his violent fits. The Devil tries to persuade Darling to worship him, but Darling says he will worship the Lord God alone. (10)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 10

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1168

Elizabeth Wright, on the rare occasion of being in town, is apprehended, stripped of her clothing to show her witches mark, and cursed for being born. Wright is also questioned about who brought her to Burton, to which she allegedly replies, the devil.(13)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 13

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1169

A stranger (Anonymous 142) visits Thomas Darling and greatly upsets him by questioning his belief in God, and by proposing that witches do not exist. Darling falls into another set of fits in the strangers presence; it is possible that the stranger is the Devil himself.(15-16)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 15-16

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1170

Master Eccarshall, the Pastor of Burton, encourages Thomas Darling to not answer the Devil when he speaks to him, because the devil is a liar and is possibly making Darling ill.(16)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 16

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1171

Jesse Bee reads from the bible and encourages Thomas Darling to fight the Devil. Although Darling has fits throughout the reading, Bee is able to finish the entire first chapter of the Gospel of John, a feat that had not been previously accomplished.(16-17)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 16-17

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1172

Widow Worthington, the good witch of Hoppers, claims that Thomas Darling has been bewitched, and that she cannot help him.(18)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 18

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1173

Alice Gooderidge is apprehended and brought to Robert Toone's home, where a Cunning man pressures her to confess to bewitching Thomas Darling. Unsuccessful at cajoling or coercion, the Cunning man puts a new pair of shoes on Gooderidge and places her near the fire so that the shoes will constrict and cause her pain, forcing her to confess.(24-25)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 24-25

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1174

Alice Gooderidge is tried for supposedly bewitching Thomas Darling. Jerome Horabin, Edward Weightman, and Mistress Caldwall are among those who come to hear Gooderidge's confession.(25)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 25

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1175

Alice Gooderidge confesses that the Devil appeared to her in the likeness of a little red and white coloured dog, which she calls Minny. Gooderidge allegedly sends Minny to seek revenge on a boy who called her a witch.(26)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 26

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1176

Alice Gooderidge claims her familiar looks like William Gregories dog, an assertion which creates the rumor that Gregories dog actually is Gooderidges familiar. However, Gooderidge claims she received her familiar from her mother (Elizabeth Wright).(27)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 27

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
1183

Alice Gooderidge confesses to Robert Toone and a Cunning man that she is sorry for confusing Thomas Darling with another boy who broke her eggs.(24-25)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 24-25

1597 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2966

A tenant (Anonymous 2) puts a heap of malt and a heap of vetches together in a room, only to find the next morning that they have mingled together and been put into a new heap.(2)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2967

A Tenant (Anonymous 2) keeps many cheeses within her cheese chamber on shelves; and a bag of hops in the same room. However, one morning, she finds that "the Cheese were all laid in the Floor in several forms," and the hops were "strewed about the Room." However, the door was found locked as it had been left at night. Sometimes, cheese was also found in the dairy house, from the trines her cows drank from.(2 )

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2968

A Tenant (Anonymous 2) leaves "several dishes of cold Meat upon a hanging Shelf" in her buttery, but finds in the morning that a tablecloth has been laid upon the floor, and dishes and silverware set upon it, with most of the meat eaten.(2 - 3)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2 - 3

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2969

In order to discover the cause of a number of mysterious occurrences within her house, a Tenant (Anonymous 2) made sure that all the rooms in her house were locked, and strewed ashes across the entrance of all the doors. However, in the morning, "no footstep or track of any thing was found," even in rooms were objects had mysteriously moved.(3)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 3

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2970

After experience a month of hauntings, possibly caused by a hag (Anonymous 485)'s "Hocus pocus Minor," some months go by without major incident, only to be ended one night when a Tenant (Anonymous 2) and her maid were going to bed, when they discovered that the hall, "dressed with green boughs, tyed on the Posts, after the Countrey fashion," was set afire, even though no fire had been made in the room for a fortnight, or any candles present. The fire was quickly put out by throwing water on it, but Anonymous 2's neighbours (Anonymous 486) come in and watch the house for the remainder of the night.(3 - 4)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 3 - 4

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2971

A Tenant (Anonymous 2) finds that "a Mow of Pulse and Pease" was set afire while she out during the day, and that all the grain either burned or was spoiled. Burnt coals were found at the bottom of the mow, which she and her neighbours conclude could only be "convey'd thither but by Witchcraft."(4)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 4

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2972

After a number of mysterious fires, a Tenant (Anonymous 2) moves out of her house, upon which occasion John Jones, "a valiant Welchman of the neighborhood," took it upon himself to sleep in the house and encounter the "Hagg" believed to be responsible for the mischief caused. John Jones takes with him "a large Baskethilted Sword, a Mastive Dog and a Lanthorn and Candle." He had not lain long, when he "heard great knocking at the Door," and suddenly, a great many cats came into the chambers and broke the windows, causing a "hideous noise." The dog howled and quacked, fearfully creeping close to his master, while the burning candle went out. The Welshman leaves the house running, protesting the next day that "he would not lye another night in the House for a hundred pounds."(4 - 5)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 4 - 5

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England 
2973

A Tenant (Anonymous 2) leaves a bowl of strawberries in a pewter dish in her buttery on a Friday night. However, upon waking, she finds both the dish and the strawberries gone, and searched all Saturday to no avail. On Monday morning, the dish appears on the foot of her bed, empty of strawberries.(5)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 5

1671 Burton upon Trent    Staffordshire  Stafford  England