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13 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific parish

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
330

Elizabeth Chandler, during her examination before Justices Robert Bernard and Nicholas Pedley, alleges that she is a victim, not a witch. She claims that she has been visited numerous times by a spirit in the night, which makes a roaring and a puffing, and leaves her sore at the bottom of her belly. Chandler adds that "she did never willingly invoke or imploy the same, but hath prayed to God to deliver her therfrom."(7-8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7-8

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
331

Joan Wallis alleges in her confession that Blackeman never lay with her, but Edward Wingfield claimed in his deposition that she had confessed differently to him. According to Wingfield, Blackeman had the use of her body as often as three times a week.(12)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12

1646, April 14   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
333

Jane Wallis is examined before Justice Robert Osborne, and confesses to having been visited six weeks before by a spirit in the shape of a man wearing black clothes. He greeted her, introduced himself as Blackeman and asked if she was poor. When she replied to the affirmative, he said he would send Grissell and Greedigut to her, to do anything she asked of them. Wallis noticed then that he had ugly feet. To her terror, he seemed to grow, then shrink, and vanished away. In his deposition, Edward Wingfield added that Blackeman appeared ancient; Wingfield claimed Wallis had confessed to him.(12)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12

1646, February   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
738

Mary Darnell alleges in her statement that, not long after her daughter's death, she made a pot of furmity and invited the neighbors over, but the pot kept boiling for an hour after she pulled it off the fire. She was unable to prevent it from boiling over, despite transferring it to numerous other bowls, tubs and vessels. Darnell heard from Lewis Carmell that Elizabeth Chandler had confessed to sending a familiar named Beelzebub to spoil the furmity.(9)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9

1645   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
746

John Browne gave deposition before Justice John Castell alleging that he had met John Clarke Jr. on the road, and that Clarke told him he was heading to Keyson because he and his parents had been accused of witchcraft. Browne told Clarke that he, too, had been accused, and that the searchers said they had found marks on him. According to Browne, Clarke claimed to have cut off his marks three days before his own searching. Clarke then became suspicious, telling Browne that he didn't believe him to be a witch as he had not seen him at any meetings. Browne said his meetings were in different places, and they parted.(13-14)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13-14

1646, May 2   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
770

Elizabeth Chandler, during her examination, denies ever striking Mary Darnell's daughter Katherine or ever sending a spirit to harm the child. She also says that Darnell's spoiled pot of furmity was not her doing.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
771

Elizabeth Chandler alleges during her examination that she had a falling out with Mary Darnell, during which Darnell turned her into a duck. She claims that her visitations from the roaring apparition began about six months later.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
772

Elizabeth Chandler, during her examination, is questioned about whether she has two imp familiars named Beelzebub and Trullibub. Chandler denies having any familiars; she claims that Beelzebub is what she calls a log of wood, and Trullibub her name for a stick.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

1646, April 7   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
778

Jane Wallis alleges in her confession that, about four days after Blackeman's initial visit, Grissell and Greedigut came to her for the first time. They had the shape of hounds wearing hog's-hair bridles, and told her that Blackeman had sent them to do whatever she bid them. She replied that she lacked nothing, but when they asked her to feed them she said she was poor and had nothing to give, at which they left. (12-13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12-13

1646, March 16   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
779

Edward Wingfield claims in his deposition that Jane Wallis confessed to him that Grissell and Greedigut came in several shapes, but mostly that of hounds with bristles on their backs. He said that they would suck on her body, and she told him that while she never sent them to do mischief, Blackeman would.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

1646   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
781

Jane Wallis alleges in her confession that Grissel and Greedigut would visit her often, and bring two or three shillings for her when they did. Edward Wingfield's deposition of her confession agreed on this detail, but added that Blackeman would be with them.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

1646, April 16   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
782

Edward Wingfield alleges in his deposition that during Jane Wallis' confession to him, she said that Grissell and Greedigut once robbed a man, pulling him from his horse to steal his money for her. He added that she often forgot their names.(13-14)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13-14

1646, April 14   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
783

John Clarke Jr. alleges during his examination by Justice John Castell that he overtook a man and three women on the road to Keyston the previous Sunday, but denied saying anything to them about cutting off witch's marks, meeting any witches or making a compact with the Devil. (13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

1646, May 2   Keiston  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England