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120 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific parish

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
146

Jane Kent is indicted at the Old Bailey for witchcraft and other diabolical arts, in which she is accused by Mr. Chamblet of allegedly bewitching his swine, wife Mrs. Chamblet, and daughter Elizabeth Chamblet. Mr. Chamblet blames Kent for Elizabeth Chamblet's death.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3-4

1682, June 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
412

Anonymous 21 of London gives birth on 16 September, 1645 to a monstrous baby that has nails coming out of its thighs, no head, and stumps for legs.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire. London: 1645, 7-8

1645, September 16 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
438

Joseph Wright is arrested and fasts for the thirty-five days of his confinement.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Miraculous Fasting of the Naked Man. Unknown: 1700, 1

1700 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
539

William Wicherely inventories his use of crystal, swords, and holy water as magical instruments.()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

1549 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
542

William Wicherely, during his examination, identifies a group of magicians and conjurers from the five hundred he claims are practicing magic in England.()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

1549 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
709

Mr. Chamblet alleges in his deposition that, shortly after he found his swine to be bewitched, his daughter Elizabeth Chamblet was also bewitched by Jane Kent; he claims she swelled all over her body and her skin became discoloured, resulting in her death.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3-4

1682, June 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
887

A groom who witnessed Ann Ashby's preternatural possession allegedly cried out 'come Rug into my mouth.' This groom died close to London under suspicious circumstances. (4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4

1652 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1032

Sir Kenelm Digby claims that the idea possession might be spread by sympathy. He presents the story of a gentlewoman whose hysteria was 'caught' by her retinue. They were healed by being separated; she was purged of ill humours.(182-183)

Appears in:
Digby, Kenelm. Of The Sympathetick Powder. A Discourse in a Solemn Assembly at Montpellier. London: 1669 , 182-183

1658 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1075

Mr. Chamblet alleges in his deposition that he had bargained with Jane Kent over two of his pigs, and that when he refused to deliver them without payment, she bewitched all of his swine.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3-4

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1076

A woman (Anonymous 128) deposes that she had searched Jane Kent, and found her to have a teat on her back and unusual holes behind her ears.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1077

A coachman (Anonymous 129) gives deposition alleging that his coach was overthrown shortly after he refused to carry Jane Kent and her goods.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1078

Jane Kent provides evidence that she is honest, a great pains-taker and a regular Church-goer, on the strength of which the Jury finds her not guilty.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

1682 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1122

Rachel Pinder and Agnes Brigges are determined to have faked vomiting pins, straws, old "clout" and other bodies.()

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574,

1574 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1134

Elizabeth Jennings accuses Margaret Russell (alias Countess, and potentially Anonymous 139), Jane Flower, Katherine Stubbs, and Nan Wood of bewitching her. She calls for the Countess' imprisonment. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

1622, April 23 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1137

Elizabeth Jennings, suffering from severe fits, convulsions, palsy, and memory loss, is treated by unnamed physicians, but the "medicines rather producing contrary effects," continued suffering. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

1622, March 17 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1415

Thomas Addy claims that physicians must be inculcated in the production of witch beliefs, because when faced by their inability to diagnose a natural cause of illness, they are willing to accept the patient's belief that it might be witchcraft causing their (or their livestock's) disease.(114-115)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114-115

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1416

Thomas Addy accuses 'ignorant' physicians of diagnosing natural disease as bewitchment, making sick children into demoniacs.(169)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 169

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1453

Thomas Addy, author of "A Perfect Discovery of Witches," claims that there Verrucae pensiles, called "Biggs, or Teats," Thymion (Thymic Tumors), called the devil's bigges, Tonsillae, (tonsils), like "little Biggs," and "black and blew,"spots, called "Fairy-nips" have all been identified as witch's marks by "ignorant" witch-searcher and witch-mongers. (128-129)

Appears in:
Addy, Thomas. A Perfect Discovery of Witches. London: 1661, 128-129

1661 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1475

Lord Francis Grant Cullen, author of Sadducimus Debellatus: or, a True Narrative of the Sorceries and Witchcrafts, asserts that the devil has altered his form over time to suit his varying purposes, stating that In the darkness of Popery he was transformed into a more innocent sort of Spirit called Brownie or Fairy. (2)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 2

1698 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1480

Thomas Addy, author of A Perfect Discovery of Witches, claims that a witch can go invisible by the help of the devil, especially if one of the Ladies of the Fairie will but lend her Giges invisible ring. (111)

Appears in:
Addy, Thomas. A Perfect Discovery of Witches. London: 1661, 111

1661 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1482

Daniel, a speaker in George Giffords A Dialogue Concerning Witches, claims that if a person is haunted with a fayrie, or a spirit: he must learne a charme compounded of some straunge speaches, and the names of God intermingled to combat such forces.(38)

Appears in:
Gifford, George. A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcraftes. London: 1593, 38

1593 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1506

Thomas Addy, in _A Candle in The Dark_ (1655) claims that an old woman (Anonymous 228) taught her neighbor the following charm when the butter would not churn: Come butter come, come butter come, Peter stands at the gate, waiting for a butterd cake, Come butter come. The same charm also appears in George Sinclair's _Satan's Invisible World Discovered_ (1685).(59)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 59

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1553

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that wizards and witches will often meet in a place and time appointed with the Devil, who "appears to them in humane shape." During these meetings the Devil will ask "if the party will renounce the Christian Faith, the Sacraments, and tread upon the Cross," after which the Devil gives "his hand, adding moreover, that this is not alone sufficient, but that he will have an homage also."(2)

Appears in:
Covent of Eluthery, Pen neer the. A Pleasant Treatise of Witches . London: 1673, 2

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1554

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that "In the Year 1553. two Witches stoe a Child from her neighbour, kild it, cut it in peices, and put it into a Kittle to boil, when the sorrowful Mother looking for her infant, came by chance into the house, and found the limbs thereof horribly consumed."(3-4)

Appears in:
Covent of Eluthery, Pen neer the. A Pleasant Treatise of Witches . London: 1673, 3-4

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1595

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that all witches and wizards have "a Spirit or Imp attending on, and assigned to them, which never leave those to whom they are subject, but assist and render them all the service they command."(4-5)

Appears in:
Covent of Eluthery, Pen neer the. A Pleasant Treatise of Witches . London: 1673, 4-5

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1596

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that witches have appointments and meetings with other witches "which are ordinarily on Tuesday or Wednesday night." Before these meetings, the witches "strip themselves naked, and anoint themselves with their Oyntments. Then are they carryed out of the house, either by the Window, Door, or Chimney, mounted on their Imps in the form of a Goat, Sheep, or Dragon." Once at the meeting the witches "make their accustomed homage, Adoring, and Proclaiming" to Lucifer who "takes his place in his Throne as King."(4-5)

Appears in:
Covent of Eluthery, Pen neer the. A Pleasant Treatise of Witches . London: 1673, 4-5

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1597

Pen neer the Covent of Eluthery, author of "A Pleasant Treatise of Witches," claims that when witches and wizards gather together "the pleasant consort [the Devil] invites them to a Ball; but the dance is strange, and wonderful, as well as diabolical, for turning themselves back to back; they take one another by the arms and raise each other from the ground, then shake their heads to a fro like Anticks, & turn themselves as if they were mad." Following this, "the Incubus's in the shap[e]s of proper men satisfy the desires of the Witches, and the Succubus's serve for whores to the WIzards." (5-6)

Appears in:
Covent of Eluthery, Pen neer the. A Pleasant Treatise of Witches . London: 1673, 5-6

1673 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1607

Samuel, a speaker in George Gifford's "A DIalogue Concerning Witches," claims that his neighbour's wife (Anonymous 250) was much troubled because "she was haunted with a fairy."(4)

Appears in:
Gifford, George. A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcraftes. London: 1593, 4

1593 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1623

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, confesses to being able to "invocate the spirite into the cristalle glasse assone as any man, but he cannot bynde the spirit so sure as other from their lyinge lyes."(333)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 333

1549 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1626

William Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "Thomas Malfrey of Goldstone besides Yarmouth, [and] a woman [Anonymous 257] besides Stoke Clare, whose name [he] knoweth not, are skryers of the glasse [divination tools]."(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1631

WIlliam Whycherly, during his examination by Sir Thomas Smith, claims that "Christopher Morgan, a plaisterer, and his wife (Mrs. Morgan), dwelling in Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane, occupieth the syve and sheeres also."(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1743

James Mason, author of "The Anatomy of Sorcery," claims that "By the turning of a sieue [sieve; a tool used in divination]," one may determine who the culprit behind a bewitchment is. (91)

Appears in:
Mason, James. The Anatomy of Sorcery. London: 1612, 91

1612 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1928

Agnes Brigges confesses at her examination by Roger Dogeson, James Style, a minister, and John Kent Percer to having "faigned and counterfelt" her possession, during which time a black silk thread, a feather, hair, a crooked pin, and two nails were pulled out of her mouth, all of which she placed there at diverse times. She performed all of this so "that no body was priuie to her doings, but herselfe."(12-14)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 12-14

1574 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1977

William Sommers is brought to London, where he continues to allege that his first possession was a fake, and accuses John Darrell of hiring him to do it. He says that he has known Darrell for four years, and that Darrell first hired him to counterfeit possession in Ashbie Park. Sommers alleges that Darrell instructed him on how to act during his dispossession. Darrell denies these accusations, but Sommers has become a man of great credit and is believed over Darrell. During his time in London, Sommers is kept first in the custody of a barber of East Smithfield, and then in the home of the Bishop of London.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 7

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1978

John Darrell is held prisoner for a week in London, then convented at Lambeth, for allegedly having William Sommers counterfeit possession. He is held on the strength of there being many known counterfeited possessions, and for Sommers' own insistence that his possession was not real. There are, however, doubts regarding Sommers' possession, as the depositions against him claim that he had done things that could not be faked.(Image 7-8)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 7-8

1597 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2171

Mr. Chamblet alleges in his deposition that Jane Kent also bewitched Mrs. Chamblet, and that after their daughter Elizabeth Chamblet died, he consulted with Dr. Ha[w]ks in Spittle-Field on the matter; Dr. Hawkes advised Mr. Chamblet to boil a quart of Mrs. Chamblet's urine with parings from her nails and some of her hair.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

1682, June 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2172

Mr. Chamblet alleges in his deposition that, as advised by Dr. Ha[w]ks, he boiled a quart of Mrs. Chamblet's urine with parings from her nails and some of her hair in a pipkin; he claims that while doing so, he heard Jane Kent screaming as if being murdered outside his door, and that the next day she was seen to be swollen and bloated.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

1682, June 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2386

Dr. Lamb, allegedly a conjurer who was eventually "killed by the Mob," invites Sir Miles Sands and Mr. Barbor to a "Mornings Draught at his House." There, he told them "if they would hold their Tongues and their Hands from medling with any thing," he would demonstrate "some sport." Drawing on his "Practice," Dr. Lamb makes a tree spring up "in the middle of the Room," and "soon after appeared three little Fellows, with Axes on their Shoulders, and Baskets in their Hands, who presently fell to work, cut down the Tree, and carried all away."(155-156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 155-156

1640 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2387

Having visited Dr. Lamb, a conjurer, in the morning, and witnessed a tree spring up in a room inddors as well as "three little Fellows, with Axes on their Shoulders, and Baskets in their Hands, who presently fell to work, cut down the Tree, and carried all away," Mr. Barbor observes a wood chip from the tree fall onto his velvet coat, and "he flips it into his Pocket," despite promising he would not be "medling with any thing." Returning to his house that night, "when he and his Family were in Bed, and asleep, all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered," waking the entire household so they were "affright." Mr. Barbor's wife told Mr. Barbor, "you told me you was at Dr. Lamb's this Day, and I fear you medled with something." Mr. Barbor tells her about the wood chip in his pocket, upon which Mrs. Barbor exclaimed, "I pray you [...] fling it out, or we shall have no Quiet." Mr. Barbor throws the chip away, and "all the VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," allowing the household to go back to sleep.(156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

1640 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2577

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from an unknown affliction "for the space of almost 8. monthes." Upon being examined by two physicians from the College, who applied "their utmost skill vppon her with their phisicall receiptes, (yea, with some practises beyond good artt) for the space of 9. or 10. weekes," determined that her "affliction did exceed both arte and nature." However, "two other learned and christian, professours likewise of phisicke," determined her affliction to be natural causing the "acquittinge of the Witch" Elizabeth Jackson, creating a "weightie controversies" amongst all involved with Mary Glover, as to whether or not her affliction was caused by possession or a disease known as "the suffocation of the mother," as suggested by one of the physicians, Edward Jorden, who published an article because of Mary Glover's case detailing how rare possessions are "now adayes" and how easy it is to mistake the suffocation of the mother for a possession, since many of the symptoms and cures such as prayer and fasting are similar. Mary Glover's case becomes quite controversial, and a symbol of the controversy between doctors of physick who believe her symptoms can be explained with "natural" causes, and doctors of divinity who believe her symptoms are caused by "supernatural" causes, including possession and bewitchment.(3-5)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 3-5

1603 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2609

After her alleged dispossession, a fourteen year old girl from London, Mary Glover's "bellye was fallen and become as lanke as it was 12 monthes before." This could also be evidence of healing from the "disease of the Mother." Mary Glover further exemplifies signs of healing, as she can drink and eat again.(52)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 52

1602, December London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2617

After the dispossession of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London who allegedly suffered from fits caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson; the student of divinity John Swan inquires "whether she did see any thinge departe from her." Mary Glover denies seeing anything, but admits that she did "feel somewhat depart," and as soon as this unknown being departed, she "felt such a freedome of all the powers and faculties of soule and body." This release brings her intense joy. (56-57)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 56-57

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2618

The student of divinity, John Swan, reflects on the case of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London who allegedly suffered fits caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson, and the manner of her release from these fits. John Swan admits that "whether Mary Glouer were possessed or dispossessed, I will not maintaine." He admits that understanding the difference between the signs of possession and of simple affliction is hard to say. Further, John Swan reflects that God may use extraordinary punishment as well as ordinary, including sickness. However, it is notable that physicians that suspect witchery "will not meddle." In such cases, it is important to call upon God. John Swan concludes that "Mary Glouer was vexed by Sathan, by the meanes of a witch." He is supported by the jury and judges of the case.(57-58)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 57-58

1603 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2620

Two days after her alleged dispossession, Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, is visited by a number of preachers and members of the company witness to her dispossession (Anonymous 437). She is visited for it was told that "she was relapsed into her former estat," which was proved false. On her walk home from supper, however, John Swan, a student of divinity, observes her to sit down and rest on a bench, saying, "O Lord, how is my strength abated: I could once rune nimblie vp and down our stayres. and being sent to markett, I could lugge home lustielye an heavie burthen without wearines." John Swan believes that it was not rest or "slouthfulnes" that caused Mary Glover's grief, which Dr. Edward Jorden claims it to be, and thus, symptoms of the disease of "the suffocation of the Moother."(62 - 63)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 62 - 63

1602, December 18 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2621

The reputation of the parents of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, is restored when Mary Glover is able to return home after her alleged dispossession. The events of Mary Glover's dispossession "pleased God to cleare their innocencie, both by open triall in face of Courte, and stretchinge as it were his owne hand from heaven."(65)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 65

1603 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2622

John Swan, a student of divinity, admits that upon publication of the exorcism performed by several preachers on Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, allegedly suffering from an affliction caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson, several conflicting opinions may emerge. Some physicians may believe it is caused by natural causes such as the disease "the suffocation of the mother," others that "it is either diabolicall, or at least supernaturall." Many doctors can account that Mary Glover's case was not counterfeit, including "a worthy Magistrate who had tryed her with fire." John Swan alleges that some men claim "there were no Witches at all" which he akins to claiming there is no Devil. These men provide evidence in the form of, for example, the impossibility of Noah's Ark; John Swan attests that such claims is to question the Apostles themselves. Mary Glover's case is demonstrated as an intense debate between religious and natural causes.(67)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 67

1603 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2624

At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman from London accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, allegedly causing the girl a number of violent fits, one Doctor Bancroft, at the time, the Lord Bishop of London, came forth, and informed the judge, Judge Anderson, who was at the time also Lord Chiefe Justice that Elizabeth Jackson was innocent, and that Mary Glover "did counterfeit." This prompts Judge Anderson to give order to Sir John Crooke, the Recorder of London, to "make triall of them in his Chamber at the Temple." This turn of events is significant, for it demonstrates the court's willingness to consider natural causes as well as supernatural in the case.(12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

1603 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2625

In order to test whether or not the fourteen year old girl from London, Mary Glover, counterfeit her bewitchment allegedly caused by Elizabeth Jackson, the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, arranged for Elizabeth Jackson to meet with Mary Glover in secret. Elizabeth Jackson arrived an hour after several neighbours (Anonymous 439), Mary Glover's mother, and Mary Glover herself arrived. At first keeping the two parties apart, Sir John Crook warns Mary Glover not to be "a false Accuser of any body." Following this, Elizabeth Jackson came disguised, "like a Countrey market-woman," her face hidden and her clothes soiled. When Mary Glover was brought before a woman (Anonymous 460) disguised as Elizabeth Jackson, she had no reaction, and Sir John Crook assures the girl that it was only her fear that had been the "cause of her harmes." However, as soon as Mary Glover touched the real Elizabeth Jackson in disguise, she "suddenly fell downe backwards on the floore, with her eyes pluckt into her, her tongue pluckt into her throat, her mouth drawn up to her eare, her bodie stiffe and sencelesse, her lipps being shut close." These symptoms were all associated with possession. Further, an "audible loud voice" came from Mary Glover's nostrils, seemingly saying "hang her, hang her." This voice could not have come from Mary Glover's mouth, as "her lips were closed shut."(12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

1602, October 18 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2626

The Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, tests Mary Glover during a fit allegedly brought on by being in the presence of the woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Mary Glover is in a fit, when to test the authenticity of her fit, the Recorder "called for a candle and a sheete of paper," and lit the piece of paper on fire. Sir John Crook then applied the paper to her hand, following up with a second, third, fourth, and fifth piece. Mary Glover's hand blistered, until the blisters broke, and "water came out." However, Mary Glover still lay "sencelesse" with the voice coming out her nostrils saying, "hang her, hang her." This seems to be evidence that Mary Glover is not counterfeiting her fits.(12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2627

The Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, verifies the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover's fit allegedly brought on by the presence of the woman Elizabeth Jackson, through a second test, following a burning. During this second test, Sir John Crook heats up a "long pinne" over a candle until it is very hot, and "thrust the head of it into her nostrills," to see if it would make her sneeze, wink, "drawe togeather her eyebrowes, or liddes, or make any semblant of feeling." However, Mary Glover "lay still as one dead and sencelesse," suggesting for a second time that Mary Glover is not counterfeiting her fits.(12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

1602, October 18 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2628

The minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, informs the Recorder of London, sir John Crook, during the examination of Mary Glover, that he had often prayed with Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of causing Mary Glover's fits. However, whenever he concluded his prayers with the Lords Prayer, Elizabeth Jackson was unable to utter the line "but deliver us from evill," and if she ever managed to say it, Mary Glover "was tost up, and shaken, as if a mastive dogge should take a little curre into his mouth." Upon hearing this, Sir John Crook bids Elizabeth Jackson to say the Lords Prayer, which she did, skipping over the line "but deliver us from evil." Upon reciting the Apostle's Creed, Elizabeth Jackson further refuses to say "Jesus Christ is our Lord." This seems proof that Elizabeth Jackson may be affiliated with the devil, and a witch. (12 - 13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12 - 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2629

The minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, informs the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, during the examination of the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, who allegedly suffers from fits caused by the woman Elizabeth Jackson, that during a fit, Mary Glover had been known to be "tost and throwne" towards Elizabeth Jackson if she layd a hand on the girl. Sir John Crook bids Mary Glover to be laid down on a bed, and cloths to be laid on top of her, most notably her head so that she should neither hear nor see her surroundings. He asked the female witnesses (Anonymous 439) present to stand around the bed, and Elizabeth Jackson to stand among them, and for each of them to lay a hand on Mary Glover softly one by one. Mary Glover at first "did not stirre," until Elizabeth Jackson lays her hand on Mary Glover, causing "all the cloathes to be throwne off, and the maid tost towards here." This seems to confirm that Elizabeth Jackson is a witch, and Mary Glover's fits are authentic.(13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2630

The Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, having examined the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, accused of counterfeiting fits allegedly caused by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson, believes that Elizabeth Jackson is a witch. He tells Elizabeth Jackson, "Lord have mercy on thee woman," and sends her to Newgate prison. As soon as the witch is taken from the room where the examination of Mary Glover is taking place, Mary Glover comes out of a fit, and the voice that came from her nostrils crying "hang her, hang her" ceased. Mary Glover and her mother depart after this verdict.(13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2631

A month after the trial and condemnation of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, with a number of violent fits, Mary Glover continues to have fits every second day of the week. These fits are "most strange and fearefull." Upon hearing this, Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, calls for an exorcism, as he "did blame me (Mr. Lewis Hughes) and all the Ministers of London [...] that we might all be of us be ashamed, to see a child of God in the clawes of Sathan." The dispossession of Mary Glover is to be achieved through "fasting and prayer."(13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 13

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2633

The day after the alleged dispossession of Mary Glover, the minister Mr. Lewis Hughes goes to the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, and informs him of the events that transpired during the girl's dispossession. Sir John Crook advises Mr. Lewis Hughes to deliver his story to the Bishop, Dr. Bancroft, who accused Mary Glover of counterfeit. Upon doing so, Mr. Lewis Hughes is granted no audience, and called "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. He is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers." The witnesses to Mary Glover's dispossession (Anonymous 437) are also slandered, and named "a rout, rable, and swarme of giddy, idle, lunatick, illuminate, holy spectators, of both sexes." This furthers the controversy around Mary Glover's case as caused by natural or unnatural means.(14-15)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 14-15

1602, December 17 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2702

A fourteen year old girl from London, Mary Glover, who is described as a girl of "good and upright steete of health," was sent on her mother on April 26, 1602, on an errand to see the "old Charewoman," Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson holds a grudge against Mary Glover, "for discovering to one of her Mistresses a certaine fashion of her subtile and importunat begging." When Mary Glover enters Elizabeth Jackson's house, she is locked in, and Elizabeth Jackson tells her accusatorily, "It had byn better that you had never medled with my daughters apparrell." Mary Glover was then delivered many threates and curses, followed by Elizabeth Jackson's "wishing an evill death to light upon her." This lasts for an hour, before Mary Glover is allowed to leave. Elizabeth Jackson leaves her with one departing threat: "My daughter shall have clothes when thou art dead and rotten."(Fol 3r - Fol 3v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol 3r - Fol 3v

1602, April 26 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2704

After leaving the house of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, who had uttered threats against the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, the young Mary Glover "felt her selfe evill at ease." She stops at the house of a neighbour, a servant named Elizabeth Burges, who immediately perceives that Mary Glover is ill as her "contenance and colour had much altered."(Fol. 3v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3v

1602, April 26 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2705

Upon hearing Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, complain of feeling ill to a neighbour, Elizabeth Burges, the old woman Elizabeth Jackson, who had previously cursed Mary Glover, immediately runs over to Elizabeth Burges house on the girl's departure. She tells Elizabeth Burges that "I have ratled up one of the Gossips that medled with my daughters apparrell, and I hope an evill death will come unto her." This is the second threat Elizabeth Jackson utters against Mary Glover, and the first in front of a witness.(Fol 3v.)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol 3v.

1602, April 26 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2707

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, returns home after visiting Elizabeth Jackson, who curses and threatens her. Upon returning home, Mary Glover "languished as in a Newtrall estate untill Monday following in the afternoone."(Fol. 3v - Fol. 4r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3v - Fol. 4r

1602, April 26 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2709

Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman who threatened and cursed the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, visits the house of Mary Glover on April 29, 1602. There, Mary Glover is "eating of a possit," when Elizabeth Jackson visits, asking for Mary Glover's mother. When Mary Glover informs the old woman that her mother was not home, Elizabeth Jackson flies into a rage, and "snappishly replied, that she must speake with her," and departed. Mary Glover returns to eating her possit, but finds she is not able to have any more as her throat was swollen and "locked up." (Fol. 4r )

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 4r

1602, April 29 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2710

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from fits for the space of eighteen days after being visited by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Her fits occur three or four times a day, and the girl is unable to eat or drink more than a spoonful. However, at the end of these eighteen days, "she was nothing impayred neither in flesh nor strength."(Fol. 4v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 4v

1602, April London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2711

The young girl, Mary Glover, suffers from daily fits after being visited and threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. The Wednesday after first falling ill, her fits are so violent, that it is feared she will die. Her parents "caused the bell to be touled for her." Upon hearing the bells, Elizabeth Jackson visited her neighbour Elizabeth Burges, and tells her, "I thanck my God he hath heard my prayer, and stopped the mouth and tyed the tongue of one of myne enemies." She repeats this sentiment at the house of Alderman Glover, Mary Glover's uncle, and at another house, adding, "The vengeance of God on her, and on all the generation of them. I hope the Devill will stop her mouth." These threats cause unease amongst those who hear them.(Fol. 4v - Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 4v - Fol. 5r

1602, May 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2712

The mother of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London suffering fits brought on after being threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, hears rumours of Elizabeth Jackson's continued threats against her daughter. She goes to confront Elizabeth Jackson, who denied everything, "yet could not forbeare but speake these wordes to her face; You have not crosses ynow, but I hope you shall have as many crosses, as ever fell upon woman and Children."(Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2713

During eighteen days of violent fits brought on after being threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, the young fourteen year old girl Mary Glover is attended by "Doctor Shereman and a Chirurgeon (Anonymous 442)." They diagnose the girl with squinacy, but nothing seemed to help the girl, save "thrusting som finger, or instrument lowe into her throte."(Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

1602, April London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2818

Elizabeth Jackson sends an orange to the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, whom has mysteriously suffered from fits after being threatened by Elizabeth Jackson. This seems to be a gift "of kindenes," causing Mary Glover to keep the orange with her for the length of a day, smelling it often. However, at the end of the day, the "same hand, arme and whole side," which Mary Glover held the orange with were "deprived of feeling and moving in all her long fitts, and not before."(Fol. 5r - Fol. 5v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r - Fol. 5v

1602, May London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2819

After experiencing mysterious fits upon being threatened by Elizabeth Jackson for some eighteen days, the fourteen year old girl from London, Mary Glover, was much recovered and could swallow. She was able to eat during this time, however, "her belly was swelled and shewed in it, and in the brest, certaine movings." These symptoms manifested during the day, along with "fitts of dumnes, blyndnes and deformed swelling of the throte." Although these symptoms are also present from the disease the suffocation of the mother, Doctor Shereman suspects some "supernaturall cause to be present." However, the doctor attempts to cure Mary Glover as if she suffered from hysteria, "but all being prooved in vaine." He declares that Mary Glover suffers from some supernatural affliction. However, her parents decide to bring in another doctor to examine the girl for the next three months, Doctor Mounford, who also proves unable to identify her malady, although he divides opinion of her disease by maintaining it is a natural affliction.(Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r

1602, May London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2820

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from fits during some six weeks after being threatened by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson. At this time, she is visited by Elizabeth Jackson while eating a "new wheaten lofe," who looks earnestly upon Mary Glover, but says nothing. After she departs, the bread Mary Glover was chewing fell out of her mouth, and she fell off the stool she sat upon, in a "grievous fitt." After this time, Mary Glover suffers from fits every time she tried eat, and on every other day at a set hour when she went to bed. This continues until her deliverance.(Fol. 6r - Fol. 6v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 6r - Fol. 6v

1602, June London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2821

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, visits a church in the next parish on a Sunday after she began to experience fits upon being threatened by the woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson is present at this sermon, and stares openly at Mary Glover. Because of this, Mary Glover "feeling her selfe amisse," is brought home, where she falls into a fit, "which was through repeticons of the witches view, increased both in strength and in strangenes dayly."(Fol. 6v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 6v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2822

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, experiences severe fits after being stared at by the old woman, Elizabeth Jenkins in church. During these fits, "she was turned rounde as a whoope, with her head backward to her hippes," and she tossed around in this position. Further, Mary Glover was "all over colde and stiffe as a frozen thing." At times, he head is between her legs as she tumbles around. Between fits, Mary Glover's mouth is open exceedingly wide at times, "during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon her mother, her sister, and Mistress Lumas, these women's faces are swollen and blistered for many days, as well as her mother's arm when she breathes upon it. Mary Glover attempts to hold her breath because of this, which gives her parents some hope that she will be delivered. There seems to be only "som extradordinary and unlawfull meanes which a Phisition in those times used," in order to cure her, but nothing natural. (Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2823

The fourteen year girl from London, Mary Glover, suffers from a number of unnatural fits after being threatened by Elizabeth Jackson. Her parents seek to keep her affliction secret, telling none but some neighbours of their daughter's sickness. In spirit of this, one day, Mary Glover's mother takes her into the city, where they accidentally meet Elizabeth Jackson. Mary Glover is so troubled after seeing Elizabeth Jackson, that she much "retorne speedelie home," and so finish their journey early. At home, Mary Glover suffers from a fit, worse than her usual by double.(Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 8r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2824

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from a new set of fits "with many uncouth novelties, and strange Caracters, of a newe stamp," after running into Elizabeth Jackson in the city of London. During these fits, which occur on every second day, Mary Glover would suddenly become ill around three in the afternoon. Upon lying down, "there apeared in her brest a notable hearing or rising," and her body would suddenly thrash about the room. Her neck appeared to be stretched longer than usual, and her eyes were turned "upward in her head." At times, it appeared she played an invisible instrument with her fingers, while her mouth made "strange antique forms," and strange noises such as "tesh" would come out of her. If prayers were said for her during her fits, when reaching the line, "Deliver us from evill," her body would be thrown across the bed she was lying on. Often, her body would fit into strange contortions as well. Her fits would last until six in the evening.(Fol. 8r - Fol. 10r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 8r - Fol. 10r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2826

A fourteen year old girl allegedly suffering from fits caused by an old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, goes to her uncle's house, Sheriff Glover, where is brought face to face with Elizabeth Jackson on a day she is not expecting a fit. "Before she could speak six works," Mary Glover enters a fit far more severe than her previous ones. After this incident, Mary Glover suffers from two kinds of fits: an ordinary fit which came every other day (which is a "strengthened and lengthened" fit compared to what she had experienced before); and extraordinary fits, which occur when Mary Glover encounters Elizabeth Jackson.(Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2828

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from a series of "ordinary" fits, in that they either regularly occur every second day in a fixed pattern, once in the afternoon and once when she goes to sleep; or whenever she tries to eat. These "ordinary" fits began around noon, and consisted of Mary Glover's eyes rolling up to the top of her head, the clenching of her jaw, and the loss of sense in her left leg. Her body also is prone to thrashing around without order. Mary Glover claims that while she cannot speak during these fits, "her understanding, togeather with her hearing, remained." Her belly would also swell "great as a football," and it would seem that an unknown presence moved about her body from her belly through her breast and unto her throat, causing her great pain. Mary Glover would also often gain large strength, so that several men were required to hold her down. At times, Mary Glover would also cry out. During her ordinary fits, Mary Glover also experiences several "intermissions of scarce halfe an hower," when her fits died down. These ordinary fits rejuvenate when Mary Glover begins to cry, and her body would contort. When these new, violent fits seized her, Mary Glover claimed to have no memory of them. Often, Mary Glover would also utter prayers, including at the end of her fitts, when she would say, "O Lord I geve thee thankes, that thow hast delivered me, this tyme, and many moe; I beseech thee (good Lord) deliver me for ever." After prayers, Mary Glover was often seized by a new set of fits, with similar symptoms to the former. Mary Glover's ordinary fits lasted until "twelve of the Clocke at midnight," including fits she experienced upon going to sleep, or whenever she "receaved nourishment, night or day." (Fol. 13r - Fol. 15r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 13r - Fol. 15r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2860

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, suffers from a number of "extraordinary" fits whenever in the presence of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. These fits are outside of her "ordinary" fits, which occur every second day for twelve hours, and whenever she tries to take sustenance. Mary Glover "extraordinary" fits began with her "seene dying away, by degrees, untill she became deprived, both of inward and outward senses." Her eyes would shut, her jaw clenched, and her body rigid. Until Elizabeth Jackson leaves, Mary Glover is fixed in this position. However, should Elizabeth Jackson approach or touch the girl, Mary Glover's body would "rise up in the middle, rebounding wise turne over," and violently thrust itself towards the old woman. At this time, a voice could be heard coming through Mary Glover's nostrils, saying "Hang her." This would repeat, until Elizabeth Jackson departed. Should Elizabeth Jackson approach Mary Glover during one of her ordinary fits, Mary Glover's fit would alter and become "extraordinary," as "all motions in the belly and breast cease, all returnes of her pangs geve over, her understanding depart, and all outward feeling be abolished." The return of the voice from Mary Glover's nostrils, saying, "Hang her," would also occur. As soon as Elizabeth Jackson removes herself from the presence of Mary Glover, the young girl recovers. (Fol. 24v - Fol. 26v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 24v - Fol. 26v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2861

Mary Glover experiences a fit of the "extraordinary" kind, at her uncle the Sheriff Glover's house. The fourteen year old girl is brought with Elizabeth Jackson, who is suspected of bewitching the young girl, to the sheriff's house on one of Mary Glover's fit days. Before Mary Glover "had spoken six wordes," she fell into a fit. Mary Glover exhibits no fear of Elizabeth Jackson, desiring to be brought face to face with the old woman, and claims after that "Goodwife Jackson had hurt her." During her fit, a voice is heard to come from Mary Glover, saying, "hang her, or hong her," which persisted "all the whyle Elizabeth Jackeson remayned in the house with her."(Fol. 26v - Fol. 27r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 26v - Fol. 27r

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2862

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, experiences an "extraordinary" fit, at the house of Sir John Harte. Mary Glover allegedly suffers from fits which began after being threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Sir John Harte has Elizabeth Jackson brought into his house while Mary Glover visits him, and the girl was "imediatly taken with one of these fitts." While the girl is lying senseless, Elizabeth Jackson touches her, and Mary Glover is "cast (very strangely) upon her," and this repeats itself from any side of the bed Elizabeth Jackson touches her from. (Fol. 27r - Fol. 27v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27r - Fol. 27v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2863

Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London who allegedly suffers from fits after the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, suffers from an "extraordinary" fit at the house of Lady Brunckard, at a time when a fit was not expected. This fit was witnessed by "many Divines and Phisitions." (Anonymous 463) During her fit, Mary Glover was cast "with great violence, towardes Elizabeth Jackson, when she touched her, and towards her only." Elizabeth Jackson is taken by fear and suffers from "gastely lookes, panting breathing, choaking speech, and fearfull tremblinge." However, the witnesses present believe this simply to be "impudent lyinge," and "nothing els but notes of a ruyned conscience." This was one of several "shows" that occurred surrounding the witnessing of the fits of Mary Glover. (Fol. 27v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2864

During the verification of the authenticity of Mary Glover's fits, the fourteen year old girl falls into a fit in the presence of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson during a trial set by the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook. After testing Mary Glover, by burning the inside of her hand during the fit, Mary Glover does not react, and Sir John Crook "proved the fyre upon the Witches hand," who cried out and asked the Recorder not to burn her. Sir John Crook demans, "Why cannot you as well beare it as she, Who as you say doth but counterfett?" At that time, Elizabeth Jackson retracts her accusation that Mary Glover counterfeit her fits, saying, "Oh no, God knowes she doth not Counterfett."(Fol. 29r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 29r

1602, October 18 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2880

It is decided after the examination Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, performed on both Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl suffering from mysterious fits, and Elizabeth Jackson, the old woman allegedly responsible for these fits, that "feare was the not the cause of this Mary Glover's strange affliction," and that Mary Glover "did not counterfett her misery." He is also convinced she is bewitched. (Fol. 29v - Fol. 30r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 29v - Fol. 30r

1602, October 18 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2885

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman allegedly responsible for causing a young fourteen year old girl to experience fits after threatening her, Mary Glover is brought forward to give evidence on a day she was not expected to have a fit "of the horrible cryme of Witchcraft." The girl was placed facing the bench (Anonymous 450), where she could not see "the old woman who was among the Prisoners in the docke," when she "felt a commanding power seaze upon her." This causes Mary Glover to cry out, "where is shee? where is she?" Some in the bench believed Mary Glover to be counterfeiting. Mary Glover was then prompted to give her evidence, but the girl cast "her hand about withall, and so, with faltering speech, sunke downe," before she could speak any words at all. She enters a fit, where she is described as "being so much writhed, as a with is writhen, that the right huckle bone was turned forward, so far over to the left side, as that it wanted not the bredth of a hand, of the place, where the lefte should stand." These symptoms were typical of Mary Glover's fits, whether or not she was aware of her surroundings. During these fits, should any pray and come to the line "deliver us from evill," her body would rebound. It was also heard during the trial, that a voice came from Mary Glover's nostrils, saying, "hang her."(Fol. 30r - Fol. 31r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 30r - Fol. 31r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2887

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman believed to be the cause of the fits a fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, experiences, the girl Mary Glover falls into a fit in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. She is carried away from the trial "by three strong men," (Anonymous 451) who confess "that they never caryed a heavyer burthen."(Fol. 31r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2888

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover so that the young girl experiences regular fits, the fourteen year old Mary Glover falls into a fit. The trial lasts all day, so that the Justices went to dinner, and Elizabeth Jackson was led out to Newgate prison. During this time, the voice coming from Mary Glover's nostrils, which repeats, "hang her," ceases. However, once Elizabeth Jackson is brought out again in an hour, "the voyce also returned." During the whole time, Mary Glover remains in her fit, "without any change."(Fol. 31r - Fol. 31v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31r - Fol. 31v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2891

The Justices presiding over the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman allegedly responsible for causing regular fits in the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, gather to see Mary Glover in a private chamber after she falls into a fit at the trial, in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. These Justices include Lord Anderson, Sir John Crook (Recorder of London), Sir William Cornwallis, Sir Jerome Bowes, among others (Anonymous 452). The bench believes Mary Glover to be counterfeiting her symptoms, and cry out in "thundring voyces; bring the fyre, and hot Irons, for this Counterfett; Come wee will marke her, on the Cheeke, for a Counterfett." Mary Glover, being "senseles," was not aware of any of these happenings. The Justices observe Mary Glover's body to be stiff, and Sir John Crook burns a paper against her hand, "untill it blistered," with no visible reaction from the girl. As soon as Elizabeth Jackson was sent for, however, and the old woman entered the chamber, the "sound in the maides nostrills," increased in volume, until it could be clearly heard to say "Hang her," both in the chamber and the courtroom. (Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2894

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman allegedly responsible for causing regular fits in the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, Mary Glover falls into a fit in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, and is taken to a separate chamber by the Justices presiding over the case. There, Lord Anderson commands Elizabeth Jackson to come to the bed, where Mary Glover lies "senseles," and to "lay her hand upon the maide." As soon as Elizabeth Jackson touches Mary Glover, the girl was "presently throwen, and casted with great violence."(Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 32r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2895

Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, so that she suffers from fits every second day, is brought forth at her trial by the Judge to say the Lord's Prayer while Mary Glover suffers from a fit brought on by being in the same room as Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson could not finish the prayer, although she often tried, being unable to say "forgeve us our trespasses," nor "Leade us not into temptation." The Judge then bids Elizabeth Jackson to say the Christian belief, which she began "leaving out our Lord," which she could not be forced to say. She also changed the phrases "the Communion of Saincts," and "the forgivenes of Sinnes," to "The communion of saincts," and "the Comission of sinnes." When she is finally made to say "Leade us not into temptation," Mary Glover's body "was tossed," which also happened when Elizabeth Jackson managed to utter "Deliver us from evill." Likewise, Mary Glover was tossed, when Elizabeth Jackson came to the phrase, "he descended into hell."(Fol. 32r - Fol. 33r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 32r - Fol. 33r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2896

The Justices (Anonymous 452) presiding over the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover, gather to discuss the evidence against Elizabeth Jackson, including the manner in which Mary Glover became ill, the "Curses that this woman gave her," the fit Mary Glover experienced while eating bread when Elizabeth Jackson visited her house and that thereafter "the mayd, ever had a fitt, upon any taking of sustenance," the curses and "prophesing threatenings," which Judge Anderson believes to be "a notable propertie of a Witch," the regularity of Mary Glover's ordinary fits, as well as the young girls succumbing to fits whenever in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson.(Fol. 33r - Fol. 33v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 33r - Fol. 33v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2897

A witness, Mr. Lewis Hughes, comes forth at Elizabeth Jackson's trial, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, in order to provide evidence against Elizabeth Jackson. Hughes is a preacher, who admitted he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward.(Fol. 33v - Fol. 34r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 33v - Fol. 34r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2899

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, the old woman is searched "under the hands of the women (Anonymous 454)," and "markes were found in divers places of her body." These marks were determined to be unlikely "to grow of any disease," but rather more "like the markes which are described to be in Witches bodyes."(Fol. 34r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2900

Elizabeth Burges comes forward as a witness at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. Elizabeth Burges admits to having seen Elizabeth Jackson threaten Mary Glover, but also tells how she "had ben therefore threatned by her," so that one day while eating prunes, the old woman visits her and Elizabeth Burges is "not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting." This continues for some three weeks after being visited by Elizabeth Jackson, "upon all sustenance of meat receaved." At another visit of Elizabeth Jackson while Elizabeth Burges was vomiting, Elizabeth Jackson allegedly wishes "that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all," adding "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The following night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by a vision in the shape of a fox; the night after that a vision in the shape of "an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough"; and a final third night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by the vision in "the likenes of a mouse." However, by "faithfull praier," aided by her Master and Mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from these visions. While recounting this tale at the trial, Elizabeth Jackson interrupts Elizabeth Burges, saying "thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon," causing Elizabeth Burges to lose her power of speech. She was led into a chamber after, where she fell ill as Elizabeth Jackson had predicted, "and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe."(Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2901

Evidence is brought forth at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, that Elizabeth Jackson's "cursing, long before this time, had ben observed to have a mischevous consequent." Once, while washing clothes for one of Lady Bond's men (Anonymous 455), Elizabeth Jackson came to collect her earnings. However, he was out of town, at which time Elizabeth Jackson said, "is he gone? I pray god he may breake his necke, or his legge, before he com againe." The man (Anonymous 455) breaks his leg during his journey, accordingly.(Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2902

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, evidence surfaces that Elizabeth Jackson "hath accustomed, to go with others, to fortune tellers." Elizabeth Jackson further confesses that she went once with her daughter, and another time with her friend Elizabeth Cooke, and that she paid to have her fortune told. This is believed to tie her in with witchcraft.(Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2903

Testimony is given at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, that once in a "dead senseles fitt," brought on by the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, Mary Glover is so heavy , that "two could scarsly lift up her head," but "upon a suddaine," Mary Glover was found to be "more light then a naturall body." This was proved when a "godly honest gentleman" (Anonymous 456) lifted her from the bed with ease and then "turning himselfe about, with her, lying upon his armes, made a shew of her," affirming to all that she was "as a curten throwen overthwart his armes." He lay Mary Glover down upon the bed again, and shortly after, the girl was found to be incredibly heavy again. These symptoms are in line with possession or bewitchment, and not of natural causes.(Fol. 35v - Fol. 36r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v - Fol. 36r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2905

Two Physicians are called upon by the court at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. These two physicians, Dr. Francis Herring and Dr. Spencer, were asked to provide their opinions, "touching Mary Glovers case." They both agreed that the girl's case "proceeded of som cause supernaturall; having stranger effects, than either the mother or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." The motion of Mary Glover's hands to her mouth, it's opening and shutting "at so strickt a measure of time," that she would fall into fits in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, the voice from Mary Glover's nostrils, and the casting about of Mary Glover's body upon being touched by Elizabeth Jackson are all cited as evidence of the supernatural. Further, the "varietie of the fitts," and the shape of the belly "did not truly resemble the mother," further supporting their conclusions.(Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2908

Two physicians, Dr. Argent and Dr. Jorden, testify at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. These two doctors come forth without being called by the court, in order to "purge Elizabeth Jackson, of being any cause of Mary Glovers harme." They were summoned by Bishop Bancroft, who first attested that Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. These physicians were also supported by a noted divine, James Meadowes, who sought to prove that Jackson had not practiced witchcraft. The two doctors "sought earnestly to make the case a meere naturall disease," by citing certain symptoms of Mary Glover's fits as in resemblance of "certen affects of the mother." However, this seems to leave the jury without "any satisfaction at all."(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2909

At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, Lord Anderson, the judge, presses Dr. Jorden to provide a name for the disease he believes Mary Glover to be suffering from, as Dr. Jorden protests that the girl's symptoms are natural and not supernatural. Dr. Jorden labels the disease, "Passio Hysterica." However, the doctor admits he cannot cure the disease, and that he will not try to. Dr. Jorden further swears that he believes Mary Glover is not counterfeiting her symptoms. Lord Anderson then answers, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall: for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause, of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." (Fol. 37v - Fol. 38r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37v - Fol. 38r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2910

Judge Anderson and Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, present themselves in front of the Jury (Anonymous 450) of the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the young girl Mary Glover. They seek to have the jury reach a verdict, cautioning that "the Land is full of Witches," who have "on their bodies divers strange marks," as Elizabeth Jackson is reported to have. Further, Judge Anderson declares that "you shall hardly finde any direct proofes in such a case," as the Devil is devious in his dealings. He reminds the Jury that Elizabeth Jackson is not afraid to threaten others, "She is full of Cursings, she threatens and prophesies, and still it takes effect." Judge Anderson also points out how illogical it is to believe that the cause of Mary Glover's fits is natural, considering the nature of her fits. The Recorder of London follows up by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather, and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft."(Fol. 38r - Fol. 39v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 38r - Fol. 39v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2911

Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover, is sentenced to "a yeeres imprisonment," after being found guilty by the Jury (Anonymous 450) at the end of her trial. During this time, she is also expected to "stand on the pillory" four times, and confess to her crime.(Fol. 39r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 39r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2912

At the end of the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused and found guilty of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, Elizabeth Jackson is taken out of the courtroom. As soon as she is gone, Mary Glover, who was in a fit for the duration of the trial, during which time a voice came from her nostrils saying "hang her," rises from the fit, and "the voyce in the mayds nostrills ceased." Her fit had lasted over eight hours.(Fol. 39v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 39v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2915

After the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover, the fits of Mary Glover are even worse, being "augmented, both in length and strength, above measure." (Fol. 40r - Fol. 40v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 40r - Fol. 40v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2916

Although adverse parties encouraged the parents of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl allegedly suffering from mysterious fits thought to be caused by the witch, Elizabeth Jackson, to decide to have more physicians examine their daughter after the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the parents of Mary Glover decide to take her to ministers for an exorcism. They believe if their daughter is delivered, it is an example of "what a loathsom bondage, to be in the hands of Sathan, and what an arme of unmatcheable power, is on the other side."(Fol. 40v - Fol. 41v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 40v - Fol. 41v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2923

Dr. Bradwell of the Physician's College in London, reflects upon the case of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Jennings, an old woman who cursed and threatened her. He points out that the Devil controlled Mary Glover's case, "namely that thence forth the maides bodie should either move at her touching, or not at hers only." He compares Mary Glover's case, to "a verie like case" of notable witcherie, which affected the children of one Mr. Throgmorton in Warboy, Huntington shire. In this case, "the Divell caused the Children to accuse mother Samuell," as the children were only well and not in fits in her presence. Once, Mother Samuell left the children, however, and "the spirit then talking with them (as it used to doe) saied; that now Mother Samuel was feeding of her spirits, and making a new League and composition with them," so that the children would be worse in her presence. This seemed to be the case for the children of Mr. Throgmorton, "And surely in this our case of M. Glover, Sathan purchased a large field of comodeties, by doing so."(Fol. 91r - Fol. 91v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 91r - Fol. 91v

1603 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2926

Dr. Bradwell, a physician from the College in London looks into the Mary Glover case, where a young girl is allegedly afflicted by fits caused the old woman Elizabeth Jackson, after she curses and threatens the girl. He describes two "natural" causes that might be responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms, one that is "originally inbred, or in her life time acquired." However, he dismisses the idea that whatever afflicts Mary Glover is inbred, for she was a healthy youth. Instead, it is more likely that she was affected by "a disease cometh through Contagion." Elizabeth Jackson, however, does not have "hurtfull breathes, or aires flowing from their bodie, or Cloathes, smite some other with the like," as one with a disease contagion usually does. Further, the symptoms of Mary Glover were more towards the "suffocation of the Mother," which "cometh not by Contagion." Finally, Mary Glover or Elizabeth Jackson did not infect others. Dr. Bradwell concludes that Mary Glover could not be affected by a natural cause, such as contagion.(Fol. 154r - Fol. 155v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 154r - Fol. 155v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2927

The physician Dr. Bradwell rebukes the writings of Dr. Edward Jorden, also a physician. Dr. Jorden examined the young girl, Mary Glover, who allegedly suffered from fits caused by the bewitchment of an old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. However, Dr. Jorden believed Mary Glover to be suffering from natural causes, and published his work in the suffocation of the mother, the disease he believes to be responsible for Mary Glover's affliction. Dr. Bradwell chastises Dr. Jorden for writing in direct response to the Mary Glover case, although he "would not touch (at all) the cause of Marie Glover in it." Dr. Bradwell further suggests that Dr. Jorden, when exposed to the supernatural, is unable to identify it, and that he is responsible for "drawing manie of the Colledge, to speake and stirre in it against us." Dr. Bradwell claims that Dr. Jorden released his book of "misconceipts" to the detriment of the minds of men, and that "he restraine the description aforesaid of a learned phisition to himself, and those only that concurred with him in this cause." Further, Dr. Jorden demonstrates himself to be contradictory, acknowledging witchcraft as well as natural disease as caused by the Devil, meaning Mary Glover's case "would constrayne him to eat his words, touching possession of Divells and witchcrafte." Dr. Jorden, "a fearfull scholler," found when trying to explain all of Mary Glover's symptoms that "neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." For example, Dr. Jorden suggests that Mary Glover was healed by fasting as in general this is helpful to cure the disease, however, Mary Glover was unable to take sustenance for many days before purposefully engaging in fasting. Dr. Bradwell concludes that Dr. Jorden cannot be right in his claims.(Fol. 42r - Fol. 42v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 42r - Fol. 42v

1602 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2928

Dr. Bradwell, a physician from the College in London, assesses Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London allegedly suffering from fits caused by witchcraft on the part of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. He feels that while the girl "maie have the semblaunce of natural, touching the outward figure, which is supernaturall, as touching the cause," of her symptoms. He claims this is "an efficient trans naturam, or (as we use to speake) supernaturall." Dr. Bradwell assesses many of Mary Glover's symptoms, explaining them in medical terms and comparing them with diagnoses, such as opisthotonus, and Emprosthotonus. Citing Mary Glover's age, Dr. Bradwell concludes that "she had not the mother, through menstrual suppression." Although Dr. Bradwell acknowledges that there is some room for interpretation of Mary Glover's symptoms, such as the interpretation of the voice coming from Mary Glover's nostrils saying "hunger," instead of "hang her." However, the conclusion Dr. Bradwell reaches is "that by the hands of Sathan her bodie was then tormented."(Fol. 100v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 100v

1603 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2929

The young girl, Mary Glover, visits her neighbour (Anonymous 441) upon discovering that she cannot swallow after a visit from Elizabeth Jackson, where she is rendered blind and speechless as well. Her neighbour brings her to her father's house, during which time her neck and throat "did swell extremely, and very deformedly." Every day thereafter, at the same time, this fit consumed her, depriving her of speech, but allowing her to breath. It seemed possible to have fingers thrust down the throat of the girl, without any disturbance.(Fol. 4r - Fol. 4v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 4r - Fol. 4v

1602, April 29 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2931

The old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, accused of bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover, confronts the College of Physicians, naming Dr. Mounford, Dr. Herring, and Dr. Bradwell as her accusers. She asked the College to consider her case. Dr. Mounford was aaway, but the other two doctors had to explain themselves in front of a dozen fellows (Anonymous 462). Dr. Herring was convinced that Mary Glover was "really bewitched and that Jackson was the culprit." Bradwell "explained Mary Glover's symptoms to the fellows and stressed that whenever Jackson came into her presence, she said 'hang her, hang her' through her nostrils." Many of the college, however, take Jackson's side. (xv)

Appears in:
McDonald, Michael. Witchcraft and Hysteria in Elizabethan London: Edward Jorden and the Mary Glover Case. London: 1990, xv

1602, November 13 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2939

Sir Richard Martin hears that a witch's hair cannot be cut, and orders a Sargent to pull 10 or 12 hairs from Anne Kirk's head to experiment on. The Sargent does so, but when he tries to cut them with barber's scissors, the hairs cause its edges to become so "battered, turned, & quite spoiled, as that they would not cut any thing." The Sergent then tries to burn the hairs, but they sit in the fire unharmed.(103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 103

1599 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2940

Thomas Addy writes in _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) that the Bible contains no written statements that witches are murderers and capable of spreading disease, that imps suck off the body of witches, that the bodies of witches contain "privy marks" assigned by the Devil, that an appropriate trial for a witch is "by sinking or swimming in the water," that witches have the ability to hurt corn, cattle, or to fly through the air. Instead, Thomas Addy calls attention to the fact that Bible does say that woe will be delivered "unto such as devour widdows houses," that "the Lord hateth the hand that sheddeth innocent blood, and the fals witness that speaketh lies," and that the Lord forbids false reports. He then condemns ministers that "teach for doctrin, the traditions of Antichrist that are not written in the Book of God?"(6 - 8)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 6 - 8

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2941

Thomas Addy writes in _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) that within the Scriptures "there is not any kind of Witch spoken of," except those mentioned in two verses in Deuteronomy. In these passages, witches are referred to as "a user of divinations, a planetarian, or a Conjecturer, or a Jugler," either male or female who cannot "passe thorow the fire." Witches are also described as "a user of charmes, or one that seeketh an Oracle, or a South-sayer, or one that asketh counsell of the dead." Thomas Addy also identifies the word "Hartumim" in Exodus 4.17, and Genesis 41.8, which is synonymous with magician. Likewise, the word Ariolus is synonymous with "Magi," which Thomas Addy counsels were the wise men, and so one must be careful when defining a witch.(9 - 11)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 9 - 11

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2942

Thomas Addy identifies in _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655), nine sorts of witches, or deceivers, or false prophets, or seducers of the people from God and his prophets, "nominated by God unto the people." These include men or women who cannot pass through fire, or who "set up an Idol" in place of God or who "falsly pretend themselves to be Gods Prophets." Further, men or women who use "divination" are considered witches and sorcerers. A third category of witches include those men or women who were "Planetarius," or believed they could read the stars and "draw People after their uncertain Predictions," which were false in the eyes of God. The fourth category included Conjurers who "had some particular pretence or colour whereupon he grounded his Divinations, making the people beleeve that thereby he could Divine or Prophesie." The fifth description of witches included "Jugglers" who engage in slight of hands, confederacy and "the abuse of Natural Magick." The six type of witch are described as "Charmers," or "Inchanter" who use charms, which are "only a strange composure of words to blinde the understandings of the people." These are often used with "juggling tricks." The seventh description of a witch includes men or women who seek "Oracles" or soothsayers, and the eighth are soothsayers themselves. The final type of witch is a "Necromancer," meaning "one that seeketh counsel of the dead."(11 - 12)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 11 - 12

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2944

A man (Anonymous 464) from England "went about in King Iames his time," as a Jugler who abused "Natural Magick," which according to Thomas Addy is the fifth description in the Bible of a witch. This man called himself, "The Kings Majesties most excellent Hocus Pocus," as whenever he performed, he would chant, "Hoc[...] pocus, tontus talontus, vade celeriter jueo," which was a "dark composure of words," meant to allow him to perform tricks without being discovered. These men are dangerous, according to Thomas Addy, as they pretend to have "the great power of God," but instead only use tricks, making them "cheating Imposters," and workers of "jugling witchcraft."(29)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 29

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2945

A Master of Arts (Anonymous 465), formerly the Lord of Leicester, is condemned "only for using himself to the study and practise of the Jugling craft." Thomas Addy argues that this is unjust for simply studying witchcraft is not the same as being a Witch, for "the essence of a Witch is not in doing false Miracles, or any other Witchcraft by demonstration or discovery, but in seducing people from God, and his Truth." (41 - 42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 41 - 42

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2946

Thomas Addy describes in his text _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) how a man is "an absolute Witch" if he "seduce the people to idolatry," but if a man "acteth the same part," but "cometh out and sheweth people the imposture, and sheweth them the Wyers and secret delusions," he is not a Witch but a "discoverer of a Witch," as well as a teacher and "illuminator of the people."(42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 42

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2947

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655), tells of a "brief tenent in the Universities" (Anonymous 466), who "did but study and contemplate upon this subject of Witchcraft," and discovered a "Popish Idol" at Cheapside Cross, "which for many years," which few had known was there, until it was pulled down "at the command of the Parliament," and the where it falsely was made with pipes to shed tears, "bewitching the people." Such trends were common according to Addy under the reign of Queen Elizabeth, which caused "images and instruments were openly burnt together, by the authority and command of the Queen." (42 - 43)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 42 - 43

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2949

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) notes that men are "easily deceived by iugling Confederacy in Conjuration," describing a tale where a Minister (Anonymous 467) believed that a Cambridge Scholar (Anonymous 468) had summoned the Devil in several shapes, including horses and ducks, and thus performed witchcraft. However, the Scholar had simply hired a boy (Anonymous 478) to create such noises as those animals made. Addy questions "how little credit ought Ministers or other men to give to flying Reports, when they themselves may so easily be deluded?"(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2952

A man (Anonymous 471) at King James' court performed witchcraft through his ability to perform as an Oracle. He would "call the King by name, and cause the King to look round about him, wondring who it was that called him." However, the King discovers this con, and would "sometimes take occasion by this impostor to make sport upon some of his Courtiers," most notably, Sir John. Anonymous 471 would call out Sir John's name, without revealing himself, in order to get Sir John "to stamp with madness," and find himself unable to ever begin discourse with the King due to constant interruption.(81 - 82)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 81 - 82

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2953

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) admonishes England for being one of many countries who believed that "the Art of swimming in the water," was a method of discovering witches, claiming that the poor country was "bewitched and deceived." He names Essex and Suffolk of being at fault, when "a wicked inquisitor" (Anonymous 472) was allegedly responsible for "cutting off of fourteen innocent people at Chelm ford Assizes,and about an hundred at Berry Assizes," including a minister (Anonymous 473) from Framingham.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2954

A gaoler, Hoy, is "brought in for a Witness" against a number of people condemned for witchcraft. However, the man is allegedly "not fit to bear the Office of a Gaoler," as he believed "the more Prisoners were executed, the more he should gain." However, his testimony is taken as evidence against these innocent people, resulting in "the shedding of innocent bloud."(102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 102

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2955

Atheism is at some point "so great, even at the very Court of England," that it is believed witches are responsible for it. This results in the "great slaughter of Men and Women (Anonymous 474) called Witches, at the Assizes at -erry, and at Chelmsford, those poor accused people," who were exposed to much cruelty, until "they would confess what their inquisitors would have them, although it were a thing impossible."(104 - 105)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 104 - 105

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2958

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) writes that a number of authors in England have allowed themselves to be seduced into believing false information about witches. Among these authors, he includes: James Bishop, author of _Daemonology_; Thomas Cooper, a minister; M. Perkins, author of a treatise of witchcraft; M. John Gaule, a minister; and M. George Gifford, a minister.(139 - 140)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 139 - 140

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England