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36 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific parish

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
120

Elizabeth Gooding is accused of causing the death of a horse.(7)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 7

1645, April Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
122

Hellen Clark confesses to having the devil appear to her in the form of a white dog, which she names Elimanzer and feeds with milk-pottage.(10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 10

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
198

Elizabeth Clarke of Manningtree, according to the second hand report given by Matthew Hopkins, allegedly enjoyed six or seven years of tri-weekly "carnall copulation with the Devil six or seven yeares, who, "in shape of a proper Gentleman, with a laced band, having the whole proportion of a man, and would say to her, Besse I must lye with you, and shee did never deny him." (2)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 2

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
199

Elizabeth Clarke of Manningtree confesses to having killed Mr. Edwards' hogs.(3)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 3

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
994

Rebecca West allegedly takes the devil, in the shape of a gentleman, for her husband. He appeared to her at night and "desired of her, that he might have the same familiaritie with her, that others that appeared unto her before." She agreed to his terms, and the devil, cold as clay, kissed her, and lead her about the room before declaring they were married. (15)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1000

Matthew Hopkins claims there is a coven of seven or eight witches living in his hometown of Manningtree, Essex. These witches allegedly make sacrifices to the Devil, and bid their imps to go to one another.(2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1002

Elizabeth Clarke is watched for four nights as a witch, with up to ten people watching her.. On the fourth night her familiars as Holt, Jarmara, Vinegar Tom, Sack and Sugar, and Newes allegedly appear.(2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1007

Anonymous 121 discloses the names other witches living with her (The Manningtree Witches) and their imp familiars called Elemauzer, Pyewacket, Peckin the Crown, and Grizzel Greedigut.(2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1009

Matthew Hopkins claims that a witch's mark is defined by three criteria: first, the mark is found in an unusual place on the body, second, no pain is felt when a pin or needle is thrust through it, and third, the mark is dry and close to the flesh (this indicates that a familiar has been sucking from it).(3-4)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 3-4

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1010

Matthew Hopkins claims that the devil does not desire witch's blood for nourishment, but to further her damnation. Hopkins believes that in drawing blood out of teats (witch' marks) the devil is able to physically enter a witch's body, and then become another creature such as a cat, rat, or mouse.(4-5)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 4-5

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1011

Matthew Hopkins asserts that an early form of testing for witchcraft in Essex and Suffolk was to keep the accused witch awake for several days on end. The thought was that, if kept awake, the witch would call on her familiars, thus proving her guilty.(5)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 5

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1012

Matthew Hopkins asserts that one way to test for witchcraft is to make the accused witch walk continuously until she is so tired and sore that she must sit down. If the woman is indeed a witch, her familiars will come to her as soon as she stops walking.(5)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 5

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1013

Matthew Hopkins claims that the devil often tricks witches when they are facing persecution. He will tell a witch that her identifying marks are so small they will not be noticed, yet they are often noticed and the witch is, as a consequence, hanged. He will also tell a witch that if she sinks during a swimming test then her name will be cleared, but a witch will often float and thus be executed.(6)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 6

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1014

Matthew Hopkins claims that he denies the confession of a witch if: it is drawn from her by torture, violence, or flattery. Under those circumstances, she will confess to improbable acts such as flying in the air or riding a broom; words are put in her mouth. (7)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 7

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1015

The Manningtree witches are allegedly searched for witch's marks. Marks are allegedly found on all of them.(3-4)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 3-4

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1016

The Manningtree witches are hanged.(2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

1644, March Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1391

Rebecca West, according to the testimony of Matthew Hopkins, confessed to taking the devil, in the shape of a Gentleman, for "her God, and thought he could doe as God," after he killed "the sonne of the said Thomas Hart," within one fortnight of being asked.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2-3

1645, April 13 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1411

John Rivet accuses Elizabeth Clarke of bewitching his wife (Mrs. Rivet). Rivet claims that his wife was taken sick and lame, withviolent fits, and was told by a cunning woman Mrs. Hoyve that two neighbors had cursed his wife. Rivet suspects Elizabeth Clarke and her mother because of the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

1645, July 29 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1774

Elizabeth Gooding sends an imp "to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Manningtree."(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

1642 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1775

Mary Tayler, the wife of John Tayler of Manningtree, refuses to give Elizabeth Gooding "some Beergood," resulting in Elizabeth Gooding's "malice" and sending of an imp to torment Mary Tayler. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

1642 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1905

Elizabeth Clarke, while being watched as a witch, allegedly attempt to strike a bargain with Matthew Hopkins, suggesting if John Sterne and himself would promise to not hurt her, that she would call one of her familiar spirits to come and play on her lap. Hopkins and Sterne refused the offer and Clarke did not produce her white spirit, one of the five familiars she allegedly kept.(6)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1906

Elizabeth Clarke, at the behest of Satan, who would otherwise never let "her rest, or be quiet," allegedly sends her familiars to kill Mr. Edwards hogs Robert Tayler's horse. Tayler himself believed that Elizabeth Gooding had committed this crime, having fallen out with his wife when Gooding wanted to have the cheese on credit.(6, 7, 10-11)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6, 7, 10-11

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1907

Elizabeth Clarke, presumably through familiar magic, allegedly kills Robert Okes, a man from Lawford in the county of Essex. He appears to have died a week after she bewitched him (or circa March 18th, 1645).(8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1908

Elizabeth Clarke allegedly bewitches the child of a Dedham clothier to death, presumably through familiar magic. (8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1909

Elizabeth Clarke allegedly bewitches Mrs. Cole to death, presumably through familiar magic. (8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1910

Anne West, presumably through an act of weather magic, allegedly raised a storm which caused Thomas Turner's boat to sink and killed Turner himself. (9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 9

1642, September. Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1911

Elizabeth Clarke becomes a witch one night as she picked up firewood, around six months after she met Anne West; West, pitying Clarke, for her lameness and her poverty, promised she would send her a thing like a "little Kitlyn, which would fetch home some victuals for this Examinant; and that it should doe her no hurt." Within four nights, a white and a familiar spirit came to her and promised to help her to a husband. They visited nightly "and sucked upon the lower parts of her body."(10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 10

1645, September Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1913

Anne Leech allegedly bewitches two of Richard Edwards' cows. She accomplished this simply by walking by Richard Edwards' pasture. A black cow fell down as she passed; a white cow died one day after its fellow, dieing on the same spot. Edwards has an autopsy performed on the cows, but "no disease discovered, which might occasion their death."(10-11)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 10-11

1644 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1914

Mary Parsely grows sick and dies within six weeks of Hellen Clarke uttering "that Mary the daughter of the said Edward and Mary Parsley should rue for all" a prognostication and curse grounded in Hellen Clarke's outrage after she had a disagreement with Mary Sr. The legal indictment for this event names the victim as "Anne."(14)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 14

1645, April 5 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1916

Prudence Hart begins to have a sudden and tragic miscarriage as she walks home one Sunday. There is no apparent cause for this; she had been about "twenty weeks gone with childe, and to her thinking, very well and healthfull," and rapidly developed "great pains, and miscarried before shee could be got home." Hart blames Anne West and Rebecca West for this tragedy, suggesting that Rebecca West thought Hart was her greatest enemy.(13)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 13

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1917

Prudence Hart feels something fall down upon her right side as she lays in bed one night, "but being dark, she cannot tell in what shape it was." She loses mobility on that side, and experiences "extraordinary pains and burning," which last a few days. Presumably Anne West and / or Rebecca West had sent a familiar spirit to plague her. (13)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 13

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1944

Margaret Moone and Elizabeth Clarke are accused of bewitching John Edwards, the infant son of Mr. Richard Edwards to death. This crime is also blamed on Anne Leech and Elizabeth Gooding.(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

1644 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1946

Margaret Moone and Elizabeth Clarke allegedly spoil three batches of Richard Edwards' beer.(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1953

Mary Philips, while "going over a broad foot Bridge, this Informant sensibly felt a great blow on her head, which strook her into a ditch up to the neck." This event is recorded in terms of her examinations of Margaret Moone, who seems to recognize her, presumably because she had magically administered the blow. (28-29)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 28-29

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
2078

An honest man from Manningtree allegedly spots "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits, leaping and skipping about him," at four o'clock in the morning outside Anne West's door. Without knowing what they are, he attempts to brain one to death with a stick, the wring its neck, drown it, only to experience it as having "vanished away."(39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
2079

Anonymous 346 accuses Anne West of sending her familiars, in the shape of four black rabbits, to trouble him. West allegedly retorts that "that they were not sent to trouble him, but were sent out as Scouts upon another designe."(39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

1645 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England