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13 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific parish

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
140

Mary/Ann Foster is examined before a Justice of the Peace and confesses to setting Joseph Weedon's barns on fire. She claims that "she lighted Touchwood, and the Devil carryed her up by the Arms to the top of the Roof, and there with her Touchwood she set fire in the Thatch." Foster also confesses to destroying Weedon's sheep.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 6-7

1674, August 22 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
191

Mary/Ann Foster is apprehended in connection to the damages to Joseph Weedon's livestock and property, and a Justice of the Peace orders her examined by a Jury of Women. They find her to have "five several strange and unusual excrescencies which appeared exactly like a Sows Teats, and seemed to be usually suckt by something."(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 5

1674, August 18 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
193

At her trial, Mary/Ann Foster denies being a witch while confessing to causing the destruction of Joseph Weedon's sheep and property. She is condemned to be hanged on the strength of her previous confession.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 7

1674, August 18 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
194

Mary Foster is hanged for witchcraft at the Northampton Assises on August 22, 1674. She refuses to speak a word beyond requesting her hands be untied.(Title Page, 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, Title Page, 7

1674, August Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1058

Master Avery and Mistress Belcher, riding home to Guilesborough in a coach after visiting Northampton Gaol, allegedly encounter a man (Anonymous 125) and a woman (Anonymous 126) riding double on a black horse. Avery sees Anonymous 125 and Anonymous 126 gesturing strangely, and is moved to cry out "That either they or their Horses should presently miscarcy." This proves prophetic, for moments later the horses drawing the carriage fell down dead. Avery rose up praising the grace and mercy of God for delivering them and not suffering foul spirits to work their mischief on men.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

1611 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1059

Master Avery's fits allegedly continue until he is standing next to the judges and Joan Vaughan was brought to him in the Northampton Castle yard. He is said to have been in the middle of a fit at the time.(B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4

1611 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1066

Mary Barber is apprehended from her home in Stanwicke by Sir Thomas T[...]ham for allegedly bewitching a man to death, causing harm to cattle and other mischief. She is committed to Northampton Gaol. She is said to be rude, degenerate, licentious, malicious, envious, cruel, violent and to possess devilish desires.(D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D3

1611, May 6 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1364

Thomas Simpson claims Phillip Flower bewitched him, a bewitchment manifest in the inability to leave her and the sensation that he was marvelously altered both in mind and body since he met her. (7)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 7

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1365

Joan Flower is considered, in popular opinion, to be a witch because she looks and acts like a witch. She has fiery, hollow eyes, a strange and exotic demeanor, considerable knowledge of oaths and curses, and seems to lack the Christian faith.(7-8)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 7-8

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1366

Joan Flower, Philip Flower, and Margaret Flower are offered services from the Devil who states that, in return for their souls, that he will appear to the women in the form of a dog, rat, or cat, and do their bidding. They ratify the contract with "certaine charmes and conjurations," and "abominable kisses, and an odious sacrifice of blood."(9)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 9

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1367

Sir Francis Manners, the Earl of Rutland and his wife, the Countess of Rutland, suffer from sickness and extraordinary convulsions. These ailments are thought to be the work of accused witches Margaret Flower, Phillip Flower, and their mother, Joan Flower.(8-9)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 8-9

1653 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1560

Ann Foster is put on trial, where she at first pleads not-guilty, "but it being so evidently proved that she was the person that had committed al those things before mentioned, she then confessed," all of which she accomplished with the help of the Devil.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 7

1674 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England 
1561

After confessing to her crimes, Mary/Ann Foster is sentenced to death. She begs forgiveness and to be burned, but the court deems that she "should be hanged at the Common place of Execution, which accordingly was performed," on the 22nd of August, 1674.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Relation of the Tryal, Condemnation, and Execution of Ann Foster. London: 1674, 7-8

1674, August 22 Northamptonshire  Northampton  Northamptonshire  Northamptonshire  England