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82 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific parish

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
145

Joan Buts pleads innocent, and is acquitted of the charges of bewitching Mary Farmer to death and using witchcraft to torment Elizabeth Burgiss. Despite hearing 19 or 20 witnesses, the Jury finds the evidence against her to be insufficient.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 2

1682, March 27 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
477

Sarah Morduck is taken into custody on the charge of bewitching Richard Hathaway with Sir Thomas Lane as the Examiner; evidence is given against her, including several witnesses' allegations (Anonymous 238) that she has a long standing reputation as an "ill liver," while another person (Anonymous 239) deposed that Morduck said Hatheway scratching her would only make him worse.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
478

Sarah Morduck hires Richard Hathaway to make her a key to her home after quarreling with her husband, and while Hathaway is working on the lock, Morduck allegedly convinces him to accept a drink over his protests; soon after Hathaway becomes unable to eat or drink, or do any work.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
479

Richard Hathaway, now allegedly unable to see in addition to unable to eat and drink, scratches Sarah Morduck at the urging of his friends (Anonymous 368), who brought her to him; he succeeds in drawing Morduck's blood, which restores his sight and ability to eat and drink.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1180

James Barrow suffers from a violent fit that is like being burned. The fit lasts for a week, during which Barrow also walks up and down a room, throws his hat from his head, lays his hands under his belly, screeches lamentably, and makes a croaking sound. (5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

1661, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1184

James Barrow allegedly sees rats (Anonymous 207) and cats (Anonymous 206) during his violent fits. The apparitions sometimes have glasses of sack (white wine) and pasties that they offer to Barrow. When Barrow refuses the food and drink, the rats and cats demand his soul. James Barrow refuses to condescend to them. When these tell Barrow that they will dine with him when "his Father and Mother was gone forth," he refuses to eat or drink, unless he "did first go behind the door and sing, with his hat off."(5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1185

James Barrow suffers from thirty fits in one day, during which he strikes himself in the face and goes lame, dumb, and blind. It is believed this could only be accomplished "by the malice and power of the Devil." (5-6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5-6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1186

James Barrow, in an effort to control his fits, is confined to one particular stool in the house. If any other person sits on the stool, Barrow is thrown flat on the ground as if dead, until the same person arises from the stool. When going to the houses of others, Barrow brings the stool with him. He counsels that no one should sit upon his stool, or he will know, however, having left the stool at a neighbour's house while at dinner with his household, he "fell down flat on his back," saying upon rising that he know "that some body hath sat upon my stool."(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1187

James Barrow declares he will not sing before he eats his food, but then chokes on his food when he attempts to eat it; Barrow cannot swallow one bite until he sings.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1188

James Barrow returns to his neighbour's house, where he accuses them of having sat upon his stool. After, he walks up and down in a frantic manner while holding a hammer, which he sometimes throws behind the door. He calls out the names of four people: Sam Man, John Sames, Mol Williams, and Mary Prett. This continues for part of the day, but none knew who those people were.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1189

James Barrows father (John Barrow) sees him sitting at a table with a pen, ink, and a pin. When John asks James what he is doing with the pin, James avoids answering the question. John thinks his sons put offs are the work of the devil. (6-7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6-7

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1191

James Barrow suffers from a fit that causes his feet to become extremely cold. Barrow calls for his mother (Mother Barrow) to pull off his hose and shoes, and when she finds his feet to be cold she attempts to warm him with clothes; Barrows anguish continues until he becomes well again on his own.(7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1192

James Barrow roars and cries, making a hideous noise, whenever someone reads the bible in his presence; Barrow himself cannot utter the name of God or Christ. (8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1193

John Barrow employs the help of physician and astrologer John Hubbard to help cure his son, James Barrow. Hubbard states he is familiar with these sorts of conditions, and believes James Barrow has been bewitched. (8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1194

John Hubbard attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment by using "fopperies and charms," including hanging papers around Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver (liquid metal mercury) under the door. These attempts are unsuccessful. (8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1195

John Hubbard attempts a second time to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment. Barrows hair is cut off at the crown in a round circle, and his finger and toe nails trimmed; the trimmings are wrapped in paper. Barrow is also instructed to go to an oak tree, take some oak boughs home to sleep on, then return to the tree and ram the paper packet of hair and nail trimmings into a hole in the trunk; these attempts are also unsuccessful.(8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1197

After taking Physick from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for some time, working under a master as an Apprentice. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat suddenly appeared to him and then entered into his body. This invasion evidently causes Barrow to look and act like a Changeling (a fairy child) and be unable to eat any food unless in his own household, preventing him from being an apprentice.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1208

John Barrow takes his bewitched son (James Barrow) to an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144) in the hopes of curing him. Anonymous 144 puts a cross on James Barrows head, which causes James Barrow to roar loudly. (9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1209

John Barrow takes his bewitched son (James Barrow) to the home of Lord Abony. Once there, a servant (Anonymous 145) pulls out a cross, causing James Barrow to roar.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1219

John Barrow claims he stripped and whipped his son (James Barrow) in the hopes of curing the boy of his possession and bewitchment.(12)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 12

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1238

John Clayton, Richard Webb, and Richard Aylmore pray for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. The prayers cause Barrow to fall into extreme and violent fits.(13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

1663 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1240

James Barrow is cured of his possession and bewitchment by prayers and an exorcism. This takes place over three days, during which time James Barrow progressively heals. At first, James Barrow cannot even stand to hear the name of God and Christ, crying out "Legat, go to the Devil Legat," although his mouth did not move. As well, he shies away from the Bible. By the end of the first day, however, he seemed to rejoice at the sight of the Bible. A second day of exorcism consisted of prayers for the better part of the day, which James Barrow endures well until night, when "he fell into a very great Agony." The third day, James Barrow admits to "strong temptations of the Devil, namely to cut his throat, or drown himself, or knock out his brains against a post." Prayer is still performed for the boy, and he roars like a dog, and tears at his clothing. A departure of five spirits is noted from the boy, after which time he is restored.(12-17)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 12-17

1663, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1241

John Crump attempts to cure his daughter (Hannah Crump) of her strange fits by calling on whatever physicians and experts he could find (and pay for) in his area. However, these attempts are unsuccessful.(18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1251

John Crump attempts to cure his daughter (Hannah Crump) of her strange fits by bringing her to London, however, she refused at Thomas Hospital in Southward. This leads John Crump to a man (Anonymous 147) who is said to know astrology. Anonymous 147 declares that Hannah Crump has been bewitched and that he cannot provide a perfect cure, and is thus dismissed by John Crump. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1252

Hannah Crump allegedly has violent fits whenever the bible is read to her; during the recitation, she bites herself in rage and grief.(18-19)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18-19

1664 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1831

Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark is ensnared by music for many years, so much so that he treasured music above his family and "fel to his musick" upon his wife's death bed against her wishes. Mr. Goodwin's obsession is allegedly the fault of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.(1 - 2, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 2, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1835

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones of London Borough of Southwark allegedly "cast a net of pretended piety and fained extraordinary holyness" over Mr. Goodwin, despite being wicked women in reality.(4, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1836

Upon her deathbed, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, the wife of Mr. Wessell Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, implores her children to take their husband away from music and "especially the frequentation of Mr. Edward Jones; and that not so much out of dislike to him as to his wife, whom shee saw to be a subtil undermining woman, that would be ready to make her own advantage of old Mr. Goodwins weakness." (2-3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2-3

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1840

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones allegedly bewitch Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, so that he tells his son-in-law and Daughter Vernon that the passion he claims for a future wife is placed upon a woman "so eminent in Piety and wisdome, that his former wife deserved not to be named the same day." Although he refuses to identify this woman, "yet his daily converse and familiarity with Mrs. Jones put them in strange thoughts."(3-4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 3-4

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1841

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "woried [her husband Mr. Starkey an Apothecarie] out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." Shortly after, she marries Mr. Pigeon a lieutenant in the regiment. Her "old imperious carriage" continues in this marriage.(4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1842

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly urged her husband, Mr. Pigeon to partake in meat and drinks "compounded" of provocative drugs to convince him to leave her everything in his estate. Mr. Pigeon refuses to consent.(5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 5

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1843

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly practices behaviour that causes her husband Mr. Pigeon to fly "into such a passion, and was so transported, that he became altogether senselesse, feeble, and irrationall."(6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1844

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark sends for Doctor Burges, a Physician, to attend to her husband after she causes him to fly into a rage. Mr. Pigeon is healed of his rage by being vomitted twice in one day, and thus restored to a feeble state by Doctor Burges. (6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1845

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly confesses to her husband, Mr. Pigeon that she behaved in such a wicked manner to her first husband, Mr. Starky, that he "committed a sin, for which he was tormented in his conscience, and fell into such an agony that as she then said, she thought he would have dyed." She promises Mr. Pigeon to never act so again.(6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1846

Despite promising to behave, Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "returnes to her old practises, and so wrought with Mr. Pigeon at the last, to part with his estate to her." (6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1847

Mrs. Jones, still a married woman, is allegedly observed by her husband Mr. Pigeon to be seducing Mr. Goodwin, by taking his hand "and putting it under her apron, holding it against the bottom of her belly, with many repeated mutual kisses."(6-7)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6-7

1646 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1848

Mrs. Jones leaves her husband for Mr. Goodwin, allegedly turning him into a "poore deluded old man" and Mr. Goodwin promises to provide for her.(8)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 8

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1849

Mr. Goodwin is quite sick for ten days after being attacked by Mr. Pigeon, but Mrs. Jones "made him forget his paine, and speeded the cure, which else might have been dangerous." Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin lie, a most un-Christian act, and say that Mr. Goodwin had been thrown from a horse, "to salve his reputation."(9)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 9

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1850

Mr. Goodwin, who has been allegedly seduced by Mrs. Jones, is made to believe his relationship with her is lawful as Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "work [him] to believe."(10, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 10, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1851

Mr. Goodwin's children attempt to draw their father out of his bewitchment daily, and try to "perswade him against these women." But is is all in vaine, for "he is so bewitched with her." (11 - 12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 11 - 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1852

The minister Mr. Cooper, at the urging of neighbours, justices, and ministers, allegedly attempts to break Mr. Goodwin's bewitchment, caused by Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon. Mr. Goodwin is thus suspended from the Sacrament, which he cares little about being restored to.(12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1853

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "possesse him [Mr. Goodwin] at their pleasure, and plye him daily to beware of his children" so that he will refuse his own children's advice. Further, Mr. Goodwin "can scarce speak for joy" upon seeing Mrs. Jones and Mrs Pigeon, and dotes them with goods and presents, at the ruin of his family's accounts. (12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1855

Roger Crey, Mr. Goodwin's eldest apprentice who allegedly spoke out against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon fell sick, and the two women "physick him, he growes worse." When Mr. Goodwin's son asks a doctor be sent for, but "the old man refuses to give his consent, boasting highly of the great skill of those two she."(13-14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 13-14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1856

Mr. Goodwin's son privately caries some of the ill Roger Crey's water to Doctor Burnet and Mr. Clarke, an apothecary, suspecting foul play on Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon's part. "At the first sight of the water he tells him, the party was a dead man, past all recovery; and that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well," confirming Mr. Goodwin's son's suspicions.(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1857

Roger Crey is allegedly continually "plye(d) with druggs" by both Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during his illness despite his pleadings for them to stop, so that "he lies raging in the violence of a burning feaver, in all probability caused by the contrary medicines they had administred to hime." He dies under these ministration. (14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1858

After Roger Crey's death, Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "tooke coach and departed, though in the dead of the night," allegedly "terrified with the guilt of what they've done."(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1859

The parents (Anonymous 308 and Anonymous 309) of a "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is also visited by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during her illness allegedly "watc'ht diligently that she should take nothing from them" after the death of Roger Crey.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1860

A "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is attended in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones "dyed of griefe, having her heart broke by the occasion of the practises of these women."(15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 15

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1861

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly attempts to get her husband Mr. Pigeon to "draw up a declaration" against the present Governors, but he refuses, "for which she vowes to be revenged of him."(16)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1862

Mr. Pigeon allegedly "got cold by his carefull tending of the childe," and tells his wife Mrs. Pigeon that he fears he has gout. She "presently with violence affirmes, that it was the Pox."(16)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1863

Mr. Pigeon sends for Mr. Knowles to come and examine him in his sickness, in order to persuade his wife, Mrs. Pigeon. (16 - 17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16 - 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1864

Upon examining Mr. Pigeon, Mr. Knowles is confronted by Mrs. Pigeon. The two argue over the nature of his sickness, which Mrs. Pigeon maintains is the pox despite having no grounds for knowing his sickness.(17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1865

Mr. Pigeon, in his sickness, recommends to Mr. Knowles and Mrs. Pigeon that he should send for "two able Physicians," and he "will submit to a search."(17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1866

Mr. Knowles pleads with Mr. Pigeon to leave his wife when she insists that Mr. Pigeon is afflicted with the Pox, "to avoyd evill." Mr. Pigeon refuses. (17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1867

Mr. Pigeon becomes violent with Mr. Knowles upon being told to leave his wife, causing him to be strangely "transported by this strange provocation, that he can scarce give account of what he did." Mrs. Pigeon may have allegedly been responsible for causing such a strange rage.(17 - 18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17 - 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1868

During the strange rage visited on Mr. Pigeon, Mrs. Pigeon "hath got a strange black face, which by her art she yet makes more visible."(18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1869

Mrs. Pigeon indulges in unnatural acts when she "so endeavoured with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army" as an appeal to the Lord General (Anonymous 310), causing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1870

The young son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin, is made "maillable" by the labours of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.(18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1871

The bewitched son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin is married to Mrs. Jones' daughter, making Mr. Goodwin and Mrs. Jones to "become brothers and sisters," rendering their own relationship unnatural in the eyes of God. This further allows Mrs. Jones to move into Mr. Goodwin's estate.(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1872

Mr. Goodwin becomes "so evill spoken of for his shamefull scandalous frequentation of these wicked women [Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon], unable to beare up under such a burden, he gave up himselfe to melancholly and carelesse stupidity, that he let his bookes run into some disorder."(20)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1873

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly fetch two bailiffs (Anonymous 311 and Anonymous 312) to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin in his own home, "in the dead of the night." This is a "Divelish action" that the women were afraid to do in the light of day for fear of their neighbour's reactions.(21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 21

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1874

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are directed by Mr. Colbourne, who is "the man midwife" that helps them bring about the "the monster" of a judgment seizing all of Mr. Goodwin's estates. (22)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1875

Mr. Goodwin's hildren, allegedly ruined by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, and seeing "that their father is now captivated more than ever to these women" presented a petition to the Justices of the County and Borough of South-wark, which brings Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones to St. Margarets Hill.(22-23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22-23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1876

Upon meeting with the Justices of Southwark, Mr. Goodwin is "seriously reproved and admonished to forsake the scandalous company of these women," Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. A witness, Mr. Gold of Clapham appears and testifies that Mrs. Pigeon in particular is "a most Angelical woman."(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1877

The Justices of Southwark request that Mr. Goodwin's children produce proof against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon for what they alleged in their petition, which they would not do "should they incurr trouble from these Litigious women." The justices dismiss the case with only an admonition to Mr. Goodwin.(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1878

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are cast out of their churches, "and all communion with them," because of their scandalous nature. They spend Sabbath "at the Dye house," instead.(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2160

Richard Hathaway is allegedly admitted to St. Thomas' Hospital under the care of several doctors and surgeons (Anonymous 369), but they are unable to cure him of his inability to eat or drink.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2161

Richard Hathaway, able to see, eat and drink again, allegedly has pins in his excrement.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2162

Richard Hathaway's friends (Anonymous 368) allegedly bring him to a cunning-woman (Anonymous 370) living in Goodmans-fields to consult with her about the pins in his excrement; the cunning-woman reportedly advises them to boil Hathaway's urine in a stone bottle, but the bottle bursts into pieces when heated. Hathaway is struck blind and unable to eat and drink once more, though none of the shards touch him, and continues to pass pins in his excrement.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2163

Richard Hathaway's neighbors allegedly assist him in scratching Sarah Morduck a second time, which permits him to eat, drink and see again for a time though he continues to pass pins in his excrement. His affliction soon resumes, however.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2164

Richard Hathaway's neighbors, Mr. Parrot and the child of Mr. Swan, become sick in "as bad a manner, tho' not altogether so strange," and their illnesses help convince the neighborhood that Sarah Morduck bewitched Hathaway.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

1701 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2165

Richard Hathaway is put under observation in a house by Richard Oldner and other Officers of the Parish, and watchmen are set to taking turns night and day, in order to determine whether or not he is a cheat.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April 12 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2166

A witness (Anonymous 371) at the examination of Richard Hathaway and Mrs. Sarah Morduck alleges in her deposition that she had seen Hathaway void a large stool with pins in it, and that she had also seen him scratch Morduck, then consume food and drink after some time without.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2167

A watchman (Anonymous 372) employed by the Officers of the Parish gives deposition at the the examination of RIchard Hathaway and Mrs. Sarah Morduck that he was tasked with watching Hathaway from Saturday, April 12th to Thursday, April 17th and on Sunday, April 20th, and alleges that he never once saw Hathaway eat or drink, but that on both the 17th and the 20th he observed Hathaway void pins from his mouth.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2168

Richard Oldner, Church-warden of St. Mary Overy, visits Richard Hathaway while he is under observation; Oldner allegedly gave Hathaway a glass of water to drink, which flew out of his mouth with great force.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April 18 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2169

Richard Hathaway allegedly cannot be made to eat and drink in court though the doctor present tries several means to get him to; it is decided to have him scratch Sarah Morduck before the court, and when he does, Hathaway immediately calls for food. Sir Thomas Lane orders bread and cheese be provided to him, and Hathaway is said to consume more than an ordinary man would in three days. Lane then observes Hathaway urinate voluminously into his britches, and pass a small amount of excrement.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2170

Sarah Morduck is allegedly heard to say at the examination that "the same time that he would be well when had scratch'd her" and soon after Richard Hathaway desired food; this combined with the depositions against her results in Sir Thomas Lane committing her to gaol to await further examination and trial. As she is being taken away, she is said to have sworn to have her revenge against several of them.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

1701, April London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2978

A rat (Anonymous 242) appears to James Barrow, to which the child says, "Satan, thou must be burned in hell fire, and all that do obey thee," often repeating those words. The rat tells the child he must go up stairs, "and play with his pretty Rat there," at which command James Barrow often would go up the stairs. There, a "little box with single money in it," would be forced out of his hand, and the child would try to "take it up often," repeating to himself, "I will not sing, I will not sing." However, usually he would sing.(7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2979

James Barrow is observed to engage in "very strange actions," such as running around the house with his hands over his ears, or hopping. Sometimes "he would sweat very much," as he "would labour and strive, as if he had been ready to be choaked." At other times, he would lie down on his back on a board, and beat himself on the face and head "as hard as he could." These actions would happen often in a day, causing him to seem like a changeling. At other times, "he would be taken with lameness, his limbs hanging down," so that he was forced to be carried. He would only come out of such fits when he was behind a door in a chair, and forced to sing.(7 - 8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7 - 8

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2980

John Barrow receives many conflicting opinions on how best to care for his bewitched son, James Barrow, but nothing seems to work. He wishes to engage in "Fasting and Prayer," as he believes some "evil Spirit or Spirits [his son] was possessed with, by the malice of some Witch." He decides to seek further advice, and happens upon a "learned Doctor." (Anonymous 487)(11)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 11

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2981

The Doctor (Anonymous 487) helping John Barrow and his bewitched son, James Barrow, proves unhelpful, as he never saw the child in person. John Barrow sees this incident as an attempt on the devil's part to delay or prevent the dispossession of his son, James Barrow, and so leaves the service of the Doctor (Anonymous 487).(11 - 12)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 11 - 12

1661 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
2982

The sister of Hannah Crump starts a day of fasting and prayer on behalf of her possessed sister, in order to begin dispossession. During this day, Hannah Crump rises from her bed "in a very great race," tearing at her clothes, and crying out "in a lamentable manner." Although there are times Hanna Crump quiets down, she still resists, kicking her father, and continuing to burn herself and her family members, breaking windows, and demanding her tabacco pipe. She reveals during prayers that her illness befell her after she consumed an apple a woman (Anonymous 488) brought her in sickness. Her family turns their prayers towards stopping the witch's powers, and she resists violently, spitting at her father. Prayer continues until evening, when Hannah Crump is "quiet on the bed, as one that was willing to rest her self after a weary dayes work."(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18 - 19

1662, July London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England