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77 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific parish

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
341

Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike, confesses before Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell. In her confession, she alleges that twenty years before, she was coming home from begging and, near the Stonepit in Gouldshey in the Forest of Pendle, a devil or spirit appeared to her in the shape of a boy wearing a coat half-brown, half-black. This spirit told her that if she gave him her soul, she could have anything she requested. Southerns demanded his name; he said he was called Tibb. Tempted by his promises, she agreed to give him her soul.(B2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2

1592   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
344

Elizabeth Southerns alleges in her confession that the best way to kill someone through witchcraft is to make a clay image of the person and dry it thoroughly. She says that if you want them to be afflicted in one place more than another, to take a thorn or pin and prick that part of the image. If you want a part of their body to be consumed away, take that part of the image and burn it. To consume their whole body, take the remainder of the image and burn it; this will cause them to die.(B2v-B3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3v

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
345

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that she, Elizabeth Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitched Robert Nutter to death. She claims that Southerns also showed her that she had bewitched Richard Ashton to death.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

1612, May 19   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
346

James Device alleges during his examination that, around the last Saint Peter's Day, Henry Bullocke came to Elizabeth Southerns and accused her granddaughter, James' sister, Alison Device, of bewitching his child, and demanded that Alison come with him to his house. Alison did, and when they got there, James claims he saw her fall on her knees, beg forgiveness, and confess to bewitching the child. (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

1611, June 29   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
347

Anne Whittle's confession and examination is heard by Justice of the Peace for Lancashire Roger Nowell on April 2, 1612 at the fence in the Forest of Pendle. (E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
348

James Device alleges during his examination that the teeth Henry Hargreaves and he found buried at the west end of Elizabeth Southerns' house are the same teeth Anne Whittle gave Southerns twelve years before. He says they also found a clay image near the teeth, almost withered away, of Anne Nutter, Anthony Nutter's daughter.(E3v-E4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E3v-E4

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
350

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, after Mrs. Moore chided her for using a charm to amend some drink, Whittle called for her familiar, Fancie, and instructed him to bite the Moores' cow on the head and make it go mad. Fancie turned into a brown dog and bit the cow, which died within six weeks.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
351

James Device alleges during his examination that, twelve years before, Anne Whittle took three scalps and and eight teeth from people buried in the graveyard of the new church in Pendle. Whittle is said to have kept four teeth for herself, and to have given the other four to Elizabeth Southerns, who showed them to Device. (E3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E3v

1600   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
354

Alison Device alleges during her examination that, about eleven years before, the family's firehouse was broken into and all or most of their linen, half a peck of cut oatmeal and a quantity of meal was stolen, all worth about twenty shillings. The following Sunday, Alison says she went to Anne Redferne and took a parcel of the same from her, claiming they were the goods stolen from her family. (E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1601   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
355

Alison Device alleges during her examination that her father, John Device, was afraid of Anne Whittle, and made a deal to pay her a measure of meal every year if she would not harm his family. This lasted until he died, eleven years before; Alison claims that he said on his deathbed that "Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, did bewitch him to death, because the said meale was not paid the last yeare. "(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1601   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
357

James Device alleges during his examination that, the previous Lent, John Duckworth promised him an old shirt, but when he went to collect it two weeks later, Duckworth denied it to him. As he left Duckworth's house, his familiar Dandy appeared to him and said "Thou didst touch the said Duckworth." Device denied it, but Dandy insisted that "thou didst touch him, and therfore I haue power of him[.]" Device finally agreed, and bid Dandy to kill Duckworth. A week later, the man was dead.(H3-H4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H4

1611, April   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
366

James Device gives deposition alleging that both Jane Bulcock and John Bulcock attended the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday.(Q3v-Q4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q3v-Q4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
367

James Device gives deposition that, at the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower, he heard John Bulcock and Jane Bulcock confess to bewitching Jennet Deane, and give their consent to bewitching Master Thomas Lister and Leonard Lister to death.(Q3v-Q4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q3v-Q4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
907

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that the third time her familiar Ball appeared to her, he was in the shape of a brown dog; this was four years before. Ball urged her to make a clay image of John Robinson, which Device did in her mother's house, drying it with the fire. She crumbled the image over the course of a week, and about a week after it was gone, Robinson died. Device claimed she did it because Robinson had "chidden and becalled" her for having a bastard child. (F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4v

1608   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
910

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that she heard Katherine Hewit and John Bulcock give their consent to assist Jennet Preston in murdering Master Lister at the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower.(Q4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Q4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
913

Jennet Device alleges during her deposition that her brother, James Device, has been a witch for three years, ever since a familiar in the shape of a black dog appeared to him at their mother, Elizabeth Device's, house. The familiar's name is Dandy.(H3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3v

1609   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
915

From all the depositions given in court, a partial guest list for the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday is drafted. This list includes Elizabeth Device, Alice Nutter, Katherine Hewit, John Bulcock, Jane Bulcock, Alice Grey, Jennet Hargraves, Elizabeth Hargraves, Christopher Howgate, Christopher Hargraves, Grace Hay, Anne Crunckshey, Elizabeth Howgate and Jennet Preston. (Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Rv-R2

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
917

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Mrs. Moore, wife to John Moore, once sent for her to amend some drink that had been forspoken. Whittle recited the charm she used, which successfully unwitched the drink. Mrs. Moore was offended by the charm and chided Whittle.()

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613,

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1200

About a week after imprisoning Elizabeth Southerns, Anne Whittle, Anne Redferne and Alison Device at Lancaster Castel, Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell becomes aware of a meeting at Malking Tower in the Forest of Pendle. He hears that at this meeting, numerous people plotted to murder Thomas Cowell and Thomas Lister, and to blow up Lancaster Castle before the next Assizes.(C2v-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v-C3v

1612, April 9   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1203

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, starting fourteen or fifteen years before, a spirit would come to her in the shape of a man for four years. When he came, he would ask her for her soul. At the end of the four years, Whittle finally agreed, and the spirit promised that "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list." He commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie, and to call that name whenever she wanted anything of him. Not long after, Fancie tried to convince her to let him hurt Richard Baldwyn's wife, but she would not let him.(D3-D3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D3v

1597   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1204

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Robert Nutter desired to have his pleasure of her daughter, Anne Redferne, and became angry when she denied him. He left in a rage, saying "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard of this, she called her familiar Fancie to her. Fancie came in the shape of a man, and Whittle told him to go revenge her of Robert Nutter. Nutter died three months later.(D4-D4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D4v

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1205

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that Elizabeth Nutter, grandmother to Robert Nutter, approached her, Widow Lomeshaw and Jane Boothman to request their assistance in killing Robert, so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle claims that all three agreed initially, but that she backed out after her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Lomeshaw was angry with Redferne when Whittle withdrew her support, but was calmed down by Mr. Baldwyn, the schoolmaster for Covlne, and Redferne's gift of a capon. Whittle added that she thought Lomeshaw and Boothman did what they could to kill Robert. This took place before Robert made advances on Anne Redferne.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1206

Elizabeth Southerns alleges during her examination that one midsummer day, about half a year before Robert Nutter died, she went to Thomas Redferne's house, and saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne on either side of the ditch outside the house. Whittle was making two clay images, and Redferne one. Southerns asked her familar, Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, what they were doing. Tibb told her they were making pictures of Christopher Nutter, Robert Nutter, and Robert's wife Marie Nutter. When Southerns would not join them, Tibb became angry and shoved her into the ditch, spilling her can of milk, and vanished. Tibb reappeared in the shape of a hare once Southerns was a quarter mile from the Redferne house.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1207

James Robinson alleges during his examination that, six years before, his wife hired Anne Whittle to card wool. While Whittle worked, she drew drink several times. For the next eight or nine weeks, all the drink in the house was found to be spoiled; Robinson accused Whittle of causing the spoilage.(E2-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E2v

1606   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1210

James Robinson alleges during his examination that, eighteen years before, he lived with Robert Nutter the elder. During this time, Robert Nutter the younger fell ill, and Robinson heard him complain several times that "he verily thought that the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and the said Redfernes wife, had bewitched him." Shortly after that, just before Nutter departed for Wales with his master, Sir Richard Shattleworth, Robinson heard him speaking to Thomas Redferne; Nutter told Redferne that "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." Nutter died on his way home, before Candlemas of the same year.(E2-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E2v

1594   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1215

James Robinson claims during his examination that "Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches."(E2-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E2v

1612, August 17   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1216

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that she called on Fancie, who was in the shape of a man, and bid him to kill Anthony Nutter's cow; the cow died not long after. Whittle claims that she did it because she thought Nutter favoured Elizabeth Southern over her.(E2-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2-E3

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1217

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that her familiar, Fancie, is responsible for her loss of most of her sight.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

1612, April 2   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1218

Anne Whittle alleges that her familiar, Fancie, came to her one night the previous summer in the shape of a bear and gaped at her. He had appeared to her in this shape many times since. The last time he appeared to her, midsummer last, he was in this shape; Whittle would not speak to him and Fancie pulled her down.(E2v-E3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3v

1611, June   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1221

Allison Device alleges during her examination that, two years before, she heard that Anne Whittle was suspected of bewitching John Moore's drink, and that Whittle had said she would "meet with the said Iohn Moore, or his."(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1222

Alison Device alleges during her examination that she had seen Anne Whittle with a clay image of John Moore Jr, child of John Moore. The child fell sick, languished for half a year and died. (E4-F)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-F

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1223

Alison Device alleges during her examination that, two years before, she was visiting with Anne Nutter, Anthony Nutter's daughter at their home, when Anne Whittle came to call. Device and Anne laughed at Whittle, and Whittle said to them "I will be meet with the one of you." Anne Nutter became sick the next day and died three weeks later. (E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1224

Allison Device alleges during her examination that, six or seven years before, Anne Whittle had a falling out with Hugh Moore when Moore accused her of bewitching his cattle. Whittle is said to have cursed Moore and said she would be revenged of him. He fell sick not long after, languished for about six months, and died. On his deathbed, Moore allegedly said that Whittle had bewitched him to death. (E4-F)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-F

1605   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1225

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that she, Elizabeth Southerns and Alice Nutter joined together to bewitch Henry Mytton to death.(F4-F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4-F4v

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1226

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that her mother, Elizabeth Device, is a witch, and she knows this because she has seen a familiar spirit come to her numerous times at her home of Malking Tower. The spirit takes the shape of a brown dog, and is called Ball. When Ball came, he would ask her mother what she would have him do.(F4v-Gv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4v-Gv

1612, August 17   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1227

James Device alleges during his examination that, two years before, his grandmother Elizabeth Southerns urged him to go to the new church in Pendle the day before Good Friday and take Communion, but not to eat the bread. Instead, he was to deliver it to whatever thing met him on the way back home. He went to church as requested, but decided to eat the Communion bread. On the way home, he met a thing in the shape of a hare, which demanded to know whether he had brought the bread. When Device answered that he had not, the hare threatened to pull him to pieces. It vanished when Device crossed himself.(H3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3

1610, April 8   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1228

James Device alleges during his examination that, four days after his grandmother sent him to get communion bread, a spirit appeared to him in the shape of a brown dog. The spirit asked for his soul, offering him revenge against anyone he desired in return. James replied that "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it."(H3-H3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H3v

1610, April 12   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1229

James Device alleges during his examination that two or three days after his familiar first appeared to him, he went to the Carre-Hall, where he argued with Anne Townley. Townley accused him and his mother Elizabeth Device of theft and kicked him out, hitting him between the shoulders on the way. A day or two after that, the spirit came again, this time in the shape of a black dog and calling itself Dandy, and urged him to make a clay image of Townley. Dandy said that if Device did, he would kill her for him. The next morning, Device made the clay image, dried it by the fire, and crumbled it over the course of the next week. Two days after the image was gone, Townley was dead. (H3-H3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H3v

1610, April 15   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1230

Jennet Device alleges during her deposition that two years before, her brother James Device called his familiar Dandy in her presence and asked the familiar to help him kill Anne Townley. A week later, Jennet claims she saw Townley in the kitchen of the the Carre-Hall looking unwell, and she thinks that James and Dandy are responsible.(H4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H4v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1231

James Device is indicted on two more counts of murder for bewitching to death John Hargraves and Blaze Hargreaves. He pleads not guilty to both.(I-Iv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I-Iv

1612, August 18   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1248

Alison Device alleges in her confession that two years before, her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns persuaded her to allow a familiar to appear to her. Southerns advised her to allow it to suck on some part of her so that she might command it to do her bidding. Not long after, a thing like a black dog appeared to her and asked her to give it her soul. She agreed, and allowed the familiar to suck at her breasts below her nipples. The spot was blue for six months after. (R3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1250

Alison Device alleges in her confession that, five days after she bid her familiar (Anonymous 186) to lame John Law, she went begging and the familiar appeared to her again. Anonymous 186 asked her to "Stay and speake with me" but she would not, and the familiar had not appeared to her since.(R3v-R4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v-R4

1612, March 23   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
1451

Edmund Robinson testifies to George Long that that he did not believe his son (Edmund Robinson Jr.) when he first came to him and his wife telling of witches. However, his son's persistence and his tears made Edmund Robinson begin to wonder whether the boy had had a vision of sorts concerning witches in the area.(144)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 144

1634, July 12   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2466

Elizabeth Southerns alleges in her confession that for five or six years, Tibb would appear to her regularly at dawn and ask what she wanted to have or have him do. Southerns claimed that at this time, she always replied that she wanted nothing yet.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2467

Elizabeth Southerns alleges in her confession that six years after Tibb first appeared to her, she was drowsing in the sun with a small child on her knee one Sunday morning. Tibb came in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to get blood from under her left arm. At this, she woke and said "Iesus saue my Child; but had no power, nor could not say, Iesus saue her selfe." This was enough to make Tibb disappear again. However, the banishment left Southerns mad for the next eight weeks.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2468

Elizabeth Southerns alleges that just before the previous Christmas, her daughter Elizabeth Device helped out Richard Baldwyn's family at their mill, and Device sent Southerns to call on Baldwyn to ask for some kind of repayment. As Southerns was blind in her advanced age, her granddaughter Alison led her to the mill; on the way, they met with Baldwyn. Baldwyn threw them off the property, saying "get out of my ground Whores and Witches, I will burne the one of you, and hang the other." Southerns met with her spirit Tibb on the way back home, and bid him "Reuenge thee eyther of him, or his."(B3-B3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B3-B3v

1611   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2470

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that, fourteen years ago, Elizabeth Southerns seduced her to "condescent & agree to become subiect vnto that diuelish abhominable profession of Witchcraft." Whittle and Southerns were at Southern's home in the Forest of Pendle. Soon after she agreed, the Devil came to her in the shape of a man and moved her to become his subject and give him her soul. Whittle resisted at first, but Southerns persuaded her until she yielded. The spirit also demanded a part of her body to suck from and took "a place of her right side neere to her ribbes."(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2471

Anne Whittle alleges in her confession that the night Elizabeth Southerns persuaded her to become a witch and make a compact with a spirit, a thing appeared in the shape of a spotted bitch and told Southerns that "she should haue Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will." This spirit, which was Southerns' familiar Tibb, brought a feast of "Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke" but no matter how much they ate, they never felt full or any benefit from eating. Tibb was accompanied by Whittle's new familiar, a spirit calling itself Fancie; the two of them cast light over the feast and cleared away the remnants. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

1598   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2473

Alison Device gives deposition accusing her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns of begging, persuading and advising her numerous times to allow a Devil or familiar to appear to her. Southerns also wanted her to allow this spirit to suck at some part of her, and claimed that if she did, the spirit would do whatever she wanted. This was two years prior to Device's examination.(C)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2474

Alison Device gives deposition against her grandmother, Elizabeth Southerns, alleging that John Nutter once came to Southerns for help with a sick cow. Southerns agreed to look at the animal, and had Alison lead her to it at about 10 o'clock at night; Southerns stayed there for about half an hour, and Alison's sister Jennet led her home again. The cow was dead the next morning, leading Alison to believe that Southerns bewitched it to death.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1612, March 13   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2475

Alison Device alleged in her deposition against Elizabeth Southerns that, about two years before, Alison had got a piggin, or wooden bucket, of blue milk and brought it to Southerns. She found, on arrival, that there was a quarter-pound of butter in the milk, and still the same amount of milk remaining. Alison added that, when she arrived, Southerns had no butter left in the house. (C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2476

Alison Device gives deposition against Elizabeth Southerns alleging that Southerns had a falling out with Richard Baldwyn two years before, and that Baldwyn would not allow her on his land. Device claims that Southerns had her lead her to Baldwyn's home around 10 o'clock at night four days later, and that Southerns stayed about an hour until Device's younger sister Jennet fetched her home. Device heard the next day that Baldwyn's daughter was sick; the child languished for a year or so and then died. Device accuses Southerns of bewitching the girl to death, as she had heard Southerns curse Baldwyn numerous times.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2477

Alison Device gives deposition against Elizabeth Southerns alleging that Southerns had a falling out with Richard Baldwyn two years before, and that Baldwyn would not allow her on his land. Device claims that Southerns had her lead her to Baldwyn's home around 10 o'clock at night four days later, and that Southerns stayed about an hour until Device's younger sister Jennet fetched her home. Device heard the next day that Baldwyn's daughter was sick; the child languished for a year or so and then died. Device accuses Southerns of bewitching the girl to death, as she had heard Southerns curse Baldwyn numerous times.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2479

James Device alleges during his examination that, about a month ago, he was walking toward his mother's home at sunset and met a brown dog coming from his grandmother's house. About two or three nights later, he heard "a voyce of a great number of Children screiking and crying pittifully" coming from his grandmother's home when he reached the same place where he had met the dog. The next five nights, also at sunset, he would hear "a foule yelling like vnto a great number of Cattes: but what they were, this Examinate cannot tell." (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

1612, March   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2480

James Device alleges during his deposition that one night last month, a thing (Anonymous 178) came into his bedroom around midnight and lay heavily on him for about an hour. The spirit then left out the window. All he could see of it was that it was black and about the size of a hare or cat.(C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

1612, March   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2482

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that she bewitched James Robinson to death.(F4-F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4-F4v

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2483

Elizabeth Device makes a confession at the home of James Wisely in the Forest of Pendle on April 27, 1612. This confession is witnessed by Justices for the Peace for Lancaster Roger Nowell and Nicholas Bannister.(F4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4

1612, April 27   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2487

James Device alleges during his examination that, about a year before, he heard his grandmother Elizabeth Southerns say that his mother Elizabeth Device had bewitched Henry Mytton to death with the help of some others. Mytton was killed because Southerns had asked him for a penny and he denied her. She arranged for his death in revenge.(G2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G2

1611   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2488

James Device alleges during his examination that, three years before, he was at his grandmother's house with his mother, Elizabeth Device, when Elizabeth was approached by a "thing in shape of a browne dogge, which his mother called Ball." The spirit spoke to Elizabeth and bid her make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it hard, and crumble it little by little so that Robinson's body would decay and wear away. Ball said that when the image was gone, Robinson would die; he then vanished. The next day, James saw his mother make an image. She crumbled it over about three weeks, and two days after it was gone, Robinson was dead.(G2-G2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G2-G2v

1609   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2489

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that, on Good Friday, she had a number of witches at her home of Malking Tower to dine. She confirmed the list her son James Device had given as being in attendance. (G3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2490

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that on Good Friday, the same day she held a feast of witches at her home of Malking Tower, her mother Elizabeth Southerns had two women of Burneley Paris at her house, the names of whom Richard Nutter's wife could tell, and that Anne Crouckshey of Marsden was also there.(G3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2491

Elizabeth Device alleges in her confession that she recalls discussing killing Master Lister at the feast at Malking Tower, but she denies that there was any talk of killing the gaoler, or of blowing up Lancaster Castle.(G3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2492

Jennet Device alleges during her examination that 20 people, only two of which were men, attended the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday. Her mother, Elizabeth Device, told her they were all witches, and that they were there to give a name to her sister Alison Device's familiar. They feasted on beef, bacon and mutton. Jennet gave the names of six of the attending witches: The wife of Hugh Hargraves, her uncle Christopher Howgate and his wife Elizabeth Howgate, Dick Miles' wife, and Christopher Jacks and his wife. She did not know the names of the rest, but confirmed that her mother and brother, James Device, were also there.(G3v-G4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v-G4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2493

James Device alleges during his examination that numerous people dined at his mother's home of Malking Tower at noon on Good Friday, three of which were men. They met to name his sister Alison Device's familiar, which they could not do because Alison was imprisoned at Lancaster Castle. The conversation turned to discussion of freeing Elizabeth Southerns, Alison Device, Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne from their imprisonment. They determined that they would need to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and blow up the castle before the next assizes in order to let them escape. (G4-G4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G4-G4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2494

James Device alleges during his examination that the following people were witches and had attended the feast at Malking Tower on Good Friday: Hugh Hargreave's wife, Christopher Bulcock's wife, John Bulcock, Myle's Nutter's mother, Elizabeth Hargreaves, Christopher Howgate, Elizabeth Howgate, Alice Graye, and Kathryn Hewit (alias Mould-heel), Preston's wife, his mother Elizabeth Device, and himself. Device claimed that they all left on horseback after agreeing to meet the next Good Friday at Preston's wife's home. If they needed to meet in the mean time, that meeting would be held at Romley's Moor.(G4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2495

Jennet Device gives deposition alleging that about three years before, her brother James Device called his familiar Dandy to kill both John Hargraves and Blaze Hargraves. (Iv-I2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Iv-I2

1609   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2496

James Device alleges during his examination that he stole a wether (a castrated sheep) from John Robinson and brought it to Malking Tower for the Good Friday feast. He also restated that the meeting was to name Alison Device's familiar, but that she was not there, and that they had discussed killing the gaoler at Lancaster and blowing up the castle to free the prisoners.(I2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2497

James Device alleges during his examination that one of the women at the Malking Tower feast on Good Friday had come to ask assistance from the rest to bewitch Thomas Lister to death. She claimed that Lister had "orne malice vnto her, and had thought to haue put her away at the last Assises at Yorke." She also claimed not to have the power to do the deed herself.(I2v-I3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v-I3

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2514

Margaret Crooke gives deposition against Anne Redferne before Justice of the Peace Roger Nowell, alleging that her brother Robert Nutter had a falling out with Redferne at Whitsontide 18 or 19 years before. He fell sick about a fortnight later, and died around Candlemas. Crooke claims to have heard him say often that "Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." (O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

1593, June 3   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2515

Margaret Crooke alleges in her deposition that her father, Christopher Nutter, became sick the Maudlintide after her brother Robert Nutter died claiming Anne Redferne had bewitched him. He languished until Michaelmas and then died. Crooke claimed that during his sickness, he " did sundry times say, That hee was bewitched; but named no bodie that should doe the same."(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

1594, July 22   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2516

John Nutter gives deposition alleging that, around Christmas eighteen or nineteen years before, he heard his brother Robert Nutter tell their father Christopher Nutter "Father, I am sure I am bewitched by the Chattox, Anne Chattox, and Anne Redferne her daughter, I pray you cause them to bee layed in Lancaster Castle[.]" Christopher called him foolish, and blamed Robert for his own misfortunes. Robert wept and continued to insist he was bewitched, saying that "I will procure them to bee laid where they shall be glad to bite Lice in two with their teeth."(Ov-O2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ov-O2

1593, December 25   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2518

James Device alleges during his examination that, two years before, he saw three clay images half a yard long at the end of the Redferne home. He claims that he saw Thomas Redferne holding one, his daughter Marie Redferne holding another, and his wife Anne Redferne holding the third. Anne Redferne was crumbling hers. Device could not tell whose images they were. Shortly after he walked away, a thing like a hare appeared and spit fire at him.(O2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O2v

1610   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2521

James Device alleges during his examination that Alice Nutter attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower.(P)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2523

James Device alleges during his examination that Katherine Hewit attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. He also claimed to have overheard Hewit and Alice Grey confess to killing the child Anne Foulds and to having Michael Hartley's child in hand.(P4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2524

Elizabeth Device alleges during her examination that Katherine Hewit was among the witches who attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. Device claims to have heard Hewit and Alice Grey confess to having killed the child Anne Foulds, and to having got ahold of another child. (P4-P4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P4-P4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2525

Elisabeth Device alleges during her examination that, during the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower, she heard Katherine Hewit give her consent for the murder of Master Lister.(P4-P4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, P4-P4v

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England 
2553

James Device alleges during his examination that a woman from Gisburne Parish in Yorke (identified as Jennet Preston) came to the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower to ask the assistance of the company gathered there. She desired to kill Master Lister of Westby because he "had borne malice vnto her, and had thought to haue put her away at the last Assizes at Yorke." He heard her say that her power was not strong enough anymore for her to do it herself.(Y3v-Y4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Y3v-Y4

1612, April 6   The Forest of Pendle  Lancashire  Lancaster  England