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ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
329

An old woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to about 80 at the time of her death and the wife of John Samuel, mother of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. Mother Alice Samuel was first accused of witchcraft when visiting the Throckmorton family while one of their daughters was sick; the child said "Grandmother looke where the old witch sitteth (pointing to the said mother Samuell) did you euer see...one more like a witch than she is." The child continued to be sick, as did the other four Throckmorton daughters within a few months. All five developed fits, claimed to be afflicted by Mother Samuel, and to see an apparition of her during their fits. Mother Samuel would frequently be invited to the Throckmorton home to visit the children; this was used in an attempt to persuade her to come so the children could scratch her. She refused and had to be forced to come, along with Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; Mother Samuel allegedly cautioned Agnes to confess nothing at that time. Three of the children fell into tormenting fits as soon as Mother Samuel entered the home, and one, who was bedridden, successfully scratched her. Elizabeth Throckmorton claimed to see an apparition of Mother Samuel with a black child on her shoulders. Lady Cromwell charged Mother Samuel with bewitching Elizabeth shortly thereafter; Mother Samuel denied it and Lady Cromwell took a lock of Mother Samuel's hair and her hairlace. She gave both to Mistress Throckmorton to burn; that night Lady Cromwell had a nightmare of Mother Samuel and a cat, after which she fell sick and died. Henry Pickering, uncle to the Throckmorton children, began to follow Mother Samuel and observe her errands. Henry spoke to her after one day of this, and she told him that the Throckmorton family abused her, that the children were faking their fits and that she would not permit her children to carry on like that without some punishment; she ended the conversation with the claim that her husband would beat her for tarrying. The eldest Throckmorton daughter, Joan, claimed to have a vision of her uncle observing Mother Samuel and described Mother Samuel's errands. Soon after, the girls all began to claim to see spirits that accused Mother Samuel. Not long after, Mother Samuel was midwife to an aunt of the Throckmorton children and the girls increased their accusations. Robert Throckmorton, noting that the girls had less fits when Mother Samuel was present, asked John Samuel for permission to hire Mother Samuel; John agreed but Mother Samuel did not and he beat her for it. She eventually agreed, and the children began to allege that the spirits that came to them were hers. While in the Throckmorton household, Mother Samuel was seen to have red marks like flea bites on her chin, which would bleed; she confessed that they were where her spirits sucked from her. She later alleged that a spirit had gotten into her belly, causing her pain and swelling. Robert Throckmorton joined his daughters in accusing her and bid her to confess. She was eventually imprisoned, and charged with bewitching Lady Cromwell to death along with her husband and daughter. In her confession, she claimed to have six familiars in the shape of chickens, three of which were named Pluck, Catch and White. She also accused John Samuel of both witching and unwitching, but refused to say anything against their daughter. While imprisoned, Throckmorton accused Mother Samuel of bewitching his livestock. She was also accused of bewitching a gaoler's servant to death, and causing her gaoler's son to become sick. Following her execution, she was stripped and searched. This search found her to have half-inch teat "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

Alice Samuel Alice Samuel Relative of Witch
329

An old woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to about 80 at the time of her death and the wife of John Samuel, mother of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. Mother Alice Samuel was first accused of witchcraft when visiting the Throckmorton family while one of their daughters was sick; the child said "Grandmother looke where the old witch sitteth (pointing to the said mother Samuell) did you euer see...one more like a witch than she is." The child continued to be sick, as did the other four Throckmorton daughters within a few months. All five developed fits, claimed to be afflicted by Mother Samuel, and to see an apparition of her during their fits. Mother Samuel would frequently be invited to the Throckmorton home to visit the children; this was used in an attempt to persuade her to come so the children could scratch her. She refused and had to be forced to come, along with Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; Mother Samuel allegedly cautioned Agnes to confess nothing at that time. Three of the children fell into tormenting fits as soon as Mother Samuel entered the home, and one, who was bedridden, successfully scratched her. Elizabeth Throckmorton claimed to see an apparition of Mother Samuel with a black child on her shoulders. Lady Cromwell charged Mother Samuel with bewitching Elizabeth shortly thereafter; Mother Samuel denied it and Lady Cromwell took a lock of Mother Samuel's hair and her hairlace. She gave both to Mistress Throckmorton to burn; that night Lady Cromwell had a nightmare of Mother Samuel and a cat, after which she fell sick and died. Henry Pickering, uncle to the Throckmorton children, began to follow Mother Samuel and observe her errands. Henry spoke to her after one day of this, and she told him that the Throckmorton family abused her, that the children were faking their fits and that she would not permit her children to carry on like that without some punishment; she ended the conversation with the claim that her husband would beat her for tarrying. The eldest Throckmorton daughter, Joan, claimed to have a vision of her uncle observing Mother Samuel and described Mother Samuel's errands. Soon after, the girls all began to claim to see spirits that accused Mother Samuel. Not long after, Mother Samuel was midwife to an aunt of the Throckmorton children and the girls increased their accusations. Robert Throckmorton, noting that the girls had less fits when Mother Samuel was present, asked John Samuel for permission to hire Mother Samuel; John agreed but Mother Samuel did not and he beat her for it. She eventually agreed, and the children began to allege that the spirits that came to them were hers. While in the Throckmorton household, Mother Samuel was seen to have red marks like flea bites on her chin, which would bleed; she confessed that they were where her spirits sucked from her. She later alleged that a spirit had gotten into her belly, causing her pain and swelling. Robert Throckmorton joined his daughters in accusing her and bid her to confess. She was eventually imprisoned, and charged with bewitching Lady Cromwell to death along with her husband and daughter. In her confession, she claimed to have six familiars in the shape of chickens, three of which were named Pluck, Catch and White. She also accused John Samuel of both witching and unwitching, but refused to say anything against their daughter. While imprisoned, Throckmorton accused Mother Samuel of bewitching his livestock. She was also accused of bewitching a gaoler's servant to death, and causing her gaoler's son to become sick. Following her execution, she was stripped and searched. This search found her to have half-inch teat "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

Alice Samuel Alice Samuel Witch
329

An old woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to about 80 at the time of her death and the wife of John Samuel, mother of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. Mother Alice Samuel was first accused of witchcraft when visiting the Throckmorton family while one of their daughters was sick; the child said "Grandmother looke where the old witch sitteth (pointing to the said mother Samuell) did you euer see...one more like a witch than she is." The child continued to be sick, as did the other four Throckmorton daughters within a few months. All five developed fits, claimed to be afflicted by Mother Samuel, and to see an apparition of her during their fits. Mother Samuel would frequently be invited to the Throckmorton home to visit the children; this was used in an attempt to persuade her to come so the children could scratch her. She refused and had to be forced to come, along with Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; Mother Samuel allegedly cautioned Agnes to confess nothing at that time. Three of the children fell into tormenting fits as soon as Mother Samuel entered the home, and one, who was bedridden, successfully scratched her. Elizabeth Throckmorton claimed to see an apparition of Mother Samuel with a black child on her shoulders. Lady Cromwell charged Mother Samuel with bewitching Elizabeth shortly thereafter; Mother Samuel denied it and Lady Cromwell took a lock of Mother Samuel's hair and her hairlace. She gave both to Mistress Throckmorton to burn; that night Lady Cromwell had a nightmare of Mother Samuel and a cat, after which she fell sick and died. Henry Pickering, uncle to the Throckmorton children, began to follow Mother Samuel and observe her errands. Henry spoke to her after one day of this, and she told him that the Throckmorton family abused her, that the children were faking their fits and that she would not permit her children to carry on like that without some punishment; she ended the conversation with the claim that her husband would beat her for tarrying. The eldest Throckmorton daughter, Joan, claimed to have a vision of her uncle observing Mother Samuel and described Mother Samuel's errands. Soon after, the girls all began to claim to see spirits that accused Mother Samuel. Not long after, Mother Samuel was midwife to an aunt of the Throckmorton children and the girls increased their accusations. Robert Throckmorton, noting that the girls had less fits when Mother Samuel was present, asked John Samuel for permission to hire Mother Samuel; John agreed but Mother Samuel did not and he beat her for it. She eventually agreed, and the children began to allege that the spirits that came to them were hers. While in the Throckmorton household, Mother Samuel was seen to have red marks like flea bites on her chin, which would bleed; she confessed that they were where her spirits sucked from her. She later alleged that a spirit had gotten into her belly, causing her pain and swelling. Robert Throckmorton joined his daughters in accusing her and bid her to confess. She was eventually imprisoned, and charged with bewitching Lady Cromwell to death along with her husband and daughter. In her confession, she claimed to have six familiars in the shape of chickens, three of which were named Pluck, Catch and White. She also accused John Samuel of both witching and unwitching, but refused to say anything against their daughter. While imprisoned, Throckmorton accused Mother Samuel of bewitching his livestock. She was also accused of bewitching a gaoler's servant to death, and causing her gaoler's son to become sick. Following her execution, she was stripped and searched. This search found her to have half-inch teat "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

Alice Samuel Alice Samuel Midwife
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Demoniac
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Accuser
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Victim
2224

An old man from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the husband of Mother Alice Samuel, father of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel refuses to go to the Throckmorton household after Robert Throckmorton arranges for her hire with John Samuel, he beats her with a cudgel until Robert Throckmorton convinces him to stop. Mother Samuel agrees to go with Throckmorton after the beating to escape John, and would not return home until he was out on an errand. When Robert Throckmorton came to question Agnes, he claimed to not know where she was while she hid above the parlour with sacks and tubs weighing down the trap door. After Mother Samuel was made to confess by the Throckmortons and Dr. Dorington convinced Robert Throckmorton to allow her to return home, John and Agnes convinced her to retract her confession. He called her a foul name the next day when he realized she had confessed all over again and had to be stopped from striking her; she fell into a faint when he tried. He later came to the Throckmorton house claiming to have heard Agnes was sick, and while there Elizabeth Throckmorton accused him of being a witch and demanded he speak a "charm" in which he confess to being a witch and that he had bewitched her; he refused. Hearing his wife deny involvement in Lady Cromwell's death in court, he said for all to hear "denie it not, but confesse the trueth: for thou didst it one way or other." Mother Samuel claimed he knew all about the death of Lady Cromwell, and that he had the skills of both a witch and an unwitcher himself. John Samuel was executed with Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel following the trial.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

John Samuel John Samuel Un-witcher
2224

An old man from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the husband of Mother Alice Samuel, father of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel refuses to go to the Throckmorton household after Robert Throckmorton arranges for her hire with John Samuel, he beats her with a cudgel until Robert Throckmorton convinces him to stop. Mother Samuel agrees to go with Throckmorton after the beating to escape John, and would not return home until he was out on an errand. When Robert Throckmorton came to question Agnes, he claimed to not know where she was while she hid above the parlour with sacks and tubs weighing down the trap door. After Mother Samuel was made to confess by the Throckmortons and Dr. Dorington convinced Robert Throckmorton to allow her to return home, John and Agnes convinced her to retract her confession. He called her a foul name the next day when he realized she had confessed all over again and had to be stopped from striking her; she fell into a faint when he tried. He later came to the Throckmorton house claiming to have heard Agnes was sick, and while there Elizabeth Throckmorton accused him of being a witch and demanded he speak a "charm" in which he confess to being a witch and that he had bewitched her; he refused. Hearing his wife deny involvement in Lady Cromwell's death in court, he said for all to hear "denie it not, but confesse the trueth: for thou didst it one way or other." Mother Samuel claimed he knew all about the death of Lady Cromwell, and that he had the skills of both a witch and an unwitcher himself. John Samuel was executed with Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel following the trial.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

John Samuel John Samuel Relative of Witch
2224

An old man from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the husband of Mother Alice Samuel, father of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel refuses to go to the Throckmorton household after Robert Throckmorton arranges for her hire with John Samuel, he beats her with a cudgel until Robert Throckmorton convinces him to stop. Mother Samuel agrees to go with Throckmorton after the beating to escape John, and would not return home until he was out on an errand. When Robert Throckmorton came to question Agnes, he claimed to not know where she was while she hid above the parlour with sacks and tubs weighing down the trap door. After Mother Samuel was made to confess by the Throckmortons and Dr. Dorington convinced Robert Throckmorton to allow her to return home, John and Agnes convinced her to retract her confession. He called her a foul name the next day when he realized she had confessed all over again and had to be stopped from striking her; she fell into a faint when he tried. He later came to the Throckmorton house claiming to have heard Agnes was sick, and while there Elizabeth Throckmorton accused him of being a witch and demanded he speak a "charm" in which he confess to being a witch and that he had bewitched her; he refused. Hearing his wife deny involvement in Lady Cromwell's death in court, he said for all to hear "denie it not, but confesse the trueth: for thou didst it one way or other." Mother Samuel claimed he knew all about the death of Lady Cromwell, and that he had the skills of both a witch and an unwitcher himself. John Samuel was executed with Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel following the trial.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

John Samuel John Samuel Witch
2225

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the daughter of Mother Alice Samuel and John Samuel, and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel was taken to the Throckmorton home to be scratched by the afflicted children, Agnes was brought with her; Mother Samuel was overheard telling Agnes not to confess to anything. Later, Robert Throckmorton came to the Samuel home to question Agnes; she hid in a room above the parlour and blocked the trap door while John Samuel tried to convince Throckmorton she wasn't there. Agnes finally emerged when Throckmorton threatened to break into the room. She was imprisoned alongside Mother Samuel, but Throckmorton took pity, posted her bail and hired her to care for his children in their fits. The children began to claim to see spirits about the same time and accused Agnes of renewing their bewitchment on Mother Samuel's behalf with the old woman's familiars. Agnes denied having any familiars for some time. Throckmorton, at the urging of his kin, forced her to say "I charge thee thou diuell, as I loue thee, and haue authoritie ouer thee, and am a Witch, and guiltie of this matter, that thou suffer this childe to be well at this present;" it was observed that the children came out of their fits every time she did so. The Throckmorton children began to scratch her routinely as well. Agnes eventually confessed to having numerous familiars, each of which tormented a particular child, and to consenting to the death of Lady Cromwell. When urged to say the Lord's Prayer and the Creed, she could not, nor could she be taught to. Agnes was charged and stood trial for bewitching Lady Cromwell to death, joining her parents in court. She denied being a witch and refused to claim pregnancy to stay her execution. She was searched after her execution, but no witches' marks were found.(B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, B

Agnes Samuel Agnes Samuel Witch
2225

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the daughter of Mother Alice Samuel and John Samuel, and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel was taken to the Throckmorton home to be scratched by the afflicted children, Agnes was brought with her; Mother Samuel was overheard telling Agnes not to confess to anything. Later, Robert Throckmorton came to the Samuel home to question Agnes; she hid in a room above the parlour and blocked the trap door while John Samuel tried to convince Throckmorton she wasn't there. Agnes finally emerged when Throckmorton threatened to break into the room. She was imprisoned alongside Mother Samuel, but Throckmorton took pity, posted her bail and hired her to care for his children in their fits. The children began to claim to see spirits about the same time and accused Agnes of renewing their bewitchment on Mother Samuel's behalf with the old woman's familiars. Agnes denied having any familiars for some time. Throckmorton, at the urging of his kin, forced her to say "I charge thee thou diuell, as I loue thee, and haue authoritie ouer thee, and am a Witch, and guiltie of this matter, that thou suffer this childe to be well at this present;" it was observed that the children came out of their fits every time she did so. The Throckmorton children began to scratch her routinely as well. Agnes eventually confessed to having numerous familiars, each of which tormented a particular child, and to consenting to the death of Lady Cromwell. When urged to say the Lord's Prayer and the Creed, she could not, nor could she be taught to. Agnes was charged and stood trial for bewitching Lady Cromwell to death, joining her parents in court. She denied being a witch and refused to claim pregnancy to stay her execution. She was searched after her execution, but no witches' marks were found.(B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, B

Agnes Samuel Agnes Samuel Relative of Witch
2227

A man from Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, known to be a doctor and "a man well knowne to be excellent skilfull in Phisicke." Robert Throckmorton consulted with him when his daughter Jane, the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, initially became afflicted with fits. The first time he concluded there was nothing wrong with Elizabeth (unless she was troubled with worms); the second time, her declared her free from the falling sickness and sent her a prescription, but it is not clear disorder the medicine was meant to treat; the third time in, he inquired as to whether there was no sorcery or witchcraft suspected in the childe. Although the answere was made no, her concluded that he could find no natural cause for Janes malady and suggested Robert Throckmorton consult Dr. Philip Butler for a second opinion. Butler prescribed the same medicines to Jane as Barrow had; the Throckmortons did not bother administering, nor any other medicines. Doctor Barrow had said that "if Master Throckmorton (to whome hee wished very well as he then said, by reason of auncient acquaintance with him) woulde follow his advice, he should not striue any more there with by Physicke, nor spend any more money about it: for he himselfe said, that he had some experience of the mallice of some witches, and he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Philip Barrow Dr. Philip Barrow Physician
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Victim
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Demoniac
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Accuser
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Accuser
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Demoniac
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Victim
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Accuser
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Demoniac
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Victim
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2231

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the son of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and brother to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Mary Throckmorton. He witnessed his sisters' affliction with fits, and was the only one for a time who could speak to Jane and have her understand him.(62-62)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 62-62

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Jr. Relative of Victim
2231

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the son of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and brother to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Mary Throckmorton. He witnessed his sisters' affliction with fits, and was the only one for a time who could speak to Jane and have her understand him.(62-62)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 62-62

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Jr. Witness
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Accuser
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Demoniac
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Victim
2233

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be wealthy and maintain a large household, and be the husband of Mistress Throckmorton, the father of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. He and his family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when his daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five of his daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Mother Samuel, in turn, said that Throckmorton's children misused her with their accusations, that they were "playing the wantons" and that if they were her children they would have been punished for it. He witnessed his daughter Joan report Henry Pickering's encounter with Mother Samuel down to their actions and exact words, and confirmed the accuracy of this report with Henry later that day. He dispersed his children to various relatives for a time, suspecting that the separation would reduce their fits; this proves to be the case. When the children were back together under his roof, he noticed that their fits were fewer when Mother Samuel was in the house, and approached her husband John Samuel, offering him money for Mother Samuel's hire. Mother Samuel refused, however, due to the accusations the children had leveled against her, but consented when Robert Throckmorton offered her refuge after John beat her severely with a cudgel for refusing. Robert began to believe his children were indeed bewitched, and ordered Mother Samuel to predict their fits, which he saw to come true. He also witnessed her chin bleeding, which Mother Samuel later told Henry Pickering was because her spirits had been sucking at it. When the children told him Agnes Samuel needed to be questioned but would hide if he tried to speak to her, Robert went to John Samuel's home to test this out. She was found to be hiding, as predicted, and would not admit she was there until he threatened to pry open the trap door she had piled with heavy sacks. At another time, he witnessed Elizabeth unable to eat until he threatened that Mother Samuel would not eat until Elizabeth could again. Not long after, he witnessed Mother Samuel suffer several days of tormenting fits of her own, including strange swellings of her belly. When his daughter Elizabeth claimed her fits would not ease until John Samuel spoke a self-accusing "charm" over her, like his daughter Agnes had been made to, Robert Throckmorton tried unsuccessfully to make John do so. He stood by his daughter Joan at the Assizes in Huntindon while she had fits before the judges and was brought out of them by Agnes' "charm." During the trial, Robert gave a deposition that was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2233

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be wealthy and maintain a large household, and be the husband of Mistress Throckmorton, the father of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. He and his family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when his daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five of his daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Mother Samuel, in turn, said that Throckmorton's children misused her with their accusations, that they were "playing the wantons" and that if they were her children they would have been punished for it. He witnessed his daughter Joan report Henry Pickering's encounter with Mother Samuel down to their actions and exact words, and confirmed the accuracy of this report with Henry later that day. He dispersed his children to various relatives for a time, suspecting that the separation would reduce their fits; this proves to be the case. When the children were back together under his roof, he noticed that their fits were fewer when Mother Samuel was in the house, and approached her husband John Samuel, offering him money for Mother Samuel's hire. Mother Samuel refused, however, due to the accusations the children had leveled against her, but consented when Robert Throckmorton offered her refuge after John beat her severely with a cudgel for refusing. Robert began to believe his children were indeed bewitched, and ordered Mother Samuel to predict their fits, which he saw to come true. He also witnessed her chin bleeding, which Mother Samuel later told Henry Pickering was because her spirits had been sucking at it. When the children told him Agnes Samuel needed to be questioned but would hide if he tried to speak to her, Robert went to John Samuel's home to test this out. She was found to be hiding, as predicted, and would not admit she was there until he threatened to pry open the trap door she had piled with heavy sacks. At another time, he witnessed Elizabeth unable to eat until he threatened that Mother Samuel would not eat until Elizabeth could again. Not long after, he witnessed Mother Samuel suffer several days of tormenting fits of her own, including strange swellings of her belly. When his daughter Elizabeth claimed her fits would not ease until John Samuel spoke a self-accusing "charm" over her, like his daughter Agnes had been made to, Robert Throckmorton tried unsuccessfully to make John do so. He stood by his daughter Joan at the Assizes in Huntindon while she had fits before the judges and was brought out of them by Agnes' "charm." During the trial, Robert gave a deposition that was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Accuser
2233

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be wealthy and maintain a large household, and be the husband of Mistress Throckmorton, the father of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. He and his family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when his daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five of his daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Mother Samuel, in turn, said that Throckmorton's children misused her with their accusations, that they were "playing the wantons" and that if they were her children they would have been punished for it. He witnessed his daughter Joan report Henry Pickering's encounter with Mother Samuel down to their actions and exact words, and confirmed the accuracy of this report with Henry later that day. He dispersed his children to various relatives for a time, suspecting that the separation would reduce their fits; this proves to be the case. When the children were back together under his roof, he noticed that their fits were fewer when Mother Samuel was in the house, and approached her husband John Samuel, offering him money for Mother Samuel's hire. Mother Samuel refused, however, due to the accusations the children had leveled against her, but consented when Robert Throckmorton offered her refuge after John beat her severely with a cudgel for refusing. Robert began to believe his children were indeed bewitched, and ordered Mother Samuel to predict their fits, which he saw to come true. He also witnessed her chin bleeding, which Mother Samuel later told Henry Pickering was because her spirits had been sucking at it. When the children told him Agnes Samuel needed to be questioned but would hide if he tried to speak to her, Robert went to John Samuel's home to test this out. She was found to be hiding, as predicted, and would not admit she was there until he threatened to pry open the trap door she had piled with heavy sacks. At another time, he witnessed Elizabeth unable to eat until he threatened that Mother Samuel would not eat until Elizabeth could again. Not long after, he witnessed Mother Samuel suffer several days of tormenting fits of her own, including strange swellings of her belly. When his daughter Elizabeth claimed her fits would not ease until John Samuel spoke a self-accusing "charm" over her, like his daughter Agnes had been made to, Robert Throckmorton tried unsuccessfully to make John do so. He stood by his daughter Joan at the Assizes in Huntindon while she had fits before the judges and was brought out of them by Agnes' "charm." During the trial, Robert gave a deposition that was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Witness
2234

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife Robert Throckmorton, the mother of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. She and her family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when her daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Mistress Throckmorton rebuked her for this, but numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Robert Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Some time later, Lady Cromwell confronted Mother Samuel on behalf of the Throckmorton family, and took from her a lock of hair and a hair net, which she gave to Mistress Throckmorton to burn.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Throckmorton Mistress Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2234

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife Robert Throckmorton, the mother of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. She and her family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when her daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Mistress Throckmorton rebuked her for this, but numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Robert Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Some time later, Lady Cromwell confronted Mother Samuel on behalf of the Throckmorton family, and took from her a lock of hair and a hair net, which she gave to Mistress Throckmorton to burn.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Throckmorton Mistress Throckmorton Witness
2235

Seven women from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to be employed as servants by Robert and Mistress Throckmorton. They begin experiencing fits after Joan Throckmorton predicts that there will be a total of twelve people afflicted in the Throckmorton household, including the five Throckmorton girls. During their fits, "they all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." This lasted about two years, and when servants left the Throckmortons' employ, their fits ceased.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Anonymous 440 (plural) Victim
2235

Seven women from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to be employed as servants by Robert and Mistress Throckmorton. They begin experiencing fits after Joan Throckmorton predicts that there will be a total of twelve people afflicted in the Throckmorton household, including the five Throckmorton girls. During their fits, "they all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." This lasted about two years, and when servants left the Throckmortons' employ, their fits ceased.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Anonymous 440 (plural) Demoniac
2236

A woman from Warboys in Hampshire. She was apprehended by Gilbert Pickering and brought to the Throckmorton house along with Mother Alice Samuel and Agnes Samuel. She was brought to one of the Throckmorton girls to be scratched. While Elizabeth Throckmorton was staying with Pickering, "at the naming of the devill, Mother Samuell, or any such black word, that keepeth the collour, as Sathan or Cicely (which is another womans name, that is suspected to be confederate in this wicked practise) she neuer feared nor would sticke at them, but alwayes shewed her selfe ready (though she very well knew that she should haue her fit for it) to cast her selfe upon the present danger."(7-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 7-11

Cicely Burder Cicely Burder Witch
2237

A man from Warboys in Hampshire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity, the parish parson or town minister and brother in law to Robert Throckmorton. Dr. Dorington visited the Throckmorton house and prayed for them, but while he did all five of the Throckmorton daughters fell into fits of shrieking and sneezing. When he paused, their fits ended, and when he resumed, their fits started once more. When Mother Alice Samuel confesses to bewitching and causing the possessions of the Throckmorton girls and displays repentance, Robert Throckmorton sends for Dr. Dorington to give comfort to her and pray for her. He hears a second confession in which she begs all the neighbours to pray for her and forgive her. He convinced Throckmorton to give her leave to return home to her husband John Samuel and counseled her to reconcile with him. However, Mother Samuel retracted her confession immediately upon returning home, and Dr. Dorington assisted Throckmorton in convincing her to confess again. He interviewed her at length while Throckmorton gathered numerous witnesses to listen outside the room, and put her words to paper for posterity, leaving her no further room to deny being a witch. After Robert Throckmorton bailed Agnes Samuel from her imprisonment alongside Mother Samuel in Huntingdon Gaol, Dr. Dorington witnessed the children's cessation of fits for a time, and also the resumption, which they blamed on Agnes picking up where her mother left off. He also witnessed Elizabeth Throckmorton accuse John Samuel of being a witch as well, including John's refusal to say a self-accusing "charm" to bring the child out of her fits. He assisted Throckmorton in questioning John during this encounter. He also witnessed Joan Throckmorton thrash and groan whenever Agnes named God or Jesus Christ, and was present when Joan scratched Agnes. After the scratching, he told Agnes that she must be in some way complicit in the children's bewitching, or else God would not allow her to suffer scratchings and accusations. HIs deposition at the Huntingdon Assizes was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 11-12

Dorington Dr. Dorington Preacher/Minister
2237

A man from Warboys in Hampshire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity, the parish parson or town minister and brother in law to Robert Throckmorton. Dr. Dorington visited the Throckmorton house and prayed for them, but while he did all five of the Throckmorton daughters fell into fits of shrieking and sneezing. When he paused, their fits ended, and when he resumed, their fits started once more. When Mother Alice Samuel confesses to bewitching and causing the possessions of the Throckmorton girls and displays repentance, Robert Throckmorton sends for Dr. Dorington to give comfort to her and pray for her. He hears a second confession in which she begs all the neighbours to pray for her and forgive her. He convinced Throckmorton to give her leave to return home to her husband John Samuel and counseled her to reconcile with him. However, Mother Samuel retracted her confession immediately upon returning home, and Dr. Dorington assisted Throckmorton in convincing her to confess again. He interviewed her at length while Throckmorton gathered numerous witnesses to listen outside the room, and put her words to paper for posterity, leaving her no further room to deny being a witch. After Robert Throckmorton bailed Agnes Samuel from her imprisonment alongside Mother Samuel in Huntingdon Gaol, Dr. Dorington witnessed the children's cessation of fits for a time, and also the resumption, which they blamed on Agnes picking up where her mother left off. He also witnessed Elizabeth Throckmorton accuse John Samuel of being a witch as well, including John's refusal to say a self-accusing "charm" to bring the child out of her fits. He assisted Throckmorton in questioning John during this encounter. He also witnessed Joan Throckmorton thrash and groan whenever Agnes named God or Jesus Christ, and was present when Joan scratched Agnes. After the scratching, he told Agnes that she must be in some way complicit in the children's bewitching, or else God would not allow her to suffer scratchings and accusations. HIs deposition at the Huntingdon Assizes was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 11-12

Dorington Dr. Dorington Relative of Victim
2237

A man from Warboys in Hampshire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity, the parish parson or town minister and brother in law to Robert Throckmorton. Dr. Dorington visited the Throckmorton house and prayed for them, but while he did all five of the Throckmorton daughters fell into fits of shrieking and sneezing. When he paused, their fits ended, and when he resumed, their fits started once more. When Mother Alice Samuel confesses to bewitching and causing the possessions of the Throckmorton girls and displays repentance, Robert Throckmorton sends for Dr. Dorington to give comfort to her and pray for her. He hears a second confession in which she begs all the neighbours to pray for her and forgive her. He convinced Throckmorton to give her leave to return home to her husband John Samuel and counseled her to reconcile with him. However, Mother Samuel retracted her confession immediately upon returning home, and Dr. Dorington assisted Throckmorton in convincing her to confess again. He interviewed her at length while Throckmorton gathered numerous witnesses to listen outside the room, and put her words to paper for posterity, leaving her no further room to deny being a witch. After Robert Throckmorton bailed Agnes Samuel from her imprisonment alongside Mother Samuel in Huntingdon Gaol, Dr. Dorington witnessed the children's cessation of fits for a time, and also the resumption, which they blamed on Agnes picking up where her mother left off. He also witnessed Elizabeth Throckmorton accuse John Samuel of being a witch as well, including John's refusal to say a self-accusing "charm" to bring the child out of her fits. He assisted Throckmorton in questioning John during this encounter. He also witnessed Joan Throckmorton thrash and groan whenever Agnes named God or Jesus Christ, and was present when Joan scratched Agnes. After the scratching, he told Agnes that she must be in some way complicit in the children's bewitching, or else God would not allow her to suffer scratchings and accusations. HIs deposition at the Huntingdon Assizes was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 11-12

Dorington Dr. Dorington Witness
2238

A woman from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to be affiliated with Saint Tues and a friend of the Throckmorton family. She, Master Whittel and a company of others went to Mother Alice Samuel's home to attempt her to persuade her back to the Throckmorton house so the five daughters afflicted with fits could scratch her. Gilbert Pickering, uncle to the Throckmorton children, joins them at Mother Samuel's home after she has successfully resisted them for some time. Once Pickering arrives, they are able to force her, Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder to come with them. Mistress Andley witnesses three of the children have fits as soon as Mother Samuel enters the house. She also assists Pickering in an experiment in which he blindfolds the children and has various people touch their hands, and sees that they will only scratch Mother Samuel and Cicely Burder.(7-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 7-11

Andley Mistress Andley Witness
2239

A man from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to be affiliated with Saint Tues and a friend of the Throckmorton family. He, Mistress Andley and a company of others went to Mother Alice Samuel's home to attempt her to persuade her back to the Throckmorton house so the five daughters afflicted with fits could scratch her. Gilbert Pickering, uncle to the Throckmorton children, joins them at Mother Samuel's home after she has successfully resisted them for some time. Once Pickering arrives, they are able to force her, Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder to come with them. Master Whittel witnesses three of the children have fits as soon as Mother Samuel enters the house. He carries Jane Throckmorton up to her bed and assists in holding her down. He also assists Pickering in an experiment in which he blindfolds the children and has various people touch their hands, and sees that they will only scratch Mother Samuel and Cicely Burder.(7-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 7-11

Whittel Master Whittel Witness
2240

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of Sir Henry Cromwell and the mother-in-law of Mistress Cromwell. Lady Cromwell comes to the Throckmorton home to comfort Robert and Mistress Throckmorton and visit the children. While there, she confronts Mother Alice Samuel, accusing her of witchcraft and taking a lock of hair and a hairlace from her. Lady Cromwell gives these objects to Mistress Throckmorton to burn. When she returns to Ramsey that night, she has a nightmare in which Mother Samuel sends a cat to her to pluck off all of her skin and flesh from her arms and body. She becomes sick thereafter, suffering fits similar to those of the Throckmorton children, and dies of it 15 months later.(30-32)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 30-32

Cromwell Lady Cromwell Victim
2240

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of Sir Henry Cromwell and the mother-in-law of Mistress Cromwell. Lady Cromwell comes to the Throckmorton home to comfort Robert and Mistress Throckmorton and visit the children. While there, she confronts Mother Alice Samuel, accusing her of witchcraft and taking a lock of hair and a hairlace from her. Lady Cromwell gives these objects to Mistress Throckmorton to burn. When she returns to Ramsey that night, she has a nightmare in which Mother Samuel sends a cat to her to pluck off all of her skin and flesh from her arms and body. She becomes sick thereafter, suffering fits similar to those of the Throckmorton children, and dies of it 15 months later.(30-32)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 30-32

Cromwell Lady Cromwell Accuser
2241

A man from Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, known to be a scholar, brother to Gilbert Pickering and uncle to Mary, Elizabeth, Joan, Jane, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. He visited the Throckmorton home and, without the knowledge of the Throckmorton family, spent a day watching Mother Alice Samuel as she went about her errands. He watched her exchange a wooden tankard for some barme with a neighbour, and overheard the womens' conversation. Pickering then stopped her in the street and questioned her; Mother Samuel was loud and impatient with him. She was also critical of Robert Throckmorton, saying that he misused her with the accusations, that the children's fits were nothing but wantonness and that they should have been punished for their behaviour. He also questioned her about her belief in God; his interpretation of her answers implied she worshiped a different God. He told her to repent and confess, or else he would have her burnt at the stake and the children would come to blow on the coals; she replied "I had rather (sayd she) see you dowsed over head and eares in this pond." Mother Samuel later confessed to Pickering that her chin bled because her spirits sucked blood from it. Pickering also witnessed Mary Throckmorton's scratching of Agnes Samuel, and Elizabeth Throckmorton's encounter with John Samuel in which she was unsuccessful in persuading him to say a self-accusing "charm" to end her fit. His deposition was used to sentence Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 32-33

Henry Pickering Henry Pickering Witness
2241

A man from Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, known to be a scholar, brother to Gilbert Pickering and uncle to Mary, Elizabeth, Joan, Jane, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. He visited the Throckmorton home and, without the knowledge of the Throckmorton family, spent a day watching Mother Alice Samuel as she went about her errands. He watched her exchange a wooden tankard for some barme with a neighbour, and overheard the womens' conversation. Pickering then stopped her in the street and questioned her; Mother Samuel was loud and impatient with him. She was also critical of Robert Throckmorton, saying that he misused her with the accusations, that the children's fits were nothing but wantonness and that they should have been punished for their behaviour. He also questioned her about her belief in God; his interpretation of her answers implied she worshiped a different God. He told her to repent and confess, or else he would have her burnt at the stake and the children would come to blow on the coals; she replied "I had rather (sayd she) see you dowsed over head and eares in this pond." Mother Samuel later confessed to Pickering that her chin bled because her spirits sucked blood from it. Pickering also witnessed Mary Throckmorton's scratching of Agnes Samuel, and Elizabeth Throckmorton's encounter with John Samuel in which she was unsuccessful in persuading him to say a self-accusing "charm" to end her fit. His deposition was used to sentence Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 32-33

Henry Pickering Henry Pickering Accuser
2242

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be Bishop of Lincoln. Mother Alice Samuel was brought before him by Robert Throckmorton and Dr. Dorington to make her official confession. She confessed before him twice, first on December 26, 1592, and again on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

William William, Bishop of Lincoln Preacher/Minister
2242

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be Bishop of Lincoln. Mother Alice Samuel was brought before him by Robert Throckmorton and Dr. Dorington to make her official confession. She confessed before him twice, first on December 26, 1592, and again on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

William William, Bishop of Lincoln Examiner/Justice
2243

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the county of Huntingdon. He, along with Justice of the Peace Richard Tryce and WIlliam, Bishop of Lincoln, heard Mother Alice Samuel's second confession, on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

Francis Crumwell Francis Crumwell Examiner/Justice
2244

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the county of Huntingdon. He, along with Justice of the Peace Francis Crumwell and WIlliam, Bishop of Lincoln, heard Mother Alice Samuel's second confession, on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

Richard Tryce Richard Tryce Examiner/Justice
2245

A man from "no dwelling...he went on the last voiage beyond the seas." According to Mother Alice Samuel, Langlad is an upright man who "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come. He taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. Mother Samuel claimed initially to not know his name, but was bid during her confession to call on her spirits for that information. They allegedly told her his name was Langlad, that he had no set home, and that he had left on a sea voyage. During Mother Alice Samuel's trial, she is made to confess that his first name is William, and that she had carnal relations with him. Some of those present at the trial "are of opinion, that it was the Diuel in mans likenesse."(59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

William Langlad William Langlad Witch
2248

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdonshire, known to be a cousin to Robert Throckmorton and second cousin to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. He visits the Throckmorton home and witnesses Joan fall into a fit which she claims will not end until Agnes Samuel says "Even as I am a witch, and consented to the death of the Lady Crumwel, so I charge thee spirit to depart, and to let her be well." Agnes is unable to get the words out. Master Throckmorton, during the Assizes at Huntingdon, also accused Mother Alice Samuel of bewitching various of his livestock to death, including two calves, a hog, a nursing sow and a cow.(75-76)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 75-76

Robert Throckmorton Master Robert Throckmorton Witness
2249

A woman from Ellington in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the aunt of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. According to Joan Throckmorton, Agnes Samuel bewitched Mistress Pickering after Mother Alice Samuel was imprisoned. Joan claims the spirit Smack told her Agnes did so, and manipulated Agnes into saying she had.(90-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 90-96

Pickering MIstress Pickering Victim
2249

A woman from Ellington in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the aunt of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. According to Joan Throckmorton, Agnes Samuel bewitched Mistress Pickering after Mother Alice Samuel was imprisoned. Joan claims the spirit Smack told her Agnes did so, and manipulated Agnes into saying she had.(90-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 90-96

Pickering MIstress Pickering Relative of Victim
2250

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Mistress Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in." Smack also claimed that John Samuel asked him to break Chappel's neck in a fall, so he "caused on the suddaine both his Pattins to be broken, and if he had fallen on the stones as he fell in the myre, he had beene maymed." Chappel, when asked, confessed that "confessed that he had once such a fall, as he met with old Samuell in the streetes, and both his Pattins were broken at one instant, and because he would not fall upn the causie (for it was but narrow) into the myre, wherin he was marveilously foyled, and if an other neighbor had not beene with him, he had beene in greater danger."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Relative of Victim
2250

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Mistress Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in." Smack also claimed that John Samuel asked him to break Chappel's neck in a fall, so he "caused on the suddaine both his Pattins to be broken, and if he had fallen on the stones as he fell in the myre, he had beene maymed." Chappel, when asked, confessed that "confessed that he had once such a fall, as he met with old Samuell in the streetes, and both his Pattins were broken at one instant, and because he would not fall upn the causie (for it was but narrow) into the myre, wherin he was marveilously foyled, and if an other neighbor had not beene with him, he had beene in greater danger."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Neighbor
2250

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Mistress Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in." Smack also claimed that John Samuel asked him to break Chappel's neck in a fall, so he "caused on the suddaine both his Pattins to be broken, and if he had fallen on the stones as he fell in the myre, he had beene maymed." Chappel, when asked, confessed that "confessed that he had once such a fall, as he met with old Samuell in the streetes, and both his Pattins were broken at one instant, and because he would not fall upn the causie (for it was but narrow) into the myre, wherin he was marveilously foyled, and if an other neighbor had not beene with him, he had beene in greater danger."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Victim
2251

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Mistress Chappel Relative of Victim
2251

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Mistress Chappel Neighbor
2251

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Mistress Chappel Victim
2252

A man from Huntingdon in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a justice and a judge. He witnesses Joan Throckmorton have fits of struggling and groaning whenever Agnes Samuel says God or Jesus Christ. Robert Throckmorton also has Agnes demonstrate before Justice Fenner how Joan will come out of her fits whenever Agnes says "As I am a witch, & a worse witch then my mother, & did consent to the death of the La. Crumwell, so I charge the devil to let mistr. Ioan Throck. come out of her fit at this present." Joan is well for 15 minutes after this, and then falls into a shaking fit before the Judge until Agnes repeats the words. She has several such fits in his presence.(104-)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 104-

Fenner Justice Fenner Examiner/Justice
2252

A man from Huntingdon in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a justice and a judge. He witnesses Joan Throckmorton have fits of struggling and groaning whenever Agnes Samuel says God or Jesus Christ. Robert Throckmorton also has Agnes demonstrate before Justice Fenner how Joan will come out of her fits whenever Agnes says "As I am a witch, & a worse witch then my mother, & did consent to the death of the La. Crumwell, so I charge the devil to let mistr. Ioan Throck. come out of her fit at this present." Joan is well for 15 minutes after this, and then falls into a shaking fit before the Judge until Agnes repeats the words. She has several such fits in his presence.(104-)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 104-

Fenner Justice Fenner Witness
2253

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon. Robert Poulter, vicar of Brampton, a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself. Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick, after she overheard him order that she was to have no meat. He is said to have died during the Assizes.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

John Langley John Langley Victim
2253

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon. Robert Poulter, vicar of Brampton, a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself. Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick, after she overheard him order that she was to have no meat. He is said to have died during the Assizes.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

John Langley John Langley Accuser
2254

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the vicar and curate of Brampton. He gave a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf of his parishoner, John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself; Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

Robert Poulter Robert Poulter Preacher/Minister
2254

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the vicar and curate of Brampton. He gave a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf of his parishoner, John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself; Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

Robert Poulter Robert Poulter Accuser
2255

A man from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a the Jailor/Gaoler's servant. According to the Jailor of Huntingdon, Anonymous 445 chained Mother Alice Samuel to her bedpost for unruly behavior, and soon after became sick with tormenting fits. He is said to have cried out against Mother Samuel during his fits, and to have displayed the strength of two men. He died of it five or six days later.(111)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 111

Anonymous 445 Victim
2256

A child from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the son of the Jailor of Huntingdon. According to his father, Anonymous 446 became sick with tormenting fits while Mother Alice Samuel was imprisoned awaiting trial. This child did not improve until has father brought him into Mother Samuel's cell and held her down so the boy could scratch her.(59, 61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59, 61

Anonymous 446 Victim
2257

A man from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Jailor/Gaoler. He gave deposition at Mother Alice Samuel's trial, alleging that she bewitched one of his men (Anonymous 445) so that he began to have fits much like the Throckmorton children, and died of it five or six days later. He also claimed that his son, Anonymous 446, became sick with fits as well. The child did not improve until the Jailor brought him to Mother Samuel's bedside and had him scratch her. After Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel were executed, he stripped them for burial and found a lump of flesh on Mother Samuel's body "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(59, 61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59, 61

Jailor of Huntingdon Relative of Victim
2257

A man from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Jailor/Gaoler. He gave deposition at Mother Alice Samuel's trial, alleging that she bewitched one of his men (Anonymous 445) so that he began to have fits much like the Throckmorton children, and died of it five or six days later. He also claimed that his son, Anonymous 446, became sick with fits as well. The child did not improve until the Jailor brought him to Mother Samuel's bedside and had him scratch her. After Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel were executed, he stripped them for burial and found a lump of flesh on Mother Samuel's body "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(59, 61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59, 61

Jailor of Huntingdon Accuser
2258

One of an unknown number of women from Huntingdon in the county of Huntingdon, known to form a Jury of Women. These women were assembled and sworn to search Mother Alice Samuel when she insisted at her trial that she was pregnant and therefore could not be put to death. They find that "she was not with childe, unlesse (as some saide) it was with the Diuell, & no marueile."(111-112)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 111-112

Anonymous 447 (plural) Witch-Searcher
2259

A man from Huntingdon in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Doctor of Divinity. He heard Mother Alice Samuel's final confession on the day of her execution.(112-113)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 112-113

Chamberin Master Doctor Chamberlin Preacher/Minister
2260

A woman from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of the Jailor of Huntingdon and the mother of Anonymous 446. After Mother Alice Samuel's execution, her husband stripped the body for burial and noticed a lump of flesh on Mother Samuel's body "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene," and showed it to her. Anonymous 448 took this teat in her hand and and strained it until issued a mix of yellow milk and water. The second time she strained it, it produced a substance like clear milk, and at the end it was seen to produce blood.(114)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 114

Anonymous 448 Relative of Victim
2260

A woman from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of the Jailor of Huntingdon and the mother of Anonymous 446. After Mother Alice Samuel's execution, her husband stripped the body for burial and noticed a lump of flesh on Mother Samuel's body "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene," and showed it to her. Anonymous 448 took this teat in her hand and and strained it until issued a mix of yellow milk and water. The second time she strained it, it produced a substance like clear milk, and at the end it was seen to produce blood.(114)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 114

Anonymous 448 Witch-Searcher