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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
233

A man Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, who at the age of 19 or 20 allegedly had several fits after being bit by a familiar named Lucie. During this time, William Sommers was imprisoned, where the Devil appeared to him in the shape of a mouse and demanded that Sommers let him back in, promising to save him from death if he yielded. Sommers allegedly agreed to being repossessed and, though he was still tormented in truth, pretended that everything he had done under possession before had been faked. Yet, when the high Sheriff demanded in the name of God that Sommers tell the truth, Sommers was cast into a fit. To determine whether he was faking, pins were thrust into his hand and leg; when he roused from the fit, he said it was the other hand which had been pricked, and that he had fallen due to stomach problems. When they brought him back to question a second time, he tried to fling himself over the gallery and break his neck. The second questioning proved to everyone's satisfaction that he was indeed possessed. Sommers was brought to London and kept first by a barber of evil repute, then by the Bishop of London. Sommers continued to insist that he had only been pretending to be possessed, and furthermore, Mr. Darrell had hired him to do it. Mr. Darrell countered, insisting that Sommers' actions while possessed were not listed in Scripture as impossible, therefore they were indeed possible and proof of possession; this argument is regarded as a poor one. It is nonetheless agreed that there is no way Sommers could have counterfeited such things as his eyes, hands and face becoming unnaturally black, or turning his head all the way around. Numerous depositions are given, and taken as proof of Sommers' possessions. After his dispossession, Sommers named Millcent Horselie as a witch, and was able to give details of her examination despite not being present for it. John Darrell later faced trial on charges of instructing Sommers and others to counterfeit both their possessions and their dispossessions to bolster his own reputation. Sommers gave deposition against Darrell, and demonstrated a counterfeit swelling before the high Commission at Lambeth in support of his claim.(Images 3, 6, 7, 8, 15, 20-21)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Images 3, 6, 7, 8, 15, 20-21

William Sommers William Sommers Demoniac
234

A woman from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a kinswoman of the Alderman of Nottingham, whom William Sommers accuses of being a witch. The Alderman of Nottingham is offended by this allegation and makes a counter-accusation against Sommers, which results in Sommers being imprisoned for witchcraft himself. John Darrell, during his trial, claimed that Sommers accused Freeman out of malice.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 6

Doll Ffreeman Doll Freeman Witch
235

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be clerk vicar of Saint Maries in Nottingham, who gives deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers naked with something the size of a mouse running up his right leg, then into his left leg, and then entering his belly. Sommers' belly swelled massively, then the swelling reduced to the size of a fist and moved to his breast, and moved from there to his neck and under his ear, where it remained at the size of a French walnut for a quarter hour. Aldridge heard a strange hollow voice insisting he belong to it, which he called a liar and replied that he was God's. Aldridge also said that Sommers acted strangely the rest of the day, and, when restrained, proved to have the strength of five men. Sommers' bed was also seen to shake and move, and a shape like five kittens moved under the coverlet.(Image 13)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13

Robert Aldridge Robert Aldridge Preacher/Minister
235

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be clerk vicar of Saint Maries in Nottingham, who gives deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers naked with something the size of a mouse running up his right leg, then into his left leg, and then entering his belly. Sommers' belly swelled massively, then the swelling reduced to the size of a fist and moved to his breast, and moved from there to his neck and under his ear, where it remained at the size of a French walnut for a quarter hour. Aldridge heard a strange hollow voice insisting he belong to it, which he called a liar and replied that he was God's. Aldridge also said that Sommers acted strangely the rest of the day, and, when restrained, proved to have the strength of five men. Sommers' bed was also seen to shake and move, and a shape like five kittens moved under the coverlet.(Image 13)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13

Robert Aldridge Robert Aldridge Witness
236

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a tailor, who gives deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers with swelling on his neck the size of a walnut that moved to his cheekbone and then to his eye, causing the eye and skin to turn black. The swelling trembled when touched.(Image 13)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13

William Hyinde William Hynde Witness
237

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a clerk and a preacher, who gave a deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers with swelling behind his ear the size of a walnut that then moved to his eye where it reduced in size but caused a blackness in the eye. When Westfield touched the swelling, it moved, and the eye returned to its natural colour. Westfield witnessed the eye change colour eight more times that day.(Image 13)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13

Thomas Westfeyld Thomas Westfield Witness
238

A woman from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be the wife of baker Robert Pie, who gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that she saw him have a fit of laughter and then have a fit in which he is thrown at the foot of the bed and folds his body in two. She also said that she once saw Sommers sitting by a fireside and be flung into the fire; it took three or four people to pull him out and he could not be put back into the chair because he was so heavy and his legs so bent. The night before Mr. Darrell came to Nottingham, she heard Sommers say that Darrell was coming during one of his fits. At other times, she heard Sommers talk without opening his mouth, saw his body blacken during fits, noticed strange smells like brimstone around him, saw a strange lump moving under his skin, and saw motions like kittens moving about under his bedcovers.(Image 13-15)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13-15

Joane Pie Joan Pie Witness
239

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, know to be a glover, who gives deposition against William Sommers alleging he saw Sommers have a fit, during which he spoke in Latin with his mouth open but without moving his lips or his tongue.(Image 14-15)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 14-15

Richard Newton Richard Newton Witness
741

A man from Ashbie de la zouche in the County of Leicestershire, known to be a priest and traveling exorcist. He is the author "A brief apologie prouing the possession of William Sommers," which was allegedly published without his consent. Darrell came Nottingham so that he may cure William Sommers of his possession, and has Sommers pray and fast to effect his dispossession. After this, Darrell was retained as preacher in Nottingham and used his position to discover witches in the town. Darrell took the names of threescore persons willing to give deposition when Sommers claimed to have fakes his possession and named him as a co-consipirator; of these, seventeen were sworn, examined and their depositions taken. Sommers insisted that he had known Mr. Darrell some four years, that Darrell had hired him to counterfeit possession in Ashbie Park, and that when Darrell arrived in Nottingham, Sommers had received instruction from him on how to behave when being dispossessed. Darrell denied these accusations, but was nonetheless imprisoned for a week thereafter. Once the depositions taken against Sommers were heard, they were taken as proof of true possession, and Darrell redeemed. in 1598, Darrell was summoned to Lancashire by Nicholas Starchie to dispossess his children and others of his household, and claimed to have successfully dispossessed six of them in one day, and the seventh on the following day. In 1599, Darrell faced charges of instructing Sommers, Katherine Wright, Thomas Darling, Mary Couper and others to fake their possessions and dispossessions to bolster his own reputation.(Images 4, 6, 7, 12)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Images 4, 6, 7, 12

John Darrell John Darrell Exorcist
741

A man from Ashbie de la zouche in the County of Leicestershire, known to be a priest and traveling exorcist. He is the author "A brief apologie prouing the possession of William Sommers," which was allegedly published without his consent. Darrell came Nottingham so that he may cure William Sommers of his possession, and has Sommers pray and fast to effect his dispossession. After this, Darrell was retained as preacher in Nottingham and used his position to discover witches in the town. Darrell took the names of threescore persons willing to give deposition when Sommers claimed to have fakes his possession and named him as a co-consipirator; of these, seventeen were sworn, examined and their depositions taken. Sommers insisted that he had known Mr. Darrell some four years, that Darrell had hired him to counterfeit possession in Ashbie Park, and that when Darrell arrived in Nottingham, Sommers had received instruction from him on how to behave when being dispossessed. Darrell denied these accusations, but was nonetheless imprisoned for a week thereafter. Once the depositions taken against Sommers were heard, they were taken as proof of true possession, and Darrell redeemed. in 1598, Darrell was summoned to Lancashire by Nicholas Starchie to dispossess his children and others of his household, and claimed to have successfully dispossessed six of them in one day, and the seventh on the following day. In 1599, Darrell faced charges of instructing Sommers, Katherine Wright, Thomas Darling, Mary Couper and others to fake their possessions and dispossessions to bolster his own reputation.(Images 4, 6, 7, 12)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Images 4, 6, 7, 12

John Darrell John Darrell Preacher/Minister
743

A man from Lenton in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a clerk, who gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he visited Sommers out of curiosity at the home of his friend Robert Cooper, clerk of St. Maries in Nottingham, where Sommers was being held. Wood witnessed Sommers having a fit, in which it took three or four lusty men to hold him down. Wood tried himself to restrain Sommers' arms, and could not. He noted that the fit lasted at least two full hours. Throughout, Sommers panted without seeming to breathe, and was hot to the touch but did not sweat or become red-faced. When Wood heard that Sommers had retracted his claim of possession, he questioned Sommers about whether he remembered Wood visiting him, and what Wood had done at that time. Sommers said he did remember, and that Wood had nipped his finger with his thumbnail. Wood called him on the lie, and Sommers revised his story: Wood did not nip his finger, he bent the finger to see if Sommers had any feeling in the hand. Wood called this a lie as well, and Sommers replied that he could not in fact remember what Wood had done.(Image 16-17)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 16-17

John Wood John Wood Witness
744

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a gentleman, gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he visited Sommers out of curiosity and found him to be having a fit in the presence of John Darrell and W. Aldred. During this fit, Sommers displayed such strength that Strelley and three other men together could hardly hold him. The four of them were breathing hard and sweating from the exertion, but Sommers did not. Strelley visited Sommers again two days later, again finding Darrell and Aldred there, and witnessed Sommers violently thrown from where he sat and hit his head against the chimney. After this, Sommers was laid out on the bed and suffered a fit, in which his neck bent double, one of his legs became tremendously heavy, and a swelling was seen to appear on various parts of his body. Strelley also witnessed Sommers gnash his teeth, foam at the mouth, and make a variety of strange noises.(Image 17)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 17

John Strelley John Strelley Witness
745

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a butcher, who gives deposition against Williams Sommers alleging that he came one night to watch over Sommers and found Mr. Westfeild and others with him. In the middle of the night, Mee heard a voice say that it would have Sommers right eye, then his left. Mee said that a day or so before, and many other times, he saw a strange swelling on Sommers' arms and legs the size of a walnut move from place to place, and swell his belly to the size of a loaf of bread so it was hard to the touch. Mee also saw Sommers turn his head all the way backwards without moving his body, and Sommers' eyes grow large and bulge. At other times, Mee saw Sommers fall, and his legs become crooked and immovable. Sommers' mouth was also seen to contort, his tongue swell to the size of a calf's, to laugh strangely, to fall senseless, to gnash his teeth and foam at the mouth, and to be cast into the fire but emerge entirely unharmed. Mee also alleged that Sommers would display extraordinary strength during his fits, such that sometimes six or more men were not enough to hold him. During these fits, a big voice would come from Sommers, saying that there was no God, that he was God, and that he was the king and prince of darkness. Furthermore, when reciting the Lord's Prayer, Sommers could not say "lead us not into temptation" and would say "lead us into temptation" instead. Mee also indicated that there would often be strange sweet smells around Sommers.(Image 17-18)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 17-18

Richard Mee Richard Mee Witness
746

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a surgeon, who gives a deposition against William Summers alleging that he during Sommers' dispossession, he saw the man gnash, wallow and foam at the mouth in such a quantity that Langford did not think it possible of a human being for an hour. During a fit, Langford had attempted to restrain Sommers with two others, but could not as he evidently has the strength of four to five men. Langford also witnessed swellings on Sommers' body, starting at his belly and ascending to his breast and neck.(Image 15-16)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 15-16

William Langford William Langford Witness
764

A man from Kirkby-in-Ashfield in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a clerk and a preacher, who gives deposition alleging that he witnessed William Sommers having a violent fit. During this fit, Thomas Hays saw one of Sommers' legs bent crooked, and something run out if it and into the other leg. After, Sommers' belly swelled, and the swelling moved to his throat, tongue and base of his ear, now the size of an egg. Not knowing what to think of this, Hays went to Mr. Arkinson, and then Mr. Ebings and Mr. Aldredg. From conversing with all three, Hays determined that no illness but the Devil could be the cause of Sommers' affliction.(Image 12)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 12

Thomas Hays Thomas Hays Witness
770

A man from Colwick in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a clerk and a preasher, who gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he was among the 150 people who witnessed the exorcism performed on Sommers by John Darrell. Aldred says that he gave a prayer, during which Sommers was tormented by fits. John Darrell gave the next prayer, and Sommers' fits doubled in intensity. Sommers menaced Darrell and had to be restrained. At the end of the exorcism, Aldred saw Sommers thrown grovelling onto a bed, and lay there as if dead. Darrell praised God and willed the watchers to be thankful, at which time Sommers was seen to thank God for his delivery from possession.(Image 13-14)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13-14

William Aldred William Aldred Preacher/Minister
770

A man from Colwick in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a clerk and a preasher, who gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he was among the 150 people who witnessed the exorcism performed on Sommers by John Darrell. Aldred says that he gave a prayer, during which Sommers was tormented by fits. John Darrell gave the next prayer, and Sommers' fits doubled in intensity. Sommers menaced Darrell and had to be restrained. At the end of the exorcism, Aldred saw Sommers thrown grovelling onto a bed, and lay there as if dead. Darrell praised God and willed the watchers to be thankful, at which time Sommers was seen to thank God for his delivery from possession.(Image 13-14)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13-14

William Aldred William Aldred Witness
771

A woman from Bridgeford in the county of Nottinghamshire, who William Sommers identifies as being a witch. Mr. Darrell and Mr. Aldred carried her to Mr. Parkins to be examined. Joan Pie hears Sommers speak the details of Horselie's examination, though there is no way he could know it.(Image 15)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 15

Millicent Horselie Millicent Horselie Witch
773

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a locksmith, who gave deposition against William Sommers in which he claims to have seen Sommers speak words in Latin to John Wigan without moving his mouth or tongue.(Image 15)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 15

Henry Nussie Henry Nussie Witness
774

A man from Graies Langlie in the county of Leicestershire, who gave deposition against William Sommers and alleges he saw Sommers held down on the bed by his head and feet while a round lump moved and panted under the bed covers. Gray lay his hands on the lump and felt it move; when he clasped his hands together, the lump deflated as if pricked and reappeared on the other side of Sommers.(Image 15-16)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 15-16

Thomas Gray Thomas Gray Witness
1814

A woman from Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be a spinster, gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that the day Mr. Darrell came to town, Sommers was extremely tormented. At this time, she saw Sommers lay senseless and cold without any discernible breath while his hands became unnaturally black. They gave him aquavitae and other things hoping to revive him, but could not, and he was so heavy he could not be moved. When he finally revived, his first words were "Darrel comes, he will have me out." She adds that the first time she called neighbors to help him, she heard a thumping or knocking from the bed, and putting a hand on the bed, felt it coming from a hollow place above his chest.(Image 18)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 18

Elizabeth Milward Elizabeth Milward Witness
1815

A man from Plumtree in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be a clerk, gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he came to Nottingham to pray for Sommers, and found Mr. Darrell, Mr. Aldridge and others there. They preached and prayed over Sommers through the afternoon, during which Pare saw Sommers grovelling face-down on the bed, and a swelling under his clothes the size of a mouse that moved all over his body. Pare also heard a knocking from the bed in several places at once, which could be felt when Pare put his hand on the bed and was found to be so low that there was no way Sommers could reach with his hand to do it.(Image 18)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 18

John Pare John Pare Witness
1816

A man from Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be a cordwinder, gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he heard Sommers in torment one day and went to see him at the home of Thomas Porter, finding him in a fit. During this fit, Sommers said to Edward Garland: "Edward Garland art thou here, how doe thy children, i will have one of them, even the youngest" to which Garland responded that he defied the Devil, that the Devil could have no power over him or his children. When Sommers came to his senses and was dressed to get out of bed, Clerk say a swelling the size of a rat at his breast. Clerk tried to grab the swelling and hold it, finding it to be as soft as a pillow, but it escaped his hand and wend down into Sommers' leg. When asked why he went to see Sommers, Clerk said that he did it to be persuaded after hearing of so many strange things and accidents.(Image 18-19)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 18-19

John Clerk John Clerk Witness
1817

A man of Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be a baker, who gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he saw Sommers in a fit lying as if dead, speaking for a full quarter hour with his lips shut and without moving his mouth or jaws. Hunt also saw a lump the size of a walnut running about Sommers' face, forehead, eyes and to his ears.(Image 19)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 19

W. Hunt W. Hunt Witness
1818

A man of Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be a gentleman, who alleged that he heard John Cooper say that when Mr. Darrell cast out the Devil from William Sommers, Darrell did not appoint the Devil anywhere to go, and that afterwards Darrell claimed to have sent the Devil into a herd of swine at the town's end.(Image 19)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 19

William Power William Power (2) Witness
1819

A man from Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire who alleged that he did say John Cooper say that when Mr. Darrell cast out the Devil from William Sommers, Darrell did not appoint the Devil a place to go. Instead, Darrell said after that now that the Devil had been cast out, he had been sent into a herd of swine and now he will come no more.(Image 19)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 19

John Pepper John Pepper Witness
1820

A man of Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be one of WIlliam Sommers' keepers at St. Johns in Nottingham, alleged that he did not know of anyone who might have persuaded Sommers to retract his claims of possession. He said he had himself threatened to whip Sommers, and confessed that a man named Wilkinson and two others came to the house one night, but he refused to let them in due to the lateness of the hour. He also said that he never knew Nicholas Aire to have access to Sommers. Cooper went on to say that it might have been Nicholas Shepherd, who was also one of Sommer's keepers appointed by William Gregorie the Mayor's clerk. Shepherd brought Sommers an ointment once, but Cooper did not hear Shepherd utter any words of charm when he anointed Sommers. Regarding the dispossession, Cooper said he did not hear Mr. Darrell assign the Devil anywhere to go, but that Darrell claimed to have sent the Devil into Collwick Hill. Cooper knew of Sommers having three fits since coming to St. Johns. (Image 19)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 19

John Cooper John Cooper Witness
1821

A man from Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be a fletcher, alleged that he did not know of any promises or other persuasion used on William Sommers to make him retract his claims of possession. Shepherd said that during one of Sommers' fits, he threatened to use pincers on Sommers' toes if he used any tricks. Shepherd also said that when Mr. Hurt, Mr. Jackson, Mr. Freeman Alderman and William Gregory the Mayor's clerk came to see Sommers, Sommers' leg was so sore he could not do any tricks, and that Gregory had commanded Shepherd give Sommers ointment. Shepherd did, and watched Sommers anoint his knee and then give some ointment to his sister for her strained finger.(Image 19-20)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 19-20

Nicholas Shepherd Nicholas Shepherd Witness
1824

A man from Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be the Alderman of Nottingham, who is offended by William Sommer's accusation that his kinswoman is a witch. The Alderman counter-accuses Sommers, and has him thrown into prison.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 6

Alderman of Nottingham Accuser
1833

A man of Yorke in the County of Yorkshire, known to be Archbishop of Yorke, who receives the depositions taken by the high Commission on William Sommers' possession. On seeing the depositions, he is satisfied that Sommers is truly possessed, and demands that Mr. John Darrell keep his insistence that the Devil might be driven out of a person through prayer and fasting to himself, as it is Darrell's opinion only. The Archbishop declines to enlighten Darrell on how the Devil might be better driven out, preferring to leave Darrell with the demand to cease claiming that prayer and fasting are effective.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 7

Archbishop of Yorke Celebrity