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ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
253

An eighteen year old maid from the city of Chester in the county of Cheshire who was allegedly possessed by a white spirit that enveloped her. She was possessed for fifteen to sixteen weeks. One day, she came home from the fields very sick and would only eat once every twenty-four hours. When she would eat, she would only eat bread and cheese. She had a fit and was in a trance from hour to hour. She was delivered by having vinegar spit up her nose until she called out for the blood of Christ and made to recite prayers with John Lane. The following day Mylner attends a sermon John Lane preached at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Chester (now St Mary's Centre, then Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill), where she attended. At the time of publication she "remayneth at this prese[n]t (praysed be god) in perfit good health and lyking." (Image 3-4)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, Image 3-4

Anne Mylner Anne Mylner Demoniac
253

An eighteen year old maid from the city of Chester in the county of Cheshire who was allegedly possessed by a white spirit that enveloped her. She was possessed for fifteen to sixteen weeks. One day, she came home from the fields very sick and would only eat once every twenty-four hours. When she would eat, she would only eat bread and cheese. She had a fit and was in a trance from hour to hour. She was delivered by having vinegar spit up her nose until she called out for the blood of Christ and made to recite prayers with John Lane. The following day Mylner attends a sermon John Lane preached at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Chester (now St Mary's Centre, then Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill), where she attended. At the time of publication she "remayneth at this prese[n]t (praysed be god) in perfit good health and lyking." (Image 3-4)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, Image 3-4

Anne Mylner Anne Mylner Faster
1266

A minister (and exorcist) then preaching in the village of Tarporley in the county of Cheshire, described as a "late fellow of Christs Colledge in the University of Cambridge, & now a famous and godly Preacher of the Gospell of Jesus Christ." Lane, witnessing one of Mylner's fits during which she is contorts her body, "demaunded of her that kepte this cruell handled creature, whether shee coulde not keepe her downe?" He decided to test this theory himself, by taking her by the hand and "pluckt down her feete, and wyth more ado kept them downe, holdinge her handes, sytting vpon her legs, in whom he found such strength and vehement panges, that he was fully perswaded." In another attempt to put a stop to Mylner's fits, Lane blew vinegar into Mylner's nostrils again and again, instructing her to call on god for mercy, until she cried: "No, no, no more for Gods sake." Afterwards he leads them all in the lord's prayer and Mylner is proclaimed delivered. Lane preaches a sermon the next day at Saint Marie's (i.e. Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill, now St. Mary's Centre), a sermon Anne Mylner herself attends. Mylner becomes a celebrity in the city and, by extension, so must have John Lane.(15)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, 15

John Lane John Lane Preacher/Minister
1266

A minister (and exorcist) then preaching in the village of Tarporley in the county of Cheshire, described as a "late fellow of Christs Colledge in the University of Cambridge, & now a famous and godly Preacher of the Gospell of Jesus Christ." Lane, witnessing one of Mylner's fits during which she is contorts her body, "demaunded of her that kepte this cruell handled creature, whether shee coulde not keepe her downe?" He decided to test this theory himself, by taking her by the hand and "pluckt down her feete, and wyth more ado kept them downe, holdinge her handes, sytting vpon her legs, in whom he found such strength and vehement panges, that he was fully perswaded." In another attempt to put a stop to Mylner's fits, Lane blew vinegar into Mylner's nostrils again and again, instructing her to call on god for mercy, until she cried: "No, no, no more for Gods sake." Afterwards he leads them all in the lord's prayer and Mylner is proclaimed delivered. Lane preaches a sermon the next day at Saint Marie's (i.e. Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill, now St. Mary's Centre), a sermon Anne Mylner herself attends. Mylner becomes a celebrity in the city and, by extension, so must have John Lane.(15)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, 15

John Lane John Lane Exorcist
1514

A man and member of the gentry then living in Chester in the county of Chershire. Over the course of his career, a he would be the Mayor of Chester twice (in 1543 and 1566-7), Sheriff of Staffordshire, and a Justice of the Peace. Sir William Sneyd's visit confirms the death of Anne Mylner's fame and the upper echelon's interest in her. He appears here presumably as a person interested in this sight as opposed to in some official capacity. Sneyd was also related to Sir William Calverley and Lady Calverely, two other illustrious visitors to Anne Mylner. His sister, Elizabeth Sneyd, married Sir William Calverley in 3 Edward VI (1550). (10 (image 6))

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, 10 (image 6)

William Sneyd Sir William Sneyd Witness
1550

A man and member of the gentry then living in Chester in the county of Chershire. He appears here, presumably as a person interested in Anne Mylner's possession, as opposed to in some official capacity. Sir William Calverley married Elizabeth Sneyd in 3 Edward VI (1550), making him a relative to Sir William Sneyd as well. ()

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565,

William Calverley Sir. William Calverley Witness
1552

A woman and member of the gentry then living in Chester in the county of Chershire. Lady Elizabeth Calverly appears a person interested in Anne Mylner's possession. She also was one of the witnesses to Mylner's dispossesion. She was married to Sir William Calverley in 3 Edward VI (1550) and the sister of Sir William Sneyd, both of whom also visited Mylner.()

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565,

Elizabeth Calverley Lady Elizabeth Calverley Witness
1556

A man from the city of Chester in the county of Cheshire, described as "Quenes maiesties high Justice in the Countye of Chester," or the Chief Justice of Cheshire. He was present at John Lane's sermon at Chester Cathedral, where Lane recounted his miraculous cure of Anne Mylner. also a distant relative to Robert Throckmorton, and his demoniac daughters, (Joan, Mary, Elizabeth, Jane, Grace).()

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565,

John Throckmorton John Throckmorton Witness