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ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
257

A seventeen year old woman from Turnbridge in the county of Kent, who in July of 1681 is suddenly plagued by two devils, one black and one gray, which seem bent bent on her destruction. The gray devil holds her hostage and tempts her to kill herself. Although she exorcises these demons, they appear again in August of the same year when Gurr becomes possessed by the little black devil. He crouches inside her, wishing sad wishes with the most ugly shrieking noises, and roaring out curses. The black devil instructs Gurr to curse and swear as I do and wish such wishes as I do and tells her that if she does, she should again be well. Gurr is also possessed by a witch who spake with the most hideous and strange noises, orders her to Be as I am, and you shall be as well as ever you were in your life. This witch continues to speak from inside of Gurr, continually repeating, do as I say, and do as I would have, and as I am, for I am a witch, a witch, I am a witch, do as I say and be as I am, and you shall be well. Gurrs claims to have twice been airborn with the black and grey devils, but prays and finds herself at ease. The witch soon attacks her again, however, warning her in such a loud, sudden, and fearful voice, to keep away from Doctor Skinner, that devil doctor, and makes Gurr strangely afrightened, causing much trembling and shaking. She continues to suffer, but so does the whole household. Gurr concluded that she had not been speedily cured and her Master and Mistress and all the family must have been forced to have left the house. Dr. Skinner casts out the devils and the witch from Margaret Gurr's body, and also cured her from scurvy and gout. After this, she is visited no more by the devils or the witch. Upon being cured, Gurr is also blessed with the miracle of being able to read the Bible, which she could not do before. (1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

Margaret Gurr Margaret Gurr Demoniac
2025

A woman from Sevenoak in the county of Kent who was seemingly miraculously cured by Dr. Skinner from "the most lamentable pain in her head," a mysterious illness which was so severe, she could not sleep. She took "much Physick" of many other doctors, but "ere no good." Immediately upon encountering Dr. Skinner, she was at ease and cured, and "now remains in vivide and perfect health." (12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

Goody Halle Goody Halle Victim
2024

A woman from an unknown area of Kent, who allegedly possesses Margaret Gurr as a witch on several instances throughout July and August of 1681. She enters Margaret Gurr and tempts "not to Pray, but Curse and Sware." She instructs Gurr to "Do as I say, and do as I would have you, and be as I am, for I am a Witch, a Witch. I am a Witch, do as I say and be as I am, and you shall be well," moreover, she emphasizes that "you shall be as well as ever you were in your Life." However, this wellness comes from possession and bewitchment alone; she counsels Margaret Gurr against seeking the help of Dr. Skinner, saying "take none of his Physick." Her possession of Margaret Gurr also causes Margaret Gurr "a most lamentable pain in my Limbs." The witch is cast out of Margaret Gurr by Dr. Skinner, along with two other devils (Anonymous 15 and Anonymous 16).(3-4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 3-4

Anonymous 382 Witch
2026

A woman from West Grinstead in Sussex, who seeks out a cure of a mysterious "Evil in her Throat" from Dr. Skinner. She encounters him at a fair, and promises to call upon him. When she fails to show, Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she did not come, and "the Woman said she had no need, for she found her self begin to mend from that same time," and is miraculously cured thereafter, having only needed to encounter Dr. Skinner in person.(12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

Anonymous 388 Victim
2027

A number of doctors from areas around the county of Kent, who attempt to treat Susan Woldredge for her mysterious illness, but who never find a cure.(14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14

Anonymous 387 (Plural) Physician
2028

A man from West Chiltington in the county of Kent, who seeks help from a number of doctors and eventually Dr. Skinner for his daughter's mysterious illness. Dr. Skinner advises Mr. Woldredge to go home, which he does. His daughter becomes cured, and after Mr. Woldredge visits the doctor again, "she was in a short time made perfectly well."(14-12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14-12

Woldredge Mr. Woldredge Relative of Victim
2029

A woman from West Chiltington in the county of Kent, who suffers from a mysterious illness where she "had the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Many doctors try to help her, but cannot. Eventually, her father seeks the help of Dr. Skinner, who advises that her father simply "go home." After doing so, "his Daughter was in extream mistery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously, "on a sudden, it began to mend." In a short time, she was made perfectly well, by Dr. Skinner.(14-12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14-12

Susan Woldredge Susan Woldredge Victim
2030

A woman from Hadlaw in Kent, who is the mother of a young servant boy of Henry Chowning, allegedly possessed by a devil in the form of a greyhound. Dr. Skinner orders her to visit him after medicine had been administered to the young servant, which she does, bringing "news he was much ammended."(9-14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 9-14

Anonymous 386 Relative of Victim
2031

A number of people from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who are witness to a young servant boy of Henry Chowning's illness, allegedly caused by a devil in the form of a greyhound. The boy "grew worse and worse," and began to lose his power to speak, causing these neighbours to suppose "him to be under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." They resolve to seek help for him, which eventually comes in the form of Dr. Skinner.(8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 385 (Plural) Witness
2032

A young man from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who is the seventeen year old servant of Henry Chowning. The young man allegedly encounters a spirit in the form of a greyhound, who instructs him to go to Virginia before disappearing. Following this encounter, the boy returns home to master, "in a great fright," and "amazed." He falls ill, and his condition continues to deteriorate, so that observers "fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," because he was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." His master seeks the help of Dr. Skinner to treat him. Dr. Skinner sees that the boy is "melancholy," and likely possessed by the Devil in the shape of a greyhound, "for, it was as it were in amaze, and his eyes were always fixed in his head," and it was difficult to get him to speak. Once the boy did speak, he confessed to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea, and matters that he was not able to mention." As well, "he spoke through the Nose (as we call it) for it was not his own speech, but the Spirit or Devil within him." After assessing the pain he was under, Dr. Skinner "understood what the means must be that must relieve him." The boy is administered medicines, which "he was very willing to take." The boy's mother finds him "much ammended" within a week. The boy complains of a "pain in his belly," so that Dr. Skinner sent him more medicine, and he was cured within "18 days time." After this, the boy is dispossessed and cured of his illness, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." decides that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," as Anonymous 384 confesses to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea," to great pain, and can speak in a voice "not his own speech." The young servant boy seems to be better when around Dr. Skinner, who then gives him medicine, leading to him being "made perfectly well in 18 days time."(8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 384 Demoniac
2032

A young man from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who is the seventeen year old servant of Henry Chowning. The young man allegedly encounters a spirit in the form of a greyhound, who instructs him to go to Virginia before disappearing. Following this encounter, the boy returns home to master, "in a great fright," and "amazed." He falls ill, and his condition continues to deteriorate, so that observers "fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," because he was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." His master seeks the help of Dr. Skinner to treat him. Dr. Skinner sees that the boy is "melancholy," and likely possessed by the Devil in the shape of a greyhound, "for, it was as it were in amaze, and his eyes were always fixed in his head," and it was difficult to get him to speak. Once the boy did speak, he confessed to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea, and matters that he was not able to mention." As well, "he spoke through the Nose (as we call it) for it was not his own speech, but the Spirit or Devil within him." After assessing the pain he was under, Dr. Skinner "understood what the means must be that must relieve him." The boy is administered medicines, which "he was very willing to take." The boy's mother finds him "much ammended" within a week. The boy complains of a "pain in his belly," so that Dr. Skinner sent him more medicine, and he was cured within "18 days time." After this, the boy is dispossessed and cured of his illness, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." decides that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," as Anonymous 384 confesses to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea," to great pain, and can speak in a voice "not his own speech." The young servant boy seems to be better when around Dr. Skinner, who then gives him medicine, leading to him being "made perfectly well in 18 days time."(8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 384 Victim
2033

A man from Hadlaw in Kent, who is the master of a young servant boy (Anonymous 384), allegedly possessed by a devil in the shape of a greyhound. Henry Chowning sends his servant boy out to the grounds. When the servant returns, Henry Chowning is witness to his servant's illness, as well as to his servant's account of an encounter with a devil in the shape of a greyhound. Henry Chowning sends for Dr. Skinner upon his servant's illness, and pays Dr. Skinner for a cure for the boy.(8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Henry Chowning Henry Chowning Witness
2034

A number of people from Tunbridge in the county of Kent, who refuse to come near Margaret Kent upon "hearing how I was tempted and tortured with Witches and Devils." Even when she is well, her friends do not speak to her, "being still afraid of me, so that I have no comfort from them."(6-7)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6-7

Anonymous 383 (Plural) Witness
2035

A man from Tunbridge in the county of Kent, who refuses to approach his sister upon "hearing how i was tempted and tortured with Witches and Devils," even after she is cured, he refuses to speak to her, "being still afraid of me, so that I have no comfort in them."(6-7)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6-7

Gurr Gurr (Brother) Relative of Victim
2035

A man from Tunbridge in the county of Kent, who refuses to approach his sister upon "hearing how i was tempted and tortured with Witches and Devils," even after she is cured, he refuses to speak to her, "being still afraid of me, so that I have no comfort in them."(6-7)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6-7

Gurr Gurr (Brother) Witness
2036

A woman from Tunbridge in the county of Kent, who is the wife of the Master of Margaret Gurr, a woman who is allegedly possessed by two devils and a witch. Mistress Elderidge is almost driven out of her house by the devils possessing Margaret Gurr, and often prays for Margaret Gurr, although it seems to do little good.(4-5)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4-5

Elderidge Elderidge (Wife) Witness
2037

A man from Tunbridge in Kent, who is the master of the young servant girl, Margaret Gurr. His servant becomes allegedly possessed by two devils and a witch. Her condition becomes so severe, that property damage extends to his household, "as if the Chairs and Stools had been thrown about the Chamber, as if the whole house had been falling down." It is concluded that if Margaret Gurr is not "speedily cured," that Christopher Elderidge "and all the whole family must have been forced to have left the house." Christopher Elderidge and his wife engage in praying often for their servant, "yet all did not good," and with Margaret Gurr's "strange actions and amazing frightful looks, they were always Terrified." (4-5)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 4-5

Christopher Elderidge Christopher Elderidge Witness
2038

A man from Westram in the county of Kent, who is a "Student of Physick and Astrology." He writes about his "marvelous cures" accomplished in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Dr. Skinner attends to Margaret Gurr who is "afflicted with Devils," which "entred into her, and spake in her, and tempted her to Kill her self;" as well as flown through the air by these devils and a witch. Dr. Skinner allegedly "cast out the Devils and Witch," essentially exorcising the demons from Margaret Gurr and curing her "of the scurvy and gout," she suffered from, within "the compass of twelve days, in which time with a Physical, Natural, and other means used, [she] was perfectly restored to [her] former health." The devils and witch never "attempted to meddle with [her] since." As well, as a result of Dr. Skinner's administrations, Margaret Gurr was granted the miracle of being able to read the Bible, "which before [she] could not." Dr. Skinner is also responsible for curing a young male servant of Henry Chowning, in Kent. The boy was allegedly visited by a spirit in the form of a greyhound, and came home "in a great fright" and "amazed." When the boy turns ill, he "grew worse and worse," and his speech began to fail, causing people around him to "resolve to look out for help, for the fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," as he suffered from an "extream melancholy." It was believed that the boy was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." It was upon this decision to seek help that Henry Chowning called upon Dr. Skinner, "hearing of the many Cures I have done," and Dr. Skinner "examined the business and well consider'd of it." He decides the boy is "possest with the Devil," as his eyes were fixed, and the boy confesses to Dr. Skinner "that he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea." The boy also "seemed to ammend while he was in the room with" Dr. Skinner, and Dr. Skinner fells he "understood what the means must be that must relieve him, and gave order for the putting up of Medicines." These are administered quickly, and the doctor tells the boy's mother to visit him in a week. When she does, she tells him that the boy was "much ammended, to the admiration of many that heard how it was." Dr. Skinner provides more medicine for the boy when the boy complains of "a pain in his belly," and the boy is made well in "18 days time," so that "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." This is the second dispossession Dr. Skinner successfully treated with medicine. Dr. Skinner also treats Susan Woldredge in Sussex, who suffered from "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Her father, Mr. Woldredge seeks out Dr. Skinner after several other doctors failed to help her, and upon finding Dr. Skinner, he is advised "she would be well and [to] go home." Mr. Woldredge did so, and at first, his daughter was "in extream misery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously "on a sudden it began to mend." Her father visits the doctor again, and the doctor "send her a purge with some other matter," and she was made "perfectly well and continued every since." Her friends reward Dr. Skinner. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of a woman in West Groustead in Sussex, who suffered from an "Evil in her Throat." She encounters Dr. Skinner at a fair, and although he had "nought to give her," he bids her to come over. She promises to, and fails to show. Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she never visited him, and finds that from the moment she met Dr. Skinner "she found her self begin to mend," and was cured. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of Goody Halle in Sevenoaks, Kent, who suffered from "the most lamentable pain in her head," which was so severe, she could not sleep. Several doctors fail to treat her, yet when she visited Dr. Skinner, "she was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," by the use of medicines Dr. Skinner provided. She remained afterward "in vivide and perfect health."(Cover)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, Cover

Iohn Skinner Dr. John Skinner Author
2038

A man from Westram in the county of Kent, who is a "Student of Physick and Astrology." He writes about his "marvelous cures" accomplished in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Dr. Skinner attends to Margaret Gurr who is "afflicted with Devils," which "entred into her, and spake in her, and tempted her to Kill her self;" as well as flown through the air by these devils and a witch. Dr. Skinner allegedly "cast out the Devils and Witch," essentially exorcising the demons from Margaret Gurr and curing her "of the scurvy and gout," she suffered from, within "the compass of twelve days, in which time with a Physical, Natural, and other means used, [she] was perfectly restored to [her] former health." The devils and witch never "attempted to meddle with [her] since." As well, as a result of Dr. Skinner's administrations, Margaret Gurr was granted the miracle of being able to read the Bible, "which before [she] could not." Dr. Skinner is also responsible for curing a young male servant of Henry Chowning, in Kent. The boy was allegedly visited by a spirit in the form of a greyhound, and came home "in a great fright" and "amazed." When the boy turns ill, he "grew worse and worse," and his speech began to fail, causing people around him to "resolve to look out for help, for the fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," as he suffered from an "extream melancholy." It was believed that the boy was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." It was upon this decision to seek help that Henry Chowning called upon Dr. Skinner, "hearing of the many Cures I have done," and Dr. Skinner "examined the business and well consider'd of it." He decides the boy is "possest with the Devil," as his eyes were fixed, and the boy confesses to Dr. Skinner "that he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea." The boy also "seemed to ammend while he was in the room with" Dr. Skinner, and Dr. Skinner fells he "understood what the means must be that must relieve him, and gave order for the putting up of Medicines." These are administered quickly, and the doctor tells the boy's mother to visit him in a week. When she does, she tells him that the boy was "much ammended, to the admiration of many that heard how it was." Dr. Skinner provides more medicine for the boy when the boy complains of "a pain in his belly," and the boy is made well in "18 days time," so that "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." This is the second dispossession Dr. Skinner successfully treated with medicine. Dr. Skinner also treats Susan Woldredge in Sussex, who suffered from "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Her father, Mr. Woldredge seeks out Dr. Skinner after several other doctors failed to help her, and upon finding Dr. Skinner, he is advised "she would be well and [to] go home." Mr. Woldredge did so, and at first, his daughter was "in extream misery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously "on a sudden it began to mend." Her father visits the doctor again, and the doctor "send her a purge with some other matter," and she was made "perfectly well and continued every since." Her friends reward Dr. Skinner. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of a woman in West Groustead in Sussex, who suffered from an "Evil in her Throat." She encounters Dr. Skinner at a fair, and although he had "nought to give her," he bids her to come over. She promises to, and fails to show. Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she never visited him, and finds that from the moment she met Dr. Skinner "she found her self begin to mend," and was cured. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of Goody Halle in Sevenoaks, Kent, who suffered from "the most lamentable pain in her head," which was so severe, she could not sleep. Several doctors fail to treat her, yet when she visited Dr. Skinner, "she was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," by the use of medicines Dr. Skinner provided. She remained afterward "in vivide and perfect health."(Cover)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, Cover

Iohn Skinner Dr. John Skinner Exorcist
2038

A man from Westram in the county of Kent, who is a "Student of Physick and Astrology." He writes about his "marvelous cures" accomplished in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Dr. Skinner attends to Margaret Gurr who is "afflicted with Devils," which "entred into her, and spake in her, and tempted her to Kill her self;" as well as flown through the air by these devils and a witch. Dr. Skinner allegedly "cast out the Devils and Witch," essentially exorcising the demons from Margaret Gurr and curing her "of the scurvy and gout," she suffered from, within "the compass of twelve days, in which time with a Physical, Natural, and other means used, [she] was perfectly restored to [her] former health." The devils and witch never "attempted to meddle with [her] since." As well, as a result of Dr. Skinner's administrations, Margaret Gurr was granted the miracle of being able to read the Bible, "which before [she] could not." Dr. Skinner is also responsible for curing a young male servant of Henry Chowning, in Kent. The boy was allegedly visited by a spirit in the form of a greyhound, and came home "in a great fright" and "amazed." When the boy turns ill, he "grew worse and worse," and his speech began to fail, causing people around him to "resolve to look out for help, for the fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," as he suffered from an "extream melancholy." It was believed that the boy was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." It was upon this decision to seek help that Henry Chowning called upon Dr. Skinner, "hearing of the many Cures I have done," and Dr. Skinner "examined the business and well consider'd of it." He decides the boy is "possest with the Devil," as his eyes were fixed, and the boy confesses to Dr. Skinner "that he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea." The boy also "seemed to ammend while he was in the room with" Dr. Skinner, and Dr. Skinner fells he "understood what the means must be that must relieve him, and gave order for the putting up of Medicines." These are administered quickly, and the doctor tells the boy's mother to visit him in a week. When she does, she tells him that the boy was "much ammended, to the admiration of many that heard how it was." Dr. Skinner provides more medicine for the boy when the boy complains of "a pain in his belly," and the boy is made well in "18 days time," so that "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." This is the second dispossession Dr. Skinner successfully treated with medicine. Dr. Skinner also treats Susan Woldredge in Sussex, who suffered from "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Her father, Mr. Woldredge seeks out Dr. Skinner after several other doctors failed to help her, and upon finding Dr. Skinner, he is advised "she would be well and [to] go home." Mr. Woldredge did so, and at first, his daughter was "in extream misery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously "on a sudden it began to mend." Her father visits the doctor again, and the doctor "send her a purge with some other matter," and she was made "perfectly well and continued every since." Her friends reward Dr. Skinner. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of a woman in West Groustead in Sussex, who suffered from an "Evil in her Throat." She encounters Dr. Skinner at a fair, and although he had "nought to give her," he bids her to come over. She promises to, and fails to show. Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she never visited him, and finds that from the moment she met Dr. Skinner "she found her self begin to mend," and was cured. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of Goody Halle in Sevenoaks, Kent, who suffered from "the most lamentable pain in her head," which was so severe, she could not sleep. Several doctors fail to treat her, yet when she visited Dr. Skinner, "she was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," by the use of medicines Dr. Skinner provided. She remained afterward "in vivide and perfect health."(Cover)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, Cover

Iohn Skinner Dr. John Skinner Physician