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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
321

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eleven year old daughter of Mary Muschamp (now Moore) and George Muschamp of the gentry, and the sister of Betty Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr. She allegedly began suffering fits at the hands of Dorothy Swinow during harvest in 1645, and was finally released from them two years later in 1647. Margaret would fall into trances and see visions of angels and other spirits. She would also suffer torments in which she would lose the use of her tongue and limbs and vomit; at various times she vomited fir branches, coal, pins, straw, wire, brick, lead and stones. She would also lose the ability to eat for weeks at a time, only able to have her lips wet with a bit of water or milk. She would also sometimes cry that a Rogue was striking her and be seen to shield herself from blows; she claimed that this Rogue fought her in various shapes such as dragon, bear, horse or cow, striking her with a club, staff, sword or dagger. Other things would fight for her. Margaret would not remember what she had done or said during her fits. If given a pen and paper, she would write then have fits and burn or chew the paper to illegibility. For a time, she insisted that she required two drops of blood from the Rogue (John Hutton) to live, and that her brother required the same. Margaret accused Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton of causing her affliction, and that of her brother and sister, claiming that her angels bid her speak out. Her statements and final prayer during her last fit was recorded.(1-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-4

Margaret Muschamp Margaret Muschamp Demoniac
321

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eleven year old daughter of Mary Muschamp (now Moore) and George Muschamp of the gentry, and the sister of Betty Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr. She allegedly began suffering fits at the hands of Dorothy Swinow during harvest in 1645, and was finally released from them two years later in 1647. Margaret would fall into trances and see visions of angels and other spirits. She would also suffer torments in which she would lose the use of her tongue and limbs and vomit; at various times she vomited fir branches, coal, pins, straw, wire, brick, lead and stones. She would also lose the ability to eat for weeks at a time, only able to have her lips wet with a bit of water or milk. She would also sometimes cry that a Rogue was striking her and be seen to shield herself from blows; she claimed that this Rogue fought her in various shapes such as dragon, bear, horse or cow, striking her with a club, staff, sword or dagger. Other things would fight for her. Margaret would not remember what she had done or said during her fits. If given a pen and paper, she would write then have fits and burn or chew the paper to illegibility. For a time, she insisted that she required two drops of blood from the Rogue (John Hutton) to live, and that her brother required the same. Margaret accused Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton of causing her affliction, and that of her brother and sister, claiming that her angels bid her speak out. Her statements and final prayer during her last fit was recorded.(1-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-4

Margaret Muschamp Margaret Muschamp Prophet
321

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eleven year old daughter of Mary Muschamp (now Moore) and George Muschamp of the gentry, and the sister of Betty Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr. She allegedly began suffering fits at the hands of Dorothy Swinow during harvest in 1645, and was finally released from them two years later in 1647. Margaret would fall into trances and see visions of angels and other spirits. She would also suffer torments in which she would lose the use of her tongue and limbs and vomit; at various times she vomited fir branches, coal, pins, straw, wire, brick, lead and stones. She would also lose the ability to eat for weeks at a time, only able to have her lips wet with a bit of water or milk. She would also sometimes cry that a Rogue was striking her and be seen to shield herself from blows; she claimed that this Rogue fought her in various shapes such as dragon, bear, horse or cow, striking her with a club, staff, sword or dagger. Other things would fight for her. Margaret would not remember what she had done or said during her fits. If given a pen and paper, she would write then have fits and burn or chew the paper to illegibility. For a time, she insisted that she required two drops of blood from the Rogue (John Hutton) to live, and that her brother required the same. Margaret accused Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton of causing her affliction, and that of her brother and sister, claiming that her angels bid her speak out. Her statements and final prayer during her last fit was recorded.(1-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-4

Margaret Muschamp Margaret Muschamp Faster
1005

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the author of "Wonderfull Newes from the North," the mother of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilia Moore, the widow of George Muschamp and the wife of Edward Moore. Mary Moore's children Margaret, George and Betty were all allegedly bewitched by Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton; Swinow was also accused of causing Moore's daughter Sibilia to die in infancy. Moore consulted doctors on behalf of her children, and brought two drops of John Hutton's blood to Margaret when the child became convinced she required it to recover. Moore campaigned to have both Hutton and Swinow tried for the bewitchment of her children.(Preface)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, Preface

Mary Moore Mary Moore Witness
1005

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the author of "Wonderfull Newes from the North," the mother of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilia Moore, the widow of George Muschamp and the wife of Edward Moore. Mary Moore's children Margaret, George and Betty were all allegedly bewitched by Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton; Swinow was also accused of causing Moore's daughter Sibilia to die in infancy. Moore consulted doctors on behalf of her children, and brought two drops of John Hutton's blood to Margaret when the child became convinced she required it to recover. Moore campaigned to have both Hutton and Swinow tried for the bewitchment of her children.(Preface)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, Preface

Mary Moore Mary Moore Relative of Victim
1005

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the author of "Wonderfull Newes from the North," the mother of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilia Moore, the widow of George Muschamp and the wife of Edward Moore. Mary Moore's children Margaret, George and Betty were all allegedly bewitched by Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton; Swinow was also accused of causing Moore's daughter Sibilia to die in infancy. Moore consulted doctors on behalf of her children, and brought two drops of John Hutton's blood to Margaret when the child became convinced she required it to recover. Moore campaigned to have both Hutton and Swinow tried for the bewitchment of her children.(Preface)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, Preface

Mary Moore Mary Moore Author
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Victim
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Faster
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Demoniac
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Relative of Victim
1006

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Colonel Swinow. Dorothy Swinow was accused and gaoled for bewitching Mary Moore's children from her first marriage, Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp, and bewitching Moore's infant daughter from her second marriage, Sibilia Moore, to death. Swinow was accused initially by Margaret, who was seen to write "Jo Hu. Do. Swo. have beene the death of one deare friend, consume another, and torment mee." Mary Moore's niece claimed that Swinow had visited the children when Moore was away and had spoken harshly of Moore to them. Swinow was also accused by John Hutton, the man also implicated in Margaret's writing, when Hutton told Moore "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." Hutton also accused her of causing the death of Lady Margery Hambleton. Margaret later accused her of causing James Fauset's fits as well. Swinow was apprehended and gaoled not long after; her husband the Colonel died around the same time. She was released on bail, then reapprehended to await trial in the Common Gaol at Morpeth.(5-6)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 5-6

Dorothy Swinow Dorothy Swinow Witch
1007

A man from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be a military officer holding the rank of Colonel and husband of Dorothy Swinow. Colonel Swinow died while Dorothy was facing accusations of witchcraft. (6)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6

Swinow Colonel Swinow Relative of Witch
1008

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp Betty Muschamp Relative of Witch
1008

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp Betty Muschamp Demoniac
1008

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp Betty Muschamp Victim
1010

An infant girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the daughter of Mary Moore and her second husband Edward Moore, and the half sister to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. Margaret told her mother Mary Moore, pregnant with Sibillia Moore, that Dorothy Swinow was "consuming the child within her." It was later alleged that Swinow "would have consumed the childe that Mrs. Moore had last in her wombe, but the Lord would not permit her; and that after the childe was borne Mrs. Swinow was the occasion of its death" along with Swinow's sister Jane. Swinow was finally apprehended and gaoled awaiting trial on charges of bewitching Sibilla to death.(16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16

Sibilla Moore Sibilla Moore Victim
1011

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Lord Robert Hambleton, the sister of Mary Moore and the aunt of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilla Moore. According to Mary Moore, Margery Hambleton "dyed in a restlesse sicknesse;" John Hutton claimed that Dorothy Swinow was responsible. Margaret Muschamp also blamed Swinow for Hambleton's death. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(8)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 8

Margery Hambleton Margery Hambleton Relative of Victim
1011

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Lord Robert Hambleton, the sister of Mary Moore and the aunt of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilla Moore. According to Mary Moore, Margery Hambleton "dyed in a restlesse sicknesse;" John Hutton claimed that Dorothy Swinow was responsible. Margaret Muschamp also blamed Swinow for Hambleton's death. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(8)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 8

Margery Hambleton Margery Hambleton Victim
1012

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Lord and knight, the husband and widower of Lady Margery Hambleton, and the brother-in-law of Mary Moore. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after Margery's death, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15

Robert Hambleton Sir Robert Hambleton Relative of Victim
1012

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Lord and knight, the husband and widower of Lady Margery Hambleton, and the brother-in-law of Mary Moore. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after Margery's death, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15

Robert Hambleton Sir Robert Hambleton Victim
1013

A man from Sunderland in the County of Northumberland, known to be "one it was suspected that could do more then God allowed of." During one of her fits, Mary Muschamp wrote an abbreviation of his name, and the undeciphered abbreviation of one other person's name. Mary Moore sent to him shortly therafter, demanding that he confess who had afflicted Margaret and threatening to apprehend him if he would not. Moore's servant reported back his answer: "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." John Hutton also blamed Swinow for the death of Margery Hambleton. When Hutton heard that Margaret wanted two drops of his blood to save her life, he tried to do it himself privately; instead "the child nickt him halfe a dozen times in the forehead, but no bloud appeared; then he put forth his right arme and that was not till her mother threatned his heart bloud should goe before she wanted it; then he layd his thumb on his arme, and two drops appeared, which she wip'd off with a paper." Margaret later claimed two more drops would save her brother, George Muschamp Jr.; her mother Mary Moore hunted Hutton down and took more of his blood. Margaret's fits were observed to not trouble her in Hutton's company, and she fell into a terrible one when he left. Moore had Hutton apprehended, and he died in prison. Margaret claimed that he was her greatest tormentor, and had he lived, he would have given them the names of two more witches. He is said to have been able to call up storms, and is credited with nearly blowing a ship off course as it entered Berwick Harbour.(7-11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-11

John Hutton John Hutton Witch
1013

A man from Sunderland in the County of Northumberland, known to be "one it was suspected that could do more then God allowed of." During one of her fits, Mary Muschamp wrote an abbreviation of his name, and the undeciphered abbreviation of one other person's name. Mary Moore sent to him shortly therafter, demanding that he confess who had afflicted Margaret and threatening to apprehend him if he would not. Moore's servant reported back his answer: "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." John Hutton also blamed Swinow for the death of Margery Hambleton. When Hutton heard that Margaret wanted two drops of his blood to save her life, he tried to do it himself privately; instead "the child nickt him halfe a dozen times in the forehead, but no bloud appeared; then he put forth his right arme and that was not till her mother threatned his heart bloud should goe before she wanted it; then he layd his thumb on his arme, and two drops appeared, which she wip'd off with a paper." Margaret later claimed two more drops would save her brother, George Muschamp Jr.; her mother Mary Moore hunted Hutton down and took more of his blood. Margaret's fits were observed to not trouble her in Hutton's company, and she fell into a terrible one when he left. Moore had Hutton apprehended, and he died in prison. Margaret claimed that he was her greatest tormentor, and had he lived, he would have given them the names of two more witches. He is said to have been able to call up storms, and is credited with nearly blowing a ship off course as it entered Berwick Harbour.(7-11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-11

John Hutton John Hutton Accuser
1013

A man from Sunderland in the County of Northumberland, known to be "one it was suspected that could do more then God allowed of." During one of her fits, Mary Muschamp wrote an abbreviation of his name, and the undeciphered abbreviation of one other person's name. Mary Moore sent to him shortly therafter, demanding that he confess who had afflicted Margaret and threatening to apprehend him if he would not. Moore's servant reported back his answer: "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." John Hutton also blamed Swinow for the death of Margery Hambleton. When Hutton heard that Margaret wanted two drops of his blood to save her life, he tried to do it himself privately; instead "the child nickt him halfe a dozen times in the forehead, but no bloud appeared; then he put forth his right arme and that was not till her mother threatned his heart bloud should goe before she wanted it; then he layd his thumb on his arme, and two drops appeared, which she wip'd off with a paper." Margaret later claimed two more drops would save her brother, George Muschamp Jr.; her mother Mary Moore hunted Hutton down and took more of his blood. Margaret's fits were observed to not trouble her in Hutton's company, and she fell into a terrible one when he left. Moore had Hutton apprehended, and he died in prison. Margaret claimed that he was her greatest tormentor, and had he lived, he would have given them the names of two more witches. He is said to have been able to call up storms, and is credited with nearly blowing a ship off course as it entered Berwick Harbour.(7-11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-11

John Hutton John Hutton Cunning-folk
1014

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the first husband of Mary Moore, and the father of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. He died an unknown time before his children allegedly became bewitched; his widow Mary married Edward Moore and later authored an account of their bewitchment.(1)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1

George Muschamp George Muschamp Relative of Victim
1015

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the second husband of Mary Moore, the father of six sons and one daughter from his previous marriage, the father of Sibilla Moore, and the stepfather of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. He, along with his sons and eldest daughter, witnessed Margaret's fits and alleged conversations with angels, and her claim that two drops of John Hutton's blood had helped her and would do the same for her brother George. Margaret also claimed that Dorothy Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and of Edward Moore against Mary Moore. Margaret White alleged that Swinow and Swinow's sister Jane Martin had come to Edward Moore's home to bewitch Margaret to death, cause George Jr. and Betty's torments, and bewitch Sibilla Moore to death as an infant when they could not kill Mary Moore or cause Sibilla to die in the womb. Swinow was finally apprehended and gaoled awaiting trial on charges of bewitching his daughter Sibilla to death.(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

Edward Moore Edward Moore Relative of Victim
1015

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the second husband of Mary Moore, the father of six sons and one daughter from his previous marriage, the father of Sibilla Moore, and the stepfather of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. He, along with his sons and eldest daughter, witnessed Margaret's fits and alleged conversations with angels, and her claim that two drops of John Hutton's blood had helped her and would do the same for her brother George. Margaret also claimed that Dorothy Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and of Edward Moore against Mary Moore. Margaret White alleged that Swinow and Swinow's sister Jane Martin had come to Edward Moore's home to bewitch Margaret to death, cause George Jr. and Betty's torments, and bewitch Sibilla Moore to death as an infant when they could not kill Mary Moore or cause Sibilla to die in the womb. Swinow was finally apprehended and gaoled awaiting trial on charges of bewitching his daughter Sibilla to death.(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

Edward Moore Edward Moore Witness
1016

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. Margaret Muschamp, when first afflicted by her fits, called for Mr. Huet to return from his pilgrimage to the Holy Island (Lindisfarne) as "that faithfull man may helpe my soule forward in praying with me, and for me." Mr. Huet came to pray, thus witnessing the latter part of her first fit. He continued to come and pray with her, along with fellow ministers Mr. Balsom and Mr. Strother, for the first 16 weeks of her torments.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Huet Mr. Huet Witness
1016

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. Margaret Muschamp, when first afflicted by her fits, called for Mr. Huet to return from his pilgrimage to the Holy Island (Lindisfarne) as "that faithfull man may helpe my soule forward in praying with me, and for me." Mr. Huet came to pray, thus witnessing the latter part of her first fit. He continued to come and pray with her, along with fellow ministers Mr. Balsom and Mr. Strother, for the first 16 weeks of her torments.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Huet Mr. Huet Preacher/Minister
1017

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp in her first fit. She was accompanied by two of her brothers, two of her sisters, and their mother; all unnamed. Muschamp, "all this while in her Heavenly Rapture, uttering such words as were admirable to the beholders," was prayed with and over by minister Mr. Huot in view of Mrs. Kenady and numerous others.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Kenady Mrs. Kenady Witness
1018

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the husband of Mrs. Robinson and a witness to Margaret Muschamp in her first fit. Muschamp, "all this while in her Heavenly Rapture, uttering such words as were admirable to the beholders," was prayed with and over by minister Mr. Huot in view of Robinson and numerous others.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

George Robinson George Robinson Witness
1019

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of George Robinson and a witness to Margaret Muschamp in her first fit. Muschamp, "all this while in her Heavenly Rapture, uttering such words as were admirable to the beholders," was prayed with and over by minister Mr. Huot in view of Mrs. Robinson and numerous others.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Robinson Mrs. Robinson Witness
1020

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp in her first fit. Muschamp, "all this while in her Heavenly Rapture, uttering such words as were admirable to the beholders," was prayed with and over by minister Mr. Huot in view of Grame and numerous others.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Katherine Grame Katherine Grame Witness
1021

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the husband of Mrs. Selby and a witness to Margaret Muschamp in her first fit. Muschamp, "all this while in her Heavenly Rapture, uttering such words as were admirable to the beholders," was prayed with and over by minister Mr. Huot in view of Selby and numerous others.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Odnel Selby Odnel Selby Witness
1022

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Odnel Selby and a witness to Margaret Muschamp in her first fit. Muschamp, "all this while in her Heavenly Rapture, uttering such words as were admirable to the beholders," was prayed with and over by minister Mr. Huot in view of Mrs. Selby and numerous others.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Selby Mrs. Selby Witness
1023

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp in her first fit. Muschamp, "all this while in her Heavenly Rapture, uttering such words as were admirable to the be|holders," was prayed with and over by minister Mr. Huot in view of Dickson and numerous others.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Margaret Dikson Margaret Dickson Witness
1024

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her."(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Anonymous 150 Preacher/Minister
1024

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her."(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Anonymous 150 Physician
1024

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her."(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Anonymous 150 Witness
1026

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Lady and the wife of Lord William Selby. Mary Moore sent for Lady Selby, along with physicians and several other friends, to witness her daughter Margaret Muschamp's second tormenting fit. Lady Selby observed Margaret unable to eat for 16 weeks, yet lose no weight. She is known to have prayed for the child in addition to witnessing her torments.(2-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 2-4

Selby Lady Selby Witness
1027

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the widow of Colonel Fenwick. Mary Moore sent for Widow Fenwick, along with physicians and several other friends, to witness her daughter Margaret Muschamp's second tormenting fit.(2-3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 2-3

Fenwick Widow Fenwick Witness
1028

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister, whom Margaret Muschamp begged to pray for her in her tormenting fits. Margaret attributes her first recovery to him, and is well and able to eat again for seven or eight weeks.(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Balsom Mr. Balsom Preacher/Minister
1028

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister, whom Margaret Muschamp begged to pray for her in her tormenting fits. Margaret attributes her first recovery to him, and is well and able to eat again for seven or eight weeks.(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Balsom Mr. Balsom Witness
1029

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister, whom Margaret Muschamp begged to pray for her in her tormenting fits. Margaret attributes her first recovery to him, and is well and able to eat again for seven or eight weeks.(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Strother Mr. Strother Preacher/Minister
1029

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister, whom Margaret Muschamp begged to pray for her in her tormenting fits. Margaret attributes her first recovery to him, and is well and able to eat again for seven or eight weeks.(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Strother Mr. Strother Witness
1030

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Lord and the husband of Lady Selby. He, along with Lady Selby, witnessed Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits, observing that despite her inability to eat for 16 weeks, the child lost no weight.(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

William Selby Lord William Selby Witness
1031

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Countess. She witnessed Margaret Muschamp in her tormenting fits, and saw that despite the child's inability to eat, she did not lose any weight. (3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Lendrik Countess Lendrik Witness
1032

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Lady. She witnessed Margaret Muschamp in her tormenting fits, and saw that despite the child's inability to eat, she did not lose any weight. (3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Haggarston Lady Haggarston Witness
1100

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother was present during Margaret Muschamp's first tormenting fit, and witnessed numerous others along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 2

Moore Moore (Sibing-Brother 1) Relative of Victim
1100

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother was present during Margaret Muschamp's first tormenting fit, and witnessed numerous others along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 2

Moore Moore (Sibing-Brother 1) Witness
1285

A man from Tweedsmouth in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. He attended Margaret Muschamp during a fit after her mother Mary Moore returned home, in which Margaret said that she must have two drops of John Huttons' or Dorothy Swinow's blood within ten days to save her life; if not, she would die or be tormented perpetually.(6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Anonymous 219 Witness
1287

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a servant. Mary Moore sent him to John Hutton to demand Hutton confess who had afflicted Margaret Muschamp. Hutton told him that Moore already knew, and that she had told Hall before sending him off; Hutton then revealed to Hall's astonishment that "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." Hall witnessed Margaret talking with her angels after receiving two drops of John Hutton's blood, and heard her say that her brother George Muschamp Jr., also afflicted by fits, needed the same if he were to live. Hall also witnessed Margaret White's confession, in which she implicated Dorothy Swinow and Jane Martin in the tormenting of the Muschamp children and in the death of Mary Moore's infant daughter Sibilla.(7-8)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-8

William Hall William Hall Witness
1354

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be George Muschamp's niece and cousin to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. Mary Moore left Margaret in Elizabeth's care one day when she had to go abroad; Margaret's voice was afflicted, leaving her only able to communicate with signs. Elizabeth brought Margaret into the garden at the child's request, and witnessed her cousin sit limply for a quarter hour and then suddenly jump up and run "thrice about the Garden, expressing a shrill voyce, but did not speake presently: she that was brought down in this sad condition came up staires on her owne legs, in her Cozens hands." She saw Margaret run to greet her mother on her return, and call out a welcome. Elizabeth also witnessed Margaret talking with her angels after receiving two drops of John Hutton's blood, and heard her say that her brother George Muschamp Jr., also afflicted by fits, needed the same if he were to live. (3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Elizabeth Muschamp Elizabeth Muschamp Witness
1354

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be George Muschamp's niece and cousin to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. Mary Moore left Margaret in Elizabeth's care one day when she had to go abroad; Margaret's voice was afflicted, leaving her only able to communicate with signs. Elizabeth brought Margaret into the garden at the child's request, and witnessed her cousin sit limply for a quarter hour and then suddenly jump up and run "thrice about the Garden, expressing a shrill voyce, but did not speake presently: she that was brought down in this sad condition came up staires on her owne legs, in her Cozens hands." She saw Margaret run to greet her mother on her return, and call out a welcome. Elizabeth also witnessed Margaret talking with her angels after receiving two drops of John Hutton's blood, and heard her say that her brother George Muschamp Jr., also afflicted by fits, needed the same if he were to live. (3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Elizabeth Muschamp Elizabeth Muschamp Relative of Victim
1355

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. He was present when she claimed receiving two drops of blood from John Hutton had averted seven years of torment. He also heard her accuse Dorothy Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption, her torments and James Faucet's unnatural fits, in addition to her claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. When en route to Spital, George Lee was "almost cast away comming into Barwick Harbour in a Ship by that fearfull tempest which HUTTON raised."(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

George Lee George Lee Witness
1355

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. He was present when she claimed receiving two drops of blood from John Hutton had averted seven years of torment. He also heard her accuse Dorothy Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption, her torments and James Faucet's unnatural fits, in addition to her claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. When en route to Spital, George Lee was "almost cast away comming into Barwick Harbour in a Ship by that fearfull tempest which HUTTON raised."(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

George Lee George Lee Victim
1356

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. He was present when she claimed receiving two drops of blood from John Hutton had averted seven years of torment. He also heard her accuse Dorothy Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption, her torments and James Faucet's unnatural fits, in addition to her claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. (9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

Henry Orde Henry Orde Witness
1357

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to have accompanied Mary Moore when she went to speak directly to John Hutton, and to have been present for Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. He heard Hutton accuse Dorothy Swinow of killing Lady Margery Hambleton, consume George Muschamp Jr., cause Margaret's torments and for all the evils that had befalling her besides. George Armorer also witnessed Margaret take some of his blood, heard the child claim that it had averted seven years of torment, and claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. He also heard her, too, accuse Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Jr.'s consumption and her torments; Margaret also blamed Swinow for James Faucet's unnatural fits.(7-8)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-8

George Armorer George Armorer Witness
1358

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. She was present when Margaret claimed receiving two drops of blood from John Hutton had averted seven years of torment. She also heard her accuse Dorothy Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption, her torments and James Faucet's unnatural fits, in addition to her claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. (9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

Anne Selby Anne Selby Witness
1359

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. She was present when Margaret claimed receiving two drops of blood from John Hutton had averted seven years of torment. She also heard her accuse Dorothy Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption, her torments and James Faucet's unnatural fits, in addition to her claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. (9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

Margaret Selby Margaret Selby Witness
1361

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Mr. Fauset, to have one sister, and through that sister to be the brother-in-law of Lady Margery Hambleton's son. Margaret Muschamp accused Dorothy Swinow of causing James Fauset to suffer unnatural fits in an attempt to kill him so that Mr. Fauset's estate would go to Hambleton's son by virtue of his marriage to Faucet's sister. Muschamp also claimed that Swinow left Faucet alone, allowing him to recover, to focus on her and her family instead.(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

James Fauset James Fauset Victim
1366

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 2) Witness
1366

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 2) Relative of Victim
1367

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 3) Relative of Victim
1367

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 3) Witness
1368

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 4) Witness
1368

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 4) Relative of Victim
1369

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 5) Witness
1369

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 5) Relative of Victim
1370

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 6) Witness
1370

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 6) Relative of Victim
1371

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the daughter of Edward Moore and his first wife, sister to six full brothers, half-sister to Sibilla Moore and step-sister to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This sister witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with her father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. She also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibing-Sister) Relative of Victim
1371

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the daughter of Edward Moore and his first wife, sister to six full brothers, half-sister to Sibilla Moore and step-sister to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This sister witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with her father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. She also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibing-Sister) Witness
1376

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a miller's wife and one of the two "bad women" who kept Dorothy Swinow's company. She, along with Swinow and the Webster's wife (a weaver; Anonymous 235), allegedly caused the deaths of John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Anonymous 234 Witch
1377

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a weaver's wife and one of the two "bad women" who kept Dorothy Swinow's company. She, along with Swinow and a miller's wife (Anonymous 234), allegedly caused the deaths of John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Anonymous 235 Witch
1378

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the husband of Mrs. Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

John Custerd John Custerd Victim
1378

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the husband of Mrs. Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

John Custerd John Custerd Relative of Victim
1379

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of John Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Custerd Mrs. Custerd Victim
1379

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of John Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Custerd Mrs. Custerd Relative of Victim
1380

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. He heard John Hutton's accusation that Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 235 had killed John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd. He witnessed Margaret Muschamp talking to her angels and make the claim that justice was required for her torments and her brother George Muschamp Jr.'s return to health. Francis Broad was also present when Margaret vomited strange objects, accused Swinow of consuming Mary Moore's unborn child, and cry out that "the Grand Witch Meg is come to the doore with a lighted Candle in each hand" followed by the smell of brimstone. He stood as a formal witness to Margaret's final fit and the speech she made in it.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Francis Broad Francis Broad Preacher/Minister
1380

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. He heard John Hutton's accusation that Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 235 had killed John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd. He witnessed Margaret Muschamp talking to her angels and make the claim that justice was required for her torments and her brother George Muschamp Jr.'s return to health. Francis Broad was also present when Margaret vomited strange objects, accused Swinow of consuming Mary Moore's unborn child, and cry out that "the Grand Witch Meg is come to the doore with a lighted Candle in each hand" followed by the smell of brimstone. He stood as a formal witness to Margaret's final fit and the speech she made in it.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Francis Broad Francis Broad Witness
1381

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known have been a witness to John Hutton's accusation that Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 235 had killed John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd. (9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Heberin Mr. Heberin Witness
1382

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known have been a witness to John Hutton's accusation that Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 235 had killed John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd. (9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

William Orde William Orde Witness
1388

A man from Nuham in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Justice of the Peace. Mary Moore gave him information about both John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow in order to gain their apprehension. Justice Foster had Hutton apprehended and imprisoned at Newcastle Gaol, but not Swinow. He also heard Margaret White's confession, in which she accused Swinow and Jane Martin of killing the infant Sibilla Moore.(10, 12)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 10, 12

Foster Justice Foster Examiner/Justice
1389

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician. He stayed with Margaret Muschamp during the last of her tormenting fits, and witnessed her final speech.(18, 24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 18, 24

Stephens Dr. Stephens Witness
1389

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician. He stayed with Margaret Muschamp during the last of her tormenting fits, and witnessed her final speech.(18, 24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 18, 24

Stephens Dr. Stephens Physician
2215

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, alleged to be a Grand Witch. According to Margaret Muschamp, Grand Witch Meg appeared on St. John's Day (Midsummer Day) night to try and take George Muschamp Jr.'s life and Betty Muschamp's use of her legs. Margaret Muschamp had gathered a group of family and neighbours to pray for them, and they successfully repelled Grand Witch Meg's attempt. The only sign of her presence is a sudden stench of brimstone; no-one sees her but Margaret.(16-17)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16-17

Meg Grand Witch Meg Witch
1390

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Jane Martin. She made a confession claiming that she had been "the Divels servant these five yeares last past." The Devil first came to her at her home in the shape of a man in blue clothes; he grabbed her tightly by the hand and told her she should never want, then gave her one nip on the shoulder and another on her back. She added that her familiar took the form of a black greyhound, and that she had carnal relations with the Devil on numerous occasions. Margaret White claimed to have eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. With Martin and Swinow, she came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Margaret White Margaret White Relative of Witch
1390

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Jane Martin. She made a confession claiming that she had been "the Divels servant these five yeares last past." The Devil first came to her at her home in the shape of a man in blue clothes; he grabbed her tightly by the hand and told her she should never want, then gave her one nip on the shoulder and another on her back. She added that her familiar took the form of a black greyhound, and that she had carnal relations with the Devil on numerous occasions. Margaret White claimed to have eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. With Martin and Swinow, she came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Margaret White Margaret White Witch
1391

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Margaret White. White accused Jane Martin of witchcraft in her confession, alleging that she had eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. White also claimed that she, Martin and Swinow came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Jane Martin Jane Martin Relative of Witch
1391

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Margaret White. White accused Jane Martin of witchcraft in her confession, alleging that she had eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. White also claimed that she, Martin and Swinow came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Jane Martin Jane Martin Witch
1396

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Clether. Dr. Clether, with Mrs. Clether, was present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Mary Moore begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (15-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15-16

Clether Dr. Clether Physician
1396

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Clether. Dr. Clether, with Mrs. Clether, was present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Mary Moore begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (15-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15-16

Clether Dr. Clether Witness
1397

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Dr. Clether. Mrs. Clether witnessed Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland, which was met with denial and the Counsellor's refusal to meddle in the matter. She heard Margaret Muschamp claim that Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and justices against Moore, and her statement of determination to take up the matter with the judge again the next day. Mrs. Clether, along with Dr. Clether, was also present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Moore again begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-15

Clether Mrs. Clether Witness
1400

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Genison. Dr. Genison witnessed Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland, which was met with denial and the Counsellor's refusal to meddle in the matter. She heard Margaret Muschamp claim that Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and justices against Moore, and her statement of determination to take up the matter with the judge again the next day. Dr. Genison invited Moore and her children to his house, which was next door to the Judge's chamber to wait for another appointment. He, along with Mrs. Genison, was also present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Moore again begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-16

Genison Dr. Genison Witness
1400

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Genison. Dr. Genison witnessed Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland, which was met with denial and the Counsellor's refusal to meddle in the matter. She heard Margaret Muschamp claim that Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and justices against Moore, and her statement of determination to take up the matter with the judge again the next day. Dr. Genison invited Moore and her children to his house, which was next door to the Judge's chamber to wait for another appointment. He, along with Mrs. Genison, was also present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Moore again begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-16

Genison Dr. Genison Physician
1401

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Dr. Genison. Her husband invited Mary Moore and her children to their house, which was next door to the Judge's chamber, to wait for a second appointment. She and Dr. Genison were present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Moore again begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-16

Genison Mrs. Genison Witness
1402

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Justice of the Peace. He heard Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland for prosecution, which he denied. The next day, Moore again appeared in the Judge's chamber to beg justice against Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-15

Anonymous 237 Examiner/Justice