Go back
39 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
368

A man from Pollok in Glasgow, Scotland, who starts has great pains which keep him from sleeping and continuous sweating. His pain seemed like he was being continuously pricked with pins.(228)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 228

Maxwell Maxwell Victim
337

A woman from Bristol in the county of Bristol, who suffers painful fits after refusing to give money to a suspected witch. She suffered from fits for seventeen years.(189)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189

Seavington Mrs. Seavington Demoniac
1239

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. This child takes on the role of prophet, predicting her imminent demise. None of her prophecies come to pass, and all the children recover after medical treatment.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Medideth Merideth (Daughter) Demoniac
1239

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. This child takes on the role of prophet, predicting her imminent demise. None of her prophecies come to pass, and all the children recover after medical treatment.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Medideth Merideth (Daughter) Prophet
1240

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. This child vomits pins, but like her siblings, recovers after medical treatment.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Merideth Merideth (Daughter 2) Demoniac
1241

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. All the children recover after medical treatment. (167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Merideth Merideth (Daughter 3) Demoniac
1242

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. All the children recover after medical treatment. (167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Merideth Merideth (Son) Demoniac
1243

A man from Bristol in the county of Bristol, whose four Merideth (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years) are allegedly bewitched. All of his children recover after medical treatment.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Mr. Merideth Witness
1244

A man from Bristol in the county of Bristol, described as one of the physicians consulted about the alleged bewitchment of the Merideth children. The physic provided by the doctor (as well as others) is recorded as having contributed to their admirable recovery.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Anonymous 199 Physician
2138

A man from Mary Poel Street in the City of Bristol, in the county of Bristol, who was a shoemaker. He was "extreamly disturbed with most surprizing, and unaccountable noises for some time." However, one night, around midnight, these noises were accompanied by "so great a light through the whole House, as if every Room had been full of burning Tapers, or Torches." After this happening, Peter Pain "applied" himself to Mr. Toogood, a minister, who agreed to visit the house. At the house, Mr. Toogood and the Pain family gathered in a Chamber, where at one end was "a large bulky Trunk," which was "so heavy, that four or five men were not able to lift it." They closed the door, and began praying, when "on a sudden something was flung against the Chamber door, with extraordinary violence." Immediately after this, the noises within the house ceased. When Peter Pain and the minister attempted to open the door, they could not do so, but had to call for neighbours to help. They found "the door barr'd close with the great Trunk aforesaid." It was concluded that it was cast there when they heard "that mighty shock against the door."(164-165)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 164-165

Peter Pain Peter Pain Victim
2139

A man from the city of Bristol in the county of Bristol, who is a minister called upon by Peter Pain, a shoemaker, when "surprizing and unaccountable noises" in his house were accompanied by "so great a light" it seemed "as if every Room had been full of burning Tapers, or Torches." This minister agrees to visit Peter Pain's house, and upon arriving, "he became an Ear-witness of the most dreadful, and accustomed noises." He gathers the Pain family into a chamber in a gallery, where at one end was "a large bulky Trunk," that was "so heavy, that four or five men were not able to lift it." The minister shuts the door, and begins praying, when suddenly "something was flung against the Chamber door, with extraordinary violence." Immediately after this, the noises within the house ceased. When Peter Pain and the minister attempted to open the door, they could not do so, but had to call for neighbours to help. They found "the door barr'd close with the great Trunk aforesaid." It was concluded that it was cast there when they heard "that mighty shock against the door."(165-166)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 165-166

Toogood Mr. Toogood Preacher/Minister
2140

A man from Spreyton, in the county of Devon, who is visited by at least two specters in his service to Mr. Philip Furze. The first of these is "a resemblance of an Aged Gentleman, like his masters Father," who approaches him "with a Pole or Staff in his hand, resembling that he was wont to carry when living, to kill the moles withal." At first Francis Fey is "not a little surprized," to see the ghost, but his directed by the specter to fulfill "several Legacies which by his Testament he had bequeathed were unpaid," including paying two persons ten shillings, and the dead man's sister, a Gentlewoman, twenty shillings. Francis Fey points out that one of the former two persons is also deceased, which prompts the specter to tell him to pay "the next Relation." It is promised that if Francis Fey does these things, the ghost would "trouble him no further." Francis Fey fulfills these wishes, save that when he goes to Totnes to visit the Gentlewoman, (Anonymous 412), she refuses the twenty shillings, fearing it is "sent her from the Devil." Francis Fey spends the night at her house, and the specter appears to him again. Francis Fey challenges the ghost's promise not to trouble him any more, saying he had done all but could not provide the sister. The ghost tells him to into Totnes and buy her a ring worth twenty shillings, and that she should accept this. Francis Fey does as he was advised, and she received the ring. After this, the "Apparition of the old Gentleman, hath seemed to be at rest, having never given the young man any further trouble." The following day, traveling with a servant of the gentlewoman (Anonymous 413), Francis Fey is attacked by the ghost of the old Gentleman's second wife (Anonymous 169), and flung off of his horse "with such violence," that there was a "resounding great noise." The young man is continually tormented by this second ghost, who thrusts his head in small places, causing him injury and requiring "the strength of divers men" to release him. She also attempts to strangle him using the girding of his injuries, and various "Cravats and Handkerchiefs, that he hath worn about his Neck." When Francis Fey wears a perriwig, the ghost tears these up after tearing them off his head, and when Francis Fey attempts to protect the perriwig "he esteemed above the rest," by putting it in several boxes, and putting weights on these boxes, the ghost still breaks all the boxes, and "rended into many small parts and tatters." The ghost also tears his shoestrings from his shoes, and tears his gloves in his pocket, and the clothes on his back, unless they belonged to another. Finally, the daemon also entangles "the feet and legs of the young man [...] about his Neck, that he hath been loosed with great difficulty." This is repeated at times with "the frames of Chairs, and Stools." Near Easter, Francis Fey is "taken up by the skirt of his doublet, by this Female Daemon, and carried a heighth into the Air." His master, Mr. Philip Furze misses him, and goes to look for him. Francis Fey is found near half an hour later, and "he was heard singing, and whistling in a bog, or quagmire," and was in fact "in a king of Trance, or extatick fit," which he sometimes suffers from, although it is unclear if these fits are caused by the spirit. When Francis Fey is asked where he was, he tells his master that he had been carried so high into the air, that "his Masters house seemed to him to be but as a Hay-cock." This story is verified when a workman finds a shoe outside of Mr. Philip Furze's house, and a perriwig in a tree. After this incident, where the young man's body had bee "on the mud in the Quagmire," was "somewhat benummed, and seemingly deader than the other." Francis Fey is then taken to Crediton, "to be bleeded," which after accomplished, he was left alone. When "the Company" (Anonymous 417) which accompanied him to Crediton found him again, he was "in one of his Fits, with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to a great bigness." When Francis Fey comes out of his fit, he explains that "a Bird had with great swiftness, and force flown in at the Window," and thrown a stone at his forehead. When searched, it was found that under where Francis Fey sat lay "a weight of Brass or Copper," which it seems the Daemon used to harm the boy. The Spirit continued to "molest the young man in a very severe and rugged manner," indefinitely.(178 - 179)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178 - 179

Francis Fey Francis Fey Demoniac
2140

A man from Spreyton, in the county of Devon, who is visited by at least two specters in his service to Mr. Philip Furze. The first of these is "a resemblance of an Aged Gentleman, like his masters Father," who approaches him "with a Pole or Staff in his hand, resembling that he was wont to carry when living, to kill the moles withal." At first Francis Fey is "not a little surprized," to see the ghost, but his directed by the specter to fulfill "several Legacies which by his Testament he had bequeathed were unpaid," including paying two persons ten shillings, and the dead man's sister, a Gentlewoman, twenty shillings. Francis Fey points out that one of the former two persons is also deceased, which prompts the specter to tell him to pay "the next Relation." It is promised that if Francis Fey does these things, the ghost would "trouble him no further." Francis Fey fulfills these wishes, save that when he goes to Totnes to visit the Gentlewoman, (Anonymous 412), she refuses the twenty shillings, fearing it is "sent her from the Devil." Francis Fey spends the night at her house, and the specter appears to him again. Francis Fey challenges the ghost's promise not to trouble him any more, saying he had done all but could not provide the sister. The ghost tells him to into Totnes and buy her a ring worth twenty shillings, and that she should accept this. Francis Fey does as he was advised, and she received the ring. After this, the "Apparition of the old Gentleman, hath seemed to be at rest, having never given the young man any further trouble." The following day, traveling with a servant of the gentlewoman (Anonymous 413), Francis Fey is attacked by the ghost of the old Gentleman's second wife (Anonymous 169), and flung off of his horse "with such violence," that there was a "resounding great noise." The young man is continually tormented by this second ghost, who thrusts his head in small places, causing him injury and requiring "the strength of divers men" to release him. She also attempts to strangle him using the girding of his injuries, and various "Cravats and Handkerchiefs, that he hath worn about his Neck." When Francis Fey wears a perriwig, the ghost tears these up after tearing them off his head, and when Francis Fey attempts to protect the perriwig "he esteemed above the rest," by putting it in several boxes, and putting weights on these boxes, the ghost still breaks all the boxes, and "rended into many small parts and tatters." The ghost also tears his shoestrings from his shoes, and tears his gloves in his pocket, and the clothes on his back, unless they belonged to another. Finally, the daemon also entangles "the feet and legs of the young man [...] about his Neck, that he hath been loosed with great difficulty." This is repeated at times with "the frames of Chairs, and Stools." Near Easter, Francis Fey is "taken up by the skirt of his doublet, by this Female Daemon, and carried a heighth into the Air." His master, Mr. Philip Furze misses him, and goes to look for him. Francis Fey is found near half an hour later, and "he was heard singing, and whistling in a bog, or quagmire," and was in fact "in a king of Trance, or extatick fit," which he sometimes suffers from, although it is unclear if these fits are caused by the spirit. When Francis Fey is asked where he was, he tells his master that he had been carried so high into the air, that "his Masters house seemed to him to be but as a Hay-cock." This story is verified when a workman finds a shoe outside of Mr. Philip Furze's house, and a perriwig in a tree. After this incident, where the young man's body had bee "on the mud in the Quagmire," was "somewhat benummed, and seemingly deader than the other." Francis Fey is then taken to Crediton, "to be bleeded," which after accomplished, he was left alone. When "the Company" (Anonymous 417) which accompanied him to Crediton found him again, he was "in one of his Fits, with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to a great bigness." When Francis Fey comes out of his fit, he explains that "a Bird had with great swiftness, and force flown in at the Window," and thrown a stone at his forehead. When searched, it was found that under where Francis Fey sat lay "a weight of Brass or Copper," which it seems the Daemon used to harm the boy. The Spirit continued to "molest the young man in a very severe and rugged manner," indefinitely.(178 - 179)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178 - 179

Francis Fey Francis Fey Victim
2141

A woman from Totnes in the county of Devon, who was the sister of the father of Mr. Philip Furze, master of the servant, Francis Frey. When Francis Frey is visited by the ghost of Mr. Furze, the father of Mr. Philip Furze and brother to Anonymous 412, he is directed to "carry Twenty Shillings" to this gentlewoman, as this legacy was not fulfilled in the original testament. Francis Fey visits the gentlewoman in Totnes, "but she utterly refused to receive" the twenty shillings, as she feared it was "sent her from the Devil." She allows the young man to stay in her house overnight, however, and when he returns under the instructions of the ghost of Mr. Furze with a ring worth twenty shillings, bought in Totnes, for the gentlewoman, she receives this gift.(178)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178

Anonymous 412 Relative of Victim
2141

A woman from Totnes in the county of Devon, who was the sister of the father of Mr. Philip Furze, master of the servant, Francis Frey. When Francis Frey is visited by the ghost of Mr. Furze, the father of Mr. Philip Furze and brother to Anonymous 412, he is directed to "carry Twenty Shillings" to this gentlewoman, as this legacy was not fulfilled in the original testament. Francis Fey visits the gentlewoman in Totnes, "but she utterly refused to receive" the twenty shillings, as she feared it was "sent her from the Devil." She allows the young man to stay in her house overnight, however, and when he returns under the instructions of the ghost of Mr. Furze with a ring worth twenty shillings, bought in Totnes, for the gentlewoman, she receives this gift.(178)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178

Anonymous 412 Witness
2142

A man from Totnes in the county of Devon, who is witness to the appearance of "the resemblance of the second wife of the old Gentleman," (Anonymous 169) before Francis Fey. The specter "threw the young man off his horse," and did so "with such violence to the ground," that there was a "resounding great noise." This caused "great astonishment" and "amazement" in the companion of Francis Fey, who was in fact a servant of a Gentlewoman who was a sister to the deceased husband of the ghost haunting Francis Fey. The gentlewoman's servant is also a witness to the leaping of Francis Fey's horse 25 feet into the air.(180)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180

Anonymous 413 Witness
2143

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Ann Langdon and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Thomasin Gidly Thomasine Gidly Victim
2143

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Ann Langdon and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Thomasin Gidly Thomasine Gidly Witness
2144

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with mistress Thomasin Gidly, and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Ann Langdon Ann Langdon Witness
2144

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with mistress Thomasin Gidly, and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Ann Langdon Ann Langdon Victim
2145

A small child from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. The child is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Mistress Thomasine Gidly, and Ann Langdon, where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Anonymous 414 Witness
2145

A small child from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. The child is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Mistress Thomasine Gidly, and Ann Langdon, where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Anonymous 414 Victim
2146

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is a maid in the household of Mr. Philip Furze, alongside Francis Fey, a servant who is haunted by the spirit of Philip Furze's deceased father's deceased second wife. One day, Francis Fey's "shoe-strings was observed (without the assistance of any hand) to come of its own accord" and fly across the room. The second shoe-string "was crawling after it," and the maid, seeing this, "with her hand drew it out." Upon doing so, "it strangely clasp'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel, or Serpent."(182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

Anonymous 414 Witness
2146

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is a maid in the household of Mr. Philip Furze, alongside Francis Fey, a servant who is haunted by the spirit of Philip Furze's deceased father's deceased second wife. One day, Francis Fey's "shoe-strings was observed (without the assistance of any hand) to come of its own accord" and fly across the room. The second shoe-string "was crawling after it," and the maid, seeing this, "with her hand drew it out." Upon doing so, "it strangely clasp'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel, or Serpent."(182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

Anonymous 414 Victim
2147

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is witness to two events caused by the specter of Mr. Philip Furze's father's second wife's ghost (Anonymous 169). The first is when the shoestrings of Francis Fey "come of its own accord out of his Shoe," and fling themselves across the room. When a maid (Anonymous 415) attempts to pick them, up, they "strangely clasp'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel or Serpent." The second occasion is when the woman found one of Francis Fey's gloves, which had been torn in his pocket while she was close to him. The gloves ere "so dexterously tatter'd, and so artificially torn, that it is conceived a Cutler could not have contrived an Instrument, to have laid it abroad so accurately." This woman was "a Lady of considerable Quality, too great for exception."(181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 181

Anonymous 416 Witness
2148

A man from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is the master of the young man, Francis Frey. When his servant goes missing the day of Easter, he sends out for him. When the young man is found, "he was heard singing, and whistling in a bog, or quagmire, where they found him in a kind of Trance, or extatick fit." Mr. Philip Furze is the son of Mr. Furze, whose ghost haunts Francis Frey for awhile, and the stepson of the second wife of Mr. Furze, who haunts Francis Frey, and is responsible for taking him "up by the skit of his doublet," into the air, causing him to go missing.(184-185)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 184-185

Philip Furze Mr. Philip Furze Witness
2149

A number of people from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who accompany Francis Fey to Crediton, when it is found that part of his body "which had been on the mud in the Quagmire," was "somewhat benummed, and seemingly deader than the other." When Francis Fey is left for a little while after being bled, he was found again "with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to a great bigness." When Francis Fey is out of his fit, he tells the company that a large bird threw a stone at his forehead. The Company search for the stone, but instead found "a weight of Brass or Copper," which they believed a Daemon (Anonymous 169) used against Francis Fey. They broke the weight "in pieces, every one taking a part, and preserving it in memory of so strange an Accident."(185-186)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 185-186

Anonymous 417 (Plural) Witness
2150

A woman from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who was a schoolmistress there after her first husband died. When she married again, to John H. she continued "her practice." She refuses to lend a "piece of small changing money," causing a woman of "evil fame" to allegedly mutter. After this incident, the schoolmistress is visited by "a monstrous great Toad walking upon all four like a Cat." She retreats into her house, and "desired her husband to get some Instrument" in order to kill the toad. However, before John H. has a chance, the toad "rusht suddenly into another room, and was never seen afterwards." That same night, the schoolmistress experienced her first fit of many, which would last a total of 17 years. During her fit, she was afflicted "with violent prickings and pains, as if her inside had been stuck with pins, needles or thorns," which causes blood to come out with her urine. These fits occur sometimes as frequently as "twice or thrice in one day, sometimes whole days together." They were also preceded by the visitation of seven or nine familiars (Anonymous 171) in form of cats, who would enter the room she was in, and for a quarter of an hour, "crawl about, and stick against the walls," while making "a dreadful yelling, hideous noise." The cats would then suddenly disappear in "a mighty great light, like a flash of lightning." This light would linger all through the night, and she would be "in the highest extremity of Misery," crying out the name of the suspected witch (Anonymous 419). Although physicians (Anonymous 420) suggested she move houses, the fits still happened, and Anonymous 418's chickens would die by "suddenly turning round, twisting their Necks several times about, until they dropt down dead." The cats belonging to Anonymous 418 were often observed to react as "if they were Devil-drove" when the cat familiars (Anonymous 171) were in the same room. The son of Anonymous 418 (Anonymous 421) also suffered from a number of fits, and during one of these, the schoolmistress saw the suspected witch "scrambling against the wall of the room." She calls out to her husband, and he takes he sword to the witch, cutting her hand. The schoolmistress also finds herself unable to enter Church, if the suspected witch (Anonymous 419) was there, but instead would have to "continue in the Porch, or at the Window." Eventually the schoolmistress dies of "pain and grief" from these fits after 17 years and the loss of her son who goes missing during one of his own fits, while she was the age of 57, and reduced from "a strait well proportioned body to a very crooked deformity."(189 - 190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189 - 190

Anonymous 418 Demoniac
2151

A man from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who was the second husband of a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) afflicted by a number of violent fits. His wife calls on him one night to "get some Instrument" in order to "dispatch" the familiar of a suspected witch (Anonymous 419), in the shape of "a monstrous great Toad" (Anonymous 170). John H. meets the toad in the entry of his house, but "before he had the power to strike at it," the toad "rusht suddenly into another room, and was never seen afterwards." At another incident, John H. is called by his wife, the schoolmistress, to attack the suspected witch who is in the household "scrambling against the wall of the room," during one of John H.'s stepson's fits. He takes his sword, and "darted" where she was, and cuts her hand. It was later observed that the suspected witch (Anonymous 419) had a lame hand.(189)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189

John John H. Witness
2152

A woman from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who is allegedly of "evil fame" amongst her neighbours, and "suspected of divers ill practices." These are particularly associated with a schoolmistress in the area, whom she allegedly mutters against. After this incident, the schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) is menaced by several familiars attributed to this woman of "evil fame," including a "monstrous great Toad," and seven or nine cats. The cats come to visit the schoolmistress before she experiences a number of violent fits. It is believed that this woman is responsible for those fits, as well the fits experienced by the schoolmistress's young son (Anonymous 421). At one incident, the schoolmistress allegedly sees the suspected woman during one of her son's fits. John H., the schoolmistress's husband "cut the Witch," and "it was observed that that Party had a lame hand for a considerable time." Further, when the suspected witch (Anonymous 419) was in church, the schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) was not able to enter the church. The suspected witch eventually dies, "five years after the Afflicted," although by that time, the schoolmistress was "of opinion that others, beside the suspected Party, contributed to her misery."(189-190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189-190

Anonymous 419 Witch
2153

A number of people from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who act as physicians for a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418), suffering from a number of violent fits. They advise her that the "inner parts of her body were wounded by some Diabolical Art," and ordered her to move houses. This did not work, however, as the schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) still suffered from fits in her new house.(192)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 192

Anonymous 420 (Plural) Physician
2154

A young man from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who upon visiting his mother (Anonymous 418) in her second home when he is only seventeen, is "taken after a most dreadful manner, in raving, and frantick Fits." During these fits, "five or six men could not hold him," and he would "leap up with his head against the Cieling." He would also seek out "a Knife, Pen-knife, or Razor," and attempt to cut his own throat, "or do himself some other mischief." The young man further claims that during his fits, a suspected witch (Anonymous 419), possibly responsible for the fits his mother (Anonymous 418) experiences, appears to him, and commands him to do these things, "or else she would strangle him, or choke him with pins, or such like." This forced those around the young man to put away sharp objects, and to clear his hands and pockets. After these fits, as is characteristic of possession, he would "cast out of his mouth Pins, and Needles, in great abundance," and be in "extream weakness," forced to stay in bed. In one instance, during one of his fits, his mother allegedly sees the suspected witch (Anonymous 419), and his stepfather, John H. cuts her hand with his sword. The young man is afflicted by these fits "for about five years," after which time, "he ran away in one of them, and hath neither been seen, nor heard of since."(192-193)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 192-193

Anonymous 421 Demoniac
2155

A man from Sherborne, in the county of Dorset, who as a falconer was "of a Temper more Considerate, and very fond of a Book by night." After a day of discoursing with a huntsman (Anonymous 423), the falconer was told that "Falconers used to look upwards, and blaspheme." That night, while the huntsman slept, the falconer "betook himself to a certain Book he had got out of Chaplains Chamber." While he read the book, and "had not read much in it," suddenly, "he saw something come to the side of the Bed." This was in fact a "frightful Goblin" (Anonymous 172), which made him remember what the Huntsman had said to him about "looking upwards, and Blaspheming." The falconer awoke the huntsman (Anonymous 423) on this, but could only get him to say "Good Devil do not mistake, for that is the Falconer," before sleeping again. Upon seeking the Chaplain, the falconer is put at ease, when the troublesome huntsman is discharged. The falconer is further counseled by the Chaplain (Anonymous 424) to "peruse no Books."(196-198)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 196-198

Anonymous 422 Victim
2156

A man from Sherborne in the county of Dorset, who is "much devoted to a glass of Liquour, as is usual with men of his function," and found himself as a man that was "very unfit for any other Contemplations." One day, while talking with a falconer (Anonymous 422), he told the falconer that "Falconers used to look upwards, and blaspheme, when the Huntsman looked downwards, and therefore minded him to regard his own state." That night, the huntsman slept, only to be awakened by the falconer who had seen a goblin (Anonymous 172). The huntsman only says, "Good Devil, do not mistake, for that is the Falconer." This is so disconcerting to the falconer and the chaplain (Anonymous 424) whose house they stayed at, that the huntsman was "discharged" as an "unwelcome Guest."(196 - 198)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 196 - 198

Anonymous 423 Co-conspirator
2157

A man from Sherborne in the county of Dorset, who allows a falconer (Anonymous 422) and a huntsman (Anonymous 423) to stay at his house as a Chaplain. The falconer borrows a book from him, and a goblin appears to him. When the falconer wakes the huntsman to talk, the huntsman says in his sleep, "Devil do not mistake, for that is the Falconer." When the falconer seeks out the Chaplain, and tells him about this, the Chaplain "discharged the unwelcome Guest (Anonymous 423), and advised the Falconer hereafter to peruse no Books."(196-198)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 196-198

Anonymous 424 Witness
2158

A man from South Petherton, in the county of Somerset, who died at a very old age as a reverend. In his youth, Mr. Edmund Ansty encountered a "huge Bear," (Anonymous 173) one night, taking his horse home from the Woodbery-Hill Fair. That night, "his Horse rushed very violently with him against one side of the Bank," and "pressed nearer to the Bushes." After doing this, "Mr. Ansty heard the Hedges crack with a dismal noise," and saw coming towards him on the road, "a large Circle of a duskish light, about the bigness of a very large Wheel." Inside this light, was "the proportion of a huge Bear." When the monster (Anonymous 173) passed by him, it "looked very gashfully at him, shewing a pair of very large flaming eyes." As soon as the beast had passed, Mr. Edmund Ansty's horse "sprung into the Road, and made homeward with so much hast, that he could not possibly rein him in, and had much ado to keep the Saddle." For sixty years, Mr. Edmund Ansty would tell this story to any who asked him about it, until his death at the age of 100 years.(199 - 201)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 199 - 201

Edmond Ansty Mr. Edmund Ansty Witness
2159

A man from Combe St. Nicholas in the county of Somerset, who riding home one day saw before him "on the side of the hill, a great company of People, that seemed to him like Country Folks, Assembled, as at a Fair." This fair, as far as he could tell, held ordinary fairs "with all kind of Trinkets, Fruit, and drinking Booths." At first, he thought this fair might be one at Chestonford, but then upon realizing it was the wrong season for it, "he was under very great surprize, and admired the meaning of what he saw should be." It occurred to him that this might be a Fair for the Fairies of Blackhill Downs (Anonymous 174). The man decides to "ride in amongst them, and see what they were," and although he could see them perfectly while he approached them, once there, "he could discern nothing at all," and instead was "thrust, as when one passes through a throng of people." After he had gone a little distance, he could again see the fair. After this incident, the man found himself in pain, and "a Lameness seized him all on one side," which continued with him "as long as he lived," which was for "more than twenty years afterward." However, he would give an "account to any that inquired of this Accicident." (208-209)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 208-209

Anonymous 425 Victim
2160

A man, his wife, and "divers of the Neighbours," from Combe St. Nicholas, in the county of Somerset, who live near Blackhill Downs. They claim that "they had at many times seen this Fair-keeping in the Summer time," a fair held for fairies (Anonymous 174). None of them dared "adventure in amongst them," for it was rumoured that whoever did so, "had received great damage by it."(210)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 210

Anonymous 426 (Plural) Witness
2160

A man, his wife, and "divers of the Neighbours," from Combe St. Nicholas, in the county of Somerset, who live near Blackhill Downs. They claim that "they had at many times seen this Fair-keeping in the Summer time," a fair held for fairies (Anonymous 174). None of them dared "adventure in amongst them," for it was rumoured that whoever did so, "had received great damage by it."(210)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 210

Anonymous 426 (Plural) Neighbor