Go back
20 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
346

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be an Irish cunningwoman, who was allegedly offered money by the confederates to murder Anne Levingston. Hook was also employed to procure witnesses who would swear to the advantage of the confederates; Hook is alleged to have sworn against Levingston herself.(3-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-5

Anne Hook Anne Hook Accuser
346

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be an Irish cunningwoman, who was allegedly offered money by the confederates to murder Anne Levingston. Hook was also employed to procure witnesses who would swear to the advantage of the confederates; Hook is alleged to have sworn against Levingston herself.(3-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-5

Anne Hook Anne Hook Cunning-folk
347

A woman allegedly from Spruce Island, near Wapping in Greater London, who is approached by the Anne Hook to testify during trial that she gave Anne Levingston seeds and powder with which to murder Lady Anne Powel; she is allegedly able to turn into a cat and is hung for witchcraft. One alternate account alleges that she conspired with an unnamed Gentlewoman to give a potion or posset to Lady Powel; another alleges that she can turn into a black cat and has a squirrel familiar. She is also found guilty of "washing" Christopher Wilson "by witchcrafte." She denied any part in Lady Powel's death; a search of her home for images of clay, hair and nails found nothing. When examined by a jury of women, she was found to have "a Teat of flesh in her secret parts more then other women usually had." She is found innocent in the death of Lady Powel but guilty of bewitching Wilson, for which she is sentenced to be hanged; she pleaded to be pregnant, but the jury found that she was not. Peterson is also known to have taken in Margaret Austin into her home out of charity, until Austin was ejected for stealing goods from her home. Joan Peterson "was condemned for practising witch-craft, and sentenced to be hanged at Tyburn, on Munday the 11th. of April, 1652."(Title Page, 4-6, 7, 8-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, Title Page, 4-6, 7, 8-9

Joan Peterson Joan Peterson Witch
802

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who signs the warrant calling for Joan Peterson's apprehension and for her house to be searched for magical items.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

Waterton Mr. Waterton Examiner/Justice
813

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be the Lady of an estate and both the aunt and godmother of Mrs. Anne Levingston, who is allegedly bewitched to death by Joan Peterson and Anne Levingston. Levingston was the beneficiary of Lady Powel's estate until the murder charges saw it stripped from her. It is conclusively determined by several examining physicians and surgeons that Lady Powel died of several compounding chronic illnesses, their professional opinion being that she not only died of natural causes but that it is extraordinary that she lived as long as she did. Lady Powel is said to have been about 80 years of age at the time of her death.(4, 6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4, 6-7

Powel Lady Powel Victim
814

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Goddard and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

George Bates Dr. Bates Physician
815

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Mary Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Bates, Dr. Goddard and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

Colledon Dr. Colledon Physician
816

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow surgeon Mr. Page, and examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Goddard, Dr. Chabrey and Dr. Bates, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

Stamford Mr. Stamford Surgeon
817

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow surgeon Mr. Stamford, and examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Goddard, Dr. Chabrey and Dr. Bates, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

Page Mr. Page Surgeon
818

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, who is alleged in Margaret Austin's indictment against Joan Peterson to have first been cured of an illness by Peterson and then made ill again through witchcraft when he is unable to pay for her services. According to Austin, Peterson warned Wilson that if he didn't pay his illness will return. Wilson was then afflicted with "very strange fits, and for twelve hours together would rage and wave like a mad man." The fits continue for another twelve hours and last for days, leaving him ill and "languishing." Contrary to Austin's testimony, Wilson does not complain of any such treatment.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Christopher Wilson Christopher Wilson Victim
819

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a "wandering person" whom in charity Joan Peterson had given a home to, who alleges in court that Joan Peterson cured Christopher Wilson of his sickness, and then made ill again when he does not pay her. Austin was ejected from Peterson's home for stealing goods from her house.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Margaret Austin Margaret Austin Witness
819

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a "wandering person" whom in charity Joan Peterson had given a home to, who alleges in court that Joan Peterson cured Christopher Wilson of his sickness, and then made ill again when he does not pay her. Austin was ejected from Peterson's home for stealing goods from her house.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Margaret Austin Margaret Austin Accuser
820

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a servant to Thomas Cromton, who allegedly stood in the session yard declaring Joan Peterson to be a witch, and offering money to strangers in exchange for testifying to the same. Colonel Okey and other Justices on the Bench summoned Southwick into the court when this came to their attention, so that the court's Recorder would take note of it.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 8

Thomas Southwick Thomas Southwick Accuser
1168

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, who is accused by Abraham Vandenbemde of hiring Joan Peterson to bewitch her long sick aunt and godmother, Lady Powel. Levingston was thought to have "received from her (the said Peterson) certain powders, and bags of seeds, to help her in her law suits and to provoke unlawfull love." Lady Powel, who had no children of her own, left her estate to Mrs. Levingston. After the accusations of using witchery to gain Lady Powel's estate, Levingston was publicly disgraced and lost the inheritance. After several physicians and surgeons testified that Lady Powel had been afflicted with numerous serious illnesses for many years and that she had therefore died of natural causes, Levingston was vindicated and proclaimed innocent.(3-4, 6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 6-7

Anne Levingston Anne Levingston Witch
1182

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, described as one of a jury of women who searched Joan Peterson for witch's marks, who found that "there was a Teat of flesh in her secret parts more then other women usually had[.]" The Jury of Women was called in after an initial search "could find nothing on her body which might create the least suspition in them of her being a witch." This second search is described as being conducted in an unnatural and barbarous manner.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5

Anonymous 169 Witch-Searcher
1881

An unknown number of persons of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Abraham Vandenbemde and Thomas Cromton, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn.(3-4, 5, 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6

Anonymous 339 Accuser
1882

A man of of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Abraham Vandenbemde and Anonymous 339 in a confederation, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn. Cromton is also known to be the employer of Thomas Southwick.(3-4, 5, 6, 8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6, 8

Thomas Cromton Thomas Cromton Accuser
1883

A man of of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Thomas Cromton and Anonymous 339 in a confederation, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn.(3-4, 5, 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6

Abraham Vandenbemde Abraham Vandenbemde Accuser
1884

A woman of Wapping in the county of Greater London, who was approached by Abraham Vandenbemde and his confederates and offered money to swear that Anne Levingston had used witchcraft to murder Lady Powel; Simpson soon realized that she had been asked in order to strip an innocent gentlewoman of her inherited livelihood and, despising such practices, refused to comply.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3

Joan Simpson Joan Simpson Accuser
1885

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Bates and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7,10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7,10-11

Goddard Dr. Goddard Physician