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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
322

A servant from birks-nooke, Yorkshire (presumably Birks Fell, Yorkshire) who is sent by her master, Mabel Fouler of Burtree House, to go buy eggs from Anne Forster. they could not agree on a price, however, and so Forster desired to look at Armstrong's head. Three days later as Armstrong is back at Burtree house and in the pasture shortly after day break, a man approaches her and asks her where she was the Friday previous. Armstrong relates that she was trying to get eggs from Ann Forster. He responds that the woman who looked at Armstrong's head "should be the first that made a horse of her spirrit, and who should be the next that would ride her ; and into what shape and liknesses she should be changed, if she would turne to there God." Then, Armstrong relates at the deposition that "And withall tould this informer how they would use all meanes they could to allure her: first, by there tricks, by rideing in the house in empty wood dishes that had never beene wett, and also in egg shells ; and how to obtaine whatever they desired by swinging in a rope; and with severall dishes of meate and drinke. But, if she eate not of their meate, they could not harme her. And, at last, tould her how it should be divulgd by eateing a piece of cheese, which should be laid by her when she laie downe in a field with her apron cast over her head, and so left her. As soon as the informant left her, she allegedly fell dead and remained so until six in the morning. She then allegedly starts suffering from these "fits" almost every day and sometimes a few times a day. She would sometimes fall into a fit from evening until dawn and on one such occasion, Anne Forster allegedly came to her and tried to put a bridle on her who was now "in the likeness of a horse." She alleges that after this incident, about a dozen people on horseback appear to her, asking her to sing for them as they danced around her, first in the shape of hares, then cats, then mice and several other shapes. They then returned home on their horses, led by their "protector." They then repeated the even for another six or seven nights. After dancing, they would go to the "Eideing house" where they all sat at a table. In the middle of a room, there was a rope hanging and everyone would touch it several times which made whatever they desired appear on the table, including meat and drink. When Armstrong tried to avoid joining them, they turned into their "own shape" and threatened her. They then never bothered her again. One day, while in the field, she found a piece of cheese and brought it home. After that, she divulged everything " hath disclosed all which she formerly kept secrett". (192-193)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 192-193

Anne Armstrong Anne Armstrong Demoniac
327

A fourteen-year-old girl, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire who suffered from fits for twelve weeks during which she could not move her limbs. When witnesses asked her who or what caused her to have fits, she replied she did not know. After suggestions names, however, Mallory reacted particularly violently to the name William Wayde. Mary Wayde allegedly confessed to the events and Mallory instantly stopped having fits. Mallory started having fits again, however, when Wayde retracted her answer. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Elizabeth Mallory Elizabeth Mallory Victim
327

A fourteen-year-old girl, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire who suffered from fits for twelve weeks during which she could not move her limbs. When witnesses asked her who or what caused her to have fits, she replied she did not know. After suggestions names, however, Mallory reacted particularly violently to the name William Wayde. Mary Wayde allegedly confessed to the events and Mallory instantly stopped having fits. Mallory started having fits again, however, when Wayde retracted her answer. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Elizabeth Mallory Elizabeth Mallory Demoniac
1090

A woman from Bolling in York (now part of Bradford in West Yorkshire) who is accused of arriving through a hole in the floor of Sara Rode's bedroom, taking her by the neck, and ramming her fingers down Sara's throat to prevent her from speaking. She would "come to" Rodes often, arriving as Rodes began to have fits which lasted a half hour long and which were accompanied by "paines and benummednes, by six tymes of a day, in greate extremity, the use of her joynts being taken from her, her hart leapeing, the use of her tongue being taken away, and her whole body neare unto death." She also allegedly took "holde of [Rodes] by the apron, and gathered itt by the bottom into her hands, and puld her soe hard by itt thatt she puld some of the gatherings out. Sykes is also accused of bewitching Henry Cordingley's livestock and causing their death. She is searched by a jury of six women, including Isabella Pollard, and "upon the side of her seate [they discovered] a redd lumpe about the biggnes of a nutt, being wett." The jury of women who searched Sykes then "wrung it with theire fingers, moisture came out of it like lee" They also " founde upon her left side neare her arme a litle lumpe like a wart, and being puld out it stretcht about halfe an inch." (28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Mary Sykes Mary Sykes Witch
1091

A juror in the case agasint Mary Sykes.(28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Henry Tempest Henry Tempest Examiner/Justice
1092

A widow from Boiling, Yorkshire (now part of Bradford in West Yorkshire), who testifies against Mary Sykes claiming that her daughter was tormented by Mary Sykes. She claims that she laid in bed with her daugher, Sara Rodes, on Sunday evening when, after being aslee for only a short while, Sara begans "quakeing and holding her hands together." When asked what she was doing, Dorothy Rodes explains, Sara allegedly said "A, mother, Sikcs wife came in att a hole att the bedd feete, and upon the bedd, and tooke me by the throate, and wold have put her fingers in my mowtli, and wold needes clioake me." Dorothy says that when she asked her daugther why she did not speak then, her daughter replied that she could not, or Mary Sykes was holding her throard and "tooke her left syde," rendering her unable to speak. (28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Dorothy Rodes Dorothy Rodes Witness
1093

A girl, daughter of Dorothy Rodes, of Bolling in the county of York (now part of Bradford in West Yorkshire), who suffers from a series of debilitating fits which lasted over a half hour each and which she attributes to Mary Sykes bewitching her. Sykes first appears to Rodes one night while she sleeps in bed with her mother, Dorothy and another child. Crawling up through a hole in the floor, Sykes takes Rodes by the throat and chokes her. She keeps her from crying out by keeping her fingers lodged down Rode's throat. Rodes continues to suffer after this incident, however. Up to six times a day she is taken by "paines and benummednes," prevented from walking, suffers heart palpitations, and muteness, so that it seems her "whole body [was] neare unto death." After each of these fits she claimed that Mary Sykes had come to her (and presumably caused them). Rodes also blamed Susan Beamont and Kellett (wife) for plaguing her. The death of Mrs. Kellet two years previously did not seem to stop these accusations. Rather, Sara suggested that Kellet never rests, for she appeared to me the fowlest feind that ever I sawe, with a paire of eyes like sawcers, and stood up betwixt them, and gave me a box of the eare in the gapsteade, which made the fire to flash out of my eyes."(28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Sara Rodes Sara Rodes Demoniac
1094

A woman who allegedly appears several times to Sara Rodes two years after her death. Rodes tells her mother (Dorothy Rodes) that Kellet's wife "stood up betwixt them, and gave [her] a box of the eare in the gapsteade, which made the fire to flash out of my eyes." (29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 29

Kellet Mrs. Kellet Divine
1095

A man from Boiling in Yorkshire who testifies that he saw Sara Rodes suffer from fits on two seperate occasions. He claims that she exhibited strange behaviours such as "quakeing" for a period of over fifteen minutes and being unable to speak when her heart rate rose too much.(29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 29

Richard Booth Richard Booth Witness
1115

A man from Tonge in Yorkshire who testifies in the case of Mary Sykes. He claims that since last Christmas, Sykes told him on several occasions that she had nine or ten beasts or horses, but that she would "make them fewer" and adding that she would bless and "cross" them.(29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 29

Henry Cordially Henry Cordially Witness
1116

A woman from Brierly in Yorkshire who is part of a jury of five women who examine Mary Sykes for marks on her body. They find on Sykes a red lump the size of a nut. It is wet and pusses. On her left side near her arm, they also find a lump, this one like an "Avart." It could be stretched out about half an inch. The jury of women claim to never have seen anything like it before. (30)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 30

Isabella Pollard Isabella Pollard Witch-Searcher
1117

A woman from Kirkethrope in Yorkshire who is tried for witchcraft at Wakefield on January 10, 1650. She is tried before Sir John Savile, Kt. Alex. Johnson, Hemy Tempest, John Stanhope, and John Hewley, She is accused by Joan Booth, wife of Wm. Booth of Warmfield, of bewitching her four-year old boy. Booth claimed her child was in good health, but suddenly became ill, his body began to swell, and his flesh began to waste after Margaret Morton gave him a piece of bread. He eventually could neither stand nor walk. Joan Booth, suspecting Morton had bewitched her child, sent for her. Morton asked the child for forgiveness and the child's mother then drew blood form the child. Then, the child immediately recovered. She is also found to have witch's marks. She has two black spots between her thighs. Her mother and sister were also believed to have practiced witchcraft. In addition, two children had died a couple of years earlier and one of them said just before passing: " Good mother, put out Morton."(38-39)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38-39

Margaret Morton Margaret Morton Witness
1118

A four year old boy from Warmfield in west Yorkshire who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Morton. According to his mother, Joane, he was in good health until he ate a piece of bread which was offered to him by Margaret Morton. After eating the bread, he became ill, his body began to swell and his flesh became "wasted." When Morton, who was suspected of bewitching the child, came to ask forgiveness and his mother drew blood from him, the child instantly began to get better. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 157 Victim
1119

A woman, the wife of Wm. Booth from Warmfield in Yorkshire who accuses Margaret Morton of bewitching her son. She claims that her son became ill after Margaret Morton bewitched him. Morton offered him a piece of bread which made the child become ill almost immediately. Her son started to heal after Morton asked for forgiveness and she (Joan Booth) drew blood from him. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Joan Booth Joan Booth Accuser
1119

A woman, the wife of Wm. Booth from Warmfield in Yorkshire who accuses Margaret Morton of bewitching her son. She claims that her son became ill after Margaret Morton bewitched him. Morton offered him a piece of bread which made the child become ill almost immediately. Her son started to heal after Morton asked for forgiveness and she (Joan Booth) drew blood from him. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Joan Booth Joan Booth Witness
1120

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

John Savile John Savile Examiner/Justice
1121

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Alex Johnson Alex Johnson Examiner/Justice
1122

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

John Stanhope John Stanhope Examiner/Justice
1123

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

John Hewley John Hewley Examiner/Justice
1124

A woman from Kirkethorpe in Yorkshire, wife of John Ward th'elder, who searches Margaret Morton for witch's marks. Morton allegedly had two black spots between her thighs, which looked like warts. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Frances Ward Frances Ward Witch-Searcher
1125

A woman from Kirkethrope in Yorkshire who is suspected of practicing witchcraft and the mother of Margaret Morton. Her reputation as a witch is used as evidence against Margaret Morton in the case where she allegedly bewitches a four year old boy. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 158 Witch
1126

A woman from Kirkethrope in Yorkshire who is suspected of practicing witchcraft and the sister of Margaret Morton. Her reputation as a witch is used as evidence against Margaret Morton in the case where she allegedly bewitches a four year old boy. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 159 Witch
1127

A servant to Hester Spivey from Hothersfielde in the county of Yorkshire (possible Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who is allegedly bewitched by Hester France. Spivey recounts that one evening, upon coming home, Johnson tells her that France had been at the house. While she (Johnson) was tending to the fire, France allegedly told her "itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with it" and then left, but then came again and curse her (Elizabeth Johnson), praying she would never bake again. Johnson starts then believing that she has been bewitched. When going to bed, she begins to suffer from fits. She laid down in bed, but could neither speak nor stand and continued to be unable to speak from six until eight or nine in the evening--except for speaking once to her brother to whom she asked that Hester France be sent for. When France came, Johnson spoke to her and "catched country people near Bradford." Elizabeth Johnson allegedly began to get better after being scratched. She was still ill, but became somewhat better. (51-52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51-52

Elizabeth Johnson Elizabeth Johnson Victim
1127

A servant to Hester Spivey from Hothersfielde in the county of Yorkshire (possible Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who is allegedly bewitched by Hester France. Spivey recounts that one evening, upon coming home, Johnson tells her that France had been at the house. While she (Johnson) was tending to the fire, France allegedly told her "itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with it" and then left, but then came again and curse her (Elizabeth Johnson), praying she would never bake again. Johnson starts then believing that she has been bewitched. When going to bed, she begins to suffer from fits. She laid down in bed, but could neither speak nor stand and continued to be unable to speak from six until eight or nine in the evening--except for speaking once to her brother to whom she asked that Hester France be sent for. When France came, Johnson spoke to her and "catched country people near Bradford." Elizabeth Johnson allegedly began to get better after being scratched. She was still ill, but became somewhat better. (51-52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51-52

Elizabeth Johnson Elizabeth Johnson Accuser
1129

A widow from Hosthersfield, Yorkshire (possibly Huddersfield) who accuses Hester France of bewitching her servant, Elizabeth Johnson. Spivey tells the jury that upon coming home one evening her servant, Elizabeth Johnson, explained how Hester France had come to the house and told her while she was tending to the fire that "itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with itt." Johnson thought nothing of it and France left, but then came back and allegedly cursed Johnson. Spivey then proceeds to explain how from six to eight one evening, Johnson could neither speak nor stand--except for one moment where she spoke to her brother, asking him to get Hester France. Spivey alleges that Johnson got better after being scratched by a needle.(51)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51

Hester Spivey Hester Spivey Witness
1129

A widow from Hosthersfield, Yorkshire (possibly Huddersfield) who accuses Hester France of bewitching her servant, Elizabeth Johnson. Spivey tells the jury that upon coming home one evening her servant, Elizabeth Johnson, explained how Hester France had come to the house and told her while she was tending to the fire that "itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with itt." Johnson thought nothing of it and France left, but then came back and allegedly cursed Johnson. Spivey then proceeds to explain how from six to eight one evening, Johnson could neither speak nor stand--except for one moment where she spoke to her brother, asking him to get Hester France. Spivey alleges that Johnson got better after being scratched by a needle.(51)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51

Hester Spivey Hester Spivey Accuser
1130

A woman from Hostersfielde in Yorkshire (possibly Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who stands trial for witchcraft at the castle of York. Hester Spivey alleges that upon coming home, her servant, Elizabeth Johnson, explained ot her how France had come to the house. While tending to the dire, France told her (Johnson) that " itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with itt.." France then left, but allegedly came back to curse Elizabeth Johnson. Johnson was then unable to speak or stand from six to eight--except for one occasion when she asked her brother to send for Hester France. (51-52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51-52

Hester France Hester France Witch
1131

A man from Hosthersfielde in the county of Yorkshire (presumably Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who testifies in the case against Hester France. He claims that Robert Cliff had been sick for about half a year, but was now very sick and weak. Johnson claims that Cliff had him send for Hester France.When France entered the Cliff's chamber, Johnson alleges Cliff scratched her and said " I thinke thou art the woman that hath done me this wrong" to which France replied that she "never did hurt in her life."(52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 52

John Johnson John Johnson Accuser
1132

A man who, according to John Johnson, accused Hester France of bewitching him. According to Johnson, Cliff had been sick for about half a year but now (at the time of the trial) had become very weak and ill. One day, Cliff asked Johnson to send for Hester France. When France arrived in Cliff's chamber, he scratched her and accused her of having caused him to become ill to which France replied that she had never hurt. (52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 52

Kobert Cliff Robert Cliff Victim
1132

A man who, according to John Johnson, accused Hester France of bewitching him. According to Johnson, Cliff had been sick for about half a year but now (at the time of the trial) had become very weak and ill. One day, Cliff asked Johnson to send for Hester France. When France arrived in Cliff's chamber, he scratched her and accused her of having caused him to become ill to which France replied that she had never hurt. (52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 52

Kobert Cliff Robert Cliff Accuser
1133

A child from Redness in the county of York who was allegedly bewitched and healed by Elizabeth Lambe according to his father Thomas Rennerd. Rennerd testifies that his wife said " I feare this wife (meaninge Eliz. Lambe) hath wronged my child." Shortly after, Rennerd's wife met Elizabeth Lambe at her (Rennerd's) doorstep where Lambe fell down on her knees and begged forgiveness. Soon after, the child recovered. (58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Rennerd Rennerd (Child) Victim
1134

The constable of Redness in the coutny of Yorkshire who testifies against Elizabeth Lambe. Rennerd explains that his wife suspected Elizabeth Lambe of bewitching his child. Then, one day, Lambe allegedly showed up at the Rennerd's doorstep and when Rennerd's wife opened the door, Lambe fell to her knees and asked for forgiveness. The child got better shortly after.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Thomas Rennerd Thomas Rennerd Accuser
1135

A woman from Redness in the county of York and the wife of constable Thomas Rennerd who suspects Elizabeth Lambe of bewitching her child. Shortly after telling her husband about her suspicions, she meets Elizabeth Lambe at her doorstep where Lambe falls to her knees and asks forgiveness. The child recovers soon thereafter.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Rennerd's Wife Accuser
1136

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having drowned his foals. Baldwin was said to be sick "in bodye" testified that because Elizabeth Lambe had allegedly murdered his foals by witchcraft, he beat her with his cane and that were it not for his wife who got on her knees and begged him for forgiveness, he would have done much worse.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Nicholas Baldwin Nicholas Baldwin Accuser
1136

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having drowned his foals. Baldwin was said to be sick "in bodye" testified that because Elizabeth Lambe had allegedly murdered his foals by witchcraft, he beat her with his cane and that were it not for his wife who got on her knees and begged him for forgiveness, he would have done much worse.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Nicholas Baldwin Nicholas Baldwin Victim
1137

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having caused Richard Brown of Redness to become ill and die. While sick, Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

John Wreight John Wright Victim
1137

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having caused Richard Brown of Redness to become ill and die. While sick, Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

John Wreight John Wright Accuser
1138

A man from redness in the county of Yorkshire who is allegedly murdered by Elizabeth Lambe by use of witchcraft. While sick, Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Kichard Browne Richard Brown Victim
1139

A woman from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire who allegedly practices witchcraft and who, in John Tatterson's opinion, is in need of salvation. Tatterson testifies (before John Assheton and Egdar Coats) that two weeks before last Christmas, he was "disabled in body." On another night, he was "troubled with ill spiretts" who told him to worship the enemy-- all of which were visible, save Anne Greene, a reputed witch. He was tormented at least four times (possibly on different occasions), but did not give in to their persuasions. Tatterson then approaches Anne Greene, telling her that he was convinced that he needed to purify and sanctify her heart and "worketh out the carnal part," leading her to salvation. During the same trial, Jeannette Hudson of Gargreave claimes that Anne Greene told her that Thomas Tatterson (presumably still John Tatterson) was "overgone with ill tongues." Margaret Wade said that her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed and when she, her mother, came to attend to her, she saw big dog with a dish in its mouth and which had two feet, sitting at the foot of the bed. She then saw three dogs and claimed that Anne Greene was one of them. Then, Anne Greene said of herself that she sometimes used charms to cure the heart. She claims to have used it twice on John Tatterson. She claims to also be able to cure head pains with water and a lock of the sufferer's hair, which she boils together and then throws into a fire to burn. She does not "meddle" with other diseases. (64-65)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64-65

Anne Greene Anne Greene Witch
1140

A juror in the case against Anne Greene.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

John Assheton John Ashton Examiner/Justice
1141

A juror in the trial against Anne Greene.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Eoger Coats Edgar Coats Examiner/Justice
1142

A man from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire who testifies against Anne Greene before John Ashton and Edgar Coats. He claims that two weeks after Christmas, he became "disabled in body" and that one night he was troubled by spirits who advised him to worship the enemy, all of which were visible except Anne Greene. The spirits appeared to him at least four times (possibly on different dates). As a result, Tatterson approached Anne Greene, telling her that he wanted to sanctify and purify her heart as well as "worketh out the carnal part" thus leading to her salvation. (64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

John Tatterson John Tatterson Victim
1142

A man from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire who testifies against Anne Greene before John Ashton and Edgar Coats. He claims that two weeks after Christmas, he became "disabled in body" and that one night he was troubled by spirits who advised him to worship the enemy, all of which were visible except Anne Greene. The spirits appeared to him at least four times (possibly on different dates). As a result, Tatterson approached Anne Greene, telling her that he wanted to sanctify and purify her heart as well as "worketh out the carnal part" thus leading to her salvation. (64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

John Tatterson John Tatterson Accuser
1143

A woman, presumably from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Anne Greene. She claims that Anne Greene told her that Thomas Tatterson was possessed with "ill tongues" and that he should have "one side taken from him."(65)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 65

Jennet Hudson Jeanette Hudson Witness
1145

A woman, presumably from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire, who allegedly appears to Margaret Wade in the shape of a dog. According to Margaret Wade, her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed one evening. When Wade came to attend to her daughter, she noticed at the foot of the bed a great big dog with a dish in its mouth. Afterwards, Wade says she saw two dogs, one of which was Anne Greene and another was Mary Nunweeke.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Mary Nunweeke Mary Nunweeke Witch
1146

A woman, presumably from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire, who claims that she saw both Mary Nunweeke and Anne Greene appear to her in the shape of dogs. According to Wade, her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed one night and when she, Wade, came to attend to her daughter, she saw a great bitch sitting at the foot of her daughter's bed. the bitch had two feet and held in its mouth a dish. Afterwards, she said she saw three dogs, one of which was Anne Greene and another which was Mary Nunweeke.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Margaret Wade Margaret Wade Witness
1146

A woman, presumably from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire, who claims that she saw both Mary Nunweeke and Anne Greene appear to her in the shape of dogs. According to Wade, her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed one night and when she, Wade, came to attend to her daughter, she saw a great bitch sitting at the foot of her daughter's bed. the bitch had two feet and held in its mouth a dish. Afterwards, she said she saw three dogs, one of which was Anne Greene and another which was Mary Nunweeke.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Margaret Wade Margaret Wade Accuser
1147

A man from Beverley in the county of Yorkshire who claims he witnessed Elizabeth Roberts change into the likeness of a cat. He claims that a week before the trial, on a Saturday evening, Elizabeth Roberts appeared to him wearing her usual clothes but with a ruff around her neck. She then vanished, turning herself into the semblance of a cat which clung near his legs and, after "much struggling," vanished, whereupon Greendife had pain in his heart. He then relates that on the Wednesday, a cat struck him in the head causing him to fall into a sort of trance. When he recovered slightly, he saw Elizabeth Roberts escaping in her regular attire. The next day, he claims that Elizabeth Roberts appeared to him in the shape of a bee, sending him in such a state that five or six people could barely hold him down.(67)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 67

John Greendife John Greendife Witness
1147

A man from Beverley in the county of Yorkshire who claims he witnessed Elizabeth Roberts change into the likeness of a cat. He claims that a week before the trial, on a Saturday evening, Elizabeth Roberts appeared to him wearing her usual clothes but with a ruff around her neck. She then vanished, turning herself into the semblance of a cat which clung near his legs and, after "much struggling," vanished, whereupon Greendife had pain in his heart. He then relates that on the Wednesday, a cat struck him in the head causing him to fall into a sort of trance. When he recovered slightly, he saw Elizabeth Roberts escaping in her regular attire. The next day, he claims that Elizabeth Roberts appeared to him in the shape of a bee, sending him in such a state that five or six people could barely hold him down.(67)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 67

John Greendife John Greendife Victim
1148

A woman, presumably from Beverley in the county of Yorkshire, who is tried for witchcraft. She is allegedly able to transform into a cat and a bee. At her trial, John Greendife claims that on one occasion, Roberts came to her in her normal shape, but then vanished by turning herself into a cat, which vanished swiftly, leaving Greendife with a pain at his heart. Then a few days later, a cat struck him in the head, causing him to fall into a trance. After the blow, he saw Roberts escaping in her usual clothes. Then, the next day, she allegedly appeared to him in the likeness of a bee, which affected him so much that five or six people could barely hold him down.(67)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 67

Elizabeth Roberts Elizabeth Roberts Witch
1149

A woman from York in the county of North Yorkshire, Katherine Earle is accused bewitching a gentleman name Rodwell and his horse (circa August 1653) by striking them both on the neck. Rodwell's horse "imediately fell sicke and dyed, and he himselfe was very sore troubled and perplexed with a paine in his necke." In addition, her daughter Ann allegedly teased the man, asking him "Doth the divell nipp the in the necke? but he will nipp the better yet." Katherine Earle also stands accused of the bewitchment of "one Mr. Franke, late of Rhodes, betwene the shoulders with her hand," asking him, as she stroke him "You are a pretty gentleman; will you kiss mee?" Mr. Frank became ill, an illness that lasted, according to one witness, thee years, all the while he languished indoors, and on his death bead, continued to blame Earle. Katherine Earl is searched for witch's marks by female witch searchers from the village; two witch-marks were found upon her a wart behind her ear, and another upon her thigh, one of which is described as being "in the likenesse of a papp." On another occasion, Earle allegedly tapped a man named Mr. Frank between the shoulders and said "You are a pretty gentleman; will you kissemee?" Mr. Frank became ill almost imeediately (before he got home) and died shortly thereafter. On his deathbed, he blamed Katherine Earle. (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Katherine Earle Katherine Earle Witch
1150

A man from Rhodes in the county of Yorkshire who claims Katherine Earle struck him in the neck as well as his mare. Hatfield testifies that about August last Katherine Earle struck him in the neck and his mare with a "docken stalke." The mare immediately became sick and died and he became troubled by pain in his neck. (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Henry Hatefeild John Hatfield Victim
1150

A man from Rhodes in the county of Yorkshire who claims Katherine Earle struck him in the neck as well as his mare. Hatfield testifies that about August last Katherine Earle struck him in the neck and his mare with a "docken stalke." The mare immediately became sick and died and he became troubled by pain in his neck. (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Henry Hatefeild John Hatfield Accuser
1151

A girl (the daughter of Katherine Earle), presumably from Rhodes in the county of Yorkshire, who encounters Henry Hatfield after he has been struck in the neck (by Katherine Earle allegedly). Perplexed, she tells him: "Doth the divell nipp the in the necke? but he will nipp the better yet."(69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Ann Earle Ann Earle Witness
1152

A woman from Wakefield in the county of York who tried for witchcraft along with her son, George Benton. According to Richard Jackson, Jennet Benton and her son George Benton "pretended" to have a a route belonging to their farm which passed through Mr. Stringer's property. Being the tenant of the property, Jackson, along with his servant Daniel Craven, endeavoured to hinder the Benton's passage, at which point George Benton threw a stone at Craven, cutting his upper lip and breaking two of his teeth. At that point, there came into effect an action against the Benton's trespassing. In response, the Bentons said that "it should be a deare day's worke unto the said Rich. Jackson, to him or to his, before the yeare went about." From that moment on, Jackson's wife could no longer hear, his child was strangely taken with fits in the nighttime and Jackson himself began to suffer from pain in his shoulders, back, and heart as well as hearing noises such as the ringing of bells accompanied by singing and dancing and which sometimes included a deep groaning. Apparitions also began appearing to the house in the shape of black dogs and cats. Since Jennet and George Benton threatened Jackson, he lost eighteen horses and mares, the deaths of which he blames on Jennet and George Benton. Susanna Maude of Snow Hill claims that Jennet Benton came to her house seeking her son and asking him to come home with her to which her son replied: Mother, which way shall I goe? You know I can goe thorrow the stone wall if yow would have me." He went on to say his father or the Devil came to their house at all times of the night. Jennet then replied: "Villaine, did it ever doe the any hurt? it will doe soe at the noone time." Despite the fact that two other witnesses also reported suspicious circumstances about Jennet and George Benton, the two deny all accusations.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Jennet Benton Jennet Benton Witch
1153

A boy from the outskirts of Wakefield in the county of York who tried for witchcraft along with his mother, Jennet Benton. According to Richard Jackson, Jennet Benton and her son George Benton "pretended" to have a a route belonging to their farm which passed through Mr. Stringer's property. Being the tenant of the property, Jackson, along with his servant Daniel Craven, endeavoured to hinder the Benton's passage, at which point George Benton threw a stone at Craven, cutting his upper lip and breaking two of his teeth. At that point, there came into effect an action against the Benton's trespassing. In response, the Bentons said that "it should be a deare day's worke unto the said Rich. Jackson, to him or to his, before the yeare went about." From that moment on, Jackson's wife could no longer hear, his child was strangely taken with fits in the nighttime and Jackson himself began to suffer from pain in his shoulders, back, and heart as well as hearing noises such as the ringing of bells accompanied by singing and dancing and which sometimes included a deep groaning. Apparitions also began appearing to the house in the shape of black dogs and cats. Since Jennet and George Benton threatened Jackson, he lost eighteen horses and mares, the deaths of which he blames on Jennet and George Benton. Susanna Maude of Snow Hill claims that Jennet Benton came to her house seeking her son and asking him to come home with her to which her son replied: Mother, which way shall I goe? You know I can goe thorrow the stone wall if yow would have me." He went on to say his father or the Devil came to their house at all times of the night. Jennet then replied: "Villaine, did it ever doe the any hurt? it will doe soe at the noone time." Despite the fact that two other witnesses also reported suspicious circumstances about Jennet and George Benton, the two deny all accusations.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

George Benton George Benton Witch
1154

A Justice from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire who heard the testimony of Richard Jackson, of Wakefield against Jennet and George Benton. The Bentons were indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Richard Jackson and his family after Jackson reprimanded them for trespassing.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Jo. Warde Jo. Ward Examiner/Justice
1155

A man who testifies against Jennet and George Benton. He claims that after throwing stones at them for trespassing, he and his wife and child began suffering from a myriad of fits. The Bentons and Jackson had been arguing about the Benton's alleged trespassing. An angry Jackson procured an action against the Bentons, prohibiting them from passing. The Bentons then threaten him and his family. Richard Jackson starts to suffer from pains in the shoulders, heart and back. he also began to hear strange noises like bells ringing accompanied by singing and dancing. (74)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74

Richard Jackson Richard Jackson Victim
1155

A man who testifies against Jennet and George Benton. He claims that after throwing stones at them for trespassing, he and his wife and child began suffering from a myriad of fits. The Bentons and Jackson had been arguing about the Benton's alleged trespassing. An angry Jackson procured an action against the Bentons, prohibiting them from passing. The Bentons then threaten him and his family. Richard Jackson starts to suffer from pains in the shoulders, heart and back. he also began to hear strange noises like bells ringing accompanied by singing and dancing. (74)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74

Richard Jackson Richard Jackson Accuser
1156

A child from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire (the son of Mrs. Jackson and Richard Jackson) who starts suffering from fits in the night, according to his father Richard Jackson, after Richard was threatened by Jennet and George Benton. (74-65)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-65

Jackson Jackson (Child) Victim
1157

A servant from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire who tried to stop Jenet and George Benton from trespassing. Craven is servant on the Bunny Hall farm through which the Bentons allegedly trespass. On one occasion, during a fight over whether or not the Bentons are allowed to pass, George Benton throws a stone at Daniel Craven, causing his upper lip to bleed and two of his teeth to break.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Daniell Craven Daniel Craven Witness
1158

A woman from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire who allegedly loses her hearing after her husband has an altercation with Jenet and George Benton. The Bentons had allegedly been trespassing on the land of the farm on which Richard Jackson worked. When Jackson passed an action against the Bentons, prohibiting them from passing, Jennet Benton threatened him and his family. Shortly thereafter is when Mrs. Jackson lost her hearing.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Jackson Mrs. Jackson Victim
1159

A man from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who is tried for witchcraft in 1656. He is married to Mary Wade who is accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. Elizabeth Mallory suffered from violents fits during which she directly accuses Mary Wade and claims that Mary Wade does not confess to doing her wrong, she would become much more violent again. William Wade, as well as his wife, deny all accusations made against them. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

William Wade William Wade Witch
1160

A woman from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who is accused of bewitching and tormenting fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. Mary Wade claims the only time she ever gave something to Elizabeth Mallory was three or four years ago and that was a dish of nuts when Lady Mallory and her children came to her house. Nevertheless, Elizabeth Mallory, at the age of fourteen, languished for twelve weeks, the use of her limbs being taken from her. Elizabeth Mallory would sometimes cry out "she comes, she comes" during her fits and when asked to whom she was referring, Mallory would reply "Mary, Mary." During her fits, Mallory would claim that Mary Wade appear in the shape of a cat sitting on the window sill or a tall woman standing at the end of her bed. After naming Mary Wade as her tormentor, Elizabeth Mallory began vomiting various things. Mary Wade was allegedly able to make Elizabeth Mallory better by confessing and asking forgiveness, which she did. At that moment, Elizabeth Mallory got better. At that moment, Wade denied that she had done her wrong. Elizabeth Mallory then immediately becomes ill and threatens her, saying that either she should confess or be tried before a justice and punished. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Mary Wade Mary Wade Witch
1161

A woman from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how Elizabeth Mallory suffered from various fits for twelve months and how Mallory repeatedly accused Mary Wade of having bewitched her, also threatening Wade that she (Mallory) would be ill and force Wade to be tried before a justice and punished if she did not confess to wronging her. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Ann Duffeild Ann Duffield Accuser
1161

A woman from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how Elizabeth Mallory suffered from various fits for twelve months and how Mallory repeatedly accused Mary Wade of having bewitched her, also threatening Wade that she (Mallory) would be ill and force Wade to be tried before a justice and punished if she did not confess to wronging her. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Ann Duffeild Ann Duffield Witness
1162

A woman from the area Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen-year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how, at the age of fourteen, Elizabeth Mallory laid languishing for approximately twelve weeks. She lost the use of her limbs and was unable to rise from bed. In that time, she suffered from several fits. Mary Wilson claims that during a fit Mallory yelled out "she comes! she comes!" and when asked to whom she was referring, Mallory replied saying it was Mary and specified that it was Mary Wade when asked. Wilson continues on to explain how Elizabeth Mallory claimed to have no recollection of her fits. (75- 79)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75- 79

Mary Wilson Mary Wilson Accuser
1162

A woman from the area Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen-year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how, at the age of fourteen, Elizabeth Mallory laid languishing for approximately twelve weeks. She lost the use of her limbs and was unable to rise from bed. In that time, she suffered from several fits. Mary Wilson claims that during a fit Mallory yelled out "she comes! she comes!" and when asked to whom she was referring, Mallory replied saying it was Mary and specified that it was Mary Wade when asked. Wilson continues on to explain how Elizabeth Mallory claimed to have no recollection of her fits. (75- 79)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75- 79

Mary Wilson Mary Wilson Witness
1181

One of a jury of women from York who is implied to have searched Katherine Earle for witch's marks; "they discovered a marke founde upon her in the likenesse of a papp."(69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Anonymous 168 Witch-Searcher
2168

A woman from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who is indicted at the Castle of York for allegedly bewitching Rennerd's child, for allegedly killing foals belonging to Nicholas Baldwin of Redness, and for allegedly using witchcraft on Richard Brown, causing him to become sick and die. In 1648, Baldwin accuses Lambe of having murdered his three foals by use of witchcraft. Baldwin therefore beat her with his cane and had it not been for his wife who got down on her knees and asked for forgiveness, Baldwin claims he would have done much worse. In 1651, Thomas Rennerd, constable of Redness, claimed that his child was sick and that his wife suspected that Elizabeth Lambe had bewitching him. One day, Rennerd claims, his wife met Elizabeth Lambe at their doorstep and that Lambe fell down on her knees asking for forgiveness. The child recovered shortly thereafter. As for the case of Richard Brown Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death. (58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Elizabeth Lambe Elizabeth Lambe Witch