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ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
101

A man from Dunwich and Cookly in the county of Suffolk, described as Bailiff twice in Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffered a variety of fits, a condition attributed to Aubrey Grinset. Born in January of 1614, he was the son of Mr. James Spatchet, and the grandson of Mr. Robert Spatchet, who conversed frequently with the late Lord Chief Justice Sir Edward Coke. Thomas Spatchet is said to have been watched over by the Providence of God from a young age. As an infant, he was dropped on his head against stone by a careless servant, leaving deep seam on the left side. As a young man, he went to draw water and fell down the well instead. He suffered no broken bones, but lost flesh from one hand, suffered a hole in his wrist, lost some skin, and was sick and bedridden for days after. Therafter, Spatchet began to have fits. At first, he would find himself abruptly unable to speak; this soon interfered with fulfilling his religious duties and prayer. His fits later took three forms: Benumbing, in which he could hear but would be unable to move; a shake that would end with his legs and feet moving with agility and harmony; finally, skipping and jumping until his strength ran out. Within a year and a half, he lost all ability to hear or partake in worship, and had difficulty eating. By the winter of 1693, he would shake throughout the day, so that he would be unable to eat until evening and be forced to do so while walking. He suffered kneading fits in 1665, which ended when he seemed to catch a thumb in his mouth and bite it. The witch Aubrey Grinset was searched and found to have an impression on her toe. A year later, the fits resumed. In 1665, Aubrey Grinset confessed to being a witch and sending an imp to cause his fits. However, she denied causing his roaring fits, which he suffered from 1665 to 1666. When he was urged to scratch her, he refused, being too tender-hearted. He attempted to visit Grinset shortly before her death, at the urging of a Mr. R., but was repelled and made to curtsey back from her. His fits remained until the death of the witch, leaving him the last two years entirely unable to pray or otherwise participate in worship. Taking physic made his fits worse, but when he stopped for two years, the fits became violent. The fits allegedly end eight weeks before Grinsets death. Before she died, she said others had him in hand as well, and that her death would not free him. He found himself unable to travel before her death, but discovered himself able again after. He continued to suffer fits to his death, though far less frequently, and he continues to have trouble praying.(2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript

Thomas Spatchet Thomas Spatchet Victim
101

A man from Dunwich and Cookly in the county of Suffolk, described as Bailiff twice in Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffered a variety of fits, a condition attributed to Aubrey Grinset. Born in January of 1614, he was the son of Mr. James Spatchet, and the grandson of Mr. Robert Spatchet, who conversed frequently with the late Lord Chief Justice Sir Edward Coke. Thomas Spatchet is said to have been watched over by the Providence of God from a young age. As an infant, he was dropped on his head against stone by a careless servant, leaving deep seam on the left side. As a young man, he went to draw water and fell down the well instead. He suffered no broken bones, but lost flesh from one hand, suffered a hole in his wrist, lost some skin, and was sick and bedridden for days after. Therafter, Spatchet began to have fits. At first, he would find himself abruptly unable to speak; this soon interfered with fulfilling his religious duties and prayer. His fits later took three forms: Benumbing, in which he could hear but would be unable to move; a shake that would end with his legs and feet moving with agility and harmony; finally, skipping and jumping until his strength ran out. Within a year and a half, he lost all ability to hear or partake in worship, and had difficulty eating. By the winter of 1693, he would shake throughout the day, so that he would be unable to eat until evening and be forced to do so while walking. He suffered kneading fits in 1665, which ended when he seemed to catch a thumb in his mouth and bite it. The witch Aubrey Grinset was searched and found to have an impression on her toe. A year later, the fits resumed. In 1665, Aubrey Grinset confessed to being a witch and sending an imp to cause his fits. However, she denied causing his roaring fits, which he suffered from 1665 to 1666. When he was urged to scratch her, he refused, being too tender-hearted. He attempted to visit Grinset shortly before her death, at the urging of a Mr. R., but was repelled and made to curtsey back from her. His fits remained until the death of the witch, leaving him the last two years entirely unable to pray or otherwise participate in worship. Taking physic made his fits worse, but when he stopped for two years, the fits became violent. The fits allegedly end eight weeks before Grinsets death. Before she died, she said others had him in hand as well, and that her death would not free him. He found himself unable to travel before her death, but discovered himself able again after. He continued to suffer fits to his death, though far less frequently, and he continues to have trouble praying.(2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript

Thomas Spatchet Thomas Spatchet Demoniac
102

A woman from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a witch and a bastard. Aubrey Grinset, alias Thrower due to her illegitimate birth, is accused of witching John Collet and Henry Winson to death, and of causing the fits of Thomas Spatchet. She is tried in Suffolk, but it is found that there is insufficient evidence to do anything to her under the law. During one of Spatchet's fits, he seemed to catch a hand and bit the thumb, which ended the fits. After this, Aubrey Grinset was seen to wear an unusually large shoe and was found to have a saw-like impression on her toe. A year later, Spatchet suffered fits in which he felt as if someone was holding him and groping his crotch, also attributed to her. In the fall of 1665, Aubrey Grinset confessed that she had afflicted Thomas Spatchet and many others, that she had made league with the Devil and had been a witch for twenty years, and bewitched John Collet of Cookly and Henry Winson of Walpool to death. The Devil had appeared first in the form of a handsome young man and later in the form of a blackish grey cat or kitten, and sucked blood from a teat. She admitted to employing an imp and sending it to Spatchet. When searched by a jury of women, her teat was found where she had said it would be, but no other marks. A second search a few days later found her covered in scratches; many nights she was seen wandering far from her cell. She was called before gentlemen to confess, and credible persons offered testimony. Questioned a third time, she confessed to hurting Spatchet, but denied killing anyone. Spatchet was urged to scratch her, but was too tender-hearted. A week before her death, she was visited by Thomas Spatchet at the urging of Mr. R., a Conformist, but Spatchet was unable to get close. When he tried, he met resistance and was forced to curtsey back away from her again. After this, Mr. R. visited her in Spatchet's place. He found her ill, with the skin of her hands and arms torn off. She told him that it was too late for her to repent, that she was damned. When he asked why she had two cudgels on her bed, she answered that they were to fight the Devil, for he would wait until she was alone and drag her out of the bed, under and back again. Before her death, she said that Spatchet would not be free on her death as others had him in hand as well. She died around Easter of 1667.(17-20, 23, 27, 28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 17-20, 23, 27, 28

Aubrey Grinset Aubrey Grinset Witch
150

A man of Cookly in the county of Suffolk, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Aubrey Grinset. She confessed to calling his household out of the house to come see the greatest snake anyone had ever seen and used the opportunity to go to him; he died about two days later.(18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18

John Collet John Collet Victim
151

A man from Walpool in the county of Suffolk, described as a victim of Aubrey Grinset, who was allegedly bewitched to death by her.(18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18

Henry Winson Henry Winson Victim
1179

One of a jury of women from the county of Suffolk, who searched Aubrey Grinset for witch's marks. The first night a jury of women searched her, they found the mark to which she confessed having. However, the second time she was searched, Anonymous 166 saw her "body was well nigh all over as if scratched with briers and thorns the like hath not been seen; and one that searched before saw this alteration."(11)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 11

Anonymous 166 Witch-Searcher
1724

One of an unknown number of Gentlemen of the county of Suffolk who questioned Aubrey Grinset, an accused witch who allegedly bewitched John Collet of Cokely and Henry Winson of Walpool to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich. A group of gentlemen first heard her confess that she had a familiar spirit, had been the death of some, and that she bewitched Thomas Spatchet. She later confessed again to two gentlemen (who may have been in the first group or different gentlemen entirely); this time she admitted to harming Spatchet but denied causing the deaths of Collet and Winson.(19-20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19-20

Anonymous 314 Accuser
1725

One of an unknown number of Credible Persons of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, who offered to give testimony against Aubrey Grinset of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. She stood accused of bewitching John Collet of Cokely in the county of Suffolk and Henry Winson of Walpool in the county of Suffolk to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk.(19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

Anonymous 317 Witness
1725

One of an unknown number of Credible Persons of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, who offered to give testimony against Aubrey Grinset of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. She stood accused of bewitching John Collet of Cokely in the county of Suffolk and Henry Winson of Walpool in the county of Suffolk to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk.(19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

Anonymous 317 Accuser
1720

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as James Spatchet is the father of alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet, who suffers from fits attributed to Aubrey Grinset, and the son of Robert Spatchet.(2)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2

Iames Spatchet James Spatchet Witness
1721

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as Robert Spatchet who is the father of James Spatchet and the grandfather of alleged demoniac Mr. Thomas Spatchet, who suffers from fits attributed to Aubrey Grinset. He is said to have conversed often with the late Lord Chief Justice, Sir Edward Coke.(2)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2

Robert Spatchet Robert Spatchet Witness
1722

A man from the county of Suffolk, described as Sir Edward Coke who was Lord Chief Justice, and known to converse with Robert Spatchet of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, the grandfather of alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet, who suffered fits attributed to Aubrey Grinset. Coke was a prominent lawyer, legal writer and politician. By 1600, he had become an extremely wealthy land and owned over a hundred properties, including property in Suffolk. He was appointed chief justice of the court of common pleas in 1606, and chief justice of the king's bench in 1613. In his text The Third Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England, Coke defined a witch as someone who has conference with the Devil, and should not be suffered to live. He also rules against conjurers, sorcerers and enchanters, as being know to consort with demons or the Devil. All are to be punished by death. Burning is the punishment for heretics, and may also be used in the case of witchcraft and consulting with the Devil. Coke mentions a precedent in which a sorcerer was beheaded, and the head burnt along with his book of sorcery. He includes using, practicing or exercising an invocation of an evil or wicked spirit in his definition of felony. Also included is consorting with wicked spirits, using or otherwise disturbing the dead for the purpose of witchcraft, harming or killing a person through witchcraft, using witchcraft to find treasure or cheating others of their money, finding lost or stolen things, provoking unlawful love, or destroying the cattle or goods of another person, or otherwise through witchcraft hurting or destroying a person.(2)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2

Edward Coke Sir Edward Coke Examiner/Justice
1723

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a Conformist. Mr. R. urged Thomas Spatchet to visit Aubrey Grinset before her death, but Spatchet was allegedly made to curtsey by an unknown force when he tried to get close. Mr. R. ended up visiting Grinset in Spatchet's place, and reported on his visit to Spatchet. Mr. R. found the skin of her hands and arms torn off, with barely a finger's breadth whole. She would not confess any witchery to him, but told him that she had made an agreement with the Devil, that it was too late for her to repent, and that she was damned. When he asked her about the two cudgels on her bed, she told him they were to fight the Devil, as he would drag her under the bed and back again when she was alone, until the noise brought someone and they would find her bloody.(27-28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 27-28

R. Mr. R. (A Conformist) Witness
1733

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a Professing Physick, treated alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet for his fits. From his observations of Spatchet's fits, he concluded that they were no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion. When the fits wore off, he observed that Spatchet would sometimes be left stretched out like a dead man.(26)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 26

Anonymous 320 Physician
1733

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a Professing Physick, treated alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet for his fits. From his observations of Spatchet's fits, he concluded that they were no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion. When the fits wore off, he observed that Spatchet would sometimes be left stretched out like a dead man.(26)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 26

Anonymous 320 Witness
1735

A man from Sudbury in the county of Suffolk, described as a witness to the fits of alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet and the author of "A faithful narrative of the wonderful and extraordinary fits." Samuel Petto provided a lengthy account of Thomas Spatchet's affliction, which he claims to have seen himself as someone who often visited Dunwich and Cokely. Petto attributes Spatchet's preservation from life-threatening injury to the Works of God, and the cause of his fits to alleged witch Aubrey Grinset. Petto was a clergyman and an ejected minister, husband to Mary and father to Samuel. After his ejection from Sandcroft, he began his long association with Sudbury. He was a firm believer in witchcraft.(Advertisement)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, Advertisement

Samuel Petto Samuel Petto Preacher/Minister
1735

A man from Sudbury in the county of Suffolk, described as a witness to the fits of alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet and the author of "A faithful narrative of the wonderful and extraordinary fits." Samuel Petto provided a lengthy account of Thomas Spatchet's affliction, which he claims to have seen himself as someone who often visited Dunwich and Cokely. Petto attributes Spatchet's preservation from life-threatening injury to the Works of God, and the cause of his fits to alleged witch Aubrey Grinset. Petto was a clergyman and an ejected minister, husband to Mary and father to Samuel. After his ejection from Sandcroft, he began his long association with Sudbury. He was a firm believer in witchcraft.(Advertisement)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, Advertisement

Samuel Petto Samuel Petto Author
1735

A man from Sudbury in the county of Suffolk, described as a witness to the fits of alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet and the author of "A faithful narrative of the wonderful and extraordinary fits." Samuel Petto provided a lengthy account of Thomas Spatchet's affliction, which he claims to have seen himself as someone who often visited Dunwich and Cokely. Petto attributes Spatchet's preservation from life-threatening injury to the Works of God, and the cause of his fits to alleged witch Aubrey Grinset. Petto was a clergyman and an ejected minister, husband to Mary and father to Samuel. After his ejection from Sandcroft, he began his long association with Sudbury. He was a firm believer in witchcraft.(Advertisement)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, Advertisement

Samuel Petto Samuel Petto Witness