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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
391

A woman from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 43 stood accused of bewitching two young girls, Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, so that they vomited wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives. The Jury was satisfied with the evidence against them, but the Judges were not wholly convinced and "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit orchestrated by the Anonymous 9 and 10.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 44 Witch
392

A woman from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 44 stood accused of bewitching two young girls, Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, so that they vomited wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives. The Jury was satisfied with the evidence against them, but the Judges were not wholly convinced and "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit orchestrated by the Anonymous 9 and 10.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 43 Witch
393

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 10 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 9 Accuser
393

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 10 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 9 Victim
394

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 9 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 10 Accuser
394

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 9 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 10 Victim
395

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a beggar. She is said to have begged at the home of Anonymous 11 for bread and beer, and to have given the girl a sorrel leaf. Shortly after Anonymous 11 ate the leaf, she began to suffer suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." After a priest prayed over the child, she began to contort violently and vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Anonymous 11's family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented. Anonymous 12 was apprehended for bewitchment and hanged for it when she confessed. Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on the child.(5-7)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-7

Anonymous 12 Witch
396

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a physician and the author of the account of a young girl's bewitchment and cure which was translated from Latin and inserted into "The most true and wonderfull narration of two women bewitched in Yorkshire." He takes Anonymous 11, a nine-year-old girl who suffers convulsive fits and vomits a variety of strange objects, as a patient. He witnessed her vomiting, monitored her while she was unable to eat for 15 days at a time, and recorded her strange swellings and convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull a pin, a threaded needle, straws and more directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He has her drink a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment for her joints, both of which he provides the recipe for, which he claims cured her affliction and would be effective in other cases of bewitchment.(Title Page)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, Title Page

Henri de Heer Henri de Heer Witness
396

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a physician and the author of the account of a young girl's bewitchment and cure which was translated from Latin and inserted into "The most true and wonderfull narration of two women bewitched in Yorkshire." He takes Anonymous 11, a nine-year-old girl who suffers convulsive fits and vomits a variety of strange objects, as a patient. He witnessed her vomiting, monitored her while she was unable to eat for 15 days at a time, and recorded her strange swellings and convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull a pin, a threaded needle, straws and more directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He has her drink a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment for her joints, both of which he provides the recipe for, which he claims cured her affliction and would be effective in other cases of bewitchment.(Title Page)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, Title Page

Henri de Heer Henri de Heer Physician
396

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a physician and the author of the account of a young girl's bewitchment and cure which was translated from Latin and inserted into "The most true and wonderfull narration of two women bewitched in Yorkshire." He takes Anonymous 11, a nine-year-old girl who suffers convulsive fits and vomits a variety of strange objects, as a patient. He witnessed her vomiting, monitored her while she was unable to eat for 15 days at a time, and recorded her strange swellings and convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull a pin, a threaded needle, straws and more directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He has her drink a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment for her joints, both of which he provides the recipe for, which he claims cured her affliction and would be effective in other cases of bewitchment.(Title Page)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, Title Page

Henri de Heer Henri de Heer Author
397

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure.(5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11 Victim
397

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure.(5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11 Demoniac
397

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure.(5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11 Faster
416

An unknown number of men from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of female physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 47 Witness
416

An unknown number of men from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of female physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 47 Physician
417

An unknown number of women from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of male physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 48 Witness
417

An unknown number of women from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of male physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 48 Physician
418

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a preacher. He comes to help the young maid, Anonymous 11, who is suffering from convulsive fits. However, his prayers only cause her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 318 Preacher/Minister
418

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a preacher. He comes to help the young maid, Anonymous 11, who is suffering from convulsive fits. However, his prayers only cause her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 318 Witness
419

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the wife of Anonymous 321 and the mother of Anonymous 11. She witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 316 Witness
419

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the wife of Anonymous 321 and the mother of Anonymous 11. She witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 316 Relative of Victim
420

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the husband of Anonymous 316 and the father of Anonymous 11. He witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 321 Relative of Victim
420

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the husband of Anonymous 316 and the father of Anonymous 11. He witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 321 Witness