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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
147

A religious woman who is allegedly bewitched and suffers from fits, barking like a dog, and vomiting hair, pieces of flesh, bone, and chestnuts(6)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 6

Judith Unknown Judith Victim
148

A young girl from Huntington who is allegedly bewitched or possessed because she is said to have flown in the air and run up the walls and ceiling. Day is described as running "up the walls with her feet, laying no hand, and on the Seiling [ceiling] with her head downwards, which she could never do before nor since."(9)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 9

Elizabeth Day Elizabeth Day Victim
149

A young woman from Littte Gaddsen in the county of Hertfordshire and the daughter of a local smith. She is described as described as "very young, and seems bashful, and modest," a "civil fair-conditioned Maid," whose "Friends [are] inclined to the Anabaptists Sect, and most that came to pray by her were of their Teachers." Hall suffers a strange and disturbing illness which made her feet shake, her body convulse, and for her to shout out strange things. This illness first appears in Autumn 1663. She was taken to see a physician, a Dr. Woodhouse, a man described as " Doctor Woodhouse from Berkhamsted, in the county of Hertfordshire, "a Man famous in curing bewitched persons," who tested her urine and diagnosed her as bewitched / possessed. Hall was exorcised over "stinking Suffumigations," which made he (strain to) vomit. She was temporarily cured, but as of August 1664 (until presumably the time of publication (1665) her torments and voices and noises were soon heard inside of her again, like the "mewing of Cats, barking of Dogs, roaring of Bears, &c. at last a Voice spoke in her, Pus Cat, what a Cat?" It was concluded that this was an "evil spirit" which plagued Hall with these "tricks and torments, [and] convulsions." Hall pinpoints her possession as beginning sometime after she saw "two Flies come down the Chimny to her." She is allegedly possessed by two spirits sent by local witches Goodwife Young and Goodwife Harrod, spirits which attempted to possess her father but were unable to. Mary was soon tempted to self-destruction (by burning, drowning, and scalding herself), and was unable to ride her horse or read the bible. Her possession manifest as convulsions and a choking sensation, although she would also be made to dance and flail about. She is also treated by Sanders (an astrologer and chiromancer), and Mr. Redman (physician and conjurer). (32)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32

Mary Hall Mary Hall Demoniac
175

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk described as prisoner of witchcraft who confesses that Devil possessed her to avoid repentance.(12)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12

Anonymous 15 Witch
176

A man who dies three days after being stroked by an invisible hand while walking in the streets in London.(12-13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12-13

Anonymous 16 Victim
177

A woman whose hand turns black after her husband allegedly dies three days after being hit on the thigh "with an invisible hand" that the black "Figure of a Mans hand, with the four Fingers, Thumb, and Palm" was "impressed deep in the Flesh."(12-13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12-13

Dark Mistress Dark Victim
178

A boy who is killed by a spectral woman and a man with trunk breeches that haunted him(13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 13

Anonymous 17 Victim
179

A woman who confesses that her imps convinced her to get revenge (13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 13

Sarah Boatman Sarah Boatman Witch
180

A woman that causes her neighbour's cows to become ill and who sends her child in the form of a cow to cause more damage to the cows.(14)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 14

Anonymous 18 Witch
887

The infant daughter of Edward Fairfax who dies under mysterious circumstances; she begins bleeding all over her body. (106)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 106

Anne Fairfax Anne Fairfax Demoniac
887

The infant daughter of Edward Fairfax who dies under mysterious circumstances; she begins bleeding all over her body. (106)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 106

Anne Fairfax Anne Fairfax Victim
1466

A physician from Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire, known as a man "famous in curing bewitched persons," who spent the better part of a year attempting to cure Mary Hall from a bewitchment by two spirits which belonged to Goodwife Harod and Goodwife Young. Throughout the course of her bewitchment, Hall was plagued by shaking limbs, convulsions, and startling speech acts; Woodhouse treated her with a myriad of different techniques. He administered an emetic, in the form of "stinking suffumigations," (used in exorcisms) he cut off her fingernails and hung them by the fireplace (as a form of coutermagic), administered her "some Liquor" which made her faint (medical / exorcism), restrained her "in her Chair" (exorcism), and gave her opium (medical). He remained convinced that Hall was possessed, a conviction based, at least in part on the erudite agreement of two medical colleagues who had visited the Nuns at Loudan.(32, 34, 36, 37, 38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38-39

Woodhouse Dr. Woodhouse Physician
1467

A woman from Little Gaddesden in the county of Hertforshire who is accused of sending two spirits to bewitch Mary Hall. The spirits speak through Hall and suggest that Harwood "gave them her Soul to come into Mary Hall." Although Harwood denies the accusations, an act which makes the spirits rage "Let Gfe Harwood be hanged, if she will, because she denyed us," she did appear at the Hall home when Dr. Woodhouse hung Mary Hall's finger nails in a bag by the chimney, an act of folkloric countermagic. Harwood's fate is not recorded. (32, 32-33, 34, 34-35, 37)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32, 32-33, 34, 34-35, 37

Harwood Goodwife Harwood Witch
1468

A man from Amersham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as "Conjurer," or an "honest and able Physician," Redman appears to be an untrained, but practicing physician / cunningman, who was "once sent to Prison" for either practicing medicine without a license, or witchcraft. Mary Hall's possessing spirits suggest Redman could help heal her. Redman instructs her parents to "take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length, and the Child suddenly recovered." Although Redman appears to heal, in part with the aid of astrology, his pratice seems based on sympathetic magic. He once advised a client to urinate in a hole in the crossroads to cure himself of Ague and another to boil an egg in urine and bury it in an ant hill to cure his distemper. Although his practice crosses magic, medicine, and folklore, it is not actually witchcraft. (39-40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39-40

Redman Dr. Redman Cunning-folk
1468

A man from Amersham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as "Conjurer," or an "honest and able Physician," Redman appears to be an untrained, but practicing physician / cunningman, who was "once sent to Prison" for either practicing medicine without a license, or witchcraft. Mary Hall's possessing spirits suggest Redman could help heal her. Redman instructs her parents to "take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length, and the Child suddenly recovered." Although Redman appears to heal, in part with the aid of astrology, his pratice seems based on sympathetic magic. He once advised a client to urinate in a hole in the crossroads to cure himself of Ague and another to boil an egg in urine and bury it in an ant hill to cure his distemper. Although his practice crosses magic, medicine, and folklore, it is not actually witchcraft. (39-40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39-40

Redman Dr. Redman Physician
1469

A man likely from Berkhamsted in the county of Hertfordshire, described as an "Astrologer & Chiromancer," who helps diagnose Mary Hall as possessed. He suggests hanging a sigil (or magic symbol) about the necks of the possessed, claims to have cured a twelve or fourteen year old boy (improperly) diagnosed by physicians as having "had Hysterick Fits." He claimed treating Hall as a hysteric would not cure her, and appears to have used "Amara Dulcis, a Mercury Placit," or woody night-shade. Nicholas Culpeper describes the herb as "excellently good to remove witchcraft both in men and beasts, as also all sudden diseases whatsoever."(39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39

Sanders Mr. Sanders Astrologer
1470

A man, a friend of William Drage, possibly from Baldock in the county of Hertfordshire, claims to have seen two witches being swum. One, he reported "sunk presently down-right; the other, though tyed Toes and Thumbs together, could not be made to sink."()

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665,

Anonymous 251 Witness
1471

A woman from Bedford in the county of Bedforshire, and an accused curser, Goodwife Rose's weapon of choice appears to be worms and lice. She allegedly bewitched a "Maid's Pease [porridge when she] that had denied her some. by wishing it to become all "worm-eaten." She also allegedly bewitched lice to plague a man, "though [he] shifted every day." She, along with her female accuser, were swum as witches. Goodwife Rose floated, and was deemed witch-like, while Anonymous 252 "sank presently, and they could scarce bring her to life with all their hast and Arts."(41)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 41

Rose Goodwife Rose Witch
1473

A woman from St. Albans in the county of Herrfordshire, nicknamed Mary by chance, who suffers through a myriad of witch-testing. She is swum as a witch and "thrust down with Poles," but she "could not be made sink." She allegedly attempted to put "head under the Water" and "got Iron next her to make her sink" in an attempt to save herself, according to one witness. She was made to show examiners her "Teats" and say the Lord's Prayer, although she could "not say Our Father, but [could only say] Your Father." She evidently confessed to everything she was accused of. (40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 40

Mary Mary-by-chance Witch
1474

A man from St. Albans in the county of Hertforshire who is imprisoned (presumably for witchcraft) along with Mary-by-chance. When the two of them are made to "shew their Teats," it is revealed hat he "had like a Breast on his side," a protuberance read as a witch's mark. (40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 40

Anonymous 252 Witch
1475

A man from the Isle of Ely (now a region around the city of Ely in the county of Cambridgeshire) who is allegedly bewitched. Before his "strange fits" came on, her was allegedly visited by a thing "like a Mouse." He was sent to see a "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician," who gave him an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off." The wizard who helped this man "asked if they were wicked People, else, he said, he could not, or would not help them." The they here is somewhat opaque. It appears that he seems like an unwitcher, but the pronoun confusion allows this to be read as him only taking wicked people as clients. (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 254 Demoniac
1476

A man from the Isle of Ely (now a region around the city of Ely in the county of Cambridgeshire) who is described as a "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician." He gave a man tormented with fits (Anonymous 254) an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off." This wizard also asked Anonymous 254 "if they were wicked People, else, he said, he could not, or would not help them." The they here is somewhat opaque. It appears that he seems like an unwitcher, but the pronoun confusion allows this to be read as him only taking wicked people as clients.(20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 255 Cunning-folk
1477

A woman from the county of Hertfordshire allegedly claimed that regardless of what happened to her in court, she was "sure not to die yet: for all the mischief she had done, was in transforming her self into the shape of a Bumble Boe; and biting the Maids thread often is pieces as she spun; which Maid came in against her."(18-19)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 18-19

Anonymous 256 Witch
1497

A woman from Lutterworth in the county of Leicestershire who is allegedly scratched to force her into unwitching a child (Anonymous 260) whom she had witched.(21)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 21

Margaret Bell Margaret Bell Witch
1498

A child from Lutterworth in the county of Leicestershire who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Bell. Anonymous 260 appears to be cured when Bell is scratched. (21)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 21

Anonymous 260 Victim
1499

A father and husband from Little Gaddesden in the county of Hertforshire and a practicing smith, Hall is described as "very conscientious," honest, and wealthy. His daughter, Mary Hall's possession begins in August 1664 (she is ill a year earlier) and presumably continues to be at the time of publication (1665). She is allegedly possessed by two spirits sent by local witches Goodwife Young and Goodwife Harrod, spirits which attempted to possess Hall himself, but were unable to. Hall spared no expense in the long term treatment of his daughter, employing Dr. Woodhouse (a physician), Mr. Sanders (an astrologer and chiromancer), and Mr. Redman (physician and conjurer). (32, 40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32, 40

Hall Goodman Hall Witness
1500

A mother and wife from Little Gaddesden in the county of Hertforshire, along with her husband, Goodwife Hall is described as "very conscientious," honest, and wealthy. Her daughter, Mary Hall's possession begins in August 1664 (she is ill a year earlier) and presumably continues to be at the time of publication (1665). She is allegedly possessed by two spirits sent by local witches Goodwife Young and Goodwife Harrod, spirits which attempted to possess her husband, Goodman Hall. but were unable to. Goodwife Hall appears to have been her daughter's primary care-giver, which must have been an exhausting job. She claims that one night the spirits would not let her (or her daughter?) sleep and would sometimes "heave her up in bed." They allegedly tempted Mary by promising to buy her "a black Gown, Hoods, and Scarfs, and Ribbins, Hay! Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins." Despite the relentless worry and disruption Mary's fits seemed to caused, Goodwife Hall appears to have worried about Mary more when she lay still, claiming that "aughter was worse when the Spirits lay still, and did not actuate her parts, for then she was heavy, and Melancholy, and like a weight lay at her Stomack." (38, 40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38, 40

Hall Goodwife Hall Witness
1506

A boy from Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire who is allegedly possessed. His fits arrive at six o'clock each day, when he begins to pull of his head clothes, pull out his hair, and scratch the skin from his face. Dr. Woodhouse first sends him prescriptions for medicines to treat convulsions. When these medicines do not work, Woodhouse goes to visit the boy himself and prescribes him a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," which appears to work as a curative. (38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38-39

Anonymous 262 Demoniac