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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
50

Hannah Crump is a girl from Warwick in the county of Warwickshire, identified as the daughter of John Crump, and who is "afflicted with strange fits. Crump is taken to Thomas Hospital in Southwark where she "was taken with one of her fits in such a manner that they would not [attempt to cure her,] but said she was fitter for Bedlam than to come into an Hospital among sick People." She was then taken to see a cunning-man or physician in "Winchester Park in Southwark," who after taking her patient history confirmed that she was bewitched and offered to cure her for five pounds, but suggested that he take on the bewitchment himself. Someone, he claimed, had to bare the curse, once it was made; if not him, than the witch herself, until one of her familiars could infect someone else with it. It occurs to Hannah Crump's sister that prayer and fasting may help Hannah Crump with her dispossession. Her family arranges for such a day to happen. During this day, Hannah Crump rises from her bed "in a very great race," tearing at her clothes, and crying out "in a lamentable manner." Although there are times Hanna Crump quiets down, she still resists, kicking her father, and continuing to burn herself and her family members, breaking windows, and demanding her tabacco pipe. She reveals during prayers that her illness befell her after she consumed an apple a woman (Anonymous 488) brought her in sickness. Her family turns their prayers towards stopping the witch's powers, and she resists violently, spitting at her father. Prayer continues until evening, when Hannah Crump is "quiet on the bed, as one that was willing to rest her self after a weary dayes work." Upon waking, Hannah Crump finds herself able to take a bible and read it for an hour or two. John Crump and his daughter, Hannah, rejoice as she is dispossessed, and her affliction never affected her again.(18 - 20)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18 - 20

Hannah Crump Hannah Crump Demoniac
72

Jame Barrow is a boy from the London Borough of Southwark described as the son of John Barrow who suffers from violent fits that start when it seems like the child is being burned. This fit lasts for a week, during which time Barrow also walks up and down a room, throws his hat from his head, lays his hands under his belly, screeches lamentably, and makes a croaking sound. He is also visited by a number of devils in the form of rats and cats, who demand his soul. During some of James Barrow's fits, he is also rendered lame, dumb, and blind. During one particular incident, James Barrow finds that he can control his fits by confining himself to a particular stool in the house. However, whenever anyone else sits on the stool, he falls over on his back. Because of the nature of James Barrow's fits, he also finds it impossible to eat until he sings. At times, he calls out the names of people, most particularly, Sam Man, John Sames, Mol Williams, and Mary Prett. Other incidents include James Barrow's inability to articulate to his father why he sits at a table with a pen, ink and a pin; a fit that causes James Barrow's feet to be extremely cold; and the inability for James Barrow to hear the Bible read in his presence without roaring or crying. Eventually, James Barrow's father, John Barrow, seeks help from outside. He first employs the help of physician and astrologer, John Hubbard, who believes Barrow has been bewitched. They use "fopperies and charms" including hanging papers around James Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver under the door. These prove unsuccessful at healing James Barrow. John Hubbard's second attempt to cure James Barrow of bewitchment is through cutting the boy's hair in a round circle, and trimming his fingers and toe nails. These are trimmings are wrapped in paper and deposited in an oak tree. This also proves useless at curing James Barrow's fits as well. However, after taking some medicine from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for a time, taking up an apprenticeship. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat entered his body, and he acts like a changeling, being unable to eat any food unless in his own household. Following this, John Barrow takes his son to a number of wise men, including: an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144), Lord Abony, a gentleman (Anonymous 146), a group of friars, and a doctor (Anonymous 487). No one seems able to cure James Barrow. However, shortly after this, John Barrow desires to engage in fasting and prayer for his son, resulting in three days of fasting and prayer, at the end of which he is restored and dispossessed. At first, James Barrow cannot even stand to hear the name of God and Christ, crying out "Legat, go to the Devil Legat," although his mouth did not move. As well, he shies away from the Bible. By the end of the first day, however, he seemed to rejoice at the sight of the Bible. A second day of exorcism consisted of prayers for the better part of the day, which James Barrow endures well until night, when "he fell into a very great Agony." The third day, James Barrow admits to "strong temptations of the Devil, namely to cut his throat, or drown himself, or knock out his brains against a post." Prayer is still performed for the boy, and he roars like a dog, and tears at his clothing. A departure of five spirits is noted from the boy, after which time he is restored.(5 - 8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5 - 8

James Barrow James Barrow Demoniac
952

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, whose name James Barrow calls out during one of his strange and violent fits.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

Sam Man Sam Man Witness
953

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, whose name James Barrow calls out during one of his strange and violent fits.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

John Sames John Sames Witness
388

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the father of demoniac, Hannah Crump. He takes his daughter to Thomas Hospital in London, as she suffers from strange, violent fits. However, the hospital refuses to take in Hannah Crump, leading John Crump to seek help from a man (Anonymous 147) who is said to know astrology. Anonymous 147 declares that Hannah Crump has been bewitched and that he cannot provide a perfect cure, and is thus dismissed by John Crump. He participates in a day of fasting and prayer to help his daughter become dispossessed. During this day, his daughter spits at him and rages while they pray over her. However, her dispossession is successful, and "God clothed our friend Iohn Crump [...] with garments of joy."(18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

John Crump John Crump Relative of Victim
388

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the father of demoniac, Hannah Crump. He takes his daughter to Thomas Hospital in London, as she suffers from strange, violent fits. However, the hospital refuses to take in Hannah Crump, leading John Crump to seek help from a man (Anonymous 147) who is said to know astrology. Anonymous 147 declares that Hannah Crump has been bewitched and that he cannot provide a perfect cure, and is thus dismissed by John Crump. He participates in a day of fasting and prayer to help his daughter become dispossessed. During this day, his daughter spits at him and rages while they pray over her. However, her dispossession is successful, and "God clothed our friend Iohn Crump [...] with garments of joy."(18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

John Crump John Crump Witness
1041

A man from Winchester Park in the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician or astrologer who provides John Crump a means of curing his bewitched daughter, Hannah Crump. Anonymous 147 suggests that in order to unwitch Hannah, he would have to take the curse on himself. The curse, he suggests, needs to be carried by someone; if not Hannah, than him, if not him the witch who cursed her would have to carry the curse until her familiars could plague someone else with it. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 147 Astrologer
1041

A man from Winchester Park in the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician or astrologer who provides John Crump a means of curing his bewitched daughter, Hannah Crump. Anonymous 147 suggests that in order to unwitch Hannah, he would have to take the curse on himself. The curse, he suggests, needs to be carried by someone; if not Hannah, than him, if not him the witch who cursed her would have to carry the curse until her familiars could plague someone else with it. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 147 Cunning-folk
955

A woman from the London Borough of Southwark, whose name James Barrow calls out during one of his strange and violent fits.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

Mary Prett Mary Prett Witness
954

A woman from the London Borough of Southwark, whose name James Barrow calls out during one of his strange and violent fits.(6)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6

Mol Williams Mol Williams Witness
957

A woman from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the wife of John Barrow and the mother of James Barrow, a boy who suffers from violent and tormenting fits.(7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 7

Mother Barrow Witness
958

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the father of James Barrow, a boy who suffers from violent and tormenting fits. John Barrow is the author of the text, "The Lord's arm stretched out in an answer of prayer, or, A true relation of the wonderful deliverance of James Barrow," in which he chronicles his son's episodes, and attempts to determine their cause. James Barrow's father, John Barrow, seeks help from outside. He first employs the help of physician and astrologer John Hubbard, who believes Barrow has been bewitches. They use "fopperies and charms" including hanging papers around James Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver under the door. These prove unsuccessful at healing James Barrow. John Hubbard's second attempt to cure James Barrow of bewitchment is through cutting the boy's hair in a round circle, and trimming his fingers and toe nails. These are trimmings are wrapped in paper and deposited in an oak tree. This also proves useless at curing James Barrow's fits as well. However, after taking some medicine from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for a time, taking up an apprenticeship. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat entered his body, and he acts like a changeling, being unable to eat any food unless in his own household. Following this, John Barrow takes his son to a number of wise men, including: an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144), Lord Abony, a gentleman (Anonymous 146), a group of friars, and a doctor (Anonymous 487). No one seems able to cure James Barrow. However, shortly after this, John Barrow desires to engage in fasting and prayer for his son, resulting in three days of fasting and prayer, at the end of which he is restored and dispossessed. (6-7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6-7

John Barrow John Barrow Author
958

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the father of James Barrow, a boy who suffers from violent and tormenting fits. John Barrow is the author of the text, "The Lord's arm stretched out in an answer of prayer, or, A true relation of the wonderful deliverance of James Barrow," in which he chronicles his son's episodes, and attempts to determine their cause. James Barrow's father, John Barrow, seeks help from outside. He first employs the help of physician and astrologer John Hubbard, who believes Barrow has been bewitches. They use "fopperies and charms" including hanging papers around James Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver under the door. These prove unsuccessful at healing James Barrow. John Hubbard's second attempt to cure James Barrow of bewitchment is through cutting the boy's hair in a round circle, and trimming his fingers and toe nails. These are trimmings are wrapped in paper and deposited in an oak tree. This also proves useless at curing James Barrow's fits as well. However, after taking some medicine from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for a time, taking up an apprenticeship. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat entered his body, and he acts like a changeling, being unable to eat any food unless in his own household. Following this, John Barrow takes his son to a number of wise men, including: an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144), Lord Abony, a gentleman (Anonymous 146), a group of friars, and a doctor (Anonymous 487). No one seems able to cure James Barrow. However, shortly after this, John Barrow desires to engage in fasting and prayer for his son, resulting in three days of fasting and prayer, at the end of which he is restored and dispossessed. (6-7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6-7

John Barrow John Barrow Witness
958

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the father of James Barrow, a boy who suffers from violent and tormenting fits. John Barrow is the author of the text, "The Lord's arm stretched out in an answer of prayer, or, A true relation of the wonderful deliverance of James Barrow," in which he chronicles his son's episodes, and attempts to determine their cause. James Barrow's father, John Barrow, seeks help from outside. He first employs the help of physician and astrologer John Hubbard, who believes Barrow has been bewitches. They use "fopperies and charms" including hanging papers around James Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver under the door. These prove unsuccessful at healing James Barrow. John Hubbard's second attempt to cure James Barrow of bewitchment is through cutting the boy's hair in a round circle, and trimming his fingers and toe nails. These are trimmings are wrapped in paper and deposited in an oak tree. This also proves useless at curing James Barrow's fits as well. However, after taking some medicine from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for a time, taking up an apprenticeship. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat entered his body, and he acts like a changeling, being unable to eat any food unless in his own household. Following this, John Barrow takes his son to a number of wise men, including: an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144), Lord Abony, a gentleman (Anonymous 146), a group of friars, and a doctor (Anonymous 487). No one seems able to cure James Barrow. However, shortly after this, John Barrow desires to engage in fasting and prayer for his son, resulting in three days of fasting and prayer, at the end of which he is restored and dispossessed. (6-7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6-7

John Barrow John Barrow Relative of Victim
960

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician and astrologer employed by John Barrow to help cure his son, James Barrow. Hubbard states he is familiar with these sorts of conditions and believes that James Barrow has been bewitched.(8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

John Hubbard John Hubbard Physician
960

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician and astrologer employed by John Barrow to help cure his son, James Barrow. Hubbard states he is familiar with these sorts of conditions and believes that James Barrow has been bewitched.(8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

John Hubbard John Hubbard Astrologer
966

An Irish Roman Catholic from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his possession by putting a cross on the boy's head. James Barrow simply roars at the cross, and Anonymous 144 sends the boy to Lord Abony.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 144 Exorcist
966

An Irish Roman Catholic from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his possession by putting a cross on the boy's head. James Barrow simply roars at the cross, and Anonymous 144 sends the boy to Lord Abony.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 144 Celebrity
967

A servant from the London Borough of Southwark, who is of Lord Abony who pulls out a cross in the presence of the bewitched boy, James Darling.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 145 Witness
967

A servant from the London Borough of Southwark, who is of Lord Abony who pulls out a cross in the presence of the bewitched boy, James Darling.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Anonymous 145 Exorcist
968

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as a Lord whose house James Barrow suffers from a possessive roar.(9)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9

Lord Abony Witness
970

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession. The gentleman (Anonymosu 146) uses holy water, ribbon, a candle, brimstone, and latin prayers in his curing efforts. None of these methods cure the boy of his possession.(9-10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9-10

Anonymous 146 Exorcist
970

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession. The gentleman (Anonymosu 146) uses holy water, ribbon, a candle, brimstone, and latin prayers in his curing efforts. None of these methods cure the boy of his possession.(9-10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9-10

Anonymous 146 Preacher/Minister
970

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession. The gentleman (Anonymosu 146) uses holy water, ribbon, a candle, brimstone, and latin prayers in his curing efforts. None of these methods cure the boy of his possession.(9-10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9-10

Anonymous 146 Witness
972

A group of friars from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempt to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession by making him pray to St. James. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers.(10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 10

Anonymous 328 (Plural) Exorcist
972

A group of friars from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempt to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession by making him pray to St. James. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers.(10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 10

Anonymous 328 (Plural) Preacher/Minister
972

A group of friars from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempt to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession by making him pray to St. James. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers.(10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 10

Anonymous 328 (Plural) Witness
984

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who prays for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. He participates with John Barrow, Mother Barrow, Richard Webb and Richard Aylmore in fasting and praying for James Barrow, leading to the boy's dispossession, of which he is a witness. (13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

John Clayton John Clayton Exorcist
984

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who prays for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. He participates with John Barrow, Mother Barrow, Richard Webb and Richard Aylmore in fasting and praying for James Barrow, leading to the boy's dispossession, of which he is a witness. (13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

John Clayton John Clayton Witness
985

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who prays for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. He participates with John Barrow, Mother Barrow, John Clayton and Richard Aylmore in fasting and praying for James Barrow, leading to the boy's dispossession, of which he is a witness. (13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

Richard Webb Richard Webb Exorcist
985

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who prays for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. He participates with John Barrow, Mother Barrow, John Clayton and Richard Aylmore in fasting and praying for James Barrow, leading to the boy's dispossession, of which he is a witness. (13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

Richard Webb Richard Webb Witness
986

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who prays for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. He participates with John Barrow, Mother Barrow, John Clayton and Richard Webb in fasting and praying for James Barrow, leading to the boy's dispossession, of which he is a witness. (13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

Richard Aylmore Richard Aylmore Witness
986

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who prays for James Barrow, a boy suffering from possession and bewitchment. He participates with John Barrow, Mother Barrow, John Clayton and Richard Webb in fasting and praying for James Barrow, leading to the boy's dispossession, of which he is a witness. (13-14)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 13-14

Richard Aylmore Richard Aylmore Exorcist
1167

A man from Warwick in the county of Warwickshire, described as a physician who allegedly treats Hanna Crump for the symptoms of possession.(18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 161 Anonymous 161 Physician
2357

A woman from Southward in the city of London, who is allegedly responsible for the bewitchment of Hannah Crump, having provided her with an apple when the girl was sick, which brought on violent fits.(19)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 19

Anonymous 488 Witch
2358

A woman from Southwark in the city of London, who is the sister of Hannah Crump, a young woman allegedly possessed. It occurs to Hannah Crump's sister that a day of fasting and prayer might help Hannah Crump become dispossessed, and she sets up such an occasion with her family in her household to aid her sister.(18 - 20)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18 - 20

Crump Crump (Sister) Relative of Victim
2358

A woman from Southwark in the city of London, who is the sister of Hannah Crump, a young woman allegedly possessed. It occurs to Hannah Crump's sister that a day of fasting and prayer might help Hannah Crump become dispossessed, and she sets up such an occasion with her family in her household to aid her sister.(18 - 20)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18 - 20

Crump Crump (Sister) Witness
2359

A man from Southwark in the city of London, who is employed by John Barrow to attend to his bewitched son, James Barrow. Although the doctor is at first amazed to hear the story of the young boy, but only reads Latin to the boy in an attempt to cure him. After a week, the doctor refuses to see the boy, and John Barrow leaves his service, concluding that it was the Devil's work to delay a dispossession of James Barrow.(11 - 12)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 11 - 12

Anonymous 487 Physician