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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1445

An old woman from the county of Essex (Anonymous 244), who lived in Queen Mary' reign, and spoke at some time to Thomas Addy, and taught him a charm she used each night to charm her bed before she fell asleep. The charm allegedly was taught to her by a priest when she was a young woman, "Matthew, Mark, Luke, and Iohn,/ The Bed be blest that I lye on."(58-59)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 58-59

Anonymous 244 Witness
1446

A man from the county of Essex, described as a Butcher (Anonymous 245) who, having lost a cow, went to visit a cunning-man (Anonymous 247). The cunning-man fooled the butcher by asking him to look at the reflections cast in a glass as his "confederate of his covered over with a Bulls Hide, and a pair of horns on his head" attempted to trick him. The butcher figured out the ruse and returned with his boy and his dog, a large mastiff, which the boy released on the confederate (Anonymous 248).(62-63)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62-63

Anonymous 245 Victim
1447

The boy from the county of Essex, described as a servant or son of a butcher who works with (Anonymous 245) to expose a cunning-man and his conferdate who attempts to trick his master /father. His job is to release a large mastiff dog on the confederate of the cunning-man, who dressed in a bull's hide and horns, is meant to represent the devil. The Boy does this and the dog clamps down on one of the cheats, forcing him to expose his ruse. (62)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62

Anonymous 246 Witness
1448

A man from the county of Essex, described as a cunning-man who is a "notable cousening Knave [..] skilful in the Black Art," a "deceiving Witch," and a "conjurer," who with the help of a "confederate" (Anonymous 248) runs a confidence scam against a local butcher who is seeking help finding a lost cow/ cattle. The cunning-man is exposed when his partner, dressed menacingly like the devil, or a devil, is attacked by the butcher's dog and is forced to revel himself to have the man call off his dog.(62-63)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62-63

Anonymous 247 Cunning-folk
1449

A man from the county of Essex, described as a cunning-man who works with Anonymous 247 to run a confidence scam against a local butcher who is seeking help finding a lost cow/ cattle. His job was to cover himself in a "Bulls Hide, and a pair of horns on his head," and pose as the Devil to terrify the butcher who was meant to be seeing the Devil. The butcher figured out the con and returned with his Boy and a mastiff, who attacked the disguised man and forced him to revel himself in exchange for having the butcher call off his dog.(62)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62

Anonymous 248 Cunning-folk
1450

A woman from the town of Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, described as "an honest woman (so always formerly reputed)" who was executed at Cambridge (1645). She appears to have been prosecuted, at least in part, as a witch, because she allegedly had a familiar. Thomas Addy represents this as "keeping a tame Frogge in a Box for sport and Phantasie."(135)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 135

Anonymous 249 Witch
2319

A man from London, who excels in "juggling craft," which is according to Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) one of the nine types of witchcraft. This man, who lived during King James' time called himself "The Kings Majesties most excellent Hocus Pocus," allegedly his name because after every trick, he would say "Hoc[...] pocus, tontus talontus, vade celeriter jubeo," which was "a dark composure of words," meant to distract observers, and "to make his Trick pass the more currantly without discovery." It is an abuse of "Natural Magick," and meant to trick innocent bystanders into believing things that are not true.(29)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 29

Anonymous 464 Witch
2320

A man from Leicester in the county of Leicestershire, who as a Master of Arts was condemned "only for using himself to the study and practise of the Jugling craft." He was formerly the Lord of Leicester, and according to the author Thomas Addy was unjustly condemned for simply studying witchcraft is not the same as being a Witch, for "the essence of a Witch is not in doing false Miracles, or any other Witchcraft by demonstration or discovery, but in seducing people from God, and his Truth." (41-42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 41-42

Anonymous 465 Witch
2320

A man from Leicester in the county of Leicestershire, who as a Master of Arts was condemned "only for using himself to the study and practise of the Jugling craft." He was formerly the Lord of Leicester, and according to the author Thomas Addy was unjustly condemned for simply studying witchcraft is not the same as being a Witch, for "the essence of a Witch is not in doing false Miracles, or any other Witchcraft by demonstration or discovery, but in seducing people from God, and his Truth." (41-42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 41-42

Anonymous 465 Victim
2321

A man from London, who "did but study and contemplate upon this subject of Witchcraft and discovered a "Popish Idol" at Cheapside Cross, "which for many years," which few had known was there, until it was pulled down "at the command of the Parliament," and the where it falsely was made with pipes to shed tears, "bewitching the people." (42 - 43)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 42 - 43

Anonymous 466 Examiner/Justice
2322

A man from London, who encounters at an inn a young Cambridge scholar (Anonymous 468). Anonymous 467 is a minister, and falls into discussions about witches and their power with the young scholar. The minister affirms that "Witches do truly conjure up the Devil in several shapes." The scholar, however, disagrees with him, and declares he will demonstrate to the minister how to conjure up the devil in a number of shapes. The scholar employs a local boy (Anonymous 477) to imitate the crowing of a cock, the neighing of a horse, the barking of a dog and the quacking of ducks. The minister believes that these imitations are real, however, even after the boy reveals himself. This "true relation" is an example of how reports are often false, for men are easily deluded, even ministers.(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

Anonymous 467 Preacher/Minister
2323

A man from Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, who visits a minister (Anonymous 467) residing at an inn as a Cambridge scholar. The two engage in a discussion, and fall into dispute about witches, "and their Power." The minister believes that witches conjure the devil in several shapes, and the Cambridge scholar offers to summon the Devil in various shapes. However, Anonymous 468 simply employs a local boy (Anonymous 477), to pretend to be a crow, a horse, a dog, and a duck. The minister believes that these noises come from real animals, even after the boy exposes himself. This "true relation" is an example of how even ministers can be deluded into believing falsehoods.(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

Anonymous 468 Examiner/Justice
2324

A boy from London, who works at an inn as a tapsters boy. He is quite talented at imitating "the crowing of a Cock, the neighing of a Horse, the barking of a Dogge, the quacking of Ducks, and the noyse of many several Beasts." He is employed by a Cambridge scholar (Anonymous 468) in order to convince a minister (Anonymous 467) that the scholar is capable of conjuring the Devil in several shapes. The boy is so convincing, the minister believes real animals are conjured. However, the boy exposes himself from "under the Bed" in laughter. Even after this, the minister would not be persuaded that animals were not present in the room. This story is used as an example of how even ministers can believe false information.(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

Anonymous 478 Co-conspirator
2325

A woman from Westwell in the county of Kent, who "had so perfectly this imposture of speaking in the Belly," an act of pretending to have been possessed by the Devil, "that many Ministers were deceived by her." These ministers "came and talked so long with that Devil, and charged him in the name of God to go out of her." The woman claimed some "poor people for Witches," responsible for her alleged possession. However, two Justices of the Peace, Mr. Thomas Wotton, and Mr. George Darrel exposed her con. She is possibly Mildred Norrington.(78 - 79)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 78 - 79

Anonymous 469 Demoniac
2327

A woman from Braintree in the county of Essex, who feigned a possession, "to the astonishment of many, and gained money from the deceived beholders." Eventually, her story "grew stale," and when money stopped coming her way, the "Devil did easily leave her." She is never tried for this con.(79)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 79

Anonymous 470 Demoniac
2328

A man from London, who serves in King James' court. This man was so talented at imposture, that "he could call the King by name, and cause the King to look round about him." When this was revealed, the King took "merriment" in asking Anonymous 471 "to make sport upon some of his Courtiers," including one Sir John. Anonymous 471 would call out Sir John's name, without revealing himself, in order to get Sir John "to stamp with madness," and find himself unable to ever begin discourse with the King due to constant interruption.(81 - 82)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 81 - 82

Anonymous 471 Co-conspirator
2329

A man from London, who serves in King James' I court. At the encouragement of the King, the imposture (Anonymous 471) would call out Sir John's name, without revealing himself, in order to get Sir John "to stamp with madness," and find himself unable to ever begin discourse with the King due to constant interruption.(81 - 82)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 81 - 82

John Sir John Victim
2330

A man from London, who serves as a "wicked inquisitor" in Essex and Suffolk. He is allegedly responsible for "cutting off of fourteen innocent people at Chelm ford Assizes, and about an hundred at Berry Assizes," including a minister (Anonymous 473) from Framingham.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

Anonymous 472 Examiner/Justice
2331

A man from Framingham in the county of Suffolk, who is executed for witchcraft alongside a hundred innocent people at the Berry Assizes by a "wicked inquisitor" (Anonymous 472). He is allegedly innocent, and a minister.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

Anonymous 473 Preacher/Minister
2331

A man from Framingham in the county of Suffolk, who is executed for witchcraft alongside a hundred innocent people at the Berry Assizes by a "wicked inquisitor" (Anonymous 472). He is allegedly innocent, and a minister.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

Anonymous 473 Victim
2332

A man from London, who is only referred to as "Hoy, the Gaoler." Hoy is brought in as a witness during the publication of a book identifying a number of witches. However, he is "not fit to bear the Office of a Gaoler, nor any other Office in a Christian Common-wealth," and believed the more prisoners were killed, "the more he should gain." His testimony is nonetheless taken as evidence, resulting in "the shedding of innocent bloud."(102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 102

Hoy Hoy Witness
2333

A number of men and women from London, who are slaughtered as witches "at the Assizes at -erry, and at Chelmsford." These "poor accused people," were exposed to much cruelty, until "they would confess what their inquisitors would have them, although it were a thing impossible."(104 - 105)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 104 - 105

Anonymous 474 Witch
2333

A number of men and women from London, who are slaughtered as witches "at the Assizes at -erry, and at Chelmsford." These "poor accused people," were exposed to much cruelty, until "they would confess what their inquisitors would have them, although it were a thing impossible."(104 - 105)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 104 - 105

Anonymous 474 Victim
2334

A man from Suffolk, who serves as a minister. He affirms that "one of the poor women that was hanged for a VVitch (Anonymous 476) at Berry Assizes, in the year 1645" sent her imps (Anonymous 235) into the army in order to kill "Parliament Souldiers," and others to kill "King's Souldiers." This man's "habit and garb might seem to claim the title of Rabbi, Rabbi."(114)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114

Anonymous 474 Preacher/Minister
2335

A woman from Suffolk, who is hanged as a witch at the Berry Assizes in the year 1645. She allegedly sends her imps (Anonymous 235) into the army in order to kill "Parliament Souldiers," and others to kill "King's Souldiers." She also allegedly sends her imps to a man's (Anonymous 477) crop of corn, causing it die. This woman allegedly confessed to these crimes.(114)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114

Anonymous 476 Witch
2336

A man from London, whose crops of corn are allegedly attacked by imps (Anonymous 235). These imps are associated with a woman, hanged for a witch (Anonymous 476). The corn is "blasted, and tipt, or crockt," causing it to die. (114)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114

Anonymous 477 Victim
2337

A man from London, who is executed at Barry in Wales, in the year 1645, as a minister accused of witchcraft. Allegedly, however, he suffers from a disease "called Hemorroids or Piles," which results in swelling and the pouring of blood, which was mistaken for witchcraft.(128)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 128

Lewis Master Lewis Preacher/Minister
2337

A man from London, who is executed at Barry in Wales, in the year 1645, as a minister accused of witchcraft. Allegedly, however, he suffers from a disease "called Hemorroids or Piles," which results in swelling and the pouring of blood, which was mistaken for witchcraft.(128)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 128

Lewis Master Lewis Victim
2338

A man from Winton, who is the author of three books, called _Daemonology_, in the name and title of the works of King James I. Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) admonishes James Bishop among a number of authors in England who have allowed themselves to be seduced into believing false information about witches.(139 - 140 )

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 139 - 140

James Bishop James Bishop Author
2339

A man from London, who was possibly born in Oxford. Thomas Cooper is an author, possibly also the bishop of Lincoln. Thomas Cooper is also an author a minister, who wrote that "Witches are Murtherers, and such as can raise Winds, and do things impossible, by the help of the Devil." Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) writes that Thomas Cooper, among a number of English authors, has allowed himself to be seduced into believing false information about witches.(151)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 151

Thomas Cooper Thomas Cooper Author
2340

A man from London, who an "Author writing upon this subject of Witchcraft, wel known to all." M. Perkins was considered "a chosen instrument of preaching Gods Word in his life," as a minister. His writings appear in the "Treatise of Witchcraft," and apparently these were published some time after his death, when "certain Writings were found in his Study." Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) writes that M. Perkins, among a number of other authors in England, has allowed himself to be seduced into believing false information about witches.(162 - 163)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 162 - 163

Perkins M. Perkins Author
2341

A man from Maldon in the county of Essex, who was both "an able Minister of Gods Word," and an author of near twenty-two published works. These include _A discourse of the subtill practises of deuilles by witches and sorcerers_ (1587) and _A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcrafts_ (1593). George Gifford is considered a moderate in the witchcraft debate, believing in the existence of witches, and that they should be severely punished. Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_, writes that among a number of other English writers, George Gifford allowed himself to be seduced into believing false information about witches.(166)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 166

George Gifford George Gifford Author
2341

A man from Maldon in the county of Essex, who was both "an able Minister of Gods Word," and an author of near twenty-two published works. These include _A discourse of the subtill practises of deuilles by witches and sorcerers_ (1587) and _A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcrafts_ (1593). George Gifford is considered a moderate in the witchcraft debate, believing in the existence of witches, and that they should be severely punished. Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_, writes that among a number of other English writers, George Gifford allowed himself to be seduced into believing false information about witches.(166)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 166

George Gifford George Gifford Preacher/Minister
2342

A man from London, who is a physician, a humanist, and an author. Thomas Addy writes three books, which illustrate his scepticism of witchcraft and witch-hunting, all of which draw upon the Bible as a sources. His works include _A Candle in the Dark: Or, A Treatise Concerning the Nature of Witches & Witchcraft_ (1655); _A Perfect Discovery of Witches_ (1661); and _The Doctrine of Devils_ (1676). The first of these works was extremely influential, exposing superstitions, and describing magic tricks and juggling.(1)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 1

Thomas Addy Thomas Addy Author