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31 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
38

Agnes Browne is a woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, identified as the mother of Joan Vaughan. She is allegedly of "poore parentage and poorer education, one that as shee was borne to no good, was for want of grace neuer in the way to receiue any, euer noted to bee of an ill nature and wicked [dis]position, spightfull and malitious, and many yeeres before shee died both hated, and feared among her neighbours." She and Joan Vaughn feuded with Mistress Belcher after Belcher struck Vaughn and reproached her unseemly behaviour. The two of them are said to have caused Belcher to feel an intolerable pain and become disfigured. Belcher's brother Master Avery, hearing her call out Brown's and Vaughan's names as her tormentors, tried to lure the two out of their home to be scratched, but was barred from approaching the house by an invisible force. He, too, allegedly became tormented for his trouble; this lasted until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. While Brown and Vaughan were imprisoned, Belcher and Avery were permitted to scratch them, ending their torments. Brown was indicted for bewitching Belcher and Avery, and for causing the death of an unnamed child, and though she pleaded innocence, was sentenced to execution. Two weeks prior to her apprehension, Brown was supposedly seen riding a sow with Katherine Gardener and Joan Lucas to visit an old witch named Mother Rhoades.(B2-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B4

Agnes Brown Agnes Brown Witch
39

Joane Vaughan is a woman from Guilsborough in the country of Northampton. She is the daughter of Agnes Browne and described as "Ioane Vaughan or Varnham a maide (or at least vnmaried) as gratious as the mother, and both of them as farre from grace as Heauen from hell." Vaughan allegedly offended Mistress Belcher with her unseemly behavior, who in response, "sodainely rase vp and strooke her, howbeit hurt her not," and drove her out of Belcher's company. Vaughan complained of this to her mother, and the two of them allegedly conspired to bewitch Belcher in retribution, causing her intolerable pain and to become disfigured. Belcher is said to have cried out Brown and Vaughan's names during her torment, spurring her brother, Master Avery, to try to lure the two out of their home to be scratched, but he was barred from approaching the house by an invisible force. Avery allegedly became tormented for his trouble in the same way as his sister; this lasted until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. While Brown and Vaughan were imprisoned, Belcher and Avery were permitted to scratch them, ending their torments. Vaughan was indicted for bewitching Belcher and Avery, and for causing the death of an unnamed child, and though she pleaded innocence, was sentenced to execution.(B2-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B4

Joan Vaughan Joan Vaughan Witch
40

Arthur Bill is a man from Raunds in the country Northampton and the son of two witches, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father). Arthur Bill was accused of bewitching Martha Aspine and suspected of bewitching numerous cattle. He was "publiquely knowne to b[e]e of an euill life and reputation, together with his father and mother." He, along with his parents, was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water; it is said that all three floated, which was thought to confirm their guilt. Arthur was sent to the Northhampton Gaol by Sir Gilbert Pickering. There, he and his mother allegedly bewitched a round ball into his father's throat to prevent him from confessing. His father nevertheless became a witness against him. Arthur is said to have had three familiars, named Grissill, Ball, Jacke. While he was imprisoned, many tried to bring him back into the fold of the Church and pray for his confession and contrition, but he maintained his innocence unto his execution.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Arthur Bill Arthur Bill Witch
40

Arthur Bill is a man from Raunds in the country Northampton and the son of two witches, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father). Arthur Bill was accused of bewitching Martha Aspine and suspected of bewitching numerous cattle. He was "publiquely knowne to b[e]e of an euill life and reputation, together with his father and mother." He, along with his parents, was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water; it is said that all three floated, which was thought to confirm their guilt. Arthur was sent to the Northhampton Gaol by Sir Gilbert Pickering. There, he and his mother allegedly bewitched a round ball into his father's throat to prevent him from confessing. His father nevertheless became a witness against him. Arthur is said to have had three familiars, named Grissill, Ball, Jacke. While he was imprisoned, many tried to bring him back into the fold of the Church and pray for his confession and contrition, but he maintained his innocence unto his execution.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Arthur Bill Arthur Bill Relative of Witch
41

Hellen Jenkenson is a woman from Thrapston in the county of Northampton, who is alleged to be "of an euill life and much suspected of this crime before her apprehension, for bewitching of Cattle and other mischiefes," and of having "liued many yeares poore, wretched, scorned, and forsaken of the world." Jenkenson was apprehended by Sir Thomas Brooke for bewitching a child to death. Prior to her apprehension, Jenkenson had been searched by Mistress Moulsho and a jury of women. The jury found witch's marks on her body. The next day, Moulsho's maid (Anonymous 402) finds that the laundry, and especially Moulsho's smock, has been covered in images of toads, snakes and other ugly creatures in retribution. When Anonymous 402 reported this, Moulsho went straight to Jenkenson's home and threatened to scratch her eyes out unless she returned the linen to its former state; on her return, the linen was white once again. Jenkenson pleaded not guilty to bewitching the child and maintained her innocence until her execution.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Hellen Ienkenson Hellen Jenkenson Witch
42

Mary Barber is a woman from Stanwicke in the county of Northampton allegedly born of "mean parents" and described as licentious, malicious, envious, cruel, monstrous and hideous, and a slave to the passions of the flesh. She was accused of bewitching a man to death and causing harm to a variety of cattle, for which she was committed to Northampton Gaol by Sir Thomas T[...]ham. Barber was ultimately found guilty and, though she maintained her innocence to the end, executed for these crimes. (D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D3

Mary Barber Mary Barber Witch
845

A woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the sister of Master Avery, who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan after striking Vaughan for unseemly behavior and sending her away. Not long after, Belcher is said to have been taken with a sudden intolerable pain in her body and to have suffered disfigurement. She was heard to cry out "Heere comes Ioane Uaughan, away with Ioane Uaughan," and to have cried out against Brown as well. When Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton, Belcher was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended her pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, she and Avery suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman.(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B3

Belcher Mistress Belcher Victim
845

A woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the sister of Master Avery, who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan after striking Vaughan for unseemly behavior and sending her away. Not long after, Belcher is said to have been taken with a sudden intolerable pain in her body and to have suffered disfigurement. She was heard to cry out "Heere comes Ioane Uaughan, away with Ioane Uaughan," and to have cried out against Brown as well. When Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton, Belcher was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended her pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, she and Avery suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman.(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B3

Belcher Mistress Belcher Relative of Victim
857

A man from Cottesbrook in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, who allegedly apprehended suspected witches Joan Vaughan and Agnes Brown and delivered them to Northampton Gaole.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

William Saunders Sir William Saunders Accuser
861

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to have ridden double on a black horse with a woman (Anonymous 126), whom Master Avery and Mistress Belcher encountered on the road home from Northampton Gaol. He and Anonymous 126 are seen to gesture strangely, causing Avery to cry out that either he and Belcher, or the horses drawing their coach, would presently miscarry. The horses immediately fell down dead.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

Anonymous 125 Witch
862

A woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to have ridden double on a black horse with a man (Anonymous 125), whom Master Avery and Mistress Belcher encountered on the road home from Northampton Gaol. She and Anonymous 125 are seen to gesture strangely, causing Avery to cry out that either he and Belcher, or the horses drawing their coach, would presently miscarry. The horses immediately fell down dead.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

Anonymous 126 Witch
863

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the daughter of Edward Aspine, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Arthur Bill. The suspicion of Bill's involvement in her death led to his arrest, and ultimately to his conviction of her murder; he was sentenced to death.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Martha Aspine Martha Aspine Victim
864

A man from Thrapston in the county of Northampton, know to be a knight, who apprehended Hellen Jenkenson on suspicion of bewitching a child to death and delivered her to the gaol at Northampton.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Thomas Brook Sir Thomas Brook Accuser
865

A woman from Thrapston in the county of Northampton, known to be a gentlewoman and chief of the jury of women who searched Hellen Jenkenson for witch's marks. This examination turned up marks, as expected. Jenkenson is said to have bewitched Moulsho's laundry in retribution, causing her smock in particular to be covered in images of toads, snakes and other ugly creatures. Moulsho's maid, Anonymous 402, reported this to her mistress, and Moulsho went straight to Jenkenson's home and threatened to scratch Jenkenson's eyes out unless she returned the linen to its former state. On her return, the linen was seen to be white once again. (D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Moulsho Mistress Moulsho Witness
865

A woman from Thrapston in the county of Northampton, known to be a gentlewoman and chief of the jury of women who searched Hellen Jenkenson for witch's marks. This examination turned up marks, as expected. Jenkenson is said to have bewitched Moulsho's laundry in retribution, causing her smock in particular to be covered in images of toads, snakes and other ugly creatures. Moulsho's maid, Anonymous 402, reported this to her mistress, and Moulsho went straight to Jenkenson's home and threatened to scratch Jenkenson's eyes out unless she returned the linen to its former state. On her return, the linen was seen to be white once again. (D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Moulsho Mistress Moulsho Witch-Searcher
866

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, who apprehended Mary Barber on suspicion of witchcraft and delivered her to gaol at Northampton.(D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D3

Thomas T[...]ham Sir Thomas T[...]ham Accuser
1097

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the brother of Mistress Belcher, who allegedly witnessed his sister's torments and heard her cry out that Joan Vaughan and Agnes Brown were the cause. He tried to lure Vaughan and Brown from their home to scratch them, but encountered an invisible barrier and was unable to approach the house. Unable to help his sister, he returned to his home, but began to be tormented in the same way. This continued until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. Avery was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended his pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, Avery and Belcher suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman; Avery praised God that it was their horses and not them that died.(B3-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3-B4

Avery Master Avery Witness
1097

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the brother of Mistress Belcher, who allegedly witnessed his sister's torments and heard her cry out that Joan Vaughan and Agnes Brown were the cause. He tried to lure Vaughan and Brown from their home to scratch them, but encountered an invisible barrier and was unable to approach the house. Unable to help his sister, he returned to his home, but began to be tormented in the same way. This continued until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. Avery was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended his pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, Avery and Belcher suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman; Avery praised God that it was their horses and not them that died.(B3-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3-B4

Avery Master Avery Relative of Victim
1097

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the brother of Mistress Belcher, who allegedly witnessed his sister's torments and heard her cry out that Joan Vaughan and Agnes Brown were the cause. He tried to lure Vaughan and Brown from their home to scratch them, but encountered an invisible barrier and was unable to approach the house. Unable to help his sister, he returned to his home, but began to be tormented in the same way. This continued until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. Avery was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended his pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, Avery and Belcher suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman; Avery praised God that it was their horses and not them that died.(B3-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3-B4

Avery Master Avery Victim
1318

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the mother of Arthur Bill, and allegedly both a witch and the wife of witch Bill (Father). When her son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, she was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Father). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol, but she was permitted to visit Arthur in his cell; the two of them used the opportunity to bewitch a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing. While imprisoned, she feared being condemned to death by hanging so greatly that she cut her own throat. It is said that, before her death, she railed against her damnation and cursed her birth and conception.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Mother) Relative of Witch
1318

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the mother of Arthur Bill, and allegedly both a witch and the wife of witch Bill (Father). When her son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, she was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Father). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol, but she was permitted to visit Arthur in his cell; the two of them used the opportunity to bewitch a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing. While imprisoned, she feared being condemned to death by hanging so greatly that she cut her own throat. It is said that, before her death, she railed against her damnation and cursed her birth and conception.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Mother) Witch
1319

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Father) Relative of Witch
1319

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Father) Witch
1319

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Father) Witness
2079

A woman from Thrapston in the County of Northampton, known to be a maidservant in Mistress Moulsho's service. The morning after Moulsho searched Hellen Jenkenson, Anonymous 402 found Moulsho's laundry, and particularly Moulsho's smock, covered in snakes and other ugly creatures. She reported this immediately to Moulsho, who marched over to Jenkenson's and threatened to scratch Jenkenson's eyes out unless she returned the linen to its former state.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Anonymous 402 Witness
2084

A man from Tichmarch in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, the brother or brother in law of Robert and Mistress Throckmorton, and the uncle of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. On hearing about the afflictions of his nieces, he came to Warboys to visit and see it for himself. He went with the group who went to persuade Mother Alice Samuel to persuade her to visit the Throckmorton children; she refused due to the accusations that she had bewitched them and feared that the children would scratch her. Pickering and company forced her to come, along with her daughter Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; he overheard her tell Agnes not to confess to anything. He witnessed the children fall into fits when Mother Samuel entered the house, and assisted Jane in scratching her. When Pickering returned home to Tichmarch Grove, he brought the children with him. He observed that Elizabeth was unafflicted during the ride there, but fell into a fit as soon as she entered his home; these fits often affected coordination when she tried to eat. Pickering experimented with taking the children into the churchyard adjoining his home while they were in their fits. He noted that they would come out of the fit as soon as they entered the churchyard, but resume again on returning to the house. About 20 years later, Sir Gilbert Pickering apprehended Arthur Bill, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father) on charges of witchcraft and delivered them to Northampton Gaol.(C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C3

Gilbert Pickering Sir Gilbert Pickering Relative of Victim
2084

A man from Tichmarch in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, the brother or brother in law of Robert and Mistress Throckmorton, and the uncle of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. On hearing about the afflictions of his nieces, he came to Warboys to visit and see it for himself. He went with the group who went to persuade Mother Alice Samuel to persuade her to visit the Throckmorton children; she refused due to the accusations that she had bewitched them and feared that the children would scratch her. Pickering and company forced her to come, along with her daughter Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; he overheard her tell Agnes not to confess to anything. He witnessed the children fall into fits when Mother Samuel entered the house, and assisted Jane in scratching her. When Pickering returned home to Tichmarch Grove, he brought the children with him. He observed that Elizabeth was unafflicted during the ride there, but fell into a fit as soon as she entered his home; these fits often affected coordination when she tried to eat. Pickering experimented with taking the children into the churchyard adjoining his home while they were in their fits. He noted that they would come out of the fit as soon as they entered the churchyard, but resume again on returning to the house. About 20 years later, Sir Gilbert Pickering apprehended Arthur Bill, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father) on charges of witchcraft and delivered them to Northampton Gaol.(C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C3

Gilbert Pickering Sir Gilbert Pickering Accuser
2084

A man from Tichmarch in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, the brother or brother in law of Robert and Mistress Throckmorton, and the uncle of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. On hearing about the afflictions of his nieces, he came to Warboys to visit and see it for himself. He went with the group who went to persuade Mother Alice Samuel to persuade her to visit the Throckmorton children; she refused due to the accusations that she had bewitched them and feared that the children would scratch her. Pickering and company forced her to come, along with her daughter Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; he overheard her tell Agnes not to confess to anything. He witnessed the children fall into fits when Mother Samuel entered the house, and assisted Jane in scratching her. When Pickering returned home to Tichmarch Grove, he brought the children with him. He observed that Elizabeth was unafflicted during the ride there, but fell into a fit as soon as she entered his home; these fits often affected coordination when she tried to eat. Pickering experimented with taking the children into the churchyard adjoining his home while they were in their fits. He noted that they would come out of the fit as soon as they entered the churchyard, but resume again on returning to the house. About 20 years later, Sir Gilbert Pickering apprehended Arthur Bill, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father) on charges of witchcraft and delivered them to Northampton Gaol.(C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C3

Gilbert Pickering Sir Gilbert Pickering Witness
2096

A woman from Gilsborough in the county of Northampton, alleged to be a witch. It is said that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, Katherine Gardiner, Agnes Brown and Joan Lucas were seen to ride at night on a sow's back to Rauenstrop to visit Mother Rhoades. However, while they were en route, Mother Rhoades died; her last words were heard to be that there were "three of her old friends comming to se her, but they came too late, Howbeit shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."(B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B5

Katherine Gardiner Katherine Gardiner Witch
2097

A woman from Gilsborough in the county of Northampton, alleged to be a witch. It is said that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, Joan Lucas, Agnes Brown and Katherine Gardiner were seen to ride at night on a sow's back to Rauenstrop to visit Mother Rhoades. However, while they were en route, Mother Rhoades died; her last words were heard to be that there were "three of her old friends comming to se her, but they came too late, Howbeit shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."(B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B5

Joan Lucas Joan Lucas Witch
2098

A woman from Ravenstrop in the county of Northampton, alleged to be a witch. It is said that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, Katherine Gardiner, Agnes Brown and Joan Lucas were seen to ride at night on a sow's back to to visit Mother Rhoades. However, while they were en route, Mother Rhoades died; her last words were heard to be that there were "three of her old friends comming to se her, but they came too late, Howbeit shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."(B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B5

Rhoades Mother Rhoades Witch