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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
185

A woman from Norfolk, described as the wife of glover Henry Smith and a cheese merchant of her own accord, Mary Smith allegedly attracted the devil's attention with the heat of her wrath against her neighbors. He appears in the shape of a black man and promised her that if she "should continue in her malice, enuy, hatred, banning and cursing; and then he would be reuenged for her vpon all those to whom she wished euill." She agreed. Smith is implicated in the bewitchment of John Orkton, Cecily Bayles, Elizabeth Hancocke, and Edmund Newton. She is executed January 12, 1616?(45-47)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 45-47

Mary Smith Mary Smith Witch
187

A man from Norfolk, described as a sailor who is generally regarded as having a strong constitution. Orkton is allegedly tormented by Mary Smith after he hit Mary Smith's son. She curses him and "wished in a most earnest and bitter manner, that his fingers might rotte off," which they duly did, as did his toes.(48-50)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 48-50

John Orkton John Orkton Victim
1245

A man from Norfolk who is a shoe maker and a seller of Holland cheese. When his trade in dairy products threatens Mary Smith's, he finds himself the victim of supernatural torments, manifest as a "madnesse or phrensie," a body "benummed," and "pains and greifes from which hee is not yet freed." He twice attempts countermagic against Smith, once burning her familiar to burn her, and once trying to scratch her, but finding himself unable to. (57-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57-59

Edmund Newton Edmund Newton Victim
1245

A man from Norfolk who is a shoe maker and a seller of Holland cheese. When his trade in dairy products threatens Mary Smith's, he finds himself the victim of supernatural torments, manifest as a "madnesse or phrensie," a body "benummed," and "pains and greifes from which hee is not yet freed." He twice attempts countermagic against Smith, once burning her familiar to burn her, and once trying to scratch her, but finding himself unable to. (57-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57-59

Edmund Newton Edmund Newton Demoniac
1245

A man from Norfolk who is a shoe maker and a seller of Holland cheese. When his trade in dairy products threatens Mary Smith's, he finds himself the victim of supernatural torments, manifest as a "madnesse or phrensie," a body "benummed," and "pains and greifes from which hee is not yet freed." He twice attempts countermagic against Smith, once burning her familiar to burn her, and once trying to scratch her, but finding himself unable to. (57-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57-59

Edmund Newton Edmund Newton Un-witcher
1246

A woman from Norfolk who curses at Mary Smith after Smith wrongfully accuses her of stealing a chicken. Hancocke is plagued by a lingering illness which manifests like possession (she suffers extreme pains, loses her senses, is tossed about the bed, tears at her hair etc.). She recovers from her illness after he father makes a witch cake, but continues to be plagued by supernatural occurences, and haunted by a great cat, and the apparition (or the person) of Mary Smith. (50-55)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 50-55

Elizabeth Hancocke Elizabeth Hancocke Victim
1246

A woman from Norfolk who curses at Mary Smith after Smith wrongfully accuses her of stealing a chicken. Hancocke is plagued by a lingering illness which manifests like possession (she suffers extreme pains, loses her senses, is tossed about the bed, tears at her hair etc.). She recovers from her illness after he father makes a witch cake, but continues to be plagued by supernatural occurences, and haunted by a great cat, and the apparition (or the person) of Mary Smith. (50-55)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 50-55

Elizabeth Hancocke Elizabeth Hancocke Demoniac
1247

A man from Yarmouth in the county of Norfolk, described as a surgeon (Anonymous 201) who is "accompted very skilfull," and whom John Orkton visits to diagnose and treat his persistent limb purification. The surgeon, "perceiuing his labour to bee wholly frustrate, gaue ouer the cure, and the diseased patient still continueth in a most distressed and miserable estate."(48-50)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 48-50

Anonymous 201 Surgeon
1248

A man from London, described as a fishmonger who falls ill after attempting to collect a debt (owed to his wife) from Henry Smith. Younges is plagued by this strange disease for over thirteen months, during which he can not walk without crutches or feed himself. He seeks medical treatment from "sundry learned and experienced Physitians in Norwich." Although he eventually recovers somewhat when Mary Smith was imprisoned for witchcraft, he was still weak at suffering from a lame hand at time of publication. (58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 58-59

Thomas Yonges Thomas Younges Victim
1249

A number of physicians from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, described as being consulted to treat and diagnose Thomas Younges' mysterious wasting illness (allegedly caused by Henry Smith's curse).(58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 58-59

Anonymous 202 Physician
1250

A man from Norfolk, described as a glove maker who is married to Mary Smith. Smith appears to be inculcated in his wife's witchcraft and be able to do some of his own, having cursed Thomas Younge.(45-46, 50-51, 58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 45-46, 50-51, 58-59

Henry Smith Henry Smith Co-conspirator
1250

A man from Norfolk, described as a glove maker who is married to Mary Smith. Smith appears to be inculcated in his wife's witchcraft and be able to do some of his own, having cursed Thomas Younge.(45-46, 50-51, 58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 45-46, 50-51, 58-59

Henry Smith Henry Smith Witch
1251

A woman from Norfolk, described as a servant who has a disagreement with Mary Smith. Smith calls Bayles "a great fattail'd sow," and promises her that she would not be fat for long. Bayles is soon struck with a wasting illness which lasts six months and does not end until Bayles quits her employment (and by implication moves far away from Smith).(55-57)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 55-57

Cecily Bayle Cecily Bayle Victim