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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
43

Anne Baker is a spinster from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire who would allegedly have visions and hear voices from thin air. She described a vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, for which William Fairebarne beat her and broke her head. Another time, she heard a voice say that the next day she and her master would die; the next day a crow beat her master to death, but she prayed him back to life and he was sick for two weeks instead. She was charged of witchcraft on suspicion of bewitching Anne Stannidge's child; Stannidge claimed that, after she consulted with Baker on the child's illness, she needed to burn some of the child's hair and nail parings in order to get Baker to bring the child home and let her go. She was also charged with bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death for give her inferior bread as alms, and of saying Joan Gylle's child was forespoken. She denied causing any deaths, but admitted to diagnosing Gylle's child. Henry Milles accused her of causing him two or three poor nights to which she responded "you should haue let me alone then." She confessed that Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis told her that a rotting glove belonging to Lord Henry had been found, that it was thought that it was buried so that his liver would rot and waste as the glove did. Baker also claimed to have a "white Dogge, which shee calleth her good Spirit."(E1-E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E1-E2

Anne Baker Anne Baker Un-witcher
43

Anne Baker is a spinster from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire who would allegedly have visions and hear voices from thin air. She described a vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, for which William Fairebarne beat her and broke her head. Another time, she heard a voice say that the next day she and her master would die; the next day a crow beat her master to death, but she prayed him back to life and he was sick for two weeks instead. She was charged of witchcraft on suspicion of bewitching Anne Stannidge's child; Stannidge claimed that, after she consulted with Baker on the child's illness, she needed to burn some of the child's hair and nail parings in order to get Baker to bring the child home and let her go. She was also charged with bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death for give her inferior bread as alms, and of saying Joan Gylle's child was forespoken. She denied causing any deaths, but admitted to diagnosing Gylle's child. Henry Milles accused her of causing him two or three poor nights to which she responded "you should haue let me alone then." She confessed that Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis told her that a rotting glove belonging to Lord Henry had been found, that it was thought that it was buried so that his liver would rot and waste as the glove did. Baker also claimed to have a "white Dogge, which shee calleth her good Spirit."(E1-E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E1-E2

Anne Baker Anne Baker Prophet
43

Anne Baker is a spinster from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire who would allegedly have visions and hear voices from thin air. She described a vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, for which William Fairebarne beat her and broke her head. Another time, she heard a voice say that the next day she and her master would die; the next day a crow beat her master to death, but she prayed him back to life and he was sick for two weeks instead. She was charged of witchcraft on suspicion of bewitching Anne Stannidge's child; Stannidge claimed that, after she consulted with Baker on the child's illness, she needed to burn some of the child's hair and nail parings in order to get Baker to bring the child home and let her go. She was also charged with bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death for give her inferior bread as alms, and of saying Joan Gylle's child was forespoken. She denied causing any deaths, but admitted to diagnosing Gylle's child. Henry Milles accused her of causing him two or three poor nights to which she responded "you should haue let me alone then." She confessed that Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis told her that a rotting glove belonging to Lord Henry had been found, that it was thought that it was buried so that his liver would rot and waste as the glove did. Baker also claimed to have a "white Dogge, which shee calleth her good Spirit."(E1-E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E1-E2

Anne Baker Anne Baker Witch
44

Joan Willimott is a woman from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a widow and a servant, who gave witness against Joan Flower, Margaret Flower, and Gamaliel Greete. She also claimed to have received a spirit named Pretty from William Berry, whom "she serued three yeares." Berry is said to have"willed her to open her mouth, and hee would blow into her a Fairy which should doe her good; and that shee opened her mouth, and he did blow into her mouth." Pretty acted as a consultant, meeting with Willimott weekly to tell her who was "stricken or fore-spoken;" she said she would go to those people and cure them with "prayers." Although she is explicitly clear that this is a benign fairy she is working with, and not a familiar, Pretty "did aske of her her Soule, which shee then promised vnto it." Willimott reported during her examination that Joan Flowers told her she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse. She also said that a week before the Flower women were apprehended, she had met with Joan and Margaret Flower at Joan's home; there, Joan Flower allowed an owl-spirit and a rat-spirit to suck from below her left ear, and said they had whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt. Willimott added that Joan Flowers took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers, and tucked it in her purse. Ellen Green alleged in her examination that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God and gave her two spirits; Green also claimed that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog sucking on her under her left flank.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v-E3

Joan Willimott Joan Willimott Un-witcher
44

Joan Willimott is a woman from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a widow and a servant, who gave witness against Joan Flower, Margaret Flower, and Gamaliel Greete. She also claimed to have received a spirit named Pretty from William Berry, whom "she serued three yeares." Berry is said to have"willed her to open her mouth, and hee would blow into her a Fairy which should doe her good; and that shee opened her mouth, and he did blow into her mouth." Pretty acted as a consultant, meeting with Willimott weekly to tell her who was "stricken or fore-spoken;" she said she would go to those people and cure them with "prayers." Although she is explicitly clear that this is a benign fairy she is working with, and not a familiar, Pretty "did aske of her her Soule, which shee then promised vnto it." Willimott reported during her examination that Joan Flowers told her she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse. She also said that a week before the Flower women were apprehended, she had met with Joan and Margaret Flower at Joan's home; there, Joan Flower allowed an owl-spirit and a rat-spirit to suck from below her left ear, and said they had whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt. Willimott added that Joan Flowers took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers, and tucked it in her purse. Ellen Green alleged in her examination that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God and gave her two spirits; Green also claimed that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog sucking on her under her left flank.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v-E3

Joan Willimott Joan Willimott Witch
44

Joan Willimott is a woman from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a widow and a servant, who gave witness against Joan Flower, Margaret Flower, and Gamaliel Greete. She also claimed to have received a spirit named Pretty from William Berry, whom "she serued three yeares." Berry is said to have"willed her to open her mouth, and hee would blow into her a Fairy which should doe her good; and that shee opened her mouth, and he did blow into her mouth." Pretty acted as a consultant, meeting with Willimott weekly to tell her who was "stricken or fore-spoken;" she said she would go to those people and cure them with "prayers." Although she is explicitly clear that this is a benign fairy she is working with, and not a familiar, Pretty "did aske of her her Soule, which shee then promised vnto it." Willimott reported during her examination that Joan Flowers told her she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse. She also said that a week before the Flower women were apprehended, she had met with Joan and Margaret Flower at Joan's home; there, Joan Flower allowed an owl-spirit and a rat-spirit to suck from below her left ear, and said they had whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt. Willimott added that Joan Flowers took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers, and tucked it in her purse. Ellen Green alleged in her examination that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God and gave her two spirits; Green also claimed that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog sucking on her under her left flank.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v-E3

Joan Willimott Joan Willimott Witness
45

Ellen Greene is a woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, who gave witness against Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God six years before while she still lived in Watham, and had given her two spirits, one in the likeness of a kitlin, or kitten, and one in the likeness of a Moldiwarp, or mole; Willimott named the kitten Pusse, and the mole Hisse Hisse. The would suck from Greene on her neck under her ears, and she gave them her soul in exchange for their service. Greene claimed to have immediately sent Pusse to bewitch a baker to death, and sent Hisse Hisse to bewitch Anne Dawse to death; both died within a fortnight. The baker is said to have called her a witch, and Dawse to have called her a witch, whore and jade. Greene said that later, she sent both spirits to bewitch to death a husbandman named Willison and his son Robert; they died within ten days. Three years later, Greene moved to Stathorne, where she claimed to have bewitched John Patchett's wife and child to death at Willimott's direction; the child died the next day, and Patchett's wife lingered for over a month. Greene added that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog that would suck under her left flank. (Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

Ellen Greene Ellen Greene Witch
45

Ellen Greene is a woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, who gave witness against Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God six years before while she still lived in Watham, and had given her two spirits, one in the likeness of a kitlin, or kitten, and one in the likeness of a Moldiwarp, or mole; Willimott named the kitten Pusse, and the mole Hisse Hisse. The would suck from Greene on her neck under her ears, and she gave them her soul in exchange for their service. Greene claimed to have immediately sent Pusse to bewitch a baker to death, and sent Hisse Hisse to bewitch Anne Dawse to death; both died within a fortnight. The baker is said to have called her a witch, and Dawse to have called her a witch, whore and jade. Greene said that later, she sent both spirits to bewitch to death a husbandman named Willison and his son Robert; they died within ten days. Three years later, Greene moved to Stathorne, where she claimed to have bewitched John Patchett's wife and child to death at Willimott's direction; the child died the next day, and Patchett's wife lingered for over a month. Greene added that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog that would suck under her left flank. (Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

Ellen Greene Ellen Greene Accuser
46

Phillip Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to be the daughter of Joan Flowers and the sister of Margaret Flowers, who was employed for a time as a charwoman at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle, and was accused of bewitching Sir Francis Manners' family, including bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death. Phillip was dismissed from service for theft and for bewitching Thomas Simpson so that he became altered in body and mind, having no power to leave her. The Devil allegedly fostered her resentment against Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse, offering his services in exchange for Phillip's blood and soul. She is said to have caused Sir Francis' sons, Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, to sicken strangely, and caused his daughter Lady Katherine to be struck by strange maladies and fits. She also allegedly bewitched Sir Francis and Lady Rosse to be unable to have more children. Phillip was apprehended, along with Margaret and their mother Joan, around Christmas, and imprisoned at Lincoln. She claimed in her confession to have witnessed her mother cursing Sir Francis and Lady Rosse, then boiling blood and feathers together and making strange speech and gestures over it. Phillip also claimed to have a familiar in the shape of a white rat, which she would allow to suck from her left breast; when the rat first came for her, it promised to make Thomas Simpson love her and help her in other ways if she would give it her soul. She was executed at Lincoln on March 11th, 1618, for acting in the "destruction of Henry Lord Rosse, with their damnable practises against others the Children of the Right Honourable Francis Earle of Rutland."(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3v

Phillip Flower Phillip Flower Witch
47

Margaret Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire. She is the daughter of Joan Flower and the sister of Phillip Flower. She was employed for a time as a charwoman, chicken-tender and laundress at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle, and was also given residence at the castle for her service. She was accused of bewitching Sir Francis Manners' family, including bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death. Margaret was dismissed from service for theft and keeping unreasonable hours; Lady Rosse nonetheless gave her a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. The Devil allegedly fostered her resentment against Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse, offering his services in exchange for Margaret's blood and soul. She is said to have caused Sir Francis' sons, Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, to sicken strangely, and caused his daughter Lady Katherine to be struck by strange maladies and fits. She also allegedly bewitched Sir Francis and Lady Rosse to be unable to have more children. Margaret was apprehended, along with Phillip and their mother Joan, around Christmas, and imprisoned at Lincoln. According to her sister Phillip, she was responsible for stealing the glove used to bewitch Henry Lord Rosse to death; Margaret claimed her mother bid her to take it, plus a glove from Sir Francis Manners and a handkerchief from Lady Katherine, for the purpose of bewitchment. Phillip also claimed that the cat familiar Rutterkin would often be seen sitting on Margaret's shoulder and sucking on her neck, but Margaret alleged in her confession that " she hath two familiar Spirits sucking on her, the one white, the other black spotted; the white sucked vnder her left brest, and the blacke spotted within the inward parts of her secrets. When shee first entertained them she promised them her soule, and they couenanted to doe all things which she commanded them." She was visited by four spirits while imprisoned; one was a devil with a head like a black ape, and three she recognized as Little Robin, Spirit, and Rutterkin. She was executed at Lincoln on March 11th, 1618, for acting in the "destruction of Henry Lord Rosse, with their damnable practises against others the Children of the Right Honourable Francis Earle of Rutland." Joan Willimot claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3v

Margaret Flower Margaret Flower Relative of Witch
47

Margaret Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire. She is the daughter of Joan Flower and the sister of Phillip Flower. She was employed for a time as a charwoman, chicken-tender and laundress at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle, and was also given residence at the castle for her service. She was accused of bewitching Sir Francis Manners' family, including bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death. Margaret was dismissed from service for theft and keeping unreasonable hours; Lady Rosse nonetheless gave her a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. The Devil allegedly fostered her resentment against Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse, offering his services in exchange for Margaret's blood and soul. She is said to have caused Sir Francis' sons, Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, to sicken strangely, and caused his daughter Lady Katherine to be struck by strange maladies and fits. She also allegedly bewitched Sir Francis and Lady Rosse to be unable to have more children. Margaret was apprehended, along with Phillip and their mother Joan, around Christmas, and imprisoned at Lincoln. According to her sister Phillip, she was responsible for stealing the glove used to bewitch Henry Lord Rosse to death; Margaret claimed her mother bid her to take it, plus a glove from Sir Francis Manners and a handkerchief from Lady Katherine, for the purpose of bewitchment. Phillip also claimed that the cat familiar Rutterkin would often be seen sitting on Margaret's shoulder and sucking on her neck, but Margaret alleged in her confession that " she hath two familiar Spirits sucking on her, the one white, the other black spotted; the white sucked vnder her left brest, and the blacke spotted within the inward parts of her secrets. When shee first entertained them she promised them her soule, and they couenanted to doe all things which she commanded them." She was visited by four spirits while imprisoned; one was a devil with a head like a black ape, and three she recognized as Little Robin, Spirit, and Rutterkin. She was executed at Lincoln on March 11th, 1618, for acting in the "destruction of Henry Lord Rosse, with their damnable practises against others the Children of the Right Honourable Francis Earle of Rutland." Joan Willimot claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3v

Margaret Flower Margaret Flower Witch
556

Sir Francis Manners is Justice of the peace for the County of Lincoln, the Earle of Rutland, owner of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle and father of Henry Lord Rosse, Francis Lord Rosse, and Lady Katherine. He is from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. All three of his children are allegedly bewitched after his wife, Countess Manners, dismisses Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. He participated in the examinations of Anne Baker and Phillip Flower. Countess Cecily Manners is his second wife, his first wife, Frances, died shortly after Lady Katherine's birth. Both of his sons died young, leaving Lady Katherine his sole heir.(C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Francis Manners Sir Francis Manners Relative of Victim
556

Sir Francis Manners is Justice of the peace for the County of Lincoln, the Earle of Rutland, owner of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle and father of Henry Lord Rosse, Francis Lord Rosse, and Lady Katherine. He is from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. All three of his children are allegedly bewitched after his wife, Countess Manners, dismisses Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. He participated in the examinations of Anne Baker and Phillip Flower. Countess Cecily Manners is his second wife, his first wife, Frances, died shortly after Lady Katherine's birth. Both of his sons died young, leaving Lady Katherine his sole heir.(C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Francis Manners Sir Francis Manners Examiner/Justice
556

Sir Francis Manners is Justice of the peace for the County of Lincoln, the Earle of Rutland, owner of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle and father of Henry Lord Rosse, Francis Lord Rosse, and Lady Katherine. He is from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. All three of his children are allegedly bewitched after his wife, Countess Manners, dismisses Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. He participated in the examinations of Anne Baker and Phillip Flower. Countess Cecily Manners is his second wife, his first wife, Frances, died shortly after Lady Katherine's birth. Both of his sons died young, leaving Lady Katherine his sole heir.(C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Francis Manners Sir Francis Manners Celebrity
556

Sir Francis Manners is Justice of the peace for the County of Lincoln, the Earle of Rutland, owner of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle and father of Henry Lord Rosse, Francis Lord Rosse, and Lady Katherine. He is from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. All three of his children are allegedly bewitched after his wife, Countess Manners, dismisses Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. He participated in the examinations of Anne Baker and Phillip Flower. Countess Cecily Manners is his second wife, his first wife, Frances, died shortly after Lady Katherine's birth. Both of his sons died young, leaving Lady Katherine his sole heir.(C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Francis Manners Sir Francis Manners Victim
557

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Cecily Manners Countess Cecily Manners Victim
557

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Cecily Manners Countess Cecily Manners Relative of Victim
557

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Cecily Manners Countess Cecily Manners Celebrity
69

William Berry is a man from Langham in the county of Rutland who was allegedly Joan Willimott's master for three years. According to Joan, William Berry gave her a spirit named Pretty; he asked her to open her mouth and told her "hee would blow into her a Fairy which should doe her good." A spirit then came out of her mouth in the shape of a woman and he willed Joan to give her soul to the spirit as it requested.(E4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4

William Berry William Berry Cunning-folk
70

Joan Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, identified as the mother of Margaret and Philip Flower and described as a 'monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious.' She was believed to be a witch in her own right as 'the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse." Joan was apprehended with her daughters on suspicion of witchcraft and died in gaol after choking on bread and butter. Margaret would often steal items for her to bewitch, such a glove belonging to Henry Lord Rosse; this glove was boiled, pricked with a knife, rubbed on her familiar Rutterkin, and either buried to rot or burnt; Margaret claimed Joan also did this with one of Sir Francis Manners' gloves but it only made Sir Francis sick, and that an attempt with a handkerchief belonging to Lady Katherine failed entirely. Joan Willimot alleged in her examination that Joan Flower told her that she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse "to the heart." Willimot also claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension, that Joan was seen with an owl and an rat spirit that sucked from under her right ear and whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt, and that Joan took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers and tucked it into her purse.(C2-C4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4v

Joan Flower Joan Flower Witch
70

Joan Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, identified as the mother of Margaret and Philip Flower and described as a 'monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious.' She was believed to be a witch in her own right as 'the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse." Joan was apprehended with her daughters on suspicion of witchcraft and died in gaol after choking on bread and butter. Margaret would often steal items for her to bewitch, such a glove belonging to Henry Lord Rosse; this glove was boiled, pricked with a knife, rubbed on her familiar Rutterkin, and either buried to rot or burnt; Margaret claimed Joan also did this with one of Sir Francis Manners' gloves but it only made Sir Francis sick, and that an attempt with a handkerchief belonging to Lady Katherine failed entirely. Joan Willimot alleged in her examination that Joan Flower told her that she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse "to the heart." Willimot also claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension, that Joan was seen with an owl and an rat spirit that sucked from under her right ear and whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt, and that Joan took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers and tucked it into her purse.(C2-C4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4v

Joan Flower Joan Flower Relative of Witch
559

A young woman from from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the the daughter of Sir Francis Manners and Frances, (d. 1605), daughter of Henry Knyvet of Charlton, Wiltshire, and widow of Sir William Bevill, and the subsequent stepdaughter of Countess Cecily Manners. She was through this marriage the half-sister of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse. This child of Sir Francis' first marriage, she would have been about 15 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. She allegedly became afflicted with "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" after Joan and Margaret Flower were dismissed from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower claimed that she stole a handkerchief from Lady Katherine at her mother, Joan Flower's, command. Joan is said to have put the handkerchief in hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bid Rutterkin to go to Lady Katherine, but the familiar only mewed, having no power to harm her. She would later marry George Villiers, becoming the Duchess of Buckingham, and bore three children to him (3 of whom survived infancy). Katherine was purportedly one of Jone of Charles I's favorites, he called her "poor fond Kate," and held a position of honor in Queen Henrietta Maria's chamber, and upon Villiers' death, she would become enormously wealthy. She would next marry Randal MacDonnell, a man with a lesser estate and a few years her junior, but who stood as the heir to the first earl of Antrim. She was described later in life as a woman of "great extraction and fortune, [...] very great wit and spirit."(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Katherine Manners Lady Katherine Manners Victim
559

A young woman from from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the the daughter of Sir Francis Manners and Frances, (d. 1605), daughter of Henry Knyvet of Charlton, Wiltshire, and widow of Sir William Bevill, and the subsequent stepdaughter of Countess Cecily Manners. She was through this marriage the half-sister of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse. This child of Sir Francis' first marriage, she would have been about 15 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. She allegedly became afflicted with "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" after Joan and Margaret Flower were dismissed from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower claimed that she stole a handkerchief from Lady Katherine at her mother, Joan Flower's, command. Joan is said to have put the handkerchief in hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bid Rutterkin to go to Lady Katherine, but the familiar only mewed, having no power to harm her. She would later marry George Villiers, becoming the Duchess of Buckingham, and bore three children to him (3 of whom survived infancy). Katherine was purportedly one of Jone of Charles I's favorites, he called her "poor fond Kate," and held a position of honor in Queen Henrietta Maria's chamber, and upon Villiers' death, she would become enormously wealthy. She would next marry Randal MacDonnell, a man with a lesser estate and a few years her junior, but who stood as the heir to the first earl of Antrim. She was described later in life as a woman of "great extraction and fortune, [...] very great wit and spirit."(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Katherine Manners Lady Katherine Manners Relative of Victim
562

A man from the county of Lincoln, known to be a Justice of the Peace for Lincoln, the brother of Sir Francis Manners and to hold the titles of Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland. Sir Francis Manners appealed to him for his assistance when his family was stricken and witchcraft was suspected. Sir George examined Phillip Flower and Anne Baker.(D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2v

George Manners Sir George Manners Examiner/Justice
563

A man from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the father of Thomas Fairebarne. Anne Baker alleged during her examination that she had a vision of his son, Thomas, being hit by a blue planet, which corresponded with some unknown affliction besetting him. William beat Baker and broke her head; Thomas is said to have recovered thereafter. However, Baker claimed that she did not send the planet. (D4-D4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4-D4v

William Fairebarne William Fairebarne Un-witcher
564

A boy from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the son of William Fairebarne. Anne Baker alleged during her examination that she had a vision of Thomas being hit by a blue planet, which corresponded with some unknown affliction besetting him. His father, William, beat Baker and broke her head; Thomas is said to have recovered thereafter. However, Baker claimed that she did not send the planet. (D4-D4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4-D4v

Thomas Fairebarne Thomas Fairebarne Victim
565

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whose young daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Anne Anne Stannidge Anne Stannidge Relative of Victim
565

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whose young daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Anne Anne Stannidge Anne Stannidge Accuser
567

A young girl from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the daughter of Anne Stannidge, whom Anne Baker allegedly of bewitched to death. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Stannidge Stannidge (Daughter) Victim
572

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the wife of William Hough, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. Baker would not admit to killing her, but she did say in her confession that she had been angry with Elizabeth for giving her "second bread" as alms when Elizabeth might haue giuen her of her better bread, for she had gone too often on her errands."(E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E

Elizabeth Hough Elizabeth Hough Victim
573

A man from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Hough; Elizabeth was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker after giving her "second bread," or inferior quality bread, for alms.(E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E

William Hough Wiliam Hough Relative of Victim
574

A woman from Bottesford in the County of Leicester, known to be a mother, who asked Anne Baker to diagnose her child's illness. Baker told her that the child was forspoken; the child died some time later.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E-Ev

Joane Gylles Joane Gylles Relative of Victim
574

A woman from Bottesford in the County of Leicester, known to be a mother, who asked Anne Baker to diagnose her child's illness. Baker told her that the child was forspoken; the child died some time later.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E-Ev

Joane Gylles Joane Gylles Witness
575

A child from from Bottesford in the County of Leicester, known to be the child of Joane Gylles, who became sick. Her mother asked Anne Baker to diagnose the child's illness, and Baker told her that the child was forspoken. The child died some time later.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E-Ev

Gylles Gylles (child) Victim
576

A man from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, who accused Anne Baker of bewitching him so that he "had two or three ill nights." She replied "you should haue let me alone then," implying that he had been harassing her.(Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Ev

Henry Milles Henry Milles Victim
577

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whom Anne Baker met with after journeying to Northamptonshire three years before. Mrs. Peakes allegedly visited Baker along with Mrs. Dennis, and told her that during her absence, Lord Henry Rosse had died. Peakes and Dennis said that one of his gloves had been buried in the ground so that Lord Henry's liver would rot and waste even as the glove did.(Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Ev

Peakes Mrs. Peakes Witness
578

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whom Anne Baker met with after journeying to Northamptonshire three years before. Mrs. Dennis allegedly visited Baker along with Mrs. Peakes, and told her that during her absence, Lord Henry Rosse had died. Peakes and Dennis said that one of his gloves had been buried in the ground so that Lord Henry's liver would rot and waste even as the glove did.(Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Ev

Dennis Mrs. Dennis Witness
580

A man from the county of Leicestershire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity and a Justice of the Peace for the county of Leicestershire. He examined Anne Baker, Joan Willimott and Ellen Greene, and witnessed their testimonies.(D4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4

Samuel Fleming Samuel Fleming Preacher/Minister
580

A man from the county of Leicestershire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity and a Justice of the Peace for the county of Leicestershire. He examined Anne Baker, Joan Willimott and Ellen Greene, and witnessed their testimonies.(D4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4

Samuel Fleming Samuel Fleming Examiner/Justice
581

A woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the wife of a labourer, with whom Joan Willimott allegedly discussed the fate of John Patchett's wife and child.(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Cooke Mrs. Cooke Witness
582

A man from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a yeoman and widower. Both his wife, Mrs. Patchett, and their child died. Joan Willimott alleged that his child would have lived had he sought help for it in time, and his wife "had an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle." Ellen Green alleged that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction.(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

John Patchett John Patchett Relative of Victim
583

A woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the wife of John Patchett. Both she and her child died, allegedly bewitched to death. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time, and Mrs. Patchett "had an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle." Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, Mrs. Patchett languished "by the space of a moneth and more, for then shee dyed; the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Pathchett Mrs. Patchett Relative of Victim
583

A woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the wife of John Patchett. Both she and her child died, allegedly bewitched to death. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time, and Mrs. Patchett "had an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle." Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, Mrs. Patchett languished "by the space of a moneth and more, for then shee dyed; the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Pathchett Mrs. Patchett Victim
584

A man from Waltham in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a shepherd, who Joan WIllimott claimed could cause harm by looking at it with the intent to hurt. He is said to have a spirit in the shape of a white mouse, which was put into him as a result of his habit of swearing, and to have a mark on his left arm that had been cut away.(E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Gamaliel Greete Gamaliel Greete Witch
585

A man from Ersby in the county of Lincolnshire, known to be a lord, who assisted in the examination of Phillip Flowers on February 25, 1618.(F4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v

Francis Willoughby Francis Lord Willoughby Examiner/Justice
596

A woman from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, who allegedly called Ellen Greene a witch, a whore and a jade. In retribution, Greene sent her familiar HIsse HIsse to bewitch Anne Dawse to death. Dawse died within a fortnight.(Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anne Dawse Anne Dawse Victim
597

A man from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the town baker, who Ellen Greene claims had "called her Witch & stricken her." For this act, Greene sent her familiar Pusse to bewitch him to death; he died within a fortnight.(Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anonymous 65 Victim
598

A man from Stonesby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a husbandman's son; Ellen Greene allegedly sent her familiar Hisse HIsse to bewitch Robert Williman to death. He died within ten days.(F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F2

Robert Williman Robert Williman Victim
599

A man from Stonesby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a husbandman; Ellen Greene allegedly sent her familiar Pusse to bewitch him to death. He died within ten days.(F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F2

Willison Willison Victim
1047

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, the son of Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners, brother to Henry Manners and half brother to Katherine Manners. Francis would be poised to inherit the title of Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland following the death of his brother Henry; he is half-brother to Lady Katherine. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 or 8 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. He allegedly became bewitched, suffering a strange sickness, after Phillip and Margaret Flowers were dismissed from service by his mother, Lady Rosse. His glove was stolen from a dung-heap by Margaret Flower, who gave it to her mother Joan Flower; Joan is said to have used the glove to bewitch him by boiling it in water, rubbing it on her familiar Rutterkin and burying it in the yard. He eventually recovered from his affliction. Francis would not be the only member of his family would would allegedly suffer from the malefic ministrations brought down by the Flowers women. Both his parents would likewise become extraordinarily ill with "sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," his sister, Katherine was at "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits," and his elder brother, Henry, sickened and died. (Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Francis Manners Francis Lord Rosse Relative of Victim
1047

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, the son of Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners, brother to Henry Manners and half brother to Katherine Manners. Francis would be poised to inherit the title of Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland following the death of his brother Henry; he is half-brother to Lady Katherine. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 or 8 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. He allegedly became bewitched, suffering a strange sickness, after Phillip and Margaret Flowers were dismissed from service by his mother, Lady Rosse. His glove was stolen from a dung-heap by Margaret Flower, who gave it to her mother Joan Flower; Joan is said to have used the glove to bewitch him by boiling it in water, rubbing it on her familiar Rutterkin and burying it in the yard. He eventually recovered from his affliction. Francis would not be the only member of his family would would allegedly suffer from the malefic ministrations brought down by the Flowers women. Both his parents would likewise become extraordinarily ill with "sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," his sister, Katherine was at "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits," and his elder brother, Henry, sickened and died. (Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Francis Manners Francis Lord Rosse Victim
1051

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, known to be the son of Sir Francis Manners. He would become himself, for a short while, Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland. He is brother to Francis Manners Jr. and half-brother to Lady Katherine Manner. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 years old at the time of his death. Henry was allegedly bewitched by Margaret, Phillip and Joan Flowers, so that "he sickened verty strangely and after a while dyed."Lord Henry's glove was stolen by Margaret Flower for her mother Joan Flower; Joan rubbed the glove on the back of her familiar Rutterkin, boiled it it water, stuck it with pins, and buried it in her yard. Lord Henry died not long after. According to Anne Baker's confession, Mrs. Peake and Mrs. Dennis told her that Lord Henry had died because as the glove rotted and wasted, so did Lord Henry's liver. Henry would not be the only member of the family tormented by witchcraft; his parents would be "subiect to sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," and made barren, and his brother would likewise be "inhumanely tortured by a strange sicknesse," and his sister was "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits." However, Henry appears to be the only one who died as a direct cause of presumed bewitchment. (F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Henry Rosse Henry Lord Rosse Relative of Victim
1051

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, known to be the son of Sir Francis Manners. He would become himself, for a short while, Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland. He is brother to Francis Manners Jr. and half-brother to Lady Katherine Manner. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 years old at the time of his death. Henry was allegedly bewitched by Margaret, Phillip and Joan Flowers, so that "he sickened verty strangely and after a while dyed."Lord Henry's glove was stolen by Margaret Flower for her mother Joan Flower; Joan rubbed the glove on the back of her familiar Rutterkin, boiled it it water, stuck it with pins, and buried it in her yard. Lord Henry died not long after. According to Anne Baker's confession, Mrs. Peake and Mrs. Dennis told her that Lord Henry had died because as the glove rotted and wasted, so did Lord Henry's liver. Henry would not be the only member of the family tormented by witchcraft; his parents would be "subiect to sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," and made barren, and his brother would likewise be "inhumanely tortured by a strange sicknesse," and his sister was "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits." However, Henry appears to be the only one who died as a direct cause of presumed bewitchment. (F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Henry Rosse Henry Lord Rosse Victim
1111

A child from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the child of John Patchett and Mrs. Patchett, and was allegedly bewitched to death along with its mother. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time. Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, "the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Patchett (Child) Relative of Victim
1111

A child from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the child of John Patchett and Mrs. Patchett, and was allegedly bewitched to death along with its mother. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time. Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, "the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Patchett (Child) Victim
1174

A man from the County of Leicestershire, known to be a knight and a Justice of the Peace, who examined Phillip Flower twice, first on February 4, 1618, and again on February 25, 1618.(F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

William Pelham Sir William Pelham Examiner/Justice
2163

A man from the County of Leicester, known to be a knight and a Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester. He was one of the Justices of the Peace to examined Joan Willimott during her third examination, on March 17, 1618, and also examined Ellen Greene the same day.(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Henry Hastings Sir Henry Hastings Examiner/Justice
2164

A man from the County of Leicester, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester. He was one of the examining Justices of the Peace on February 4, 1618, when Phillip Flower was brought in to give evidence against her sister Margaret Flower.(F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Butler Mr. Butler Examiner/Justice