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ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
48

Doctor John Lambe is a man from Worcester in the county of Worcestershire, known to be an astrologer, cunning-man, teacher of gentleman's children, magician and juggler, and to style himself a physician. He employed Anne Bodenham as a maid. He stood charges at the Worcester Assizes for "two seuerall Inditements; one for vnchristian and damnable practises against the person of an Honourble Peere of this Realme; and the other for damnable inuocation and worship of euill Spirits." The first charge referred to an attempt to disable or weaken the Thomas, sixth Lord Windsor. He was found guilty on both charges, but judgement was suspended in the case of the first. Dr. Lambe allegedly drew Mr. Wayneman into his practice of conjuration and promised to show him an angel, but summoned a spirit instead. He is said to posses the skill to "intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children," and to have four spirits trapped in a crystal glass. He called the chief sprit Benias. He also predicted the drowning of Lady Fairfax's brothers. While at a gentleman's house entertaining guests with juggling tricks, Anthony Birch saw shapes in his crystal ball. Through the use of his spirits, he could "vndertake any difficult thing, and did very often discouer and bring to light goods and chattels although they had for a long time beene lost," tell whether someone was a witch or not, what disease afflicted a person whether he had seen them or not, and show women their future husbands in his crystal ball. He could also tell what private marks a person had on their body and personal details they had kept secret. 40 people involve in his arraignment allegedly died within two weeks after. Dr. Lambe was indicted a second time on charges of luring Joan Seager, an 11-year-old girl, to his home and raping her. He was found guilty and sentenced to death for this violation, but was pardoned by the crown. Some evidence surfaced suggesting that Seager's father owed Dr. Lambe money, and that the rape charge was laid shortly after he tried to collect on the debt. A year later, Dr. Lambe attended a play at the Fortune Theatre in London and was mobbed when he left. The mob pursued him and beat him to death with stones and cudgels.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

John Lambe John Lambe Witch
48

Doctor John Lambe is a man from Worcester in the county of Worcestershire, known to be an astrologer, cunning-man, teacher of gentleman's children, magician and juggler, and to style himself a physician. He employed Anne Bodenham as a maid. He stood charges at the Worcester Assizes for "two seuerall Inditements; one for vnchristian and damnable practises against the person of an Honourble Peere of this Realme; and the other for damnable inuocation and worship of euill Spirits." The first charge referred to an attempt to disable or weaken the Thomas, sixth Lord Windsor. He was found guilty on both charges, but judgement was suspended in the case of the first. Dr. Lambe allegedly drew Mr. Wayneman into his practice of conjuration and promised to show him an angel, but summoned a spirit instead. He is said to posses the skill to "intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children," and to have four spirits trapped in a crystal glass. He called the chief sprit Benias. He also predicted the drowning of Lady Fairfax's brothers. While at a gentleman's house entertaining guests with juggling tricks, Anthony Birch saw shapes in his crystal ball. Through the use of his spirits, he could "vndertake any difficult thing, and did very often discouer and bring to light goods and chattels although they had for a long time beene lost," tell whether someone was a witch or not, what disease afflicted a person whether he had seen them or not, and show women their future husbands in his crystal ball. He could also tell what private marks a person had on their body and personal details they had kept secret. 40 people involve in his arraignment allegedly died within two weeks after. Dr. Lambe was indicted a second time on charges of luring Joan Seager, an 11-year-old girl, to his home and raping her. He was found guilty and sentenced to death for this violation, but was pardoned by the crown. Some evidence surfaced suggesting that Seager's father owed Dr. Lambe money, and that the rape charge was laid shortly after he tried to collect on the debt. A year later, Dr. Lambe attended a play at the Fortune Theatre in London and was mobbed when he left. The mob pursued him and beat him to death with stones and cudgels.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

John Lambe John Lambe Cunning-folk
48

Doctor John Lambe is a man from Worcester in the county of Worcestershire, known to be an astrologer, cunning-man, teacher of gentleman's children, magician and juggler, and to style himself a physician. He employed Anne Bodenham as a maid. He stood charges at the Worcester Assizes for "two seuerall Inditements; one for vnchristian and damnable practises against the person of an Honourble Peere of this Realme; and the other for damnable inuocation and worship of euill Spirits." The first charge referred to an attempt to disable or weaken the Thomas, sixth Lord Windsor. He was found guilty on both charges, but judgement was suspended in the case of the first. Dr. Lambe allegedly drew Mr. Wayneman into his practice of conjuration and promised to show him an angel, but summoned a spirit instead. He is said to posses the skill to "intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children," and to have four spirits trapped in a crystal glass. He called the chief sprit Benias. He also predicted the drowning of Lady Fairfax's brothers. While at a gentleman's house entertaining guests with juggling tricks, Anthony Birch saw shapes in his crystal ball. Through the use of his spirits, he could "vndertake any difficult thing, and did very often discouer and bring to light goods and chattels although they had for a long time beene lost," tell whether someone was a witch or not, what disease afflicted a person whether he had seen them or not, and show women their future husbands in his crystal ball. He could also tell what private marks a person had on their body and personal details they had kept secret. 40 people involve in his arraignment allegedly died within two weeks after. Dr. Lambe was indicted a second time on charges of luring Joan Seager, an 11-year-old girl, to his home and raping her. He was found guilty and sentenced to death for this violation, but was pardoned by the crown. Some evidence surfaced suggesting that Seager's father owed Dr. Lambe money, and that the rape charge was laid shortly after he tried to collect on the debt. A year later, Dr. Lambe attended a play at the Fortune Theatre in London and was mobbed when he left. The mob pursued him and beat him to death with stones and cudgels.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

John Lambe John Lambe Magician
372

A girl from Southwark in the county of Greater London, known to be the eleven year old daughter of Elizabeth Seager. On Whitson Eve, Dr. Lambe's serving-women were busy and he needed someone to deliver a basket of herbs to him. According to Joan, who told her tale to both her mother Elizabeth and to Mabel Swinnington, when she came with the basket, Dr. Lambe sent away his serving-man with a message and locked the door. He then led her into his closet, barred that door as well, put her on a joint-stool and stuck his tongue in her mouth. She was afraid and struggled, "but hee would not let her alone, but stroue with her." Joan was afraid to report this to her mother at first, thinking she would be beaten. When Elizabeth came to Mabel Swinton for help, Mabel took Joan into her home and got the rest of the story out of her. When Mabel examined Joan to dress her injuries, she found "the place did smoake like a pot that had seething liquor in it that were newly vncouered" and that Joan was very sore. Joan told her that "Lambs maid Becke had brought her a thing in a dish, and had drest her, but there was a little specke of the venimous substance of it, that stucke vpon the inside of her thigh." When Mabel pulled it away, "it had festerd the place where it stucke." Dr. Lambe was convicted of Joan's rape, sentenced to death, received a reprieve, and was struck down for it by an angry mob a year later.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Joan Joan Seager Joan Seager Victim
812

A man from Tardebigge in the county of Worcestershire, known to be a gentleman. Master Wayneman allegedly met Dr. Lambe by chance. During their conversation, Lambe told him he could "tell him what secret markes he had on his body, and what Acts he had done in his life," which he did. Lambe also claimed to have command of spirits and promised to show Wayneman an angel. Curious, Wayneman agreed to the demonstration, and Lambe took a crystal ball from his pocket, set it on the top of his hat on the table, and said "I addure thee." When Wayneman asked why he said he adored, rather than admired, the angel, Lambe told him he had to say "adore" or the spirit would not appear. He then admitted that he deceived Wayneman, and had conjured a spirit, not an angel at all. Wayneman claimed that when they met another time, Lambe persuaded him to assist in another conjuration. At that time, Lambe also told him he could "doe strange things, as intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children." Wayneman also reported that Lambe had four spirits trapped in his crystal ball, of which the one named Benias was chief.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Wayneman Master Wayneman Witness
821

An unknown number of men or boys from an unknown part of the county of York, known to be the sons of the Earl of Moultgrave and brothers to the Lady Fairfax. Dr. Lamb told Lady Fairfax "within this few dayes your heart will ake, by occasion and accident of water," and three days later, her brothers all drowned.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Anonymous 118 Victim
822

A woman from London in the county of Greater London, known to be a gentlewoman and the daughter of a lawyer. While John Lambe was imprisoned, she approached him and asked him to show her who her husband would be. When he finally agreed to the request and she had the jailer let her into the room he was confined to, he bid her draw close to the bed and look into his crystal ball, which he set on the ground. She reported seeing numerous people she knew in its depths, and the image finally resolved to a gentleman she did not recognize, dressed all in green. Dr. Lambe told her to take note of him, and said that though they would meet without him intending to make himself a suitor, he would feel compelled to be by the time they parted company. She described this encounter and Dr. Lambe's prediction to numerous of her acquaintances, and a few days later the man in green came to her father's house in the hope of becoming a client. The man in green's horse spooked when he dismounted and kicked him. He was taken into the gentlewoman's home to recover, and the two fell in love while he was under her care. They married not long thereafter.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Anonymous 117 Witness
823

A woman from St. Martin's Parish near the Exchange in the county of Greater London, known to be the wife of bricklayer William Swinnerton. Though not named as such, Mabel Swinnington takes on the role of healer after Joan Seager was raped by Dr. Lambe; Elizabeth Seager brought her daughter to Mabel for help. Though the girl was much ashamed, Mabel coaxed her into telling how she had delivered a basket of herbs to Dr. Lambe, and that on her arrival he sent away his serving-man with a message and locked the door. He then led her into his closet, barred that door as well, put her on a joint-stool and stuck his tongue in her mouth. She was afraid and struggled, "but hee would not let her alone, but stroue with her." Mabel took Joan into her home to examine the child and dress her injuries. During the examination, Mabel found "the place did smoake like a pot that had seething liquor in it that were newly vncouered" and that Joan was very sore. Joan told her that "Lambs maid Becke had brought her a thing in a dish, and had drest her, but there was a little specke of the venimous substance of it, that stucke vpon the inside of her thigh." When Mabel pulled it away, "it had festerd the place where it stucke." The next day, Mabel went to Dr. Lambe's home and found him busily folding linen, surrounded by women. She confronted him, declaring that "you haue vndone an honest mans child, for well shee may recouer her health of body againe, but neuer her credit, for it will bee a staine to her reputation whil'st shee liues." He would not admit to the deed, but demanded to see Joan and examine her. Mabel replied "she hath bin too late with you already, she will come no more here" and told him she not only knew he had sent his maid to dress Joan, but that the dish holding the venomous substance had been left behind.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Mabel Swinnerton Mabel Swinnerton Witness
824

A woman from Southwark in the county of Greater London, known to be the mother of Joan Seager. Elizabeth Seager brought her daughter to Mabel Swinnington for help after Joan was raped by Dr. Lambe. At the time, Elizabeth's husband was imprisoned awaiting execution on unknown charges.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Elizabeth Seager Elizabeth Seager Relative of Victim
2261

A woman from an unknown part of the county of York, known to be a Lady and sister to the sons of the Earl of Moultgrave (Anonymous 118). While they were both guests of a gentleman of the county of York, Dr. Lambe told her "Madam, your Ladyship is very merry and pleasant, but within this few dayes your heart will ake, by occasion and accident of water." Three days later, her brothers all drowned.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Fairfax Lady Fairfax Witness
2261

A woman from an unknown part of the county of York, known to be a Lady and sister to the sons of the Earl of Moultgrave (Anonymous 118). While they were both guests of a gentleman of the county of York, Dr. Lambe told her "Madam, your Ladyship is very merry and pleasant, but within this few dayes your heart will ake, by occasion and accident of water." Three days later, her brothers all drowned.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Fairfax Lady Fairfax Relative of Victim
2262

A man from Worcester in the county of Worcestershire, known to be a gentleman. Anthony Birch was guest at the house of a gentleman while Dr. Lambe was there performing juggling tricks. When Dr. Lambe left his crystal ball on a table, Birch picked it up and, when the shape of a hand appeared in the glass, looked within it. He saw "a shepheard with a sheepehooke and tarbox on his backe" before Dr. Lambe noticed it in his hand and snatched it away. In Birch's opinion, it manifestly appeareth that the said Doctor Lambe was an absolute Witch, a Sorcerer and Iugling person absolutely giuen ouer to lewd wicked and diabolicall courses, an invocator and adorer of impious and wicked Spirits."

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Anthony Birch Anthony Birch Witness
2263

A man from Tewksbury in the county of Worcestershire, known to be a juror at the trial of Dr. Lambe. Dr. Lambe approached him and fell on his knees, asking Wheeler for a blessing and declaring that "he should shortly be one of his twelue Godfathers." Wheeler admitted to having been summoned to the Jury and asked Dr. Lambe whether he could truly do the strange things he was reputed to be capable of. In response, Dr. Lambe asked him to take off his garter and tie it around his middle as securely as he could. Wheeler did so, tying twenty knots. Dr. Lambe then asked him to take it off, and he said he could not as long as the knots were there. Dr. Lambe took hold of the garter and removed it from Wheeler with such ease "it seemed to all the company, and to Wheeler himselfe, that the Garter came out of his very body." Wheeler was frightened by this and left unsure whether he had been injured by the removal.

A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe

Wheeler Wheeler Witness