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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse Agnes Waterhouse Witch
1

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse Agnes Waterhouse Relative of Witch
1

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse Agnes Waterhouse Relative of Victim
639

Doctor Cole is a man from Stanford Rivers in the County of Essex, known to be a Reverend, a Doctor of Divinity and as of 1599 the Archdeacon of Essex. He and Master Henry Fortescue heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown.,(9)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9

Thomas Cole Dr. Thomas Cole Witness
639

Doctor Cole is a man from Stanford Rivers in the County of Essex, known to be a Reverend, a Doctor of Divinity and as of 1599 the Archdeacon of Essex. He and Master Henry Fortescue heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown.,(9)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9

Thomas Cole Dr. Thomas Cole Examiner/Justice
2

Elizabeth Francis is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the granddaughter of Eve of Hatfield Peverel and the wife of Christopher Francis. Eve is said to have taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve, bidding her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," a familiar in the shape of a white spotted cat. Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Her first request was to "be ryche and to haue goodes" which the cat fulfilled by bringing her eighteen sheep but they "dyd all weare awaye." She wanted to marry Andrew Byles, which Sathan promised to help her do on the condition that she allow Byles to "abuse" her first; Byles refused to marry her after. In revenge, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later has Sathan kill him with a touch. Sathan demanded a drop of blood for every service, leaving red spots on her body. Francis found herself to be pregnant after Byle's death, which she ended by drinking a decoction of a herb Sathan recommended. When she was ready to try again for a husband, she successfully persuaded Christopher Francis by getting pregnant with his child; their daughter was born three months after the wedding. They fought often, leading Francis to have Sathan kill the child, now a year and a half old. The girl's death did not smooth their relationship, and Francis has Sathan lame her husband by appearing in his shoe in the shape of a toad and allowing Christopher to kill him. When she tired of Sathan, she allegedly passed him on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse, a woman who may have been her sister making her also the aunt of Joan Waterhouse. Francis is also said to have had a familiar in the shape of a dog bewitch Alice Poole for denying her yeast. She appears as tied to the legal pursuit of witchcraft in 1566, 1572, 1578, and 1579; she is mprisoned and pilloried. However, her alleged crimes eventually catch up with her. She is hanged for the bewitchment of Alice Poole. The Essex Assize records show her charged first with bewitching the infant John Auger, second with bewitching Mary Cocke, and the final time for bewitching Alice Poole to death.(9-11)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-11

Elizabeth Frauncis Elizabeth Francis Witch
2

Elizabeth Francis is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the granddaughter of Eve of Hatfield Peverel and the wife of Christopher Francis. Eve is said to have taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve, bidding her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," a familiar in the shape of a white spotted cat. Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Her first request was to "be ryche and to haue goodes" which the cat fulfilled by bringing her eighteen sheep but they "dyd all weare awaye." She wanted to marry Andrew Byles, which Sathan promised to help her do on the condition that she allow Byles to "abuse" her first; Byles refused to marry her after. In revenge, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later has Sathan kill him with a touch. Sathan demanded a drop of blood for every service, leaving red spots on her body. Francis found herself to be pregnant after Byle's death, which she ended by drinking a decoction of a herb Sathan recommended. When she was ready to try again for a husband, she successfully persuaded Christopher Francis by getting pregnant with his child; their daughter was born three months after the wedding. They fought often, leading Francis to have Sathan kill the child, now a year and a half old. The girl's death did not smooth their relationship, and Francis has Sathan lame her husband by appearing in his shoe in the shape of a toad and allowing Christopher to kill him. When she tired of Sathan, she allegedly passed him on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse, a woman who may have been her sister making her also the aunt of Joan Waterhouse. Francis is also said to have had a familiar in the shape of a dog bewitch Alice Poole for denying her yeast. She appears as tied to the legal pursuit of witchcraft in 1566, 1572, 1578, and 1579; she is mprisoned and pilloried. However, her alleged crimes eventually catch up with her. She is hanged for the bewitchment of Alice Poole. The Essex Assize records show her charged first with bewitching the infant John Auger, second with bewitching Mary Cocke, and the final time for bewitching Alice Poole to death.(9-11)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-11

Elizabeth Frauncis Elizabeth Francis Relative of Witch
2

Elizabeth Francis is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the granddaughter of Eve of Hatfield Peverel and the wife of Christopher Francis. Eve is said to have taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve, bidding her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," a familiar in the shape of a white spotted cat. Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Her first request was to "be ryche and to haue goodes" which the cat fulfilled by bringing her eighteen sheep but they "dyd all weare awaye." She wanted to marry Andrew Byles, which Sathan promised to help her do on the condition that she allow Byles to "abuse" her first; Byles refused to marry her after. In revenge, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later has Sathan kill him with a touch. Sathan demanded a drop of blood for every service, leaving red spots on her body. Francis found herself to be pregnant after Byle's death, which she ended by drinking a decoction of a herb Sathan recommended. When she was ready to try again for a husband, she successfully persuaded Christopher Francis by getting pregnant with his child; their daughter was born three months after the wedding. They fought often, leading Francis to have Sathan kill the child, now a year and a half old. The girl's death did not smooth their relationship, and Francis has Sathan lame her husband by appearing in his shoe in the shape of a toad and allowing Christopher to kill him. When she tired of Sathan, she allegedly passed him on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse, a woman who may have been her sister making her also the aunt of Joan Waterhouse. Francis is also said to have had a familiar in the shape of a dog bewitch Alice Poole for denying her yeast. She appears as tied to the legal pursuit of witchcraft in 1566, 1572, 1578, and 1579; she is mprisoned and pilloried. However, her alleged crimes eventually catch up with her. She is hanged for the bewitchment of Alice Poole. The Essex Assize records show her charged first with bewitching the infant John Auger, second with bewitching Mary Cocke, and the final time for bewitching Alice Poole to death.(9-11)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-11

Elizabeth Frauncis Elizabeth Francis Relative of Victim
3

Jone Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex known to be an eighteen years old spinster, the daughter of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, and the niece of Elizabeth Francis. She claimed Mother Waterhouse tried to teach her witchcraft, but that she had refused to learn it. She confessed in court that Mother Waterhouse had a familiar in the shape of a toad she called Sathan, which would appear suddenly whenever Mother Waterhouse had a task for him. Joan allegedly tried calling Sathan herself after a neighbour, Agnes Brown, refused her bread and cheese. Sathan appeared, demanding her body and soul in payment rather the red rooster she offered; Joan agreed and then went to Brown and made her afraid. The dog still haunted Joan, but she claimed to have never set it on anyone else. Mother Waterhouse, in her confession, corroborated Joan's story. Agnes Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter over the course of the next few days and claimed to belong to Mother Waterhouse. Joan was tried for the bewitchment of Agnes Brown so that Brown became disabled in her right leg and arm at the Essex Assizes, but is found not guilty.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Joan Waterhouse Joan Waterhouse Witch
3

Jone Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex known to be an eighteen years old spinster, the daughter of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, and the niece of Elizabeth Francis. She claimed Mother Waterhouse tried to teach her witchcraft, but that she had refused to learn it. She confessed in court that Mother Waterhouse had a familiar in the shape of a toad she called Sathan, which would appear suddenly whenever Mother Waterhouse had a task for him. Joan allegedly tried calling Sathan herself after a neighbour, Agnes Brown, refused her bread and cheese. Sathan appeared, demanding her body and soul in payment rather the red rooster she offered; Joan agreed and then went to Brown and made her afraid. The dog still haunted Joan, but she claimed to have never set it on anyone else. Mother Waterhouse, in her confession, corroborated Joan's story. Agnes Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter over the course of the next few days and claimed to belong to Mother Waterhouse. Joan was tried for the bewitchment of Agnes Brown so that Brown became disabled in her right leg and arm at the Essex Assizes, but is found not guilty.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Joan Waterhouse Joan Waterhouse Relative of Witch
3

Jone Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex known to be an eighteen years old spinster, the daughter of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, and the niece of Elizabeth Francis. She claimed Mother Waterhouse tried to teach her witchcraft, but that she had refused to learn it. She confessed in court that Mother Waterhouse had a familiar in the shape of a toad she called Sathan, which would appear suddenly whenever Mother Waterhouse had a task for him. Joan allegedly tried calling Sathan herself after a neighbour, Agnes Brown, refused her bread and cheese. Sathan appeared, demanding her body and soul in payment rather the red rooster she offered; Joan agreed and then went to Brown and made her afraid. The dog still haunted Joan, but she claimed to have never set it on anyone else. Mother Waterhouse, in her confession, corroborated Joan's story. Agnes Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter over the course of the next few days and claimed to belong to Mother Waterhouse. Joan was tried for the bewitchment of Agnes Brown so that Brown became disabled in her right leg and arm at the Essex Assizes, but is found not guilty.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Joan Waterhouse Joan Waterhouse Witness
433

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be wealthy. Elizabeth Francis allegedly desired Andrew Byles as a husband, and was advised by her familiar Sathan to allow him to "abuse" her first. She does so, but Byles refuses to marry her. Francis, desiring revenge, had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later kill him with a touch. After Byles death, Francis finds herself pregnant with his child and ends the pregnancy with a decoction of a herb Sathan recommends to her.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Andrew Byles Andrew Byles Victim
444

A girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be 12 years old and to work in her family's milkhouse. Agnes Brown allegedly refused her Joan Waterhouse bread and cheese one day, for which Joan allegedly summoned her mother's familiar Sathan to frighten the girl. Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle appeared with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter and unlocked the milkhouse. She claimed the dog went in and emerged a while later claiming to have made butter for her. Brown reporting this to her aunt, who fetched a priest; they found the imprint of butter on some of the cheese in the milkhouse. The dog returned twice more over the next week for more butter. The last time, it carried a dagger and threatened to kill her, identifying Mother Waterhouse as its "sweet dame" and the owner of the knife. Mother Waterhouse called Brown a liar for this last, saying she only owned a great knife, not a dagger. Joan was acquitted of bewitching Brown, though the girl allegedly became disabled in her right leg and arm.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Agnes Browne Agnes Browne Victim
444

A girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be 12 years old and to work in her family's milkhouse. Agnes Brown allegedly refused her Joan Waterhouse bread and cheese one day, for which Joan allegedly summoned her mother's familiar Sathan to frighten the girl. Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle appeared with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter and unlocked the milkhouse. She claimed the dog went in and emerged a while later claiming to have made butter for her. Brown reporting this to her aunt, who fetched a priest; they found the imprint of butter on some of the cheese in the milkhouse. The dog returned twice more over the next week for more butter. The last time, it carried a dagger and threatened to kill her, identifying Mother Waterhouse as its "sweet dame" and the owner of the knife. Mother Waterhouse called Brown a liar for this last, saying she only owned a great knife, not a dagger. Joan was acquitted of bewitching Brown, though the girl allegedly became disabled in her right leg and arm.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Agnes Browne Agnes Browne Witness
478

A woman from Hatfield Peveral in the county of Essex, known to be the grandmother of Elizabeth Francis and Agnes Waterhouse, and great-grandmother to Joan Waterhouse. According to Elizabeth Francis, Grandmother Eve was the first witch in the family, and taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve. Grandmother Eve bid her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," which was the white spotted cat that became Francis' familiar. Francis claims that Grandmother Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Eve is an important figure in English witchcraft history as not only as a witch matriarch, but also for the way the story establishes through her the importance of the renunciation of God, and the care and employ of a familiar spirit, to the creation of a witch.(3-4)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 3-4

Eve Eve of Hatfield Peveral Witch
478

A woman from Hatfield Peveral in the county of Essex, known to be the grandmother of Elizabeth Francis and Agnes Waterhouse, and great-grandmother to Joan Waterhouse. According to Elizabeth Francis, Grandmother Eve was the first witch in the family, and taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve. Grandmother Eve bid her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," which was the white spotted cat that became Francis' familiar. Francis claims that Grandmother Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Eve is an important figure in English witchcraft history as not only as a witch matriarch, but also for the way the story establishes through her the importance of the renunciation of God, and the care and employ of a familiar spirit, to the creation of a witch.(3-4)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 3-4

Eve Eve of Hatfield Peveral Relative of Witch
648

A man from Chelmsford in the County of Essex, known to be a Queen's Attorney at the Essex Assizes. He heard the confessions of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown on July 27, 1566. When Mother Waterhouse denied allowing her familiar Sathan to suck her blood, Master Gerard lifted her kerchief to reveal numerous red spots on her face and nose. This forced Mother Waterhouse to admit to feeding Sathan her blood.(22, 24, 36-37)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 22, 24, 36-37

Gerard Master Gerard Examiner/Justice
647

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the wife of Anonymous 85. She and husband allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill Anonymous 85 with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 86 Relative of Victim
647

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the wife of Anonymous 85. She and husband allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill Anonymous 85 with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 86 Neighbor
640

A man from Faulkborne in the County of Essex, known to be a Justice of the Peace and, as of 1564, Sherrif of Essex. Master Henry Fortescue and Reverend Dr. Thomas Cole heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown.()

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566,

Henry Fortescue Henry Fortescue Examiner/Justice
640

A man from Faulkborne in the County of Essex, known to be a Justice of the Peace and, as of 1564, Sherrif of Essex. Master Henry Fortescue and Reverend Dr. Thomas Cole heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown.()

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566,

Henry Fortescue Henry Fortescue Victim
641

A man from an unknown part of Essex, known to be the author of "The Examination and confession of certaine wytches at Chensforde in the countie of Essex." He collected, edited and provided inter-textual commentary on the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown(Title Page, 5, 8)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, Title Page, 5, 8

John Phillips John Phillips Author
642

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. He allegedly offended Mother Agnes Waterhouse, for which she bid her familiar Sathan kill three of his hogs. Mother Waterhouse rewarded Sathan with a chicken and a drop of her blood.(14-15 (B-Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 14-15 (B-Bv)

Kersye Father Kersye Victim
643

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Agnes Waterhouse, for which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown Widow Gooday's cow.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Gooday Widow Gooday Victim
644

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown three of Anonymous 67's geese.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 67 Neighbor
644

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown three of Anonymous 67's geese.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 67 Victim
645

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse who refused to give Mother Waterhouse butter. In revenge, Mother Waterhouse caused her to "lose the curdes" two or three days later.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 68 Victim
645

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse who refused to give Mother Waterhouse butter. In revenge, Mother Waterhouse caused her to "lose the curdes" two or three days later.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 68 Neighbor
646

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the husband of Anonymous 86. He and his wife allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill him with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 85 Neighbor
646

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the husband of Anonymous 86. He and his wife allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill him with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 85 Victim
649

A man from Chelmsford in the County of Essex, known to be a Justice at the Essex Assizes. He heard the confessions of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown on July 27, 1566.(22, 24)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 22, 24

Southcote Justice Southcote Examiner/Justice
1103

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a tailor and a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's final confession, he offended her and she tried to set her familiar Sathan on him to "hurte and destroy him & his goodes." Sathan failed in his task and returns to tell Mother Waterhouse that "Wardol was so strong in fayth that he hadde no power to hurt hym." Sathan tries again numerous times to cause Wardol mischief, but it proves in vain.(38-40)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 38-40

Wardol Mr. Wardol Victim
1103

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a tailor and a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's final confession, he offended her and she tried to set her familiar Sathan on him to "hurte and destroy him & his goodes." Sathan failed in his task and returns to tell Mother Waterhouse that "Wardol was so strong in fayth that he hadde no power to hurt hym." Sathan tries again numerous times to cause Wardol mischief, but it proves in vain.(38-40)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 38-40

Wardol Mr. Wardol Neighbor
1104

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the husband of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the father of Joan Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's confession, the two lived "somwhat vnquietly," and for that reason she had her familiar Sathan kill him about nine years before.(14-16 (B-Bii))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 14-16 (B-Bii)

Waterhouse Mr. Waterhouse Victim
1104

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the husband of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the father of Joan Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's confession, the two lived "somwhat vnquietly," and for that reason she had her familiar Sathan kill him about nine years before.(14-16 (B-Bii))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 14-16 (B-Bii)

Waterhouse Mr. Waterhouse Relative of Witch
1294

An infant girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Francis and Christopher Frances, and a year and a half old at the time of her death. Elizabeth used her pregnancy with this child to convince Christopher Frances to marry her; their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to " much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked her familiar Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again.(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Francis Francis (Child) Relative of Witch
1294

An infant girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Francis and Christopher Frances, and a year and a half old at the time of her death. Elizabeth used her pregnancy with this child to convince Christopher Frances to marry her; their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to " much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked her familiar Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again.(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Francis Francis (Child) Relative of Victim
1294

An infant girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Francis and Christopher Frances, and a year and a half old at the time of her death. Elizabeth used her pregnancy with this child to convince Christopher Frances to marry her; their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to " much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked her familiar Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again.(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Francis Francis (Child) Victim
1295

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a yeoman, the husband of Elizabeth Francis and father of an infant girl. When Elizabeth desired Christopher as her husband, her familiar Sathan advised her to fornicate with him first; Elizabeth then used the resulting pregnancy to convince Christopher to marry her. Their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to "much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again. The marriage continued unquiet after the child's death and Elizabeth had Sathan lie in wait in Christopher's shoe in the form of a toad. When Christopher found the toad with his toe, she had him kill it, giving Sathan the opportunity to inflict Christopher with "a lamenes wherof he can not healed"(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Christopher Francis Christopher Francis Relative of Victim
1295

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a yeoman, the husband of Elizabeth Francis and father of an infant girl. When Elizabeth desired Christopher as her husband, her familiar Sathan advised her to fornicate with him first; Elizabeth then used the resulting pregnancy to convince Christopher to marry her. Their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to "much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again. The marriage continued unquiet after the child's death and Elizabeth had Sathan lie in wait in Christopher's shoe in the form of a toad. When Christopher found the toad with his toe, she had him kill it, giving Sathan the opportunity to inflict Christopher with "a lamenes wherof he can not healed"(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Christopher Francis Christopher Francis Relative of Witch
1295

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a yeoman, the husband of Elizabeth Francis and father of an infant girl. When Elizabeth desired Christopher as her husband, her familiar Sathan advised her to fornicate with him first; Elizabeth then used the resulting pregnancy to convince Christopher to marry her. Their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to "much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again. The marriage continued unquiet after the child's death and Elizabeth had Sathan lie in wait in Christopher's shoe in the form of a toad. When Christopher found the toad with his toe, she had him kill it, giving Sathan the opportunity to inflict Christopher with "a lamenes wherof he can not healed"(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Christopher Francis Christopher Francis Victim
2217

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be Agnes Browne's aunt and to oversee the family's milkhouse. When Agnes came to her claiming that a thing like a large black dog had demanded butter from her and gone into the milkhouse, Anonymous 87 called for a priest to have Agnes recite prayers. When Agnes claimed the next day that the thing had returned, Anonymous 87 took back the milkhouse key from Agnes and had the girl show her the print in butter Agnes claimed the thing had left on the cheese.(28-36)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 28-36

Anonymous 87 Relative of Victim